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Encyclopedia > Dextrocardia
Dextrocardia
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 Q24.0
ICD-9 746.87
DiseasesDB 3617
MeSH C14.240.400.280

Dextrocardia refers to the heart being situated on the right side of the body. Dextrocardia Situs Inversus refers to the heart being a mirror image situated on the right side. For all visceral organs to be mirrored, the correct term is Dextrocardia Situs Inversus Totalis. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). ... // Q00-Q99 - Congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities (Q00-Q07) Congenital malformations of the nervous system (Q00) Anencephaly and similar malformations (Q01) Encephalocele (Q02) Microcephaly (Q03) Congenital hydrocephalus (Q04) Other congenital malformations of brain (Q05) Spina bifida (Q06) Other congenital malformations of spinal cord (Q07) Other congenital malformations of nervous... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The Disease Bold textDatabase is a free website that provides information about the relationships between medical conditions, symptoms, and medications. ... Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a huge controlled vocabulary (or metadata system) for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... In anatomy, the viscera are the internal organs of an animal, in particular the internal organs of the head, thorax and abdomen. ... This article is about the biological unit. ... Situs inversus (also called situs transversus) is a rare congenital condition in which the major visceral organs are reversed or mirrored from their normal positions. ...


Dextrocardia is believed[citation needed] to occur in approximately 1 in 8000 people, while 1 in 1,000 of these will have Situs Inversus. Totalis occurs in approximately 1 in 5,000 of Dextrocardia Situs Inversus.


Kartagener’s Syndrome occurs in approximately 1 in 25 of Totalis. This disorder affects the sinus and bronchial cilia causing constant sinus and bronchial symptoms that medication can not rectify. With Kartagener’s both are usually present all year rather than being seasonal. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), also known as immotile ciliary syndrome, is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a defect in the action of the tiny hairs (cilia) lining the respiratory tract. ... Sinus may refer to: In anatomy, where a sinus is a sac or cavity in any organ or tissue: Paranasal sinus, an air cavity in the cranial bones, especially those near the nose Sinus (anatomy), description of the general term Anal sinuses, the furrows which separate the columns in the... Not to be confused with Psyllium. ...


Although statistically people with Dextrocardia Situs Inversus do not have any medical problems from the disorder, some are prone to a number of bowel, esophagus, bronchial and cardiac problems. Some of these conditions can be life threatening if left unchecked.


ECG leads must be placed in reversed positions on a person with Dextrocardia. In addition, when defibrillating someone with dextrocardia, the pads should be placed in reverse positions. That is, instead of upper right and lower left, pads should be placed upper left and lower right. “QRS” redirects here. ... Typical view of defibrillation in progress, with the operator at the head, but clear of contact with the patient Defibrillation is the definitive treatment for the life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias ventricular fibrillation and pulseless ventricular tachycardia. ...


"Technical dextrocardia" refers to the apparent presentation of dextrocardia caused usually by inadvertantly swapping the limb leads on a 12 lead ECG. Usually this would show as an extreme axis deviation.


Use as a plot device

  • Julius No (Dr. No) from 007 James Bond also had dextrocardia. He survived being "shot in the heart and left for dead".
  • A shooting victim in the CSI: Crime Scene Investigation episode "Bully for You" was nearly killed 6 months prior to the episode because he was stabbed by a fork to the left of the sternum, where his heart should have been normally. Of the 3 .44 caliber bullets that struck the victim, the show's medical examiner confirmed a cardiac wounding on the right side of the chest. Additional dialogue indicated all of his organs were mirrored, as in situs inversus totalis, but the only descriptive term used is "dextrocardia" (with no modifiers).

Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty (commonly abbreviated MGS2) is a stealth-based game that was developed and published by Konami for the PlayStation 2 in 2001. ... For other uses of Dr. No, see Dr. No. ... CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is a popular Alliance Atlantis/CBS police procedural television series, running since October 2000, about a team of forensic scientists. ... Bully for You is the fourth episode from the second season of the popular American crime drama CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, which is set in Las Vegas, Nevada. ...

References

  • MedEd at Loyola GrossAnatomy/thorax0/Heart_Development/Dextrocardia.html
  • Overview at rch.org.au
A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ... A congenital disorder is a medical condition or defect that is present at or before birth (for example, congenital heart disease). ... For transport in plants, see Vascular tissue. ... Persistent truncus arteriosus (or Truncus arteriosus) is a rare form of congenital heart disease that presents at birth. ... Double outlet right ventricle (or DORV) is a condition where both of the great arteries connect (in whole or in part) to the right ventricle. ... Double outlet right ventricle (or DORV) is a condition where both of the great arteries connect (in whole or in part) to the right ventricle. ... Transposition of the great vessels (TGV) is a group of congenital heart defects (CHDs) involving an abnormal spatial arrangement of any of the primary vessels: superior and/or inferior vena cavae (SVC, IVC), pulmonary artery, pulmonary veins, and aorta. ... The correct title of this article is . ... levo-Transposition of the great arteries (l-Transposition of the great arteries, levo-TGA, or l-TGA), also commonly referred to as congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (CC-TGA), is an acyanotic congenital heart defect (CHD) in which the primary arteries (the aorta and the pulmonary artery) are... Interventricular septum (or ventricular septum, or during development septum inferius) is the stout wall separating the lower chambers (the ventricles) of the heart from one another. ... A ventricular septal defect (or VSD) is a defect in the ventricular septum (the wall dividing the left and right ventricles of the heart). ... Atrial septal defects (ASD) are a group of congenital heart diseases that enables communication between atria of the heart and may involve the interatrial septum. ... Lutembachers syndrome is a form of atrial septal defect which involves mitral stenosis. ... Atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) is characterized by a deficiency of the atrioventricular septum of the heart. ... The tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect which classically has four anatomical components. ... Eisenmengers syndrome or Eisenmengers reaction is defined as the process in which a left-to-right shunt in the heart causes increased flow through the pulmonary vasculature, causing pulmonary hypertension, which in turn, causes increased pressures in the right side of the heart and reversal of the shunt... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Heart chamber is a general term used to refer to any of the four chambers of the Mammalian heart: Right atrium receives oxygen-depleted blood from the body via the superior vena cava and the inferior vena cava and pumps it through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle. ... The pulmonary valve, also known as pulmonic valve, is the semilunar valve of the heart that lies between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery and has three cusps. ... The tricuspid valve is on the right side of the heart, between the right atrium and the right ventricle. ... The pulmonary valve, also known as pulmonic valve, is the semilunar valve of the heart that lies between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery and has three cusps. ... Pulmonary valve stenosis is a medical condition in which outflow of blood from the right ventricle of the heart is obstructed at the level of the pulmonic valve. ... Pulmonary valve insufficiency (or incompetence, or regurgitation) is a condition where the pulmonary valve is not strong enough to prevent backflow into the right ventricle. ... The tricuspid valve is on the right side of the heart, between the right atrium and the right ventricle. ... Tricuspid valve stenosis is a valvular heart disease which results in the narrowing of the orifice of the tricuspid valve of the heart. ... Tricuspid atresia is a form of congenital heart disease whereby there is a complete absence of the tricuspid valve. ... Ebsteins anomaly is a congenital heart defect in which the opening of the tricuspid valve is displaced towards the apex of the right ventricle of the heart. ... The aortic valve is one of the valves of the heart. ... The mitral valve (also known as the bicuspid valve or left atrioventricular valve), is a dual flap (bi = 2) valve in the heart that lies between the left atrium (LA) and the left ventricle (LV). ... The aortic valve is one of the valves of the heart. ... Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is a heart condition caused by the incomplete opening of the aortic valve. ... Aortic insufficiency (AI), also known as aortic regurgitation (AR), is the leaking of the aortic valve of the heart that causes blood to flow in the reverse direction during ventricular diastole, from the aorta into the left ventricle. ... A bicuspid aortic valve is a heart condition that is usually due to a congenital deformity. ... The mitral valve (also known as the bicuspid valve or left atrioventricular valve), is a dual flap (bi = 2) valve in the heart that lies between the left atrium (LA) and the left ventricle (LV). ... Mitral stenosis is a narrowing of the orifice of the mitral valve of the heart. ... Mitral regurgitation (MR), also known as mitral insufficiency, is the abnormal leaking of blood through the mitral valve, from the left ventricle into the left atrium of the heart. ... Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (also known as HLHS), is a rare birth defect in which the left side of the heart is severely underdeveloped. ... A congenital heart defect (CHD) is a defect in the structure of the heart and great vessels of a newborn. ... Levocardia is a medical condition where the heart is on the correct side of the body (the left), but the related structures are on the wrong side, either due to corrected transposition of the great vessels or to situs inversus. ... Cor triatriatum is a congenital heart defect where the left atrium is subdivided. ... Great arteries is a term used to refer collectively to the primary arteries of the heart, which include: Pulmonary artery: the vessel that carries oxygen-depleted blood from the right ventricle to the lungs. ... Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a congenital heart defect wherein a childs ductus arteriosus fails to close after birth. ... Sketch showing heart with coarctation of the aorta. ... Interrupted aortic arch is a very rare heart defect in which the aorta is not completely developed. ... An overriding aorta is a congenital heart defect where the aorta is positioned directly over a ventricular septal defect, instead of over the left ventricle. ... Aneurysm of the aortic sinus, also known as the sinus of Valsalva. ... A vascular ring is a congenital defect in which there is an abnormal formation of the aorta and/or its surrounding blood vessels. ... Pulmonary atresia is a congenital malformation of the pulmonary valve in which the valve orifice fails to develop. ... The term Great veins refers to one of the following veins: superior vena cava inferior vena cava one of the four pulmonary veins Category: ... In anatomy, a persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is the most common variation of the thoracic venous system,[1][2] is prevalent in 0. ... This is a rare congenital heart disease in which the pulmonary venous return is directed to the right atrium though venous channels. ... Scimitar syndrome (or Partially Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return, PAPVR) is a congenital heart defect characterized by anomalous venous return from the right lung. ... Arteriovenous malformation or AVM is a congenital disorder of the veins and arteries that make up the vascular system . ... A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a congenital disorder of blood vessels within the brain, characterized by tangle(s) of veins and arteries. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Johns Hopkins Children's Hospital | Cove Point Foundation | Dextrocardia (121 words)
The term Dextrocardia means that the heart is in the right chest (dextro means right in Latin) rather than in the left chest, as is the usual case.
There are various forms of dextrocardia, ranging from a normally configured heart that is positioned further to the right than normal (dextro-position) to so-called "mirror-image dextrocardia," in which the positions of the heart chambers and major vessels are exactly the reverse of the "normal" arrangement (see diagram at left).
Chest x-rays and an ECG (echocardiogram) may be used to determine which type of dextrocardia is present.
Su Journal » Blog Archive » Dextrocardia (600 words)
Of Dextrocardia with mirror-image dextrocardia associated with high rates of the heart is on the opposite side of the ECG are defects can, however, in fact the heart is located on the heart condition characterized by noting that the arterial atrium is defective, it was less when compared to confirm dextrocardia.
Dextrocardia with a normal fetal heartbeat during pregnancy is located on the left in the right side of the report Dextrocardia with dextrocardia in 8500.
Dextrocardia with situs inversus is the high incident uc diagnosis of atrioventricular septal defect with left to the left and in the hospital for roughly 8 weeks.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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