FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Dewsbury" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Dewsbury
Dewsbury


Dewsbury County Court Dewsbury is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Dewsbury shown within West Yorkshire
Population 54,341 (2001 Census)
OS grid reference SE245225
Metropolitan borough Kirklees
Metropolitan county West Yorkshire
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town DEWSBURY
Postcode district WF12-13
Dialling code 01924
Police West Yorkshire
Fire West Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
European Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament Dewsbury
List of places: UKEnglandYorkshire

Coordinates: 53°41′30″N 1°37′59″W / 53.6916, -1.6331 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Kirklees is a metropolitan borough of West Yorkshire, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The WF postcode area, also known as the Wakefield postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Batley, Castleford, Dewsbury, Heckmondwike, Knottingley, Liversedge, Mirfield, Normanton, Ossett, Pontefract and Wakefield in England. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... West Yorkshire Police is the police force covering West Yorkshire in the United Kingdom. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide, statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the Metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Dewsbury is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the historic English county of Yorkshire. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Dewsbury is a market town within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England. It is to the west of Wakefield, and lies by the River Calder and the Calder and Hebble Navigation. The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... Kirklees is a metropolitan borough of West Yorkshire, England. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wakefield (disambiguation). ... The River Calder is a river flowing through the predominantly urban areas of West Yorkshire, England, and gives its name to the borough of Calderdale. ... Looking towards the terminal basin of the Calder and Hebble Navigation, from a point near the junction with the Rochdale Canal The Calder and Hebble Navigation is a wide-locked (140) navigable inland waterway system in West Yorkshire, England. ...


Historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, after undergoing a period of major growth in the 19th century as a mill town, Dewsbury went through a period of decline. More recently there has been rapid and ongoing redevelopment of derelict mills into luxury apartments and other projects concerned with regenerating run-down or deprived areas. The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... The West Riding as an administrative county prior to its abolition in 1974. ... A Mill town, also known as factory town or mill village, is typically a settlement that developed around one or more mills or factories (usually cotton mills or factories producing textiles). ...


According to the 2001 census the Dewsbury urban sub-area had a population of 54,341. Dewsbury is the largest town in the Heavy Woollen District, which forms a conurbation of small mill towns. UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... A woollen mill in Dewsbury, now converted to flats but retaining as a feature the mill name. ...

Contents

History

Toponymy

The Domesday Book of 1086 records the name of the town as Deusberia and Deusberie. The name is believed to mean "fortified place by a stream", from Old English deaw "dew" (in the sense stream) and burg "fort" [1]. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... Dew on a spider web Dew is water in the form of droplets that appears on thin, exposed objects in the morning or evening. ... Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ...


There are some other theories on the name's origin:

  1. A Mercian name, after the founder of a fortified settlement in the area, named Dui, Dew or Deus--"beria" meaning fort or stronghold.[2]
  2. "God's Hill", from the old British word "Duw", meaning God (cf Latin "Deus"), and "burg", meaning a hill.[3][4]
  3. "Tiu's Hill", as above, but derived from the Germanic god Tiu from the same Indo-European origin.[5]

Mercia, sometimes spelled Mierce, was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy, in what is now England, in the region of the Midlands, with its heart in the valley of the River Trent and its tributary streams. ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Tiu is a proper name that has two meanings: Tiu (pharaoh) (4th millenium BC), the first (predynastic) Pharaoh of Lower Egypt Tyr, as the Old English name for the Sky-God of Norse Mythology Tim Ivan Uriche (T.I.U) (1946–2002), was a famous German reporter during the Cold... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies Indo-European is originally a linguistic term, referring to the Indo-European language family. ...

Early history

In Saxon times, Dewsbury was a centre of considerable importance. The Parish of Dewsbury extended east of the Pennines to encompass Huddersfield, Mirfield and Bradford. Ancient legend records that in 627 Paulinus, the first Bishop of York, preached in the church situated here. Numerous Saxon graves have been found in Dewsbury and Thornhill.[6] For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... Typical Pennine scenery. ... , Huddersfield is a large town within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England, near the confluence of the River Colne and the River Holme. ... , Mirfield is a small town and civil parish within the Kirklees borough of West Yorkshire, England, near Dewsbury. ... For other uses, see Bradford (disambiguation). ... Saint Paulinus, (?-October 10, 644), was the first bishop of York. ... For other uses, see York (disambiguation). ... Thornhill is a former village, now suburb of Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, England. ...


Dewsbury Minster lies near the banks of the River Calder, traditionally on the site where Paulinus preached. Parts of the church are said to date to the 13th century.[7] It houses the "Devil's Knell", a bell rung each Christmas Eve, one toll for each year, in a tradition dating back to the 15th century. It was donated by Sir Thomas de Soothill, in penance for murdering a servant boy in a fit of rage. The tradition was commemorated on a Royal Mail postage stamp in 1986. [8] Minster can refer to Minster (cathedral) Place names: Canada Lloydminster, Alberta / Saskatchewan United Kingdom Minster-in-Thanet, Kent Minster-in-Sheppey, Isle of Sheppey, Kent, England Minster Lovell, Oxfordshire, England. ... The River Calder is a river flowing through the predominantly urban areas of West Yorkshire, England, and gives its name to the borough of Calderdale. ... Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ...


Dewsbury Market was established in the 14th century for local clothiers. Occurrences of the plague in 1593 and 1603 closed the market until it was reopened in 1741. Bubonic plague is the best-known manifestation of the bacterial disease plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. ...


Throughout the Middle Ages Dewsbury retained a measure of importance in ecclesiastical terms, collecting tithes from as far away as Halifax in the mid-14th century. John Wesley visited the area five times in the mid-18th century, and the first Methodist Society was established in 1746. Centenary Chapel on Daisy Hill commemorates the centenary of this event, and the Methodist tradition remained strong in the town. [9] The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Halifax. ... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... A centenary is an event to celebrate the 100th anniversary of an event. ...


Industrial Revolution

1770, a short branch of the Calder and Hebble Navigation Canal was completed, linking Dewsbury to the main canal system and giving access to distribution centres in Manchester and Hull. By the time of the Industrial Revolution, Dewsbury was one of the centres for the "shoddy" industry, the recycling of old woollen items by mixing them with new wool and making them into heavy blankets and uniforms. The town benefited economically from the canal, its location at the heart of the Heavy Woollen District, and its proximity to the coal mines. The railways arrived in 1848 when Dewsbury Wellington Road railway station on the London and North Western Railway opened; this is the only station which remains. Other stations were Dewsbury Central (Great Northern Railway) which closed in 1964 and Dewsbury Market Place (Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway) which closed in 1930; a fourth goods-only station was built in the early 1900s at Savile Town (Midland Railway). In 1985 a road bypass was built on the site of Central Station and its adjacent viaduct, and nothing remains of Market Place Station. The 1800s saw a great increase in population, rising from 4,566 in 1801 to around 30,000 by 1890. Looking towards the terminal basin of the Calder and Hebble Navigation, from a point near the junction with the Rochdale Canal The Calder and Hebble Navigation is a wide-locked (140) navigable inland waterway system in West Yorkshire, England. ... For other uses, see Canal (disambiguation). ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Look up hull in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... This article is about wool, the fiber. ... A woollen mill in Dewsbury, now converted to flats but retaining as a feature the mill name. ... Dewsbury railway station serves the town of Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, England. ... The London and North Western Railway (LNWR) was formed in 1846 by the merger of three railway companies - the Grand Junction Railway, London and Birmingham and Manchester and Birmingham. ... The Great Northern Railway (GNR) was a British railway company, founded by the London & York Railway Act of 1846. ... The Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway (L&YR) was a major British railway company before the 1923 Grouping, although in 1922 it had already entered into a working agreement with the London and North Western Railway. ... This article is about the historical British railway company. ...


The town’s rapid expansion and commitment to industrialisation was not without problems, resulting in social instability. In the early 1800s Dewsbury was one of the centres of Luddite opposition to industrialisation in which workers retaliated against the onset of mechanisation and smashed the new machinery which threatened their way of life. In the 1830s Dewsbury was also one of the centres of Chartist agitation. The C vote to the working classes. In August 1838, after a speech by Chartist leader Fergus O’Connell, a mob of between five and seven thousand people besieged the Dewsbury Poor Law Guardians in the town’s Royal Hotel. The mob had to be dispersed by troops. Trouble again flared in 1840 when radical agitators seized control of the town, again troops were called in and stationed in the town to maintain order. This radical tradition left a legacy in the political life of the town, in fact the town’s first elected MP in 1867 was John Simon, a Jewish lawyer from Jamaica and a Liberal. The Luddites were a social movement of English textile artisans in the early nineteenth century who protested — often by destroying textile machines — against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution, which they felt threatened their livelihood. ...


The mills were still often run as family businesses, and continued manufacturing after the wool crisis in 1950-51, which saw Australian sheep farmers begin to charge higher prices. However, the recovery of the late 1960s was reversed by the 1973 oil crisis, and the textile industry in Dewsbury declined, with only bed manufacturing remaining a large scale employer. For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... Australian Sheep Sheep husbandry is the raising and breeding of domestic sheep, and a subcategory of animal husbandry. ... The 1973 oil crisis began on October 17, 1973, when the members of Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC, consisting of the Arab members of OPEC plus Egypt and Syria) announced, as a result of the ongoing Yom Kippur War, that they would no longer ship oil to nations... For other uses, see Bed (disambiguation). ...


Recent history

After questioning at Dewsbury Police Station, it was to the courtroom of Dewsbury Town Hall that Peter Sutcliffe, the infamous Yorkshire Ripper, was taken after his arrest in January 1981 to be formally charged before magistrates. In 2005, two high profile crimes once more brought the media spotlight on Dewsbury. In June, a girl of 12 was charged with grievous bodily harm following what was reported as the attempted hanging of a five year old boy from Chickenley[10]. Also Mohammad Sidique Khan (from Thornhill), one of the July 7th bombers was discovered to have been living in Dewsbury. This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Peter Sutcliffe (born June 2, 1946), infamous as the Yorkshire Ripper, was convicted in 1981 of the murders of thirteen women and attacks on seven more from 1975 to 1980. ... Grievous bodily harm or GBH is a phrase used in English criminal law which was introduced in ss18 and 20 Offences Against The Person Act 1861. ...


On February 19, 2008, Shannon Matthews disappeared from her home in Dewsbury Moor. 24 days after going missing, Shannon was found alive on March 14, 2008 hidden in the base of a divan bed in Batley Carr. A 39-year-old man, named as Michael Donovan, was arrested. The hunt for Shannon Matthews was the largest police search for a missing person since the hunt for the Yorkshire Ripper nearly 30 years previously. Shannon Matthews' mother was subsequently arrested and charged with perverting the course of justice and child neglect. [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Sutcliffe (born June 2, 1946), infamous as the Yorkshire Ripper, was convicted in 1981 of the murders of thirteen women and attacks on seven more from 1975 to 1980. ...


Governance

Dewsbury was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1862[11], its first mayor being Dr George Fearnley. The 1868 Reform Act constituted Dewsbury a parliamentary borough, its first MP being Mr Sergeant Simon. The fine Victorian town hall that stands in front of the old marketplace was built in 1886-89. Dewsbury's boundaries were expanded to include the urban districts of Ravensthorpe, Thornhill, Soothill Nether and half of Soothill Upper[citation needed] in 1910 and it was elevated to county borough status in 1913. "Soothill Nether" refers to the current east end of the town, although, at the time, Chickenley and Chidswell were hamlets, and Earlsheaton formed the bulk of the area's population. The covered market was opened in 1904 and during the 1920s trade moved from the original market place to the area around the covered market. A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... In the United Kingdom, the Reform Act could refer to various Acts Reform Act 1832 (The First Reform Act or The Great Reform Act), which abolished rotten boroughs and gave representation to previously unrepresented urban areas like Birmingham etc. ... Parliamentary boroughs are boroughs that are entitled to representation in a Parliament. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ...


In 1974 responsibility for local government passed to Kirklees Metropolitan Council, with its headquarters in Huddersfield. The population of Dewsbury has remained broadly static over the past century - the 1911 census recorded 53,351 people [12], and the 1971 census 51,326 people, making it the fourth least populous county borough in England (after Canterbury, Burton and Yarmouth). Kirklees is a metropolitan borough of West Yorkshire, England. ... Canterbury is a cathedral city in east Kent in South East England and is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Primate of All England, head of the Church of England and of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Map sources for Burton-upon-Trent at grid reference SK2422 Burton upon Trent also known as Burton-on-Trent, or simply Burton, is a large town straddling the River Trent in the east of Staffordshire, England, which originally grew up around the monastery of St. ... , Great Yarmouth, often known to locals as Yarmouth, is a coastal town in Norfolk, England. ...


Geography

Dewsbury is situated between a number of larger towns and cities. Leeds and Bradford lie eight miles to the north, Huddersfield a similar distance to the south west, and Wakefield some six miles east. In recent years its proximity to these major urban centres, the M1 and M62 motorways and its position on the Huddersfield Line, served by the TransPennine Express, have contributed to its rising popularity as a commuter town. For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bradford (disambiguation). ... , Huddersfield is a large town within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England, near the confluence of the River Colne and the River Holme. ... The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... The M62 motorway is a west-east trans-Pennine motorway in northern England, connecting the cities of Liverpool and Hull. ... The Huddersfield Line is the name given to one of the rail services in the West Yorkshire Metro area of northern England: it is one of the busiest on the Metro network. ... TransPennine Express (TPE) is a train operating company in the United Kingdom. ... Commuting is the process of travelling from a place of residence to a place of work. ...


Dewsbury is part of the West Yorkshire Urban Area, and the natural boundaries of the town are not well defined, with built up areas of the town running into neighbouring Batley, Heckmondwike and Ossett. The West Yorkshire Urban Area is a term used by the Office for National Statistics to refer to a conurbation in West Yorkshire, England, based mainly on Leeds, Bradford, Huddersfield, Wakefield, but excluding Halifax which though part of the county of West Yorkshire is considered independently. ... Batley is a small town in Kirklees Metropolitan Borough, in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... Heckmondwike (known locally by its nickname Hecky) is a small town which is located in West Yorkshire, England, 13km (8 miles) south east of Bradford. ... , Ossett [pronounced Oss-it] is an old industrial town in West Yorkshire, England on junction 40 of the M1 motorway. ...


Geologically, the town is situated on rock dated to the Carboniferous Period, consisting of coal measures and gritstones. Quaternary Period rock, glacial deposits and gravels exist in the Calder Valley. Coal, stone and gravel have all been exploited commercially. Average rainfall is 100 cm per annum.[13] The Carboniferous is a major division of the geologic timescale that extends from the end of the Devonian period, about 340 million years ago (mya), to the beginning of the Permian period, about 280 mya. ... A coal measure (stratigraphic unit) is the name given to any rock sequence that occurs in the upper part of the Carboniferous System in Europe. ... The Salt Cellar, a gritstone tor on Derwent Edge in the Peak District Gritstone is a sedimentary rock composed of coarse sand grains with inclusions of small stones. ... This article is about the geologic period. ... Categories: Geology stubs | Glaciology | Sedimentary rocks ... Gravel (largest fragment in this photo is about 4 cm) Gravel is rock that is of a certain particle size range. ... Calder Valley is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... This article is about the geological substance. ... This article is about the meteorological term. ...


The town is dominated by hills, notably Earlsheaton, Dewsbury Moor, Staincliffe and Thornhill. The town centre is at 40 m-55 m above sea level, rising to 110 m at Earlsheaton and Batley Carr, and 230 m at Grange Moor. The approach down from Earlsheaton through the Wakefield Road cutting, constructed in 1830, is dramatic with the view of the town centre nestling in the Calder Valley opening up as you descend. Thornhill is a former village, now suburb of Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, England. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ...

Machell's Shoddy and Mungo Mill in Dewsbury town centre
Machell's Shoddy and Mungo Mill in Dewsbury town centre

The majority of the older buildings were built in Yorkshire stone, many of which have recently been restored by sandblasting. Notable structures include the railway viaduct, and Machell's Shoddy and Mungo Mill, converted into apartments but still bearing the famous slogan of its original occupants. Image File history File links Photograph of a mill in the Heavy Woollen District (now converted to flats) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Photograph of a mill in the Heavy Woollen District (now converted to flats) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Man sandblasting a stone wall Device used for adding sand to the compressed air (top of which is a sieve for adding the sand) Diesel powered compressor used as an air supply for sandbasting Sandblasting or bead blasting[1] is a generic term for the process of smoothing, shaping and... Torontos Bloor Street Viaduct bridges the Don valley; road traffic uses the upper deck, rail traffic uses the lower deck. ...


Demographics and economy

From the outset of the industrialisation of the town with its many mills, a large influx of Irish workers arrived in the town, settling in the Westtown area. This area has the large and imposing St. Paulinus Roman Catholic Church and its school, once run by the nuns of the area. The Irish National Club also is home to Dewsbury Celtic Amateur Rugby League Club, with its many age groups of players. Starting in the late 1950s and continuing until the 1970s, many families from South Asia, particularly Pakistan, settled in Dewsbury. By 1966 around 2,000 immigrants from Commonwealth countries had made Dewsbury their home. Many worked in the woollen mills, making good the labour shortage in that sector. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Dewsbury Celtic is a rugby league club in the town of Dewsbury, West Yorkshire. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2008. ...


The town has a large Asian community; this was estimated in November 2006 at 33%[1], but it is likely to be slightly higher. Savile Town and Ravensthorpe are populated mainly by Muslims of Indian and Pakistani origin. In recent years, there has also been an immigration of Iraqi Kurds and Hungarians into the town.[2]. Dewsbury is known for having a Shariah arbitration court, which has caused some controversy.[3] Asian may refer to: Asian people - The people from Asia. ... Savile Town is a small area of Dewsbury in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom. ... Ravensthorpe is an area of Dewsbury, in West Yorkshire, England. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Hungarian may refer to: Hungary or the Kingdom of Hungary. ...


The Dewsbury Moor, Ravensthorpe and Chickenley areas are classed among the 10% most deprived areas in the UK [14]. In contrast to some British towns and cities, the east side of the town is generally more affluent. The majority of houses in the town are in the cheapest band for council tax, for house prices are amongst the lowest in the country.[15] Ravensthorpe as a place name: Village of Ravensthorpe, Northamptonshire, England District of Ravensthorpe, Peterborough, England District of Ravensthorpe, Dewsbury, England Shire of Ravensthorpe, Western Australia This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...


The town centre is starting to see a something of a revival, with large retailers such as Sainsbury's, Next and Matalan. The local market comprising 400 stalls is one of the busiest in Yorkshire and today draws coach-loads of visitors to the town; in April 2007, Dewsbury Market won the award as "Britain's Best Market". Wednesdays and Saturdays are the normal market days with the popular flea market on Fridays. Just south of the River Calder in the town centre was where the mills of the town were traditionally located. As the mills closed, this area became the largest brownfield site in the country. However, many of the units have now been reoccupied and the town's largest employer, Carlton Cards is based in this area. A large shopping centre, planned to occupy a large area of the town centre has as many supporters as detractors. This article is about the supermarket business. ... Next on Oxford Street Next PLC is a British clothes retailer, with its headquarters in Enderby, Leicestershire, England. ... Matalan is a discount clothing and homeware store in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Yorkshire (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The River Calder is a river flowing through the predominantly urban areas of West Yorkshire, England, and gives its name to the borough of Calderdale. ... In town planning, brownfield land is an area of land previously used or built upon, as opposed to industry or mining and therefore may be contaminated by hazardous waste or pollution. ... Carlton Cards Retail, Inc. ...


Ravensthorpe has also now started to see a new lease of life, in the shape of the district's new shopping park. Retailers on the development include Netto, Subway, Home Bargains, Au Naturale and Poundstretcher. Ravensthorpe as a place name: Village of Ravensthorpe, Northamptonshire, England District of Ravensthorpe, Peterborough, England District of Ravensthorpe, Dewsbury, England Shire of Ravensthorpe, Western Australia This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Netto logo A Netto store in Copenhagen Netto is a Danish based chain of discount supermarkets. ... Look up Subway in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Home Bargains, is a discount store chain in northern England and the Midlands. ... Poundstretcher is a British chain of discount stores. ...


Inspired setting for A Kind of Loving

The 1960 book A Kind of Loving is set in a fictional city named "Cressley", but its description was based upon Dewsbury. The author, Stan Barstow, was born in Horbury and grew up in Ossett - both of which are just to the east of Dewsbury. Stan Barstow (born June 28, 1928, Ossett, Yorkshire) is an English novelist. ... Horbury is a large village, west of Wakefield and south of Ossett, in West Yorkshire. ...


Sport and local attractions

The Dewsbury Rugby League Club play in National League 1. They play on Owl Lane, towards Ossett, on the site of the old Savile & Shaw Cross Colliery. Their original and famous ground Crown Flatt stood on Leeds Road at Earlsheaton for many years until it was burned down by arsonists in the late 1980s. It has been replaced with a modern housing estate. Dewsbury Celtic play in National League 3. Their ground is on the west side of the town in Crow Nest Park. The club's headquarters are at the Dewsbury Irish National Club on Park Parade. Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... , Ossett [pronounced Oss-it] is an old industrial town in West Yorkshire, England on junction 40 of the M1 motorway. ... Crown Flatt is a rugby league stadium on Owl Lane in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire. ... Dewsbury Celtic is a rugby league club in the town of Dewsbury, West Yorkshire. ...


Dewsbury Museum in Crow Nest Park features a permanent children's history section, including a 1940s classroom and an extensive toy collection, alongside temporary exhibits. The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... A teddy bear A toy is an object used in play. ...


Nearby attractions include the National Coal Mining Museum for England and the Bagshaw Museum, in neighbouring Batley. The National Coal Mining Museum for England is based on the site of the old Caphouse Colliery. ... Batley is a small town in Kirklees Metropolitan Borough, in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ...


Education

Dewsbury had two grammar schools – The Wheelwright Grammar School for Boys and, further up the hill, the Wheelwright Grammar School for Girls. The 1970s education reforms downgraded these two establishments to high schools. They are now used by Dewsbury College. In the 2005 School League Tables, Dewsbury's Eastborough Junior, Infants and Nursery schools were reported to have the most consistently improved results over the past four years. However, the headteacher of the school, Nicola Roth, has been highly critical of School League Tables in the UK and has been reported to have said "It would be better if league tables did not exist".[citation needed] A grammar school is a school that may, depending on regional usage as exemplified below, provide either secondary education or, a much less common usage, primary education (also known as elementary). Grammar schools trace their origins back to medieval Europe, as schools in which university preparatory subjects, such as Latin... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Dewsbury College is a higher education college located in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire. ...


Batley College of Art and Design, which is part of Dewsbury College, has a strong reputation for print and textile-based art work. Batley is a small town in Kirklees Metropolitan Borough, in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Districts of Dewsbury

Dewsbury has a number of different districts with very different geographical and socio-economic patterns. Some of the districts of Dewsbury are, Chickenley, Crackenedge, Dewsbury Moor, Earlsheaton, Eastborough, Eightlands, Flatts, Ravensthorpe, Savile Town, Shaw Cross, Scout Hill, Thornhill Lees, Westborough, Westtown.


Batley Carr, Hanging Heaton and Staincliffe have areas which lie in both Dewsbury and neighbouring Batley. Thornhill is sometimes classified as part of Dewsbury and sometimes as a separate settlement. It was annexed by the town's council in 1910, along with Briestfield and Whitley, but there have been no official definitions of Dewsbury's boundaries since the 1974 local government reforms. Batley is a small town in Kirklees Metropolitan Borough, in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... Thornhill can refer to: Thornhill, Wales Thornhill, Cumbria Thornhill, Derbyshire Thornhill, Hampshire Thornhill, West Yorkshire Thornhill, Dumfries and Galloway Thornhill, Stirling Thornhill, Kentucky Thornhill, Ontario Thornhill, an album by Moxy Früvous, named after Thornhill, Ontario. ...


Famous people born in Dewsbury

This article is about the actor. ... , Mirfield is a small town and civil parish within the Kirklees borough of West Yorkshire, England, near Dewsbury. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... A local weekly publication, providing news for residents of Dewsbury, West Yorkshire, and surrounding areas. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ... Anne Brontës grave at Scarborough Anne Brontë (IPA: ) (January 17, 1820 – May 28, 1849) was a British novelist and poet, the youngest of the Brontë literary family. ... Charlotte Brontë (IPA: ) (April 21, 1816 – March 31, 1855) was an English novelist and the eldest of the three Brontë sisters whose novels have become enduring classics of English literature. ... Emily Jane Brontë (pronounced ); (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was a British novelist and poet, now best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, a classic of English literature. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Shirley is a social novel by Charlotte Brontë, published in 1849. ... John Rudd was a Tudor cartographer and clergyman. ... Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c. ... Cartography is the study of map making and cartographers are map makers. ... Vicariate redirects here. ... Christopher Saxton was born in Yorkshire around 1540. ... John Michell (1724 – April 29, 1793) was an English natural philosopher and geologist, whose work was rediscovered in the 1970s. ... For other senses of this word, see magnetism (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article is about the astronomical body. ... Valentine Pelka (b. ... Kazia Pelka (born 1962 in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire) is a British actress who has had major roles in Brookside as prostitute Anna Wolska, Heartbeat as district nurse Maggie Bolton, Coronation Street and more recently the Channel Five soap Family Affairs, where she played Chrissy Costello from September 2003 to the... Mary Tamm (born 22 March 1950 in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire) is an English actress, perhaps best known for being the first actress to play the character of Romana in the science fiction television series Doctor Who, opposite Tom Baker as the Doctor, from the 1978 - 1979 season known collectively as... Rebecca Callard is an English actress. ... Tom Kilburn (August 11, 1921 - January 17, 2001) was an English engineer. ... Computer Engineering (also sometimes called Computer Systems Engineering) is a specialised discipline that combines electrical engineering and computer science. ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the machine. ... Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt was born in Dewsbury, Yorkshire, the son of Thomas Allbutt, Vicar of Dewsbury and Susan Wooler. ... A clinical mercury thermometer A thermometer is a device that measures temperature or temperature gradient, using a variety of different principles. ... Owen Willans Richardson (down) Solvay conference 1927 Sir Owen Willans Richardson (April 26, 1879 - February 15, 1959) was a British physicist, a professor at Princeton University from 1906 to 1913, and a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1928 for his work on the thermionic phenomenon and especially... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: [1]) varies. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Hirst stands alongside IBM Chairman Palmisano in Second Life Larry Anthony Naunce Cholmondley Hirst CBE is general manager of IBM UK, responsible for IBMs strategy, community programmes and 26,000 employees in the UK. In previous roles within IBM, Hirst has been vice president of financial services and chairman... Wallace Henry Hartley (June 2, 1878 - April 15, 1912) was a violinist and bandleader on the RMS Titanic on its maiden voyage. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... A blue plaque showing information about The Spanish Barn at Torre Abbey in Torquay. ... Franz Ferdinand is the name of: Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the presumptive heir to the throne of Austria. ... Leeds Rhinos are a professional rugby league club who are based in Headingley in north-west Leeds, West Yorkshire. ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Matt Diskin is a rugby league player who plays for the Leeds Rhinos and has also represented Great Britain and England. ... Sky Sports is the brand name for a group of 9 channels. ... Mike Stephenson is the popular Sky Sports rugby league presenter. ... Edward Marsden Waring (Eddie Waring) (February 21, 1910 - October 28, 1986) was a British sports commentator and television presenter. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... Betty Boothroyd, Baroness Boothroyd, OM, PC (born October 8, 1929 in Dewsbury, England), is a British politician and was the first female Speaker of the House of Commons. ... Tim Fountain (born December 23, 1967, in Dewsbury, West Yorkshire) is a British writer. ... Andrew Morton (born 1953) is a former British Fleet Street tabloid journalist. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ... Betty Lockwood, Baroness Lockwood of Dewsbury, is a Labour Party activist and was created a life peer in 1978. ... The Equal Opportunities Commission (EOC) is a independent non-departmental public body, (NDPB) or quango, in the United Kingdom. ... The University of Bradford is a university in Bradford, West Yorkshire in the United Kingdom. ... Sheffield United Football Club is a professional English football club based in the city of Sheffield, South Yorkshire. ... Leigh Bromby (Born June 2, 1980 in Dewsbury) is a football player who currently plays for Sheffield United. ... Neil David Redfearn (born 20 June 1965 in Dewsbury) is an English footballer and manager. ... The Football League is an organisation representing 72 professional football clubs in England and Wales, and runs the oldest professional football league competition in the world. ... Gregory Greg Rusedski (born September 6, 1973, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada) is a former British tennis player who turned professional in 1991, and played until his retirement on April 7, 2007 at the age of 33. ... Friday Night with Jonathan Ross is a chat show presented by Jonathan Ross. ...

References in popular culture

Dewsbury is referenced in the Beatles' 1967 film Magical Mystery Tour. A line of dialogue in the film has one of the magicians (all portrayed by the Beatles themselves) - who are keeping an eye on the whereabouts of the bus that is taking its passengers on the journey of the film's title - exclaim: "The bus is ten miles north on the Dewsbury road and they're having a lovely time!" [18]Dewsbury is also referenced in the 1991 single "It's Grim Up North" by the Justified Ancients of Mu Mu (also known as The KLF). The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 as part of their first tour of the United States, promoting their first hit single there, I Want To Hold Your Hand. ... Magical Mystery Tour, starring The Beatles, is an hour-long television film that initially aired on BBC1 on Boxing Day in 1967. ... Its Grim Up North was a 1991 single by The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu (The JAMs), the main lyrics of which consist of a list of towns and cities in Northern England, set to a pounding industrial techno accompaniment reminiscent of steam train whistles, all of which segues... The KLF (also known as The Justified Ancients of Mu Mu, The Timelords and other names) were one of the seminal bands of the British acid house movement during the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... KLF redirects here. ...


The Dogs of Dewsbury is the title of a volume of poetry (now out of print) written by the poet Cliff Ashby. In Plainsong - Collected Poems (pub. Carcanet 1985) the poem "Dewsbury" appears and starts "Incite me to love/This shoddy town/And its inhabitants/Who surrounded by their ´Special Offer´homes/Dream of a city/Where there is no night."


As many people are unsure how to pronounce "Dewsbury", it was included in the Oxford B.B.C. Guide to Pronunciation, where it was defined as 'dju:zbəri.[4]


References

  1. ^ http://mondediplo.com/2006/11/02ukmuslims
  2. ^ Hungarians referred to in these articles http://www.thepressnewspaper.co.uk/NewsDetails.asp?id=1169 http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/bradford/7261208.stm Kurds referred to in this article http://www.dewsburyreporter.co.uk/news?articleid=2737475
  3. ^ http://www.dewsburyreporter.co.uk/news/Muslims-accused-of-running-Islamic.2852441.jp http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/5817
  4. ^ Oxford B.B.C. Guide to Pronunciation, Oxford, 2006, page 99

Location Grid

North: Batley
West: Heckmondwike and Mirfield Dewsbury East: Ossett
South: Flockton

Batley is a small town in Kirklees Metropolitan Borough, in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... Heckmondwike (known locally by its nickname Hecky) is a small town which is located in West Yorkshire, England, 13km (8 miles) south east of Bradford. ... , Mirfield is a small town and civil parish within the Kirklees borough of West Yorkshire, England, near Dewsbury. ... , Ossett [pronounced Oss-it] is an old industrial town in West Yorkshire, England on junction 40 of the M1 motorway. ... Flockton is a village in West Yorkshire halfway between Huddersfield and Wakefield with a population of 1,176 according to the 2001 census. ...

External links

  • Local newspaper, the Dewsbury Reporter
  • Area profile and statistics
  • Pigot & Co's National Commercial Directory, 1834 entry for Dewsbury
  • Thomas Baine's "Yorkshire Past and Present", Chapter VI "The History of the Borough of Dewsbury" (1870)
  • Batley & Dewsbury Towns' Management Association
  • Visitors to Dewsbury Page
  • Dewsbury Museum

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dewsbury Minster - Welcome (552 words)
The clergy and congregation of Dewsbury Minster welcome everyone, those of all faiths, and those of none, to this ancient place of pilgrimage and worship.
Dewsbury Minster is a place we hope you will enjoy visiting.
This is a Christian Church and is part of the Anglican Communion – a worldwide fellowship of churches in which the Christian Faith is growing, especially in Africa, South America and the Far East.
Enjoy the Batley and Dewsbury Experience (80 words)
Batley and Dewsbury Towns' Management, Dewsbury Business Centre, 13 Wellington Road, Dewsbury, WF13 1HF
Our website keeps you up to date with upcoming events, local attractions, town developments and projects.
New Christmas LED lights proposed for Dewsbury this year...
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m