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Encyclopedia > Devon
Devon

Flag
Motto of County Council: Auxilio divino (Latin: By divine aid)
Geography
Status Ceremonial & (smaller) Non-metropolitan county
Region South West England
Area
- Total
- Admin. council
- Admin. area
Ranked 4th
6,707 km² (2,590 sq mi)
Ranked 3rd
6,564 km² (2,534 sq mi)
Admin HQ Exeter
ISO 3166-2 GB-DEV
ONS code 18
NUTS 3 UKK43
Demography
Population
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
- Admin. council
- Admin. pop.
Ranked 11th
1,122,100
167/km² (433/sq mi)
Ranked 12th
740,800
Ethnicity 98.7% White
Politics

Devon County Council
http://www.devon.gov.uk/
Executive Liberal Democrat
Members of Parliament
Districts
  1. Exeter
  2. East Devon
  3. Mid Devon
  4. North Devon
  5. Torridge
  6. West Devon
  7. South Hams
  8. Teignbridge
  9. Plymouth (Unitary)
  10. Torbay (Unitary)

Devon is a large county in the South West of England. Alternatively people refer to the county as Devonshire, but it is an entirely unofficial name, often indicating a traditional or historical context. The county shares borders with Cornwall to the west and Dorset and Somerset to the east. Its coastline follows the English Channel to the south and the Bristol Channel to the north. Devon is a county in south west England. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Devon. ... St Petrocs Cross Flag of Devon is the flag of the English county of Devon. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... map of admin county File links The following pages link to this file: Devon Categories: GFDL images ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the region. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This is a List of Ceremonial counties of England by Population - 2002 mid-year estimates from the Office for National Statistics, unrounded figures published by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister in the Entitlement Notification Reports for Revenue Support Grants [1]. See also: List of Administrative shire counties of... This is a list of non-metropolitan counties of England by population. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Benjamin Peter James Bradshaw (born August 30, 1960) British politician and is the Labour Member of Parliament for Exeter and the Minister for Local Environment, Marine and Animal Welfare with the rank of Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Angela Frances Browning (born December 4, 1946) British politician. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Charles Geoffrey Cox, QC (commonly known as Geoffrey), is a Conservative politician, who was elected as member of Parliament for Devon West and Torridge in the 2005 general election. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Linda Wade Gilroy (born July 19, 1949, Moffat, Scotland as Linda Wade Jarvie) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British political party. ... Nicholas Barton Harvey (born 3 August 1961) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... Adrian Mark Sanders (born 25 April 1959) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... Alison Jane Seabeck (born January 20, 1954) is the Labour MP for Plymouth Devonport. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Anthony David Steen (born 22 July 1939) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Gary Nicholas Streeter (born 2 October 1955) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Hugo Swire MP Hugo George William Swire (born 30 November 1959) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Richard Younger-Ross (born January 29, 1953) is a politician in England. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... Districts in the Ceremonial County of Devon. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... East Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... Mid Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... See also North Devon (UK Parliament constituency) North Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... Torridge is a local government district in Devon, England. ... West Devon is a local government district and borough in Devon, England. ... South Hams is a local government district on the south coast of Devon, England. ... Teignbridge is a local government district in Devon, England. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ... This article is about the region. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dÉ”.sÉ™t], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... Satellite view of the Bristol Channel Map of the Bristol Channel The Bristol Channel (Welsh: ) is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from the West Country and extending from the lower estuary of the River Severn (Afon Hafren) to that part of the North...


Devon is the third largest of the English counties and has a population of 1,109,900. The county town is the cathedral city of Exeter, and the county contains two independent unitary authorities: the port city of Plymouth and the Torbay conurbation of seaside resorts. In addition to Devon County Council itself, much of the county is rural or National Park land. 365 square miles (950 km²) are occupied by Dartmoor and as a result of its rural land use it has, by British standards, a low population density. A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... This article is about national parks. ... High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ...


The county is home to England's only natural UNESCO World Heritage Site, which is the Dorset and East Devon Coast, known as the Jurassic Coast for its geology and geographical features. Along with its neighbour, Cornwall, Devon is known as the "Cornubian massif". This geology gives rise to the landscapes of Dartmoor and Exmoor, which are both National Parks. Devon has seaside resorts and historic towns and cities, plus a mild climate, accounting for the large tourist sector of its economy. Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... Org type Specialized Agency Acronyms UNESCO Head Director General of UNESCO Koïchiro Matsuura Japan Status Active Established 1945 Website www. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... The Jurassic Coast is a World Heritage Site on the English Channel coast of southern England. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ... Exmoor is a National Park situated on the Bristol Channel coast of South West England. ... The Brecon Beacons National Park, looking from the highest point of Pen Y Fan (886 m/2907 feet) to Corn Du (873 m/2864 feet) The national parks of England and Wales are areas of relatively undeveloped and scenic landscape that are designated under the National Parks and Access to...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Devon

The neutrality of this article is disputed. ...

Toponymy

The name 'Devon' derives from the name of the Celtic people who inhabited the southwestern peninsula of Britain at the time of the Roman invasion c. 50AD, known as the Dumnonii, thought to mean 'deep valley dwellers'. In some of the Celtic languages, Devon is known as Dyfnaint (Welsh), Devnent in Breton, Dewnans (Cornish) and reconstructed as Deunens/Deunans in (Old Devonian). This article is about the European people. ... Roman invasion of Britain: Britain was the target of invasion by forces of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire several times during its history. ... The Dumnonii is the Latin name for a Celtic tribe that inhabited the Westcountry of England. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Breton (Brezhoneg) is a Celtic language spoken by some of the inhabitants of Brittany (Breizh) in France. ... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... Southwestern Brythonic is one of two dialects into which the Brythonic language split following the Battle of Deorham in A.D. 577, the other being Western Brythonic, which later evolved into Welsh and Cumbric. ...


William Camden, in his 1607 edition of Britannia described Devon as being one part of an older, wider country that once included Cornwall: William Camden William Camden (May 2, 1551 - November 9, 1623) was an English antiquarian and historian. ...

[It] was in ancient time inhabited by those Britains whom Solinus called Dunmonii … . But … the Country of this nation is at this day divided into two parts, known by later names of Cornwall and Denshire …

William Camden, Britannia.[1]

There is some dispute over the use of 'Devonshire' instead of Devon,[who?] and there is no official recognition of the term 'Devonshire' in modern times. One theory is that the 'shire' suffix is due to a mistake in the making of the original letters patent for the Duke of Devonshire, resident in Derbyshire.[who?] However, there are references to 'Defenascire' in old English texts from before 1000AD,[2] which translates to modern English as 'Devonshire'. The term Devonshire may have originated around the 8th century, when it changed from Dumnonia to Defensascir.[3] The Dukes of Devonshire are members of the aristocratic Cavendish family in the United Kingdom. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ...


Human occupation

Devon was one of the first areas of England settled following the end of the last ice age. Dartmoor is thought to have been settled by Mesolithic hunter-gatherer peoples from about 6000 BC. The Romans held the area under military occupation for around 250 years. Later the area became a frontier between Brythonic Dumnonia and Anglo-Saxon Wessex, and it was absorbed into Wessex by the mid-9th century. Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ... The Mesolithic (Greek mesos=middle and lithos=stone or the Middle Stone Age[1]) was a period in the development of human technology between the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods of the Stone Age. ... In anthropology, the hunter-gatherer way of life is that led by certain societies of the Neolithic Era based on the exploitation of wild plants and animals. ... The name Dumnonia derives from the Latin name Dumnonii given by the Romans to a Celtic tribe that lived there, reputed to mean Deep valley dwellers. However, this name is also represented in Britains two Brythonic languages: Cornish and Welsh, as Dewnans and Dyfnaint respectively. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ... For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ...


Devon has also featured in most of the civil conflicts in England since the Norman Conquest, including the Wars of the Roses, Perkin Warbeck's rising in 1497, the Prayer Book Rebellion of 1549, and the English Civil War. The arrival of William of Orange to launch the Glorious Revolution of 1688 took place at Brixham. Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... Contemporary painting of Warbeck Perkin Warbeck (c. ... The Prayer Book Rebellion or Western Rebellion occurred in the southwest of England in 1549. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... William III (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702) was the Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28 June 1672, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots (under the name William II) from... The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (VII of Scotland) in 1688 by a union of Parliamentarians and the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau (William of Orange), who as a result ascended the English throne as William... Brixham (IPA: ) is a small town in the county of Devon, in the south-west of England. ...


Devon has produced tin, copper and other metals from ancient times. Devon's tin miners enjoyed a substantial degree of independence through Devon's stannary parliament, which dates back to the twelfth century. The last recorded sitting was in 1748.[4] This article is about the metallic chemical element. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... The Stannary Parliaments and Stannary Courts were legislative and legal institutions in Cornwall and in Devon in the Dartmoor area. ...


Economy and industry

Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide

Devon is one of the rural counties, with the advantages and problems characteristic of these. Despite this, the county's economy is also heavily influenced by its two main urban centres, Plymouth and Exeter.[citation needed] Devon is a county in South West England. ... Part of the seafront at Torquay. ... Part of the seafront at Torquay. ... This article is about the English town. ...


Like neighbouring Cornwall to the west, Devon is disadvantaged economically compared to other parts of southern England, owing to the decline of a number of core industries, notably fishing, mining and farming. Consequently, most of Devon has qualified for the European Community Objective 2 status, particularly around Exmoor, Bideford Bay and the Hartland Point peninsula which is somewhat cut off from industrial Britain by road and rail transport - although these areas of North Devon are only 20 miles (32 km), by boat from Swansea in Wales. A proposal, which has the backing of both the Welsh Assembly Government and the South West Regional Assembly, as well as Devon County Council is to have a year-round ferry service from either Ilfracombe or Bideford to Swansea which would help stimulate and build economic growth for both South-West Wales and the North coast of Devon and Cornwall.[citation needed] For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... The European Community (EC) was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The European Union has designated certain geographic regions as qualifying for Objective 2 status. ... Exmoor is a National Park situated on the Bristol Channel coast of South West England. ... Hartland Point is a rocky outcrop of land on the coast of Devon in the United Kingdom. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Official logo of the Welsh Assembly Government The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) (Welsh: , LlCC) was firstly an executive body of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of the First Minister and his Cabinet from 1999 to 2007. ... The South West Regional Assembly (SWRA) is the regional assembly for the South West region of England, established in 1999. ... It has been suggested that List of cultural venues and events in Ilfracombe be merged into this article or section. ...


The 2001 UK foot and mouth crisis harmed the farming community severely.[5] Nearly half of the holdings of the Duchy of Cornwall are in Devon, including a large area of farmland.[citation needed] Notice telling people to keep off the North York Moors. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Since the rise of seaside resorts with the arrival of the railways in the 19th century, Devon's economy has been heavily reliant on tourism. The county's economy has followed the trend of British seaside resort decline since the mid-20th century, with some recent revival. This revival has been aided by the designation of much of Devon's countryside and coastline as the Dartmoor and Exmoor national parks, and the Jurassic Coast and Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape World Heritage Sites. In 2004 the county's tourist revenue was £1.2 billion.[6] High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ... Exmoor is a National Park situated on the Bristol Channel coast of South West England. ... The Jurassic Coast is a World Heritage Site on the English Channel coast of southern England. ... The Cornwall and West Devon Mining Landscape is a World Heritage Site in the counties of Cornwall and Devon in the South West of England. ...


The attractive lifestyle of the area is drawing in new industries which are not heavily dependent upon geographical location.[citation needed] In 2003, the Met Office, the UK's weather service, moved to Exeter. The Met Office (originally an abbreviation for Meteorological Office, but now the official name in itself), which has its headquarters at Exeter in Devon, is the United Kingdoms national weather service. ...


Geology, landscape and ecology

Heathland at Woodbury Common in southeast Devon

Devon is the only county in England to have two separated coastlines; the South West Coast Path runs along the entire length of both, around 65% of which is named as Heritage Coast. Inland, the Dartmoor National Park lies wholly in Devon, and the Exmoor National Park lies in both Devon and Somerset. Apart from these areas of high moorland the county has attractive rolling rural scenery, and villages with thatched cob cottages. All these features make Devon a popular holiday destination. The variety of habitats means that there is a wide range of wildlife (see Dartmoor wildlife, for example). A popular challenge among birders is to find over 100 species in the county in a day.[citation needed] The county's wildlife is protected by the Devon Wildlife Trust, a charity which looks after 40 nature reserves. Heath (habitat) at Woodbury Common, Devon, England - photo User:MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Heath (habitat) at Woodbury Common, Devon, England - photo User:MPF File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Heaths are anthropogenic habitats found primarily in northern and western Europe, where they have been created by thousands of years of human clearance of natural forest vegetation by grazing and burning on mainly infertile acidic soils. ... Area of common land that is predominantly heathland adjacent to Woodbury, Devon and containing Woodbury Castle. ... The South West Coast Path passes along the cliffs (seen in the distance) at Ilfracombe, North Devon. ... A Heritage Coast is a strip of coastline designated by the Countryside Agency in England and Wales. ... High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ... This article is about national parks. ... Exmoor is a National Park situated on the Bristol Channel coast of South West England. ... This article is about the county of Somerset in England. ... Thatching is the art or craft of covering a roof with vegetative materials such as straw, reed or sedge. ... Cob building dated 1539 in Devon, England. ... Tourist redirects here. ... Dartmoor and the fact that a great deal of it is undisturbed for much of the year is an encouragement to the wildlife. ... Birding or birdwatching is a hobby concerned with the observation and study of birds (the study proper is termed American origin; birdwatching is (or more correctly, was) the commonly-used word in Great Britain and Ireland and by non-birders in the United States. ... The Devon Wildlife Trust is a wildlife trust covering the county of Devon, England. ...


The landscape of the south consists of rolling hills dotted with small towns, such as Dartmouth, Salcombe, Totnes amongst others. The towns of Torquay and Paignton are the principal seaside resorts on the south coast. The north of the county is very rural with few major towns except Barnstaple, Great Torrington, Bideford and Ilfracombe. East Devon has the first seaside resort to be developed in the county, Exmouth and the more upmarket Georgian town of Sidmouth, headquarters of the East Devon District Council. Exmouth marks the western end of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. The town seen from the River Dart Dartmouth is a town in Devon in the south-west of England. ... The view from Salcombe waterfront Salcombe is a town in the South Hams district of Devon, England on the Kingsbridge Estuary. ... , Totnes (IPA: ) is a market town in South Devon, England. ... This article is about the English town. ... Paignton harbour , Paignton (IPA: ) is a coastal town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Statistics Population: 34,000 (April 2006 Est. ... The old Town Hall (now the town museum) in the centre of Great Torrington. ... , Bideford is a small port town on the estuary of the River Torridge in north Devon, south-west England. ... It has been suggested that List of cultural venues and events in Ilfracombe be merged into this article or section. ... Map sources for Exmouth at grid reference SY004809 Exmouth is a town in Devon, England, at the east side of the mouth of the River Exe. ... Location within the British Isles Sidmouth Arms of Sidmouth Town Council Sidmouth is a small town of 14,400 on the east Devon coast in south west England about 15 miles south east of Exeter. ... The Jurassic Coast is a World Heritage Site on the English Channel coast of southern England. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

The Great Red cliff of Foreland Point

Devon gave its name to a geological era: the Devonian era, so named by Adam Sedgwick because the distinctive Old Red Sandstone of Exmoor was studied by geologists here. Devon's other major rock system[citation needed] is the carboniferous sandstone which stretches from Bideford to Bude in Cornwall, and contributes to a gentler, greener, more rounded landscape. Download high resolution version (1280x960, 405 KB)my photo of Foreland point File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 405 KB)my photo of Foreland point File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For the Celtic language, see Southwestern Brythonic language; for the residents of the English county, see Devon. ... Adam Sedgwick (March 22nd, 1785–January 27, 1873) was one of the founders of modern geology. ... The Old Red Sandstone is a rock formation of considerable importance to early paleontology. ... , Bideford is a small port town on the estuary of the River Torridge in north Devon, south-west England. ... For the town in the United States, see Bude, Mississippi. ...


Devon's Exmoor coast has the highest cliffs in southern Britain, culminating in the Great Hangman, a 1043 ft (318 m) "hog-backed" hill with an 820 ft (250 m) cliff-face, located near Combe Martin Bay. Its sister cliff is the 716 ft (218 m) Little Hangman, which marks the edge of Exmoor. Great Hangman from Little Hangman on the South West Coast Path Hangman cliffs are near Combe Martin on Devons Exmoor coast. ...


One of the features of the North Devon coast is that Bideford Bay and the Hartland Point peninsula are both west-facing, Atlantic facing coastlines; meaning that a combination of an off-shore (east) wind and an Atlantic swell produce excellent surf. The beaches of Bideford Bay (Woolacombe, Saunton, Westward Ho! and Croyde), along with North Cornwall, and the coast of South Wales, are the main centres of surfing in Britain. Hartland Point is a rocky outcrop of land on the coast of Devon in the United Kingdom. ... Woolacombe beach, viewed from the north Woolacombe is a seaside resort on the coast of North Devon, England, which lies at the mouth of a valley (or combe). The beach is 2. ... Saunton is a village located approximately two miles from Braunton, on the North Devon coast in the South West of England. ... Westward Ho! is a seaside town in Torridge, Devon, England, near Bideford. ... Croyde is a village in the north-west of Devon south of Woolacombe and near the towns of Braunton and Ilfracombe. ...


Rising temperatures have led to Devon becoming the first place in modern Britain to commercially cultivate olives.[7] For the Italian political alliance see Olive Tree, and the color, olive (color). ...


Politics and administration

The administrative centre of Devon is the city of Exeter. The largest city in Devon Plymouth, and the conurbation of Torbay (including Torquay, Paignton and Brixham) are now unitary authorities separate from the remainder of Devon which is administered by Devon County Council for the purposes of local government. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1200 × 800 pixel, file size: 452 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Permission File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Exeter Cathedral... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1200 × 800 pixel, file size: 452 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Permission File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Exeter Cathedral... The west front. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in England. ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... This article is about the English town. ... Paignton harbour , Paignton (IPA: ) is a coastal town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... Brixham (IPA: ) is a small town in the county of Devon, in the south-west of England. ... A unitary authority is a term used in a two-tier local government system to describe a unit of local government that operates as a single tier. ... Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ...


Devon County Council, is controlled by the Liberal Democrats,[8] consists of 33 Liberal Democrats, 23 Conservatives, four Labour and two independent councillors.[9] At a national level, Devon has five Conservative MPs, three Liberal Democrat MPs, and three Labour MPs. The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...


In December 2007, the Department for Communities and Local Government referred Exeter City Council's bid to become a Unitary Council to the Boundary Committee. This was because they felt the application did not meet all their strict criteria. The Boundary Committee will report back to the Government by the end of year. The Boundary Committee will be asked look at the feasibility of a unitary Exeter in the context of examining options for unitary arrangements in the wider Devon county area. The Department for Communities and Local Government is a United Kingdom government department. ... Exeter City Council is the council and local government of the city of Exeter, Devon. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ...


Cities, towns and villages

For a complete list of settlements see list of places in Devon.
The inner harbour, Brixham, south Devon, at low tide

The main settlements in Devon are the cities of Plymouth, a historic port now administratively independent, Exeter, the county town, and Torbay, the county's tourist centre. Devon's coast is lined with tourist resorts, many of which grew rapidly with the arrival of the railways in the 19th century. Examples include Dawlish, Exmouth and Sidmouth on the south coast, and Ilfracombe and Lynmouth on the north. The Torbay conurbation of Torquay, Paignton and Brixham on the south coast is perhaps the largest and most popular of these resorts, and is now administratively independent of the county. Rural market towns in the county include Axminster, Barnstaple, Bideford, Honiton, Newton Abbot, Okehampton, Tavistock and Tiverton. This is a list of settlements in Devon, England. ... The inner harbour, Brixham, south Devon, at low tide. ... The inner harbour, Brixham, south Devon, at low tide. ... Brixham (IPA: ) is a small town in the county of Devon, in the south-west of England. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... Map sources for Dawlish at grid reference SX963767 The Great Western Main Line runs along the Dawlish seafront Dawlish is a town on the south coast of Devon, England, 12 miles from the County town of Exeter, with a population of around 13,000 people. ... Map sources for Exmouth at grid reference SY004809 Exmouth is a town in Devon, England, at the east side of the mouth of the River Exe. ... Location within the British Isles Sidmouth Arms of Sidmouth Town Council Sidmouth is a small town of 14,400 on the east Devon coast in south west England about 15 miles south east of Exeter. ... It has been suggested that List of cultural venues and events in Ilfracombe be merged into this article or section. ... Lynmouth is a village in Devon, England. ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... This article is about the English town. ... Paignton harbour , Paignton (IPA: ) is a coastal town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... Brixham (IPA: ) is a small town in the county of Devon, in the south-west of England. ... The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... Location within the British Isles Arms of Axminster Town Council Axminster is a small market town on the eastern border of Devon, England. ... Statistics Population: 34,000 (April 2006 Est. ... , Bideford is a small port town on the estuary of the River Torridge in north Devon, south-west England. ... Location within the British Isles Honiton is a town in Devon, England. ... You may be looking for Newton Abbot (UK Parliament constituency) , Newton Abbot is a market town in Devon, England on the River Teign, with a population of 23,580 (2001 census). ... Okehampton is a town in Devon, England, at the northern edge of Dartmoor, on the River Okement. ... , Tavistock is a market town within West Devon, England on the River Tavy, from which its name derives, and has a population of 11,018. ... Tiverton is a town in the County of Devon, in England. ...


Symbols

Coat of Arms

The coat of arms of Devon County Council

There was no established coat of arms for the county until 1926: the arms of the City of Exeter were often used to represent Devon, for instance in the badge of the Devonshire Regiment. When a county council was formed by the Local Government Act 1888 it was required to adopt a common seal. The seal contained three shields depicting the arms of Exeter along with those of the first chairman and vice-chairman of the council (Lord Clinton and the Earl of Morley).[10] Image File history File links Devon_arms. ... Image File history File links Devon_arms. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... The Earldom of Morley was created in 1815 in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ...


The county council received a grant of arms from the College of Arms on October 11, 1926. The main part of the shield displays a red crowned lion on a silver field, the arms of Richard Plantagenet, Earl of Cornwall. The chief or upper portion of the shield depicts an ancient ship on wavers, for Devon's seafaring traditions. The Latin motto adopted was Auxilio Divino (by Divine aid), that of Sir Francis Drake. The 1926 grant was of arms alone. On March 6, 1962 a further grant of crest and supporters was obtained. The crest is the head of a Dartmoor Pony rising from a "Naval Crown". This distinctive form of crown is formed from the sails and sterns of ships, and is associated with the Royal Navy. The supporters are a Devon bull and a sea lion. [11] [12] In April 2006 the council unveiled a new logo which was to be used in most everyday applications, though the coat of arms will continue to be used for "various civic purposes".[13] [14] The entrance of the College of Arms. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard (5 January 1209 - 2 April 1272) was Count of Poitou (bef. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmoor pony roams wild in Dartmoor National Park, Devon, in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Devon Cattle In 1623, two heifers and a bull from north Devonshire, England, were received by a member of the Plymouth Colony. ...


Flag

Main article: Flag of Devon

Devon also has its own flag which has been dedicated to Saint Petroc, a local saint with dedications throughout Devon and neighbouring counties. The flag was adopted in 2003 after a competition run by BBC Devon.[15] The winning design was created by website contributor Ryan Sealey, and won 49% of the votes cast. The colours of the flag are those popularly identified with Devon, for example, the colours of the rugby union team, and the Green and White flag flown by the first Viscount Exmouth at the Bombardment of Algiers (now on view at the Teign Valley Museum), as well as the county's most successful football team, Plymouth Argyle. On 17 October 2006, the flag was hoisted for the first time outside County Hall in Exeter to mark Local Democracy Week, receiving official recognition from the county council[16]. St Petrocs Cross Flag of Devon is the flag of the English county of Devon. ... Saint Petroc (sometimes spelt Petrock, also Pedrog in Welsh and Perreux in French) (c. ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Viscount Exmouth is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... The Bombardment of Algiers took place on August 27, 1816. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For details of the current season, see Plymouth Argyle F.C. season 2007-08 Plymouth Argyle Football Club, commonly known as the Pilgrims, are one of only two clubs in the Football League to play in a principally green home strip. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Culture

The beach at Westward Ho!, north Devon, looking north towards the Taw and Torridge estuaries

Devon's place names include many with the ending 'coombe/combe' or 'tor' - Coombe being the Brythonic word for 'valley' or hollow whilst tor derives from a number of Celtic loan-words in English (Old Welsh twrr and Scots Gaelic tòrr) used as a name for the formations of rocks found on the moorlands. Its frequency is greatest in Devon, where it is the second most common place name component (after 'ton', derived from the Old English 'tun' meaning farm, village). Westward Ho! beach, looking north . ... Westward Ho! beach, looking north . ... Westward Ho! is a seaside town in Torridge, Devon, England, near Bideford. ... River Taw rises at Taw Head, a spring on the central northern flanks of Dartmoor. ... The River Torridge is a river in Devon in England. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ...


Devon has a variety of festivals and practices. One example of these include the flaming tar barrels in Ottery St. Mary, where people who have lived in Ottery for long enough are called upon to celebrate Bonfire Night by running through the village (and the gathered crowds) with flaming barrels of tar on their backs.[17] Bonfire Night can refer to a number of occasions: St. ...


The county has given its name to a number of culinary specialities. The Devonshire cream tea, involving scones, jam and clotted cream, is thought to have originated in Devon (though claims have also been made for neighbouring counties); in other countries, such as Australia and New Zealand, it is known as a "Devonshire tea". In New South Wales, Australia, Devon is a name for luncheon meat (processed ham). The name changes in different states of Australia (for example, 'Fritz' in South Australia, 'Polony' in Western Australia) but all describe the same type of meat. Cream tea composed of scones, clotted cream and strawberry jam Cream tea at The Orchard, Grantchester A cream tea, Devonshire tea or Cornish cream tea[1] is tea taken with a combination of scones, clotted cream, and jam. ... Scones with honey. ... Jam from berries Jam (also known as jelly or preserves) is a type of sweet spread or condiment made with fruits or sometimes vegetables, sugar, and sometimes pectin if the fruits natural pectin content is insufficient to produce a thick product. ... Clotted cream on scones with jam, also called Cream Tea. ... NSW redirects here. ... Devon is a type of manufactured meat product sold in Australia (also referred to as Polony particularly in Western Australia, and as Fritz in South Australia). ... For the song, see South Australia (song). ... Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person...


Sport

Devon has been home to a number of customs, such as its own form of wrestling. As recently as the 19th century, a crowd of 17,000 at Devonport, near Plymouth, attended a match between the champions of Devon and Cornwall. Another Devon sport was 'outhurling' which was played in some regions until the twentieth century (e.g. 1922, at Great Torrington). Other ancient customs which survive include Dartmoor step dancing, and 'Crying The Neck'. This article is about the city in England. ... High Willhays, the highest point on Dartmoor and southern England at 621 m (2037 ft) above sea level, with Yes Tor beyond. ... Crying The Neck is a harvest festival tradition practiced in the Western part of England in particular Cornwall. ...


Devon has three professional football teams, based in each of its three most populated towns and cities. Competing in the Football League Championship, Plymouth Argyle F.C. are the biggest and most successful team in the county whilst Exeter City F.C. play in Football League Two. Torquay United compete in the Conference National. Plymouth's best performance came in 1987 when they finished seventh in the Football League Second Division, while Torquay and Exeter have never progressed beyond the third tier of the league. The county's biggest non-league club is Tiverton Town F.C. which competes in the Southern Football League Premier Division. The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... For details of the current season, see Plymouth Argyle F.C. season 2007-08 Plymouth Argyle Football Club, commonly known as the Pilgrims, are one of only two clubs in the Football League to play in a principally green home strip. ... Exeter City Football Club are an English football club, based in Exeter, who were members of the Football League from 1920 to 2003, and will rejoin the league for the 2008-09 season, after 5 seasons in the Conference National. ... Football League Two (often referred to as League Two for short or Coca-Cola Football League 2 for sponsorship reasons) is the third-highest division of The Football League and fourth-highest division overall in the English football league system. ... Torquay United Football Club, nicknamed the Gulls, are an English association football team based in Torquay. ... Conference National (currently billed as the Blue Square Premier for sponsorship reasons) [1] is the top division of the Football Conference. ... From 1892 until 1992, the Football League Second Division was the second highest division overall in English football. ... Tiverton Town is a football club currently playing in the Southern League Premier Division. ... The Southern Football League Premier Division is a football league covering central and south western England. ...


Rugby Union is popular in Devon. Two teams — Plymouth Albion and Exeter Chiefs — are, as of 2007, in National Division One. In basketball, Plymouth Raiders play in the British Basketball League. Tamar Valley Cannons, also based in Plymouth, are Devon's only other representatives in the National Leagues. Motorcycle speedway is also supported in the county, with both the Exeter Falcons and Plymouth Devils succeeding in the National Leagues in recent years. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Plymouth Albion Rugby Football Club are a Rugby Union club who play in Plymouth, Devon. ... Exeter Rugby Club is a rugby union club based in Exeter, England. ... National League One is the second tier of the English rugby union leagues. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Plymouth Raiders, officially called Kularoos Plymouth Raiders by sponsorship, is South-west Englands leading basketball team. ... “BBL” redirects here. ... Tamar Valley Cannons is an English amateur basketball team based in Plymouth, Devon. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Motorcycle speedway, normally referred to as Speedway, is a motorcycle sport that involves usually 4 and sometimes up to 6 riders competing over 4 laps of an oval circuit. ... The Exeter Falcons were a Speedway team which operated from 1947 until their closure in 2005 at the County Ground Stadium in Exeter. ... The Plymouth Devils are a speedway team in the British Conference League. ...


Famous Devonians

Devon is known for its mariners, such as Sir Francis Chichester, Sir Francis Drake, Sir Humphrey Gilbert, Sir Richard Grenville and Sir Walter Raleigh. The poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the crime writer Agatha Christie, the painter and founder of the Royal Academy, Sir Joshua Reynolds, the dog breeder John "Jack" Russell and frontman Chris Martin from the English rock band Coldplay were born in Devon. This is a list of notable people who were either born in, or lived for a substantial time in, the county of Devon in the United Kingdom. ... Sir Francis Chichester (September 17, 1901 – August 26, 1972), aviator and sailor, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for becoming the first person to sail single-handed around the world by the clipper route, and the fastest circumnavigator, in nine months and one day overall. ... This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ... Sir Humphrey Gilbert (c. ... Sir Richard Grenville (alternately spelt Greynvile, amongst others) (June 6, 1542 - September 1591) was an Elizabethan sailor, explorer, and soldier. ... This article is about the sixteenth-century explorer. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), commonly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime writer of novels, short stories and plays. ... The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London, England. ... Sir Joshua Reynolds Sir Joshua Reynolds (July 16, 1723–February 23, 1792) was the most important and influential of eighteenth-century English painters, specialising in portraits and promoting the Grand Style in painting which depended on idealization of the imperfect. ... John (Jack) Russell (December 12, 1795 – April 28, 1883), The Sporting Parson was an enthusiastic hunter and dog breeder as well as an ordained minister. ... This article is about the Coldplay musician. ...


Education

Devon has a mostly comprehensive education system, except for four grammar schools: in Colyton, Churston and a boys' and girls' school in Torquay. There are 37 state and 23 independent secondary schools. There are three tertiary (FE) colleges and an agricultural college (Bicton College, near Budleigh Salterton). Torbay has 8 state (with 3 grammar schools) and 3 independent secondary schools, and Plymouth has 17 state (with 3 grammar schools - two female and one male) and 2 independent secondary schools. East Devon and Teignbridge have the largest school populations, with West Devon the smallest (with only two schools). Only one school in Exeter, Mid Devon, Torridge and North Devon have a sixth form - the schools in other districts mostly have sixth forms, with all schools in West Devon and East Devon having a sixth form. Colyton could be Colyton, New South Wales Colyton, Devon This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Churtson (or Churston Ferrers) is a coastal village in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the English town. ... Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... List of agricultural universities and colleges is an incomplete list of agricultural universities and colleges. ... Bicton College is a small college (around 500 full-time and 1000 part-time pupils) in Bicton, Devon, that specialises in agriculture but is currently running courses such as Animal Care, Countyside Management, Horticulture, Outdoor Leisure, Veterinary Nursing and Agricultural Engineering, Aboriculture and Floristry. ... The Beach at Budleigh Salterton Budleigh Salterton is a small town on the south coast of Devon, England approximately 15 miles south of Exeter. ...


See also

This is a list of the Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) in Devon, England, United Kingdom. ... The West Country dialects and West Country accents are generic terms applied to any of several English dialects and accents used by much of the indigenous population of the southwestern part of England, the area popularly known as the West Country. ...

References

  1. ^ William Camden, Britannia (1607) with an English translation by Philemon Holland - Danmonii. www.philological.bham.ac.uk. Retrieved on 2008-03-29.
  2. ^ Manuscript A: The Parker Chronicle. Retrieved on 2007-06-29.
  3. ^ Davies, Norman (2000). The Isles: A History, 207. ISBN 0333692837. 
  4. ^ Devon's Mining History and Stannary parliament. users.senet.com.au. Retrieved on 2008-03-29.
  5. ^ In Devon, the county council estimated that 1,200 jobs would be lost in agriculture and ancillary rural industriesHansard, 25th April 2001
  6. ^ Devon County Council, 2005. Tourism trends in Devon.
  7. ^ Paul Simons (2007-05-14). Britain warms to the taste for home-grown olives. Times Online. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  8. ^ "English elect councils and mayors", The BBC, 2005-05-07. Retrieved on 2008-05-28. 
  9. ^ Devon County Council, List of Councillors by party affiliation.
  10. ^ A. C. Fox-Davies, The Book of Public Arms, 2nd edition, London, 1915
  11. ^ W. C. Scott-Giles, Civic Heraldry of England and Wales, 2nd edition, London, 1953
  12. ^ A brief history of Devon's coat of arms (Devon County Council)
  13. ^ Council's designs cause logo row (BBC News)
  14. ^ Policy and Resources Overview Scrutiny Committee Minutes, April 3 2006
  15. ^ BBC - Devon Community Life - Devon gets its own flag
  16. ^ Devon County Council Press Release, 16 October 2006
  17. ^ Ottery Tar Barrels. BBC. Retrieved on 2008-05-14.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Devon (category)
The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Torbay (IPA: ) is an east-facing bay, at the western most end of Lyme Bay in the south-west of England, situated roughly midway between the cities of Exeter and Plymouth. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... East Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... Mid Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... See also North Devon (UK Parliament constituency) North Devon is a local government district in Devon, England. ... Torridge is a local government district in Devon, England. ... West Devon is a local government district and borough in Devon, England. ... South Hams is a local government district on the south coast of Devon, England. ... Teignbridge is a local government district in Devon, England. ... External link Appledore (DMOZ.org) Categories: Stub | Towns in Devon ... Ashburton is a little town on the fringes of Dartmoor in Devon, lying adjacent to the A38 Devon Expressway. ... Location within the British Isles Arms of Axminster Town Council Axminster is a small market town on the eastern border of Devon, England. ... Statistics Population: 34,000 (April 2006 Est. ... Location within the British Isles Beach at Beer. ... , Bideford is a small port town on the estuary of the River Torridge in north Devon, south-west England. ... , Bradninch is a small town in Devon, England, lying about three miles south of Cullompton. ... Brixham (IPA: ) is a small town in the county of Devon, in the south-west of England. ... Buckfastleigh is a small town in Devon, England, partly within Dartmoor National Park, and on the A38. ... The Beach at Budleigh Salterton Budleigh Salterton is a small town on the south coast of Devon, England approximately 15 miles south of Exeter. ... Location within the British Isles Chagford is a small town on the north-east edge of Dartmoor, in Devon, England, close to the River Teign. ... Chudleigh is a small town in Devon, England located between the towns of Newton Abbot and Exeter. ... Colyford is a small town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... The Church of St. ... Cranbrook is the name chosen for a new town in East Devon, it will initially consist of 2,900 residential properties (up to 6,550 properties by 2026[1]) as well as all the required infrastructure to support a town of this size. ... , Crediton (Credington, Cryditon, Kirton) is a town in Devon, England about 12 km north west of Exeter, with a population of about 6,500. ... Location within the British Isles Cullompton is a town in Devon, England, lying on the River Culm and close to the M5 Motorway. ... Map sources for Dartmouth, Devon at grid reference SX877514 The town seen from the River Dart Dartmouth is a town in Devon in the south-west of England. ... Map sources for Dawlish at grid reference SX963767 The Great Western Main Line runs along the Dawlish seafront Dawlish is a town on the south coast of Devon, England, 12 miles from the County town of Exeter, with a population of around 13,000 people. ... For other uses, see Exeter (disambiguation). ... Map sources for Exmouth at grid reference SY004809 Exmouth is a town in Devon, England, at the east side of the mouth of the River Exe. ... The old Town Hall (now the town museum) in the centre of Great Torrington. ... Location within the British Isles The town of Hartland, which incorporates the hamlet of Stoke to the west and the village of Meddon in the south, is the most north-westerly settlement in the county of Devon, England. ... The Hatherleigh Website here Location within the British Isles Hatherleigh is a small Market Town in Devon, England. ... A (very) small market town in the west of Devon, UK, near the county border with Cornwall. ... Location within the British Isles Honiton is a town in Devon, England. ... It has been suggested that List of cultural venues and events in Ilfracombe be merged into this article or section. ... Ivybridge is a town in the South Hams area of Devon, England. ... For the Kingsbridge in New York City, see Kingsbridge, Bronx, New York. ... Moretonhampstead is a fairly small market town in Devon, England. ... You may be looking for Newton Abbot (UK Parliament constituency) , Newton Abbot is a market town in Devon, England on the River Teign, with a population of 23,580 (2001 census). ... North Tawton is a small town in Devon, England, on the river Taw. ... Northam is a small town in Devon, England, lying north of Bideford and south of Westward Ho!. It is thought to have been the site of an Anglo-Saxon castle, and is said to have been where Hubba the Dane attacked Devon and was repelled (perhaps by Alfred the Great... Okehampton is a town in Devon, England, at the northern edge of Dartmoor, on the River Okement. ... Map sources for Ottery St Mary at grid reference SY099955 Ottery St Mary is a town in Devon, England, on the River Otter, about ten miles east of Exeter. ... Paignton harbour , Paignton (IPA: ) is a coastal town in Devon in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Location within the British Isles Princetown is a town situated on Dartmoor in the county of Devon in England. ... The view from Salcombe waterfront Salcombe is a town in the South Hams district of Devon, England on the Kingsbridge Estuary. ... A town in western Devon, most famous for being the place where the Western Rebellion (otherwise known as the Prayerbook rebellion) first started, and where the rebels made their final stand. ... , Seaton is a seaside town in East Devon on the south coast of England. ... Location within the British Isles Sidmouth Arms of Sidmouth Town Council Sidmouth is a small town of 14,400 on the east Devon coast in south west England about 15 miles south east of Exeter. ... South Molton is a town in Devon, England Categories: Devon geography stubs | Towns in Devon ... , Tavistock is a market town within West Devon, England on the River Tavy, from which its name derives, and has a population of 11,018. ... , Teignmouth (IPA: ) is a town on the north bank of the estuary mouth of the River Teign in south Devon, England. ... Tiverton is a town in the County of Devon, in England. ... Map sources for Topsham, Devon at grid reference SX966884 Topsham is a small town in Devon, England, on the east side of the River Exe estuary between Exeter and Exmouth. ... This article is about the English town. ... , Totnes (IPA: ) is a market town in South Devon, England. ... Westward Ho! is a seaside town in Torridge, Devon, England, near Bideford. ... This is a list of civil parishes in the ceremonial county of Devon in England. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Devon travel guide - Wikitravel (1026 words)
Devon [1] (also known, far less commonly, as "Devonshire") is a large county in England's West Country, bordered to the west by Cornwall and to the east by Dorset and Somerset.
It is possible to travel to Ilfracombe in North Devon from Penarth and Swansea in South Wales on the paddle steamers Waverly and Balmoral.
The county of Cornwall lies to the west of Devon, Dorset and Somerset to the east and north.
Devon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1627 words)
Devon is a large county in South West England, bordering on Cornwall to the west, Dorset and Somerset to the east.
Devon is one of the rural counties, with the advantages and problems characteristic of these.
Devon and South Devon are breeds of cattle that originated in the county.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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