FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > Devil's club
Devil's Club
Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ...Scientific classification
In biology, a kingdom is the top_level, or nearly the top_level, grouping of organisms in scientific classification. ...Kingdom: Divisions Green algae land plants (embryophytes) non_vascular embryophytes Hepatophyta _ liverworts Anthocerophyta _ hornworts Bryophyta _ mosses vascular plants (tracheophytes) seedless vascular plants Lycopodiophyta _ clubmosses Equisetophyta _ horsetails Pteridophyta _ true ferns Psilotophyta _ whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta _ adderstongue ferns seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta _ seed ferns Pinophyta _ conifers Cycadophyta _ cycads Ginkgophyta _ ginkgo Gnetophyta _ gnetae Magnoliophyta _ flowering...Plantae
This article discusses categorisations of organisms. ...Division: Classes Magnoliopsida _ Dicots Liliopsida _ Monocots The flowering plants (also angiosperms or Magnoliophyta) are one of the major groups of modern plants, comprising those that produce seeds in specialized reproductive organs called flowers, where the ovulary or carpel is enclosed. ...Magnoliophyta
Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ...Class: Orders see text Dicotyledons or dicots are flowering plants whose seed contains two embryonic leaves or cotyledons. ...Magnoliopsida
Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ...Order: Families Apiaceae (carrot family) Araliaceae (ginseng family) Pittosporaceae Griseliniaceae Torriceliaceae The Apiales are an order of flowering plants. ...Apiales
Scientific classification or biological classification refers to how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ...Family: Genera Aralia Fatsia Hedera _ Ivy Panax _ Ginseng Reynoldsia Schefflera and others, see text of article The Araliaceae is known as the Ivy or Ginseng family. ...Araliaceae
See genus (mathematics) for the use of the term in mathematics. ...Genus: Oplopanax
In biology, a species is a kind of organism. ...Species: horridus
In biology, binomial nomenclature is a standard convention used for naming species. ...Binomial nomenclature
Oplopanax horridus (Sm.) Miq.

Devil's Club (Oplopanax horridus, Genera Aralia Fatsia Hedera _ Ivy Panax _ Ginseng Reynoldsia Schefflera and others, see text of article The Araliaceae is known as the Ivy or Ginseng family. ...Araliaceae) is a large_leaved spiny shrub of the Darker red states are always part of the Pacific Northwest. ...Pacific Northwest coastal forests of World map showing location of North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is the third largest continent in area and in population after Eurasia and Africa. ...North America. Also known as Devil's Walking Stick, this plant is well known to residents and visitors because of its spines. The local Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ...Aboriginals regarded it as a sacred plant, using it for both ritual and medicine.


To prepare devil's club tea, harvest legnths of the grey prickly stalk. Using a knife, rake the stalk to remove the spines and bark to expose the green layer in between the wood and the bark. This greenery is where the medicine is, although it will not harm your drink if you get peices of the bark or the wood in it _ it will merely alter the taste. Using the knife, cut the green layer off and let dry. Steep for two to three hours for a light tea, or for a darker tea, for as long as 24 hours.


Burning devil's club on a fire as an inscent is also beleived to chase away evil spirits.


 
 

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