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Encyclopedia > Desire (album)
Desire
Desire cover
Studio album by Bob Dylan
Released January 5, 1976
Recorded July – October 1975
Genre Rock
Length 56:13
Label Columbia
Producer(s) Don DeVito
Professional reviews
Bob Dylan chronology
The Basement Tapes
(1975)
Desire
(1976)
Hard Rain
(1976)

Desire is an album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on the Columbia Records label in 1976. It is often listed among the best of Dylan's albums and it was well-received and commercially successful. Desire reached #1 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart for 5 weeks, becoming one of Dylan's top-selling studio albums (currently certified double platinum), while reaching #3 in the UK. Most of the album's songs were written in collaboration with Jacques Levy. Image File history File links PetSounds 7/5/05 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A Studio Album is an album of regular studio recordings. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... A music genre is a category (or genre) of pieces of music that share a certain style or basic musical language (van der Merwe 1989, p. ... Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the performers, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes . ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 4. ... Robert Christgau (sometimes abbreviated in print to Xgau), born April 18, 1942, is an American essayist, music journalist, and rock critic. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... The Basement Tapes are a series of recordings by North American folk-rockers Bob Dylan and The Band, recorded in mid-1967. ... Hard Rain is a live album by American musician Bob Dylan, captured during the second, and less successful leg of the Rolling Thunder Revue. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ... Jacques Levy was a songwriter and theatre director, born July 29, 1935; died September 30, 2004. ...


The album is noted by many for its controversial opening track, "Hurricane", which tells the story of boxer Rubin Carter. Carter was convicted of the murder of three people in 1966, but released on appeal more than twenty years later. Hurricane is a protest song by Bob Dylan about the imprisonment of Rubin Hurricane Carter. ... Professional boxing bout featuring Ricardo Domínguez (left) versus Rafael Ortíz Boxing, also called Western Boxing, pugilism, prizefighting (when referring to professional boxing) or the sweet science (a common nickname among fans), is a sport and martial art in which two participants of similar weight fight each other with... Rubin Carter Rubin Hurricane Carter (born May 6, 1937), a middleweight boxer between 1961 and 1966, is better known for his controversial convictions (1967, 1976) for three June 1966 murders in Paterson, New Jersey, and his subsequent release from prison in 1985. ...

Contents

Context

Desire was released between the two legs of Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour. By 1975, Dylan had extensive experience playing with a number of bands, but these groups were assembled by others. In the case of the Hawks (later known as The Band), the group had performed for a number of years before ever meeting Dylan. Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eric Anderson in October 1975 The Rolling Thunder Revue was a tour headed by Bob Dylan in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976. ... The Band was an influential Canadian-American rock group of the 1960s and 1970s. ...


Dylan's idea of forming his own band, who would later be known as the Rolling Thunder Revue, came when he saw Patti Smith and her group play at The Other End (formerly, and currently renamed The Bitter End) on June 26, 1975. Smith had yet to record an album, but she was already attracting a lot of attention from the music press and industry. According to Clinton Heylin, these were her first shows with drummer Jay Dee Daugherty, the culmination of four years spent "compiling a unique rock & roll sound". According to Smith, Dylan was immediately struck by the chemistry between Smith and her band, and expressed a wish that he had chosen to stay with a single band. Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eric Anderson in October 1975 The Rolling Thunder Revue was a tour headed by Bob Dylan in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976. ... Patti Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ...


Dylan would spend many nights over the next two weeks in New York's Greenwich Village and The Other End in particular, eventually meeting Rob Stoner and reacquainting himself with Bob Neuwirth. Stoner would later join his Rolling Thunder Revue, and Dylan would meet the remaining members through Neuwirth. According to Smith, he was thinking about improvisation and extending himself "language-wise". The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (pronounced Grennich Village; also called simply the Village) is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City. ... Rob Stoner (Rothstein) is a multi-instrumentalist that started his career as a hired gun in New York. ... Bob Neuwirth is an American singer, songwriter, record producer and visual artist. ...


Recording sessions

Around the time of his first meetings with Smith and Stoner, Dylan began work on several new songs, finishing at least one song called "Abandoned Love". Then, sometime in late June, while driving around the Village, Dylan met Scarlet Rivera. Rivera was invited to his rehearsal studio where she spent the afternoon playing along with several of the new songs. According to Rivera, "One More Cup of Coffee", "Isis", and "Mozambique" were all rehearsed with Dylan on guitar and Rivera accompanying on violin. As the rehearsals progressed, Dylan attempted some of the same songs on piano, experimenting with different keys in the process. Soon after, Dylan would ask Rivera to join him for his next album. Scarlet Rivera is a solo violinist. ...


As early as mid-July, the concept of the Rolling Thunder Revue was beginning to solidify. According to Don DeVito, a representative for Columbia Records, the possibility of forming a band and touring the United States playing unnannounced concerts was already being discussed at this point.


Meanwhile, Dylan's songwriting partnership with Jacques Levy continued to grow. Jacques Levy was then best-known for "Chestnut Mare", a collaboration with Roger McGuinn that ultimately became one of The Byrds' last hits. Dylan had met Levy the previous spring, but they became reacquainted with each other at the Other End. Jacques Levy was a songwriter and theatre director, born July 29, 1935; died September 30, 2004. ... James Roger McGuinn (born July 13, 1942) is an American singer-songwriter, who was born as James Joseph McGuinn III in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ...


One night, Dylan met Levy at his loft and showed him an early draft of "Isis". According to Levy, "Isis" began life as a "slow dirge", unlike anything he'd ever heard before, which he felt gave the appearance of setting the listener up "for a long story". When Dylan first played this embryonic version for him, the two of them started working together. According to Levy, it was an enjoyable song-writing partnership, with Levy writing words and Dylan contributing ideas. The session lasted until the early hours of the morning, after which Dylan and Levy traveled to The Other End. Dylan read the lyrics to the gathered crowd, to favorable reactions. The partnership went on to pen "Hurricane" and other tracks later featured in Desire.


Dylan finally held a recording session on July 14th, recording two songs co-written with Levy: "Joey", an epic ballad about gangster Joey Gallo, and "Rita Mae", a short song about lesbian writer Rita Mae Brown. At this time, the Rolling Thunder Revue had not yet formed. The participating musicians instead consisted of the Dave Mason Band, Scarlet Rivera (the only future member of the Rolling Thunder Revue to participate in this session), and a number of other session players. Disappointed with the results, the session merely encouraged Dylan to form his own working band for his upcoming album. Joey Gallo (April 7, 1929 - April 7, 1972) better known as Crazy Joe Gallo, was a gangster who was a member of the Profaci crime family (later known as the Colombo crime family). ... Rita Mae Brown (born November 28, 1944) is a prolific American writer and social activist, notable for novels, poetry, and screenwriting. ... Dave Mason, born David Thomas Mason, May 10, 1944, is a multi-talented musician -- singer, songwriter, and guitarist -- from Worcester, England, who first found fame with the rock band Traffic. ... Session musicians are musicians available for hire, as opposed to musicians who are either permanent members of a musical outfit or who have acquired fame in their own right. ...


Following the session, Dylan and Levy isolated themselves in the Hamptons to work on their songs. According to Levy, they finished off a total of fourteen songs over a three week period, but in reality, they finished roughly half that number in less than two weeks. In total, an entire album's worth of songs was written in less than four weeks of collaboration with Levy. The Hamptons, shown highlighted The Hamptons refers to a group of towns and seaside villages on the South Fork, Suffolk County on the east end of Long Island, New York State, some dating from the 1600s. ...


Two weeks after the first, failed session, Dylan returned to Studio E on July 28 with approximately 21 musicians at his disposal. By most accounts, the recording process was very haphazard. Dylan was determined to record the songs live, while producer Don DeVito's inexperience led him to 'stack' instruments on the multitrack tapes, making it virtually impossible to properly remix any of the songs or to overdub any off-key accompaniments.


Neil Hubbard, who was present at the session, felt that there were too many musicians present and the session lacked leadership. Guitarist Eric Clapton was present, just one of five guitarists in the studio. Clapton recalled later that Dylan appeared to be seeking an opportunity to work with new people he had met, although Clapton felt that Dylan was uncomfortable performing personal songs with such a large group present, and left the session after advising Dylan to use a smaller band, a sentiment later reiterated by Rob Stoner to producer Don DeVito. An example of the famous Clapton is God graffiti craze Eric Patrick Clapton CBE (born March 30, 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English guitarist, singer and composer, who is one of the most respected and influential musicians of the rock era, garnering an unprecedented three inductions into...


Others at this session included Rob Stoner, Scarlet Rivera, Emmylou Harris (then known only for her harmony singing with Gram Parsons), and the English pub-rock band Kokomo. Many of them would later, and at the time, recount their frustrations regarding the recording process for Desire. Emmylou Harris, ca. ... Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973) was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist born Ingram Cecil Connor, III. A solo artist as well as a member of both The Byrds and The Flying Burrito Brothers, he is best known for a series of recordings which anticipate the...


The following day, Dylan returned to Studio E with roughly half the number of musicians, retaining Stoner, Rivera, Harris, Hugh McCracken, and Vinnie Bell as well as saxophonist Mel Collins and percussionist Jody Linscott of Kokomo. This time, they managed a usable take of the song "Oh, Sister", but the remainder of the session was deemed unacceptable. The cover of King Crimsons debut album In the Court of the Crimson King (1969). ...


On the night of July 30th, 1975, Dylan returned to Studio E with a smaller group of musicians, including Stoner, Rivera, Harris, and drummer Howie Wyeth (a friend of Stoner's who was hired by Dylan on Stoner's suggestion). For the most part, this group of musicians formed the core of the Rolling Thunder Revue. The difference became apparent early on in the session, when a usable take of "Isis" was recorded on the first try. Both Dylan and Stoner were pleased with the session, and Stoner suggests that the more intimate sound was much closer to the sound of the completed album.


Five of the nine songs from Desire were recorded at that session, as well as a slow version of "Isis", the original master take of "Hurricane", the single-only release "Rita Mae", and a successful take of "Golden Loom" that was later released in 1991. Of the participating musicians, only Emmylou Harris was dissatisfied with the results. It would also be her last session as she had prior commitments with her own career. Emmylou Harris, ca. ...


The following night, Dylan held another session, this time recording three songs. From this session, Dylan recorded the master take for "Isis" as well as master takes for "Abandoned Love" and "Sara". Dylan's wife Sara, the subject of the song that bore her name, also accompanied him to this session. Sara Dylan (born Wilmington, Delaware, October 28, 1939), born as Shirley Marlin Noznisky and later known as Sara Lownds, was the first wife of singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ...


Outtakes

The Desire sessions yielded a number of outtakes, but only one of these outtakes received any serious consideration. Written from the point-of-view of someone "despairing, isolated, [and] lost", "Abandoned Love" debuted as an impromptu performance at the Other End on July 3, 1975. Clinton Heylin wrote that the song suggested Dylan's self-confidence as an artist had returned, but that he still faced problems in his marriage. Originally intended for the album, it was ultimately replaced by "Joey". "Abandoned Love" would not see official release until 1985 when a finished take was issued on the boxed-set retrospective, Biograph. Its first and only live performance at the Other End circulates as a highly-prized recording among collectors. Biograph is a collection of Bob Dylan tracks, both rare and popular, that was released in 1985. ...


Another song, "Rita Mae", was issued on a single-only release. An uptempo tribute to lesbian writer Rita Mae Brown, it was later covered by Jerry Lee Lewis on his self-titled album, issued in 1979. Rita Mae Brown (born November 28, 1944) is a prolific American writer and social activist, notable for novels, poetry, and screenwriting. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935) is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist. ...


Two other recordings were later released upon other albums. "Catfish", a tribute to future Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Hunter (better known as Catfish Hunter), and "Golden Loom" were officially released on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961-1991 in 1991. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... James Augustus Catfish Hunter (April 8, 1946 – September 9, 1999) was a prolific Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher between 1965 and 1979. ... The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961-1991 is a compilation box set by Bob Dylan. ...


Song information

Hurricane

The album opens with "Hurricane", arguably the most popular song on Desire. It protests the innocence of former middleweight boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, convicted for triple homicide in 1966. Rubin was eventually released some years later after a United States District Court Judge ruled that Carter had not received a fair trial. Hurricane is a protest song by Bob Dylan about the imprisonment of Rubin Hurricane Carter. ... Rubin Carter Rubin Hurricane Carter (born May 6, 1937), a middleweight boxer between 1961 and 1966, is better known for his controversial convictions (1967, 1976) for three June 1966 murders in Paterson, New Jersey, and his subsequent release from prison in 1985. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ...


Dylan had been inspired to write it after reading Carter's autobiography, The Sixteenth Round, which Carter had sent to Dylan because of his prior commitment to the civil rights struggle. Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ...


During the fall tour preceding Desire's release, Dylan and the Rolling Thunder Revue played a benefit concert for Carter in New York City's Madison Square Garden. The following year, they played another benefit at Houston, Texas's Astrodome. Dylan met with Carter on December 5th, 1975, and performed a concert in Clinton State Prison, in which Carter took to the stage, to address the press. Among those present were representatives of People Magazine who ran an article about Dylan and Carter on December 22nd of the same year. The magazine sought to use prison bars as a prop for photographs. However, as Clinton prison was a low-security facility, a grate used to close off a hallway was used instead to separate Carter from Dylan, for the purposes of the photograph.[1] A benefit concert is a concert featuring musicians, comedians, or other performers that is held for a charitable purpose, often directed at a specific and immediate humanitarian crisis. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... The Reliant Astrodome, formerly just the Astrodome, is a domed sports stadium in Houston, Texas, and is part of the Reliant Park complex. ... People, a weekly magazine of celebrity and popular culture news, debuted on February 27, 1974. ...


Isis

One of the most celebrated songs on Desire is the symbolic travelogue "Isis". According to NPR's Tim Riley, "Isis" tells the story of a young groom who marries his bride before he learns the value of loyalty. Riley wrote that the story told of a man who learns about the love of a woman through the deception of another man and a "quest for riches that resigned itself to the quest for human contact". Isis is the second track on the Bob Dylan album Desire. ... Offical NPR logo National Public Radio (NPR) is an independent, private, non-profit membership organization of public radio stations in the United States. ...


Mozambique

"Mozambique" started as a game, to see how many "ique" rhymes Dylan and Levy could find.


Black Diamond Bay and Romance in Durango

Desire featured two more complex travelogues in "Black Diamond Bay" and "Romance in Durango". As described by Heylin, the former relates the destruction of a tiny island, observed from two perspectives: from a hotel on the island itself and from the narrator's point of view through a television news report. The song essentially describes what the people on the island at the time do with the time that they have left when they realize that they are about to die. The various characters tend to fend for themselves, panic, and in one case commit suicide, rather than colaborrating to find a way to save each other. The song also describes the news-watcher's indifference to the catastrophes he hears about on TV, as the narrator goes to get another beer rather than watch the news story about the catastrophe on the island. He says "I never did plan to go anyway to Black Diamond Bay." "Romance in Durango" concerns an outlaw and his lover, on the run in Mexico. Heylin described the song as "the climax to an unmade Sam Peckinpah movie in song." Durango (IPA pronunciation ) is one of the constituent states of Mexico. ... David Samuel Sam Peckinpah (February 21, 1925 – December 28, 1984) was an American film director. ...


Oh, Sister

"Oh, Sister" became a concert favorite during the fall tour preceding Desire's release. Tim Riley noted that it was the first time Dylan had invoked God as a method of wooing a woman, and that with Emmylou Harris, the song became a discourse on the fragility of love. Harris's vocal on the final mix was actually overdubbed a day later, one of the few overdubs made during the Desire sessions. Emmylou Harris, ca. ...


Joey

The longest song of the album is "Joey". A twelve-verse ballad, it describes the life of deceased gangster Joey Gallo and created a substantial amount of controversy when Desire was released. Dylan presents Gallo as an outlaw with morals, in the tradition of songs like Woody Guthrie's "Pretty Boy Floyd". Dylan's Gallo refused to kill innocent people, made peace with black men, and shielded his family when he was about to be shot as they were eating in a restaurant. Many commentators, notably rock critic Lester Bangs have argued, however, that Gallo was well-known as a vicious Mafioso whose documented career was not accurately reflected in the song's lyrics. Joey Gallo (April 7, 1929 - April 7, 1972) better known as Crazy Joe Gallo, was a gangster who was a member of the Profaci crime family (later known as the Colombo crime family). ... Woody Guthrie with Guitar Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967), known as Woody Guthrie was an influential and prolific American folk musician noted for his identification with the common man, the poor and the downtrodden, and for his abhorrence of fascism and exploitation. ... Charles Arthur Pretty Boy Floyd. ... Lester Bangs during an interview Leslie Conway Bangs (December 14, 1948 – April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ...


The song details Gallo's murder in Umberto's Clam Bar in Little Italy, on April 7, 1972. Graphic details of Gallo's murder had been published in Donald Goddard's biography while Gallo's friends, actor Jerry Orbach and his wife Mary, were introduced to Dylan through Levy. Dylan said in 1975 that he had considered Gallo more a hero than a gangster. After hearing Jerry and Mary Orbach talk about Gallo, Dylan wrote the entire song in one night. Jerome Bernard Orbach (October 20, 1935 – December 28, 2004) was an American actor best known for his starring role as wisecracking New York Police Department Detective Lennie Briscoe in the Law & Order television series and for his musical theater roles. ...


Unlike fictional outlaws like Robin Hood, or real-life ones like Jesse James and Billy the Kid, Gallo was not a figure of the distant past nor was he mythologized by tall tales spread by word-of-mouth and the local press. With Gallo's life still prominent in the minds of the public and without favorable media coverage, Dylan's attempt to romanticize Gallo was greeted with an enormous amount of contempt by the press, public officials, and private citizens alike. Robin Hood memorial statue in Nottingham. ... Jesse Woodson James (September 5, 1847–April 3, 1882) was an American outlaw, the most famous member of the James-Younger gang. ... The only known photograph of Billy the Kid. ...


Goddard's biography depicted Gallo as a racist who often beat his wife and abused his children who had taken part in a brutal gang rape of a young boy while he was in prison. None of these details was mentioned or alluded to in Dylan's "Joey". Instead, the song paints a far more romantic portrait, incorporating a lyric that Gallo "would not carry a gun/'I'm around too many children,' he'd say, 'they should never know of one.'"


Lester Bangs later wrote a scathing response to a question posed by Dylan in the song's chorus: "What made them want to come and blow you away?". In a Village Voice article published in March 7, 1976, Bangs argued that some could have considered there to have been an open contract on Gallo for his shooting of gangster Joe Colombo almost a year previously. Bangs also suggested that two other theories advanced by investigators extremely close to the case showed Gallo attempting to lay claim to territory occupied by other, more powerful mob factions. Despite all the controversy, Clinton Heylin noted that "Joey" remained the one song from Desire to have regularly featured in concert in the nineties. Lester Bangs during an interview Leslie Conway Bangs (December 14, 1948 – April 30, 1982) was an American music journalist, author and musician. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ...


Sara

Desire closes with "Sara", arguably Dylan's most public display of his own personal life. An ambitious tribute to his wife, Sara, it is possibly Dylan's only song in which he steps out of his public persona and directly addresses a real person, with striking biographical accuracy. Tim Riley wrote that it was "a fevered cry of loss posing as sincere devotion." Sara Dylan (born Wilmington, Delaware, October 28, 1939), born as Shirley Marlin Noznisky and later known as Sara Lownds, was the first wife of singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ...


Dylan's marriage was in a turbulent state when he wrote the song. Dylan's estrangement from his wife had led to at least one separation in the previous year. Sara was present at the song's recording session, (on the same day he recorded two other songs that touched on the subject of marriage: "Isis" and "Abandoned Love"). However, In March of 1977, Sara Dylan filed for divorce. Sara Dylan (born Wilmington, Delaware, October 28, 1939), born as Shirley Marlin Noznisky and later known as Sara Lownds, was the first wife of singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ...


Aftermath

Desire would not be released until after early the following year. In the meantime, Dylan embarked on the first leg of a North American tour with the Rolling Thunder Revue. During the course of the tour, which received heavy media coverage, Dylan and his band unveiled songs from Desire in addition to reinterpreting past works. The Rolling Thunder Revue was also augmented by guest musicians such as Mick Ronson (best known for his work with David Bowie) and other artists such as Roger McGuinn, Joni Mitchell, and Joan Baez who not only contributed during Dylan's set, but also played complete sets of their own. Bruce Springsteen was invited to perform, but declined when Dylan informed him that he could not use the E Street Band to back him. Mick Ronson (May 26, 1946 – April 29, 1993) was a British guitarist, composer, multi-instrumentalist, arranger and producer. ... David Bowie (born David Robert Jones on January 8, 1947) is an English singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer whose work spans more than four decades. ... James Roger McGuinn (born July 13, 1942) is an American singer-songwriter, who was born as James Joseph McGuinn III in Chicago, Illinois. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a noted Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... Joan Chandos Báez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Bruce Springsteen (born September 23, 1949) is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... The E Street Band is a backing band that has toured and recorded with rock musician Bruce Springsteen since 1972. ...


The fall of 1975 would ultimately produce a widely criticized film, Renaldo and Clara, but the concerts themselves were well-received. Often regarded as one of Dylan's finest series of shows, this first leg of the tour was eventually documented on The Bootleg Series Vol. 5: Bob Dylan Live 1975, The Rolling Thunder Revue. Renaldo and Clara is a surrealist movie, by and starring Bob Dylan. ...


On January 5th, 1976, Desire was released, garnering a fair share of critical acclaim. Critic Dave Marsh would call it one of the "two best records Dylan has made since John Wesley Harding" and gave it a four-star review in the 1979 Rolling Stone Record Guide. Some critics were not impressed; Robert Christgau wrote: "Although the candid propaganda and wily musicality of "Hurricane" delighted me for a long time, the deceitful bathos of it's companion piece "Joey" tempts me to question the unsullied innocence of Rubin Carter himself". He disputed their categorization as protest songs and mused that Dylan's songs about oppressed "heroes" may have been a reflection of Dylan's own feelings at the time. Christgau described Dylan's voice and rhymes as "viscous" and the strength of backing vocalists Ronee Blakley and Emmylou Harris as "distinctly kid". Christgau negatively compared these tracks with "Sara" and "Isis", before rating the album a moderate "B-". Dave Marsh (born 1950) is an American music critic. ... John Wesley Harding is an album of original songs by Bob Dylan, produced by Bob Johnston and released on December 27, 1967. ... The Rolling Stone Album Guide, previously known as the Rolling Stone Record Guide, is a book that along with its sister publication, the magazine Rolling Stone, is one of the best places to find definitive reviews of popular music (apart from wikipedia!). // First Edition Title: The Rolling Stone Record Guide... Robert Christgau (sometimes abbreviated in print to Xgau), born April 18, 1942, is an American essayist, music journalist, and rock critic. ... Emmylou Harris, ca. ...


Nevertheless, critical support was strong enough to place Desire at #26 on The Village Voice's Pazz & Jop Critics Poll for 1976. In 2003, the album was ranked number 174 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. [2] The Village Voice is a weekly newspaper in New York City featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... The Pazz & Jop critics poll is a highly influential poll of music critics run by The Village Voice newspaper. ... Rolling Stone is an American magazine devoted to music, politics and popular culture. ... The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2003. ...


The album also received a fair share of commercial success, eventually topping the U.S. Billboard charts.


Track listing

All tracks written by Bob Dylan and Jacques Levy, except as noted.

  1. "Hurricane" – 8:33
  2. "Isis" – 6:58
  3. "Mozambique" – 3:00
  4. "One More Cup of Coffee (Valley Below)" (Dylan) – 3:43
  5. "Oh, Sister" – 4:05
  6. "Joey" – 11:05
  7. "Romance in Durango" – 5:50
  8. "Black Diamond Bay" – 7:30
  9. "Sara" (Dylan) – 5:29

Hurricane is a protest song by Bob Dylan about the imprisonment of Rubin Hurricane Carter. ... Isis is the second track on the Bob Dylan album Desire. ...

Personnel

Musicians

Production Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... Ercole de Roberti performing the song Freinds Of P: Concert, c. ... For the popular Tamil film, see Rhythm (film) Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the accentuation of sounds or other events over time. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Harmonica A harmonica is a free reed musical wind instrument (also known, among other things, as a mouth organ or mouth harp, Hobo Harp, French harp, tin sandwich, lickin stick, blues harp, simply harp, or Mississippi saxophone), having multiple, variably-tuned brass... A grand piano, with the lid up. ... Scarlet Rivera is a solo violinist. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A drum kit (or drum set or trap set) is mostly a collection of drums, cymbals and sometimes other percussion instruments arranged for convenient playing by a single drummer. ... A 24-bass piano accordion An accordion is a musical instrument of the handheld bellows-driven free reed aerophone family, sometimes referred to as squeezeboxes. ... Carved (electric) and round backed mandolins (front) A mandolin is a small, stringed musical instrument which is plucked, strummed or a combination of both. ... Rob Stoner (Rothstein) is a multi-instrumentalist that started his career as a hired gun in New York. ... Martin EB18 Bass Guitar in flight case. ... Emmylou Harris, ca. ... Ronee Blakley in Nashville Ronee Blakley (b. ... Steven Soles is an American singer-songwriter, record producer, and guitarist. ...

  • Don DeVito – producer
  • Luther Rix – conductor
  • Stan Kalina – mastering
  • Don Meehan – engineer
  • Lou Waxman – recording director
  • Ruth Bernal – cover photography
  • Ken Regan – cover art
  • John Berg – cover design

Miscellanea

  • The track "One More Cup of Coffee" was later covered by The White Stripes on their 1999 debut album.
  • "Hurricane" is notable for its use of the epithet "shit", which is unusual for a Dylan song: the only other instance in his work is in the song "George Jackson" ("He wouldn't take shit from no one"). Apart from these two instances of "shit", the strongest swear word on a Dylan album is "goddamn" on "Ballad in Plain D" (Another Side of Bob Dylan, 1964).
  • "Hurricane" is obliquely referenced in a Simpsons episode ("Pokey Mom") when a criminal at a prison rodeo is said to be so vile "Bob Dylan wrote a song to keep him in prison!". Ironically, this statement also recalls Dylan's take on William Zantzinger, as he musically chronicled in "The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll" back in 1963.
  • Dylan's "Sara" was part inspiration for Nick Cave's own 'divorce song' "Where do we go now but nowhere".

The White Stripes are an American minimalist rock duo from Detroit, composed of Jack White on guitar, piano, lead vocals and songwriting, and Meg White on drums, percussion and vocals. ... Cover of Soledad Brother George Jackson (September 23, 1941 – August 21, 1971) was a Black American militant who became a member of the Black Panther Party while in prison, where he spent the last 12 years of his life. ... Another Side of Bob Dylan, released August 8, 1964, is an album of original songs by Bob Dylan. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Pokey Mom is the tenth episode of The Simpsons twelfth season, aired on January 14, 2001. ... Steer roping Rodeo is a traditional North American sport with influences from the history of Mexican vaqueros (cowboys) and American cowboys. ... The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll is the title of a topical song by Bob Dylan. ... Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds in 2005. ...

Resources

  • Lyrics and sound clips

Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... Bob Dylan is the eponymous debut from American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... The Freewheelin Bob Dylan, released May 27, 1963, was folk musician Bob Dylans second LP. This release established him as a songwriter of premier importance. ... The Times They Are a-Changin is the third album by Bob Dylan, released in 1964 by Columbia Records and produced by Tom Wilson. ... Another Side of Bob Dylan, released August 8, 1964, is an album of original songs by Bob Dylan. ... Bringing It All Back Home is an album of original songs by American musician Bob Dylan, released on March 22, 1965. ... Highway 61 Revisited, widely regarded as one of the greatest albums ever, was the sixth album released by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Blonde on Blonde is the seventh album by rock legend Bob Dylan, released by Columbia Records in 1966. ... John Wesley Harding is an album of original songs by Bob Dylan, produced by Bob Johnston and released on December 27, 1967. ... Nashville Skyline is an album by Bob Dylan, released in 1969. ... Self-portrait by Vincent Van Gogh A portrait is a painting, photograph, or other artistic representation of a person. ... New Morning was released in October 1970 by Bob Dylan, only four months after the controversial Self Portrait. ... Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid is a soundtrack album released by Bob Dylan in 1973 for the Sam Peckinpah film of the same name. ... Dylan is a Bob Dylan album, released on Columbia Records in 1973 , which compiles outtakes drawn mostly from Dylans New Morning sessions in the spring of 1970. ... Planet Waves (1974) is an album by Bob Dylan, and was recorded with The Band at Village Recorder in Los Angeles during three different sessions in November 1973. ... Blood on the Tracks is a 1975 album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... The Basement Tapes are a series of recordings by North American folk-rockers Bob Dylan and The Band, recorded in mid-1967. ... Street Legal can refer to: Street Legal, a 1978 album by Bob Dylan Street Legal, a Canadian television show that ran from 1987 to 1994 Street Legal, a New Zealand television series. ... Slow Train Coming was Bob Dylans first album after he openly became a born again Christian. ... Saved was Bob Dylans first album of the 1980s, and his 24th overall. ... The SMiLE of its day? ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Empire Burlesque is a 1985 album release by Bob Dylan. ... Knocked Out Loaded is a 1986 album release by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... // Down in the Groove Down in the Groove is a 1988 album release by Bob Dylan. ... Oh Mercy is rock legend Bob Dylans twenty-sixth studio album, released in 1989 by Columbia Records. ... Under the Red Sky is a 1990 album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Good as I Been to You is a traditional folk music album made by Bob Dylan in 1992. ... World Gone Wrong is the twenty-ninth studio album (according to the list below)by Bob Dylan, released in 1993 by Columbia Records. ... Time Out of Mind is Bob Dylans critically-acclaimed comeback album, released in 1997. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Modern Times is the thirty-first studio album by Bob Dylan, released on August 29, 2006 by Sony BMG. It is his third consecutive album to be met with widespread critical and fan acclaim. ... Before the Flood is the title of a 1974 live album by Bob Dylan and The Band. ... Hard Rain is a live album by American musician Bob Dylan, captured during the second, and less successful leg of the Rolling Thunder Revue. ... Bob Dylan At Budokan is an audio recording taken from two different shows on February 28 and March 1, 1978. ... Real Live is a live album by Bob Dylan. ... Dylan & The Dead (1989) is a live album by Bob Dylan and Grateful Dead recorded in July 1987 during the much-touted tour of the same name. ... The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration is a live double-album release in recognition of Bob Dylans 30 years as a recording artist. ... MTV Unplugged is Bob Dylans 1995 unplugged release, recorded and issued at the peak of that formats popularity. ... Live at The Gaslight 1962 is a single CD release including ten songs from early Bob Dylan performances at the Gaslight cafe in New York Citys Greenwich Village. ... The Concert For Bangla Desh is a live triple album and double DVD by George Harrison and celebrity friends performed in aid of the homeless Bengali refugees of the 1971 Bangladesh Liberation War. ... Bob Dylans Greatest Hits (1967) was the first compilation album released by Bob Dylan. ... Bob Dylans Greatest Hits Vol. ... Masterpieces was released in Japan and Australlia in anticipation for Bob Dylans 1978 tour. ... Biograph is a collection of Bob Dylan tracks, both rare and popular, that was released in 1985. ... Bob Dylans Greatest Hits Volume 3 is the third official compliation album by Bob Dylan, released in 1994. ... The Essential Bob Dylan is the fourth official compilation by Bob Dylan, released as a double-CD set in 2000. ... The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961-1991 is a compilation box set by Bob Dylan. ... Dont Look Back (sic) is a 1967 documentary film by D.A. Pennebaker that covers Bob Dylans 1965 concert tour of England. ... Eat the Document is a rarely exhibited documentary of Bob Dylans 1966 tour of England with the Hawks. ... Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is a 1973 film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring James Coburn and Kris Kristofferson. ... Renaldo and Clara is a surrealist movie, by and starring Bob Dylan. ... Originally written by Scott Richardson, Hearts of Fire was rewritten by Joe Eszterhas because the studio felt that Richardson was, in their eyes, a baby writer and not experienced enough to take on the responsibility of a starring vehicle for Bob Dylan. ... Masked and Anonymous is a 2003 film written and directed by Seinfeld writer Larry Charles. ... DVD cover No Direction Home is a documentary by Martin Scorsese that traces the life of Bob Dylan, and how he managed to make such a big impact in the 20th century. ... Tarantula is an experimental novel by Bob Dylan, written early in his musical career. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... // Albums Singles U.S. / North American releases 12/1962 Mixed Up Confusion / Corrina, Corrina A-side later included on the 1997 revised Biograph; B-side uncompiled 7/1963 Blowin In The Wind / Dont Think Twice from The Freewheelin Bob Dylan 4/1965 Subterranean Homesick Blues / She Belongs To Me...

References

  • Original Seeds Vol. 2, CD liner notes by Kim Beissel, 2004, re Nick Cave and Dylan.

  Results from FactBites:
 
PJ Harvey - Is This Desire? | Album Review @ Music-Critic.com : the source for music reviews, interviews, articles, ... (408 words)
Her use of imagery in the lyrics as well as her sultry voice make the album become a beckoning call like that of a siren.
The music is there as well, complimenting the words to a T. All of the music on the album is dark and dreary, except for when she becomes upset or enraged at the pain and torture found in loving.
The musical work on this album does an excellent job of showing the feelings Harvey is attempting to show.
Desire (album) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3284 words)
Desire is an album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on the Columbia Records label in 1976.
Desire reached #1 on the Billboard Pop Albums chart for 5 weeks, becoming one of Dylan's top-selling studio albums (currently certified double platinum), while reaching #3 in the UK.
Desire was released between the two legs of Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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