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Encyclopedia > Desert
Hills in the Judean desert.

A desert is a landscape or region that receives very little precipitation. Deserts can be defined as areas that receive an average annual precipitation of less than 250 mm (10 in),[1][2] or as areas in which more water is lost than falls as precipitation.[3] In the Köppen climate classification system, deserts are classed as BWh (hot desert) or BWk (temperate desert). In the Thornthwaite climate classification system, deserts would be classified as arid megathermal climates.[4][5] For other uses of Desertion, see Abandonment. ... Desert can refer to: Dry terrain, a geographic term for an area that receives little precipitation Committing the act of desertion, illegally quitting an army in philosophy, reward or punishment earned or deserved, or the deservedness of reward or punishment; desert (philosophy) It may also be a misspelling of dessert... Not to be confused with Desert. ... Desert hills in southern Judea, looking east from the town of Arad Judea or Judaea (יהודה Praise, Standard Hebrew Yəhuda, Tiberian Hebrew Yəhûḏāh) is a term used for the mountainous southern part of historic Palestine, an area now divided between Israel, Jordan and the West Bank. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... Evapotranspiration (ET) is the sum of evaporation and plant transpiration. ... Updated Köppen-Geiger climate map[1] The Köppen climate classification is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. ... In climatology, the term megathermal (or less commonly, macrothermal) is sometimes used as a synonym for tropical. ...

Contents

Terminology

Deserts are part of a wider classification of regions that, on an average annual basis, have a moisture deficit (i.e. they can potentially lose more than is received). Deserts are located where vegetation cover is exceedingly sparse.[6]


Geography

A satellite image of the Sahara, the world's largest hot desert and second largest desert after Antarctica.

Deserts take up one-third of the Earth's land surface.[1] They usually have a large diurnal and seasonal temperature range, with high daytime temperatures (in summer up to 45 °C or 113 °F), and low night-time temperatures (in winter down to 0 °C; 32 °F) due to extremely low humidity. Water acts to trap infrared radiation from both the sun and the ground, and dry desert air is incapable of blocking sunlight during the day or trapping heat during the night. Thus during daylight most of the sun's heat reaches the ground. As soon as the sun sets, the desert cools quickly by radiating its heat into space. Urban areas in deserts lack large (more than 25 °F/14 °C) daily temperature ranges, partially due to the urban heat island effect. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (7432x4168, 8513 KB) Sahara desert from space. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (7432x4168, 8513 KB) Sahara desert from space. ... Diurnal temperature variation is a viticultural term that relates to the variation in temperature that occurs from the highs of the day to the cool of nights. ... The term humidity is usually taken in daily language to refer to relative humidity. ... For other uses, see Infrared (disambiguation). ... Prism splitting light High Resolution Solar Spectrum Sunlight in the broad sense is the total spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Thermal insulation Thermal insulation on the Huygens probe Rockwool Insulation, 1600 dpi scan against the grain Rockwool Insulation, 1600 dpi scan with the grain The term thermal insulation can refer to materials used to reduce the rate of heat transfer, or the methods and... Sol redirects here. ... Tokyo, a case of Urban Heat Island. ...



Many deserts are formed by rain shadows, mountains blocking the path of precipitation to the desert. Deserts are often composed of sand and rocky surfaces. Sand dunes called ergs and stony surfaces called hamada surfaces compose a minority of desert surfaces. Exposures of rocky terrain are typical, and reflect minimal soil development and sparseness of vegetation. For the Australian television series see Rain Shadow (TV series). ... For other uses, see Sand (disambiguation). ... This article is about the geological substance. ... This article is about the sand formations, for other meanings see Dune (disambiguation) Mesquite Flat Dunes in Death Valley National Park In physical geography, a dune is a hill of sand built by eolian (wind-related) processes. ... Issaouane Erg, Algeria. ... Cyclists crossing hamada, approaching Erg Chebbi sand dunes, Morocco A hamada (ara. ... This article is about the geological substance. ... Aerial view of mixed aspen-spruce forest in Alaska Vegetation is a general term for the plant life of a region; it refers to the ground cover life forms, structure, spatial extent or any other specific botanical or geographic characteristics. ...

The snow surface at Dome C Station in Antarctica is a representative of the majority of the continent's surface.

Bottomlands may be salt-covered flats. Eolian processes are major factors in shaping desert landscapes. Cold deserts (also known as polar desert) have similar features but the main form of precipitation is snow rather than rain. Antarctica is the world's largest cold desert (composed of about 98 percent thick continental ice sheet and 2 percent barren rock). Some of the barren rock is to be found in the so-called Dry Valleys of Antarctica that almost never get snow, which can have ice-encrusted saline lakes that suggest evaporation far greater than the rare snowfall due to the strong katabatic winds that evaporate even ice. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (937x688, 137 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antarctica Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (937x688, 137 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Antarctica Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... This article is about common table salt. ... Eolian (or aeolian or æolian) processes pertain to the activity of the winds and more specifically, to the winds ability to shape the surface of the Earth and other planets. ... Polar deserts are areas with annual precipitation less than 250 millimetres and a mean temperature during the warmest month of less than 10° C. Polar deserts on Earth cover nearly 5 million square kilometres and are mostly bedrock or gravel plains. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about precipitation. ... Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... An ice sheet is a mass of glacier ice that covers surrounding terrain and is greater than 50,000 km² (19,305 mile²).[1] The only current ice sheets are in Antarctica and Greenland; during the last ice age at Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) the Laurentide ice sheet covered much... The blue ice covering Lake Fryxell, in the Transantarctic Mountains, comes from glacial meltwater from the Canada Glacier and other smaller glaciers. ... A salt lake or saline lake is a landlocked body of water which has a concentration of salts (mostly sodium chloride) and other minerals significantly higher than most lakes (often defined as at least 3,000 milligrams of salt per liter). ... A katabatic wind, from the Greek word katabatikos meaning going downhill, is a wind that blows down a topographic incline such as a hill, mountain, or glacier. ...


The largest hot desert is the Sahara. The Sahara is the worlds second largest desert (second to Antarctica), over 9,000,000 km² (3,500,000 mi²), located in northern Africa and is 2. ...


Deserts sometimes contain valuable mineral deposits that were formed in the arid environment or that were exposed by erosion. Due to extreme and consistent dryness, some deserts are ideal places for natural preservation of artifacts and fossils.


Etymology

English desert and its Romance cognates (including Italian deserto, French désert and Spanish desierto) all come from the Latin desertum, which means "an unpopulated place". This in turn is derived from the Egyptian word dSr.t, which literally means "red land" and refers to the desert. The correlation between aridity and sparse population is complex and dynamic, varying by culture, era, and technologies, and thus the use of the word desert can cause confusion. In English prior to the 20th century, desert was often used in the sense of "unpopulated area", without specific reference to aridity; but today the word is most often used in its climate-science sense (an area of low precipitation)—and a desert may be quite heavily populated, with millions of inhabitants. Phrases such as "desert island" and "Great American Desert" in previous centuries did not necessarily imply sand or aridity; their focus was the sparse population. But the connotation of a hot, parched, sandy place often influences today's popular interpretation of those phrases. A desert island in Palau. ... The Great American Desert was an inaccurate term that described the area west of the Missouri River and east of the Rocky Mountains in the 19th century. ...


Types of desert

The Agasthiyamalai hills cut off Tirunelveli (India) from the monsoons, creating a rainshadow region

In 1953, Peveril Meigs divided desert regions on Earth into three categories according to the amount of precipitation they received. In this now widely accepted system, extremely arid lands have at least 12 consecutive months without rainfall, arid lands have less than 250 millimeters (10 in) of annual rainfall, and semiarid lands have a mean annual precipitation of between 250 and 500 millimeters (10-20 in). Arid and extremely arid lands are deserts, and semiarid grasslands are generally referred to as steppes.[1] Image File history File links Désert-du-Thar. ... Image File history File links Désert-du-Thar. ... A NASA satellite image of the Thar Desert, with the India-Pakistan border superimposed is found in canada, united states. ... , Jaisalmer   (The Golden City) is a town in the Indian state of Rajasthan. ... Image File history File links High_desert. ... Image File history File links High_desert. ... Eastern Oregon is a geographical term that is generally taken to mean the area of the state of Oregon east of the Cascade Range, save the region around the Dalles and sometimes Klamath County. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 240 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Desert Tirunelveli Rainshadow Tirunelveli District Agastyamalai Wikipedia:Featured pictures candidates/August-2006 Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1280x960, 240 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Desert Tirunelveli Rainshadow Tirunelveli District Agastyamalai Wikipedia:Featured pictures candidates/August-2006 Wikipedia:Featured picture candidates... A view of the Agasthyarkoodam from the base A view of the Agasthyamalai range from the Tirunelveli rainshadow region Agastya Malai (Agastyarkoodam), a peak of 1868 m in the Western Ghats. ... , Tirunelveli (Tamil: ) is a Municipal Corporation, sixth largest city in Tamil Nadu (after Chennai, Madurai, Coimbatore, Trichy and Salem) in southern India and the district headquarters of Tirunelveli district. ... For other uses, see Monsoon (disambiguation). ... A Rainshadow is an area which is unusally dry due to nearby geographic features. ... Peveril Meigs, III, (1903-1979) was an American geographer, notable for his studies of arid lands on several continents and in particular for his work on the native peoples and early missions of northern Baja California, Mexico. ... The steppe of Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, steppe (from Slavic step) is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally reckoned as being dominated by tall grasses, while short grasses are said...


Measurement of rainfall alone can't provide an accurate definition of what a desert is because being arid also depends on evaporation which depends in part on temperature. For example, Phoenix, Arizona receives less than 250 millimeters (10 in) of precipitation per year, and is immediately recognized as being located in a desert due to its arid adapted plants. The North Slope of Alaska's Brooks Range also receives less than 250 millimeters (10 in) of precipitation per year, but is not generally recognized as a desert region. For other uses, see Temperature (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ... ... Brooks Range from near Galbraith Lake The Brooks Range is a mountain range that stretches from west to east across northern Alaska and into Canadas Yukon Territory, a total distance of about 1100 km (700 mi). ...


So "potential evapotranspiration" supplements measurement of rainfall in providing a scientific measurement-based definition of a desert. The water budget of an area can be calculated using the formula P-PE±S, wherein P is precipitation, PE is potential evapotranspiration rates and S is amount of surface storage of water. Evapotranspiration is the combination of water loss through atmospheric evaporation, coupled with the evaporative loss of water through the life processes of plants. Potential evapotranspiration, then, is the amount of water that could evaporate in any given region. As an example, Tucson, Arizona receives about 300 millimeters, (12 in), of rain per year, however about 2500 millimeters, (100 in), of water could evaporate over the course of a year.[citation needed] In other words, about 8 times more water could evaporate from the region than actually falls. Rates of evapotranspiration in other regions such as Alaska are much lower. Evapotranspiration (ET) is the sum of evaporation and plant transpiration. ... Vaporization redirects here. ... , Tucson (pronounced ) is the seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, located 118 miles (188 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 miles (98 km) north of the U.S.-Mexico border. ...


There are different forms of deserts. Cold deserts can be covered in snow or ice; frozen water unavailable to plant life. These are more commonly referred to as tundra if a short season of above-freezing temperatures is experienced, or as an ice cap if the temperature remains below freezing year-round, rendering the land almost completely lifeless. For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about water ice. ... For other uses, see Tundra (disambiguation). ... An ice cap is a dome-shaped ice mass that covers less than 50,000 km² of land area (usually covering a highland area). ...


Most non-polar deserts are hot in the day and chilly at night (for the latitude) because of the lack of the moderating effect of water. In some parts of the world, deserts are created by a rain shadow effect in which air masses lose much of their moisture as they move over a mountain range; other areas are arid by virtue of being very far from the nearest available sources of moisture. For the Australian television series see Rain Shadow (TV series). ... For exotic financial options, see Mountain range (options). ...


Deserts are also classified by their geographical location and dominant weather pattern as trade wind, mid-latitude, rain shadow, coastal, monsoon, or polar deserts. Former desert areas presently in non-arid environments are paleodeserts. Polar deserts are areas with annual precipitation less than 250 millimetres and a mean temperature during the warmest month of less than 10° C. Polar deserts on Earth cover nearly 5 million square kilometres and are mostly bedrock or gravel plains. ...


Montane deserts are arid places with a very high altitude; the most prominent example is found north of the Himalaya especially in Ladakh region of Jammu and Kashmir, in parts of the Kunlun Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. Many locations within this category have elevations exceeding 3,000 meters (10,000 ft) and the thermal regime can be hemiboreal. These places owe their profound aridity (the average annual precipitation is often less than 40 mm/1.5in) to being very far from the nearest available sources of moisture. Montane deserts are normally cold. Mount McKinley in Alaska has one of the largest visible base-to-summit elevation differences anywhere A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... Altitude is the elevation of an object from a known level or datum. ... Perspective view of the Himalaya and Mount Everest as seen from space looking south-south-east from over the Tibetan Plateau. ... Region containing Kunlun Mountains Karakash River in the Western Kunlun Shan, seen from the Tibet-Xinjiang highway Peak in Kunlun range View of Western Kunlun Shan from the Tibet-Xinjiang highway The Kunlun mountain range (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is one of the longest mountain chains in Asia, extending... Tibet Autonomous Region, Qinghai Province and Sichuan Province of China lie on the Tibetan Plateau. ... Hemiboreal means halfway between the temperate and subarctic (or boreal) zones. ...


Rain shadow deserts form when tall mountain ranges block clouds from reaching areas in the direction the wind is going. As the air moves over the mountains, it cools and moisture condenses, causing precipitation on the windward side. Moisture almost never reaches the leeward side of the mountain, resulting in a desert. When that air reaches the leeward side, the air is dry, because it has already lost the majority of its moisture. The air then warms, expands, and blows across the desert. The warm, desiccated air takes with it any remaining small amounts of moisture in the desert. For the Australian television series see Rain Shadow (TV series). ... Dew on a spider web Moldy bread Moisture generally refers to the presence of water, often in trace amounts. ... Leeward is the side of a boat away from the direction where the wind is coming (i. ...


Desert features

Satellite view of Al-Dahna desert in Saudi Arabia showing different depositional features.

Sand covers only about 20 percent of Earth's deserts. Most of the sand is in sand sheets and sand seas—vast regions of undulating dunes resembling ocean waves "frozen" in an instant of time. In general, there are six forms of deserts: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x1341, 1640 KB) Summary Satellite image of Al-Dahna desert in Saudi Arabia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x1341, 1640 KB) Summary Satellite image of Al-Dahna desert in Saudi Arabia. ... Satellite view of Al-Dahna desert. ... For other uses, see Sand (disambiguation). ...

  • Mountain and basin deserts
  • Hamada deserts, which consist of plateau landforms
  • Regs, which consist of rock pavements
  • Ergs, which are formed by sand seas
  • Intermontane Basins
  • Badlands, which are located at the margins of arid lands comprising clay-rich soil

Nearly all desert surfaces are plains where eolian deflation—removal of fine-grained material by the wind—has exposed loose gravels consisting predominantly of pebbles but with occasional cobbles. Cyclists crossing hamada, approaching Erg Chebbi sand dunes, Morocco A hamada (ara. ... Sea wave polishing pebbles into rounded corners Pebbles For other uses, see Pebble (disambiguation). ... Cobble is a geologic term for a rock or rock fragment with a grain size with dimensions between 64–256 mm (2. ...


The remaining surfaces of arid lands are composed of exposed bedrock outcrops, desert soils, and fluvial deposits including alluvial fans, playas, desert lakes, and oases. Bedrock outcrops commonly occur as small mountains surrounded by extensive erosional plains. Bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the Earths surface. ... Aridisols are a soil order in USA soil taxonomy. ... A vast alluvial fan blossoms across the desolate landscape between the Kunlun and Altun mountain ranges that form the southern border of the Taklimakan Desert in China’s XinJiang Province. ... It has been suggested that Playa lake be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Lake (disambiguation). ...


Several different types of dunes exist. Barchan dunes are produced by strong winds blowing across a level surface and are crescent-shaped. Longitudinal or seif dunes are dunes that are parallel to a strong wind that blows in one general direction. Transverse dunes run at a right angle to the constant wind direction. Star dunes are star-shaped and have several ridges that spread out around a point.


Oases are vegetated areas moistened by springs, wells, or by irrigation. Many are artificial. Oases are often the only places in deserts that support crops and permanent habitation. For the English rock band, see Oasis (band). ... A natural spring on Mackinac Island in Michigan. ... Village pump redirects here, for information on Wikipedia project-related discussions, see Wikipedia:Village pump. ... Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the soil usually for assisting in growing crops. ...


Flora and fauna

Deserts have a reputation for supporting very little life, but in reality deserts often have high biodiversity, including animals that remain hidden during daylight hours to control body temperature or to limit moisture needs. Some fauna includes the kangaroo rat, coyote, jack rabbit, and many lizards. Some flora includes shrubs, Prickly Pears, Desert Holly, and the Brittle bush. Rainforests are among the most biodiverse ecosystems on earth Biodiversity is the variation of life forms within a given ecosystem, biome or for the entire Earth. ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Species 22, see text Kangaroo rats, genus Dipodomys, are small rodents native to North America. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... Genera Lepus Caprolagus Pronolagus Hares and Jackrabbits belong to family Leporidae, and mostly in genus Lepus. ... For other uses, see Lizard (disambiguation). ...

Flora of Baja California Desert, Cataviña region, Mexico

Most desert plants are drought- or salt-tolerant, such as xerophytes. Some store water in their leaves, roots, and stems. Other desert plants have long taproots that penetrate to the water table if present, or have adapted to the weather by having wide-spreading roots to absorb water from a greater area of the ground. Another adaptation is the development of small, spiny leaves which shed less moisture than deciduous leaves with greater surface areas. The stems and leaves of some plants lower the surface velocity of sand-carrying winds and protect the ground from erosion. Even small fungi and microscopic plant organisms found on the soil surface (so-called cryptobiotic soil) can be a vital link in preventing erosion and providing support for other living organisms. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1680, 1495 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Baja California Ensenada, Baja California Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1680, 1495 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Baja California Ensenada, Baja California Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... A xerophyte or xerophytic organism (xero meaning dry, phyte meaning plant) is a plant which is able to survive in an ecosystem with little available water or moisture, usually in environments where potential evapotranspiration exceeds precipitation for all or part of the growing season. ... This article is about the plant root system. ... For other uses, see Root (disambiguation). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Deciduous (disambiguation). ... In more arid regions, vegetative cover is generally sparse. ...

Deserts typically have a plant cover that is sparse but enormously diverse. The giant saguaro cacti of the Sonoran Desert provide nests for desert birds and serve as "trees" of the desert. Saguaro grow slowly but may live up to 200 years. When 9 years old, they are about 15 centimeters (6 in) high. After about 75 years, the cacti develop their first branches. When fully grown, saguaro cacti are 15 meters tall and weigh as much as 10 tons. They dot the Sonoran and reinforce the general impression of deserts as cactus-rich land. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 767 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A forest of Saguaro Cacti - Tucson, Arizona. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 767 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A forest of Saguaro Cacti - Tucson, Arizona. ... For the Palm OS program, see Saguaro(Palm OS). ... Map of the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... For the Palm OS program, see Saguaro(Palm OS). ... Map of the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. ...


Although cacti are often thought of as characteristic desert plants, other types of plants have adapted well to the arid environment. They include the pea and sunflower families. Cold deserts have grasses and shrubs as dominant vegetation. Subfamilies Cactoideae Maihuenioideae Opuntioideae Pereskioideae See also taxonomy of the Cactaceae A cactus (plural: cacti, cactuses, or cactus) is any member of the succulent plant family Cactaceae, native to the Americas. ... For other uses and abbreviations, see PEA. Binomial name L. A pea, although treated as a vegetable in cooking, is botanically a fruit; the term is most commonly used to describe the small spherical seeds or the pods of the legume Pisum sativum. ... For other uses, see Sunflower (disambiguation). ...


Water

The shifting sands simulator at Questacon, Canberra

Rain does fall occasionally in deserts, and desert storms are often violent. A record 44 millimeters (1.7 in) of rain once fell within 3 hours in the Sahara. Large Saharan storms may deliver up to 1 millimeter per minute. Normally dry stream channels, called arroyos or wadis, can quickly fill after heavy rains, and flash floods make these channels dangerous. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1067, 551 KB) Moving sand simulator - Questacon, Canberra File links The following pages link to this file: Desert ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1067, 551 KB) Moving sand simulator - Questacon, Canberra File links The following pages link to this file: Desert ... Questacon – the National Science and Technology Centre, is located on the southern shore of Lake Burley Griffin in Canberra, Australia. ... An arroyo is a dry creek bed or gulch that fills with water either seasonally, or after a heavy rain. ... Wadi alMujib, Jordan A wadi (Arabic: ) is traditionally a valley. ... Lower Antelope Canyon was carved out of sandstone by flash floods A Flash Flood is a rapid flooding of geomorphic low-lying areas (washes), rivers and streams, caused by the intense rainfall associated with a thunderstorm, or multiple training thunderstorms. ...


Though little rain falls in deserts, deserts receive runoff from ephemeral, or short-lived, streams fed considerable quantities of sediment for a day or two. Although most deserts are in basins with closed or interior drainage, a few deserts are crossed by 'exotic' rivers that derive their water from outside the desert. Such rivers infiltrate soils and evaporate large amounts of water on their journeys through the deserts, but their volumes are such that they maintain their continuity. The Nile River, the Colorado River, and the Yellow River are exotic rivers that flow through deserts to deliver their sediments to the sea. Deserts may also have underground springs, rivers, or reservoirs that lie close to the surface, or deep underground. Plants that have not completely adapted to sporadic rainfalls in a desert environment may tap into underground water sources that do not exceed the reach of their root systems. For other uses, see Nile (disambiguation). ... The Colorado River from the bottom of Marble Canyon, in the Upper Grand Canyon Colorado River in the Grand Canyon from Desert View The Colorado River from Laughlin Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona The Colorado River is... For other Yellow Rivers, see Yellow River (disambiguation). ...


Lakes form where rainfall or meltwater in interior drainage basins is sufficient. Desert lakes are generally shallow, temporary, and salty. Because these lakes are shallow and have a low bottom gradient, wind stress may cause the lake waters to move over many square kilometers. When small lakes dry up, they leave a salt crust or hardpan. The flat area of clay, silt, or sand encrusted with salt that forms is known as a playa. There are more than a hundred playas in North American deserts. Most are relics of large lakes that existed during the last ice age about 12,000 years ago. Lake Bonneville was a 52,000 kilometers² (20,000 mi²) lake almost 300 meters (1000 ft) deep in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho during the Ice Age. Today the remnants of Lake Bonneville include Utah's Great Salt Lake, Utah Lake, and Sevier Lake. Because playas are arid landforms from a wetter past, they contain useful clues to climatic change. In soil science, agriculture and gardening, hardpan is a general term for a dense layer of soil, residing usually below the uppermost topsoil layer. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... A butte in the Great Salt Lake Desert Lake Bonneville was a prehistoric pluvial lake that covered much of North Americas Great Basin region. ... Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Utah, is the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere,[1] the fourth-largest terminal lake in the world,[2] and the 33rd largest lake on Earth. ... Utah Lake and Utah Valley Utah Lake is Utahs , and it is one of the largest naturally occurring fresh-water lakes in the western United States. ... We dont have an article called Sevier Lake Start this article Search for Sevier Lake in. ...


When the occasional precipitation does occur, it erodes the desert rocks quickly and powerfully.


The flat terrains of hardpans and playas make them excellent racetracks and natural runways for airplanes and spacecraft. Ground-vehicle speed records are commonly established on Bonneville Speedway, a racetrack on the Great Salt Lake hardpan. Space shuttles land on Rogers Lake Playa at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Bonneville Salt Flats Bonneville Speedway is an area of the Bonneville Salt Flats near Wendover, Utah, that is marked out for motor sports. ... Edwards Air Force Base (IATA: EDW, ICAO: KEDW) is a United States Air Force airbase located on the border of Kern County and Los Angeles County, California in the Antelope Valley, 7 miles (11 km) due east of Rosamond. ...


Mineral resources

Some mineral deposits are formed, improved, or preserved by geologic processes that occur in arid lands as a consequence of climate. Ground water leaches ore minerals and redeposits them in zones near the water table. This leaching process concentrates these minerals as ore that can be mined. For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ... Groundwater is any water found below the land surface. ... Leaching may refer to: Leaching (agriculture) Leaching (chemical science) Leaching (metallurgy) Dump leaching Heap leaching Tank leaching Leaching (pedology) Bioleaching Parboiling, also known as leaching Categories: ... For other uses, see Ore (disambiguation). ... Cross section showing the water table varying with surface topography as well as a perched water table The water table or phreatic surface is the surface where the water pressure is equal to atmospheric pressure. ...


Evaporation in arid lands enriches mineral accumulation in their lakes. Lake beds known as Playas may be sources of mineral deposits formed by evaporation. Water evaporating in closed basins precipitates minerals such as gypsum, salts (including sodium nitrate and sodium chloride), and borates. The minerals formed in these evaporite deposits depend on the composition and temperature of the saline waters at the time of deposition. It has been suggested that Playa lake be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Gypsum (disambiguation). ... Made of Porn and sex things Inhalation respiratory irritation Skin May cause irritation. ... Sodium chloride, also known as common salt, table salt, or halite, is a chemical compound with the formula NaCl. ... Borates in chemistry are chemical compounds containing boron bonded to three oxygen atoms written as B(OR)3. ... A sample of evaporite material Evaporites (IPA: ) are water-soluble, mineral sediments that result from the evaporation of bodies of surficial water. ...


Significant evaporite resources occur in the Great Basin Desert of the United States, mineral deposits made famous by the "20-mule teams" that once hauled borax-laden wagons from Death Valley to the railroad. Boron, from borax and borate evaporites, is an essential ingredient in the manufacture of glass, enamel, agricultural chemicals, water softeners, and pharmaceuticals. Borates are mined from evaporite deposits at Searles Lake, California, and other desert locations. The total value of chemicals that have been produced from Searles Lake substantially exceeds US$1 billion. The Great Basin is a large, arid region of the western United States, commonly defined as the contiguous watershed region, roughly between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, that has no natural outlet to the sea. ... For other uses, see Death Valley (disambiguation). ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... For other uses, see Boron (disambiguation). ... Borax from Persian burah. ... This astronaut photograph depicts the Searles Lake playa (characterized by white surface mineral deposits) bounded by the Argus and Slate Mountains Searles Lake (also called Searles Dry Lake), is an evaporite basin located near the community of Trona in San Bernardino County, CA. Searles Valley Minerals currently extracts 1. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ...


The Atacama Desert of Chile is unique among the deserts of the world in its great abundance of saline minerals. Sodium nitrate has been mined for explosives and fertilizer in the Atacama since the middle of the 19th century. Nearly 3 million tonnes were mined during World War I. Atacama redirects here; for the political-administrative region of Chile, see Atacama Region. ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... Spreading manure, an organic fertilizer Fertilizers (also spelled fertilisers) are compounds given to plants to promote growth; they are usually applied either through the soil, for uptake by plant roots, or by foliar feeding, for uptake through leaves. ... This article is about the metric tonne. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Valuable minerals located in arid lands include copper in the United States, Chile, Peru, and Iran; iron and lead-zinc ore in Australia; chromite in Turkey; and gold, silver, and uranium deposits in Australia and the United States. Nonmetallic mineral resources and rocks such as beryllium, mica, lithium, clays, pumice, and scoria also occur in arid regions. Sodium carbonate, sulfate, borate, nitrate, lithium, bromine, iodine, calcium, and strontium compounds come from sediments and near-surface brines formed by evaporation of inland bodies of water, often during geologically recent times. For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... Fe redirects here. ... General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... General Name, symbol, number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ... Chromite, iron magnesium chromium oxide: (Fe,Mg)Cr2O4, is an oxide mineral belonging to the spinel group. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... General Name, symbol, number beryllium, Be, 4 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, period, block 2, 2, s Appearance white-gray metallic Standard atomic weight 9. ... Rock with mica Mica sheet Mica flakes The mica group of sheet silicate minerals includes several closely related materials having highly perfect basal cleavage. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... For other uses, see Clay (disambiguation). ... Specimen of highly porous pumice from Teide volcano on Tenerife, Canary Islands. ... Scoria Scoria is a textural term for macrovesicular volcanic rock ejecta. ... Sodium carbonate (also known as washing soda or soda ash), Na2CO3, is a sodium salt of carbonic acid. ... The sulfate anion, SO42− The structure and bonding of the sulfate ion In inorganic chemistry, a sulfate (IUPAC-recommended spelling; also sulphate in British English) is a salt of sulfuric acid. ... Trinitrate redirects here. ... Bromo redirects here. ... For other uses, see Iodine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Calcium (disambiguation). ... General Name, Symbol, Number strontium, Sr, 38 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 5, s Appearance silvery white metallic Standard atomic weight 87. ...


The Green River Formation of Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah contains alluvial fan deposits and playa evaporites created in a huge lake whose level fluctuated for millions of years. Economically significant deposits of trona, a major source of sodium compounds, and thick layers of oil shale were created in the arid environment. The Green River Formation is an Eocene geologic formation that records the sedimentation in a series of intermontane lakes. ... Official language(s) English Demonym Coloradan Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th in the US  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Alluvium is soil land deposited by a river or other running water. ... Trona, hydrated sodium bicarbonate carbonate (Na3HCO3CO3·2H2O), is an evaporite mineral. ... For sodium in the diet, see Salt. ... Oil shale Oil shale is a general term applied to a fine-grained sedimentary rock containing significant traces of kerogen (a solid mixture of organic chemical compounds) that have not been buried for sufficient time to produce conventional fossil fuels. ...


Some of the more productive petroleum areas on Earth are found in arid and semiarid regions of Africa and the Mideast, although the oil fields were originally formed in shallow marine environments. Recent climate change has placed these reservoirs in an arid environment. It's noteworthy that Ghawar, the world's largest and most productive oilfield is mostly under the Empty Quarter and Al-Dahna deserts. Petro redirects here. ... Drilling rig in a small oil field Near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 An oil field is an area with an abundance of oil wells extracting petroleum (oil) from below ground. ... Ghawar Field is a large oil field in Saudi Arabia. ... Location of the empty quarter in Arabia Sand dunes in the Empty Quarter The Empty Quarter (Arabic: Rub al Khali الربع الخالي), is one of the largest sand deserts in the world, encompassing the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula, including southern Saudi Arabia, and areas of Oman, the United Arab Emirates... Satellite view of Al-Dahna desert. ...


Other oil reservoirs, however, are presumed to be eolian in origin and are presently found in humid environments. The Rotliegendes, a hydrocarbon reservoir in the North Sea, is associated with extensive evaporite deposits. Many of the major U.S. hydrocarbon resources may come from eolian sands. Ancient alluvial fan sequences may also be hydrocarbon reservoirs. A 3-dimensional rendered Ball-and-stick model of the methane molecule. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ...


Human life in deserts

Mahktesh Gadol, an erosional basin in the Negev Desert of southern Israel.

A desert is a hostile, potentially deadly environment for unprepared humans. In hot deserts, high temperatures cause rapid loss of water due to sweating, and the absence of water sources with which to replenish it can result in dehydration and death within a few days. In addition, unprotected humans are also at risk from heatstroke. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 750 pixel, file size: 217 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photograph taken by Mark A. Wilson (Department of Geology, The College of Wooster). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 750 pixel, file size: 217 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photograph taken by Mark A. Wilson (Department of Geology, The College of Wooster). ... :For the light machine gun see IMI Negev. ... SWEAT is an OLN/TSN show hosted by Julie Zwillich that aired in 2003-2004. ... Dehydration (hypohydration) is the removal of water (hydro in ancient Greek) from an object. ... Hyperthermia is an acute condition resulting from excessive exposure to heat, it is also known as heat stroke or sunstroke. ...


Humans may also have to adapt to sandstorms in some deserts, not just in their adverse effects on respiratory systems and eyes, but also in their potentially harmful effects on equipment such as filters, vehicles and communication equipment. Sandstorms can last for hours, sometimes even days. Look up sandstorm in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Among quadrupeds, the respiratory system generally includes tubes, such as the bronchi, used to carry air to the lungs, where gas exchange takes place. ... Air filter in an Opel Astra car, top side=clean side Air filter in an Opel Astra car, bottom side=dust side Automotive air filter clogged with dust and debris. ...


Despite this, some cultures have made hot deserts their home for thousands of years, including the Bedouin, Tuareg tribe and Pueblo people. Modern technology, including advanced irrigation systems, desalinization and air conditioning have made deserts much more hospitable. In the United States and Israel for example, desert farming has found extensive use. A Bedouin man in Sinai Peninsula The Bedouin, (from the Arabic (), pl. ... For other senses of this name, see Tuareg (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Pueblo be merged into this article or section. ... Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the soil usually for assisting in growing crops. ... Desalination refers to any of several processes that removes the excess salt and minerals from water in order to obtain fresh water suitable for animal consumption or for irrigation, sometimes producing table salt as a byproduct. ... Note: in the broadest sense, air conditioning can refer to any form of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. ... Desert farming generally relies on irrigation, as it is the easiest way to make a desert bloom. ...


In cold deserts, hypothermia and frostbite are the chief hazards, as well as dehydration in the absence of a source of heat to melt ice for drinking. Falling through pack-ice or surface ice layers into freezing water is a particular danger requiring emergency action to prevent rapid hypothermia. Starvation is also a hazard; in low temperatures the body requires much more food energy to maintain body heat and to move. As with hot deserts, some people such as the Inuit have adapted to the harsh conditions of cold deserts. Hypothermia is a condition in which an organisms temperature drops below that Required fOr normal metabolism and Bodily functionS. In warm-blooded animals, core [[body Temperature]] is maintained nEar a constant leVel through biologic [[homEostasis]]. But wheN the body iS exposed to cold Its internal mechanismS may be unable... This article is about a medical condition. ... Dehydration (hypohydration) is the removal of water (hydro in ancient Greek) from an object. ... Food energy is the amount of energy in food that is available through digestion. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ...


Most traditional human life in deserts is nomadic. It depends in hot deserts on finding water, and on following infrequent rains to obtain grazing for livestock. In cold deserts, it depends on finding good hunting and fishing grounds, on sheltering from blizzards and winter extremes, and on storing enough food for winter. Permanent settlement in both kinds of deserts requires permanent water and food sources and adequate shelter, or the technology and energy sources to provide it. For the 2006 historical epic set in Kazakhstan, see Nomad (2006 film). ...


Many deserts are flat and featureless, lacking landmarks, or composed of repeating landforms such as sand dunes or the jumbled ice-fields of glaciers. Advanced skills or devices are required to navigate through such landscapes and inexperienced travellers may perish when supplies run out after becoming lost. In addition sandstorms or blizzards may cause disorientation in severely-reduced visibility. This article is about the winter storm condition. ...


The danger represented by wild animals in deserts has featured in explorers' accounts but does not cause higher rates of death than in other environments such as rainforests or savanna woodland, and generally does not by itself affect human distribution. Defence against polar bears may be advisable in some areas of the Arctic, as may precautions against venomous snakes and scorpions in choosing sites at which to camp in some hot deserts. This article is about the animal. ... A venomous snake is a snake that uses modified saliva, venom, delivered through fangs in its mouth, to immobilize or kill its prey. ... Superfamilies Pseudochactoidea Buthoidea Chaeriloidea Chactoidea Iuroidea Scorpionoidea See classification for families. ... Car camping is camping in a tent, but nearby the car for easier access and for supply storage. ...


Examples of desert climate

Southern hemisphere

Climate chart for Antofagasta, Chile
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source: [7]


For the copper-mining company named after the region, see Antofagasta plc. ...


See also

For the labor union vitiation procedure, see NLRB election procedures#Decertification elections. ... The International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA) (founded 1977) is an agroforestry institution that is based in Aleppo in Syria. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... This is a list of deserts in the world ordered by area. ... This is a list of North American deserts. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c What is a desert?
  2. ^ According to What is a desert?, this definition is due to Peveril Meigs
  3. ^ desert. Encyclopædia Britannica online. Retrieved on 2008-02-09.
  4. ^ Fredlund, D.G.; Rahardjo, H. (1993). Soil Mechanics for Unsaturated Soils (pdf), Wiley-Interscience. ISBN 978-0471850083. Retrieved on 2008-05-21. 
  5. ^ Glossary of Meteorology. Megathermal Climate. Retrieved on 2008-05-21.
  6. ^ 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica
  7. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/world/city_guides/results.shtml?tt=TT001750

Peveril Meigs, III, (1903-1979) was an American geographer, notable for his studies of arid lands on several continents and in particular for his work on the native peoples and early missions of northern Baja California, Mexico. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Deserts

Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Klaus Töpfer, former UNEP Exec. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Danakil Desert lies in north eastern Ethiopia and in southern Eritrea, where it forms the Southern Red Sea district. ... The template of this page is being worked at Wikipedia:WikiProject Ecoregions/Template. ... Kalahari redirects here. ... Desert landscape in Southern Libya The Libyan Desert (Arabic: الصحراء الليبية) is an African desert that is located in the northern and eastern part of the Sahara Desert and occupies southwestern Egypt, eastern Libya and northwestern Sudan. ... Dune 7, one of the highest sand dunes in the world (ca. ... Fragment of Nubian Desert seen from space The Nubian Desert, is in the eastern region of the Sahara Desert, it spans 407, 000 km2 or 157,000 square miles of northeastern Sudan between the Nile and the Red Sea, at . ... Nyiri Desert, also called The Nyika or Tarudesert, is a desert in Kenya. ... The Richtersveld National Park is situated in South Africa’s Northern Cape province, a mountainous desert landscape characterised by rugged kloofs, high mountains and dramatic landscapes. ... Map of the Ténéré The Ténéré is a desert region in the south central Sahara. ... A photo of a rock formation in Egypts White Desert The Farafra Oasis is an isolated oasis located in Western Egypt. ... The Aral Karakum desert lies north of the Aral Sea in Kazakhstan. ... The Badain Jaran Desert can be found in western Inner Mongolia. ... A remote, arid, and rugged area of the Xinjiang Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... This page contains special characters. ... The Indus Valley Desert is a desert ecoregion of northern Pakistan. ... The Karakum Desert, also spelled Kara-Kum and Gara Gum (“Black Sand”) (Turkmen: Garagum, Russian: Каракумы) is a desert in Central Asia. ... The Desert of Kum-tagh is a section of the Gobi Desert which lies east-southeast of the Desert of Lop. ... The Kyzyl Kum (Uzbek: red sand; also called Qyzylqum) is a desert in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. ... Ordos Desert 1912 The Ordos Desert (Chinese: 鄂尔多斯沙漠; Pinyin: ÈěrduōsÄ« Shāmò) is a desert and steppe region lying on a plateau in the south of the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Qaidam, also spelt Tsaidam, is an arid basin in Qinghai, western China. ... The Registan Desert is an extremely arid plateau region located between Helmand and Kandahar provinces in southwestern Afghanistan. ... The Saryesik Atyrau Desert stretches for about 400 km south of Lake Balkhash in eastern Kazakhstan. ... Dust storm in Taklamakan Desert from space, June 25, 2005 The Taklamakan Desert (also Taklimakan) is a desert of Central Asia, in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Tengger desert (腾格里沙漠) covers about 36,700 square km and is in the Gansu Province in China. ... Thal desert is situated in Punjab Pakistan. ... A NASA satellite image of the Thar Desert, with the India-Pakistan border superimposed is found in canada, united states. ... Derawar Fort in Cholistan. ... Tottori Sand Dunes The Tottori Sand Dunes ) are unique sand dunes located near Tottori City in Tottori Prefecture, HonshÅ«, Japan. ... The Ustyurt Plateau, Ustyurt also spelled Ust-Urt and Usturt (Kazakh: Ãœstirt, Turkmen: Ãœstyurt), is a central Asian plateau in Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan, between the Aral Sea and the Caspian Sea. ... A four wheel drive in the Gibson Desert The Gibson Desert is a Western Australian desert made up of sandhills and dry grass. ... Location of deserts in Australia This article is about the Australian desert. ... The IBRA regions, with Great Victoria Desert in red The Great Victoria Desert is a barren, arid, and sparsely populated desert ecoregion in southern Australia. ... The Little Sandy Desert is desert in Australia, located in Western Australia near the Great Sandy Desert. ... Say the word desert, and the usual definition conjured up is one of dry land that rarely if ever sees rain. ... Ted Colsons expedition across the Simpson Desert in 1936 The Simpson Desert occupies approximately 170,000 square kilometres of central Australia[1]. It is bounded to the west by the Finke River and Mabel Range, to the north by Adam Range, to the east by the Georgina and Diamantina... Bore Track in the Strzelecki Desert, South Australia. ... Sturts Stony Desert is an area in the north-east of South Australia, named by Charles Sturt in 1844, whilst trying to reach the exact centre of Australia. ... The Tanami Desert is a desert in northern Australia. ... The Western Desert refers to a large tract of desert in the west of Australia, comprising the Gibson Desert, the Great Sandy and Little Sandy Deserts. ... Bardenas Reales is a semi-desert in Navarre, Spain. ... BÅ‚Ä™dów Desert (Polish: ) - desert in Upper Silesian Industry Region (Poland / European Union) at bound Metropolis Katowice. ... Foggy morning on the Deliblato Sands. ... The Highlands of Iceland cover most of the interior of Iceland. ... The Ryn Desert or Ryn-Peski Desert, is a desert in western Kazakhstan, north of the Caspian Sea and southeast of the Volga Upland. ... A view of the badlands in the Granada Plateau (Hole of Guadix). ... The ad-Dahna desert is the central division of the Arabian desert. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Dasht-e Kavir desert: satellite photograph Dasht-e Kavir (دشت كوير in Persian), also known as Kavir-e Namak or Great Salt Desert is a large desert lying in the middle of the Iranian Plateau. ... As seen from space Dasht-e Lut is a large salt desert in southeastern Iran. ... Desert hills in southern Judea, looking east from the town of Arad Judea or Judaea (יהודה Praise, Standard Hebrew Yəhuda, Tiberian Hebrew Yəhûḏāh) is a term used for the mountainous southern part of historic Palestine, an area now divided between Israel, Jordan and the West Bank. ... The Nefud or An-Nafud is a desert area in the northern part of the Arabian peninsula, occupying a great oval depression; 180 mi (290 km) long and 140 mi (225 km) wide. ... This article is about the desert area Rub’ al Khali (more properly pronounced as ar-Rub ah-Hali, see Pronunciation in the Arabic Language section), of the Arabian Peninsula. ... :For the light machine gun see IMI Negev. ... The Syrian Desert (Arabic: ), also known as the Syro-Arabian desert, is a combination of steppe and true desert that is located in parts of the nations of Syria, Jordan, and Iraq. ... Tihamah or Tihama (Arabic: []) is a narrow coastal region of Arabia on the Red Sea. ... This is a list of North American deserts. ... The Alvord Desert is a desert in the southeastern part of the American state of Oregon. ... Amargosa Desert The Amargosa Desert is located in western Nevada, USA, along the border with California. ... The Baja California desert is a Desert ecoregion of Mexicos Baja California Peninsula. ... The Black Rock Desert is a dry lake bed in northwestern Nevada in the United States. ... DrumHeller Channels The Channeled Scablands are unique geological erosion features in the U.S. state of Washington. ... Map of the Chihuahuan Desert. ... The Colorado Plateau, also called the Colorado Plateaus Province, is a physiographic region of the Intermontane Plateaus, roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) Wheeler Peak in Great Basin National Park, Nevada. ... The Great Salt Lake Desert is a large playa in northern Utah, located west of the Great Salt Lake. ... The route of Jornada del Muerto trail. ... For the indigenous American tribe, see Mohave. ... The Nkmip Desert, (pronounced In-ka-meep) Is a desert found in British Columbia, Canada. ... Painted Desert, Arizona Painted Desert, Arizona. ... The Smoke Creek Desert is found in northwestern Nevada in the United States. ... Map of the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. ... Atacama redirects here; for the political-administrative region of Chile, see Atacama Region. ... Cape of the Vela, La Guajira Desert by the Caribbean Sea. ... The Monte Desert, is a South American desert, located within the country of Argentina. ... Astronaut photography of the Patagonian Desert (most of the view) contrasted with the Limay River, seen flowing eastward from the Andes. ... The Sechura desert is a desert ecoregion of coastal Peru. ... The Tatacoa Desert The Tatacoa Desert (Spanish for Desierto de la Tatacoa) is a desert located in the Colombian Department of Huila, some 38 km from the city of Neiva. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... This is a list of deserts in the world ordered by area. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Desert Biomes (554 words)
A cold desert is a desert that has snow in the winter instead of just dropping a few degrees in temperature like they would in a Hot and Dry Desert.
Hot and Dry Deserts temperature ranges from 20 to 25° C. The extreme maximum temperature for Hot Desert ranges from 43.5 to 49° C. Cold Deserts temperature in winter ranges from -2 to 4° C and in the summer 21 to 26° C a year
Hot and Dry Deserts are warm throughout the fall and spring seasons and very hot during the summer.
desert - Search Results - MSN Encarta (241 words)
Desert, term applied to regions of the earth that are characterized by less than 254 mm (10 in) of annual rainfall, an evaporation rate that exceeds...
Arabian Desert, arid region, eastern Egypt, lying between the Mediterranean Sea on the north, the Red Sea and the Gulf of Suez on the east, the...
Atacama Desert, arid region in northern Chile, bounded on the west by mountains along the Pacific Coast and on the east by the Andes Mountains.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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