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Encyclopedia > Derry
Londonderry/Derry
Scots: Lunnonderrie/Derrie
Irish: Doire Cholm Cille/Doire
Maiden City, Stroke City


Vita Veritas Victoria
"Life, Truth, Victory" Derry is the name of several places: In Northern Ireland of the United Kingdom: The city of Derry, or Londonderry County Derry, or County Londonderry In the Republic of Ireland River Derry and Derry Water River in County Wicklow Derry, County Sligo In the United States: Derry, New Hampshire, a... Londonderry is the name of several places: in the United Kingdom: County Londonderry or County Derry The city of Londonderry or Derry Londonderry County Borough Council now called Derry City Council Londonderry Port, the citys port Londonderry Eglinton Airport now called City of Derry Airport Londonderry (parliamentary borough) (historically... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... Image File history File links Derry_arms_2003. ...


Londonderry/Derry shown within Northern Ireland
Population City Proper:
83,652 
Derry Urban Area:
90,663  

(2001 Census)
Irish grid reference H876455
District Derry City
County County Londonderry
Constituent country Northern Ireland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LONDONDERRY[1]
Postcode district BT47, BT48
Dialling code 028
Police Northern Ireland
Fire Northern Ireland
Ambulance Northern Ireland
European Parliament Northern Ireland
UK Parliament Foyle
NI Assembly Foyle
Website: www.derrycity.gov.uk
List of places: UKNorthern IrelandCounty Londonderry

Coordinates: 54°59′45″N 7°18′27″W / 54.9958, -7.3074 Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... The Derry Urban Area is the urban area that includes and surrounds the city or Derry/Londonderry in County Derry/County Londonderry in Ireland. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The Irish national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Ireland. ... Northern Ireland is divided into 26 districts for local government purposes. ... Derry City Council (Londonderry County Borough Council until 1984) is a district council in County Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ... Northern Ireland is one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom. ... For other places with similar names, see Londonderry (disambiguation) and Derry (disambiguation). ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The BT postcode area, also known as the Belfast postcode area covers Northern Ireland and was the last part of the United Kingdom to be coded, between 1970 and 1974. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (Irish: Seirbhís Póilíneachta Thuaisceart na hÉireann) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Location of NIFB districts The Northern Ireland Fire Brigade (NIFB) are the official fire fighters for Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. ... The Northern Ireland Ambulance Service (NIAS) is the ambulance service that serves the whole of Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Northern Ireland is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Foyle is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a six flowered linen or flax plant. ... Foyle is a constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... List of settlements in Northern Ireland—data from the 2001 census List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Northern Ireland List of villages in Northern Ireland Lists of places within counties List of places in County Antrim List of places in County Armagh List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Derry or Londonderry (Irish: Doire or Doire Cholm Chille, meaning Oak wood of Colm Cille), often called the Maiden City, is a city in Northern Ireland. The old walled city of Londonderry lies on the west bank of the River Foyle, and the present city now covers both banks (Cityside to the west and Waterside to the east): the river is spanned by two bridges. The district extends to rural areas to the southeast of the city. The population of the city proper was 83,652 in the 2001 Census. The Derry Urban Area (including Culmore, New Buildings and Strathfoyle) had a population of 90,663, making it the second-largest city in Northern Ireland[2][3] and Ulster, and the fourth largest on the island of Ireland. The wider Derry City Council area had a population of 107,300 as of June 2006.[4] Derry was the last city in Britain and Ireland to be encircled with defensive walls; and is one of the few cities in Europe that never saw these fortifications breached. Derry is very near the border with County Donegal in the Republic of Ireland and also serves the west of County Londonderry. The district is run by Derry City Council and contains both Londonderry Port and City of Derry Airport. See Columba (disambiguation) and St Columb for other uses. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ... The River Foyle at Night. ... The Waterside is an urban neighbourhood on the east side of the River Foyle opposite the Cityside of Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The Derry Urban Area is the urban area that includes and surrounds the city or Derry/Londonderry in County Derry/County Londonderry in Ireland. ... Culmore (Irish: Chuil Móir) is a large village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, close to Derry. ... New Buildings (also written Newbuildings) is a village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... Strathfoyle is a village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, about five miles north east of Derry. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... This article is about the nine-county Irish province. ... Derry City Council (Londonderry County Borough Council until 1984) is a district council in County Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Ulster Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East, Donegal South West County seat: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ... For other places with similar names, see Londonderry (disambiguation) and Derry (disambiguation). ... Derry City Council (Londonderry County Borough Council until 1984) is a district council in County Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ... Londonderry Port at Lisahally in Derry in Northern Ireland is the United Kingdom’s most westerly port and has capacity for 30,000 ton vessels as well as accepting cruise ships. ... City of Derry Airport Entrance. ...


The city has had a very close relationship with what is now County Donegal for centuries. The person traditionally seen as the "founder" of the original Derry is St. Columba (also known as Colm Cille or St. Columb), a holy man and royal prince from Tír Chonaill, the old name for almost all of modern County Donegal (of which the west bank of the Foyle was a part before 1600). Derry and the nearby town of Letterkenny form the major economic core of northwest Ireland. Statistics Province: Ulster Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East, Donegal South West County seat: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ... A separate article is titled Columba (constellation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference C167188 Statistics Province: Ulster County: Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East Dialling Code: 074, +000 353 74 Area: 307. ...

Contents

Name

Main article: Derry-Londonderry name dispute
Road-sign with the reference to London obscured near Magherafelt.
Road-sign with the reference to London obscured near Magherafelt.

According to the city's Royal Charter the official name is Londonderry and, as stated in a recent High Court decision in January 2007,[5] remains so. It usually appears as such on maps.[6] The city is known by many as Derry, which is an anglicisation of the old Irish Daire, which in modern Irish is spelt Doire, and translates as ‘Oak-grove’. The name derives from the settlement's earliest references, Daire Calgaich (‘oakwood of Calgach’).[7] The name was changed from Derry in 1613 during the Plantation of Ulster to reflect the establishment of the city by the London guilds.[8] A vandalised road-sign at nearby Strabane, County Tyrone in which the London in Londonderry has been daubed over with black paint. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Magherafelt UK Parliament: Mid Ulster European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Magherafelt Postal District(s): BT45 Population (2001) 8,372 Magherafelt (from the Irish: Machaire Fiolta meaning Plain of Fioghalta) is a town in County Londonderry... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), which are listed in the List of Quercus species, and some related genera, notably... The Plantation of Ulster was a planned process of colonisation which took place in the northern Irish province of Ulster during the early 17th century in the reign of James I of England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


The name "Derry" is used by nationalists and indeed virtually all of Northern Ireland's Catholic community,[9] as well as all those of the Republic of Ireland, whereas many unionists prefer "Londonderry"; however in everyday conversation Derry is also used frequently by Protestants. Apart from this local government decision, official use within the UK the city is usually[9] known as Londonderry. In the Republic of Ireland, the city and county are almost always referred to as Derry, on maps, in the media and in conversation[citation needed]. Whereas official road signs in the Republic use the name Derry, those in Northern Ireland invariably bear Londonderry (sometimes abbreviated to L'Derry), although a number of these have had the reference to London obscured, by those who disagree with the UK's official spelling. Usage varies among local organisations, with both names being used. Examples are City of Derry Airport, City of Derry Rugby Club, Derry City FC and the Protestant Apprentice Boys Of Derry, as opposed to Londonderry Port and Londonderry Chamber Of Commerce.[10] The council changed the name of the local government district covering the city to Derry on May 7, 1984, consequently renaming itself Derry City Council.[11] This did not change the name of the city, although the city is coterminous with the district, and in law the city council is also the "Corporation of Londonderry" or, more formally, the "Mayor, Aldermen and Citizens of the City of Londonderry".[12] The form "Londonderry" is used for the post town by the Royal Mail. Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... In the context of Irish politics, Unionists are people in Northern Ireland, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union 1800, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which Northern Ireland, created in that latter Act, remains part of the United Kingdom of Great... City of Derry Airport Entrance. ... The City of Derry Rugby Club is a rugby union club, formed in 1881 in Derry currently playing rugby union in the AIB Division Three. ... Derry City FC is a Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland, it is also the only club in the league from Northern Ireland. ... Apprentice Boys of Derry Crest The Apprentice Boys Of Derry are a Protestant fraternal society with a worldwide membership, founded in 1814. ... Londonderry Port at Lisahally in Derry in Northern Ireland is the United Kingdom’s most westerly port and has capacity for 30,000 ton vessels as well as accepting cruise ships. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ...


The city is also nicknamed the Maiden City by virtue of the fact that its walls were never penetrated during the siege of Derry in the late 17th century. It is also nicknamed 'Stroke City' by local broadcaster, Gerry Anderson, due to the 'politically correct' use of the oblique notation Derry/Londonderry.[9] A recent addition to the landscape has been the erection of several large stone columns on main roads into the city welcoming drivers, euphemistically, to "the walled city." For context see the Williamite war in Ireland and Jacobitism. ... Gerard Michael Anderson, known professionally as Gerry Anderson (born 1944) is a Sony Award-winning radio and television broadcaster working for BBC Northern Ireland, and a member of the Radio Academy Hall of Fame. ...


History

St Columb's Cathedral
St Columb's Cathedral
Main article: History of Derry

The city has long been a focal point for important events in Irish history, including the 1688-1689 siege of Derry and Bloody Sunday on 30 January 1972. Image File history File links St Columbs Cathedral in Londonderry flying the Crimson Banner of the Apprentice Boys of Derry. ... Image File history File links St Columbs Cathedral in Londonderry flying the Crimson Banner of the Apprentice Boys of Derry. ... Derry is one of the longest continuously inhabited places in Ireland. ... The History of Ireland began with the first known settlement in Ireland around 8000 BC, when hunter-gatherers arrived from Great Britain and continental Europe, probably via a land bridge. ... For context see the Williamite war in Ireland and Jacobitism. ... // The Bogside area viewed from the city walls Bloody Sunday (Irish: Domhnach na Fola) is the term used to describe an incident in Derry[1], Northern Ireland, on 30 January 1972 in which 26 civil rights protesters were shot by members of the 1st Battalion of the British Parachute Regiment... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Early history

Derry is one of the oldest continuously inhabited places in Ireland.[13] The earliest historical references date to the 6th century when a monastery was founded there by St. Columba or Colmcille, a famous saint from what is now County Donegal, but for thousands of years before that people had been living in the vicinity. This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... See Columba (disambiguation) and St Columb for other uses. ... Statistics Province: Ulster Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East, Donegal South West County seat: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ...


Before leaving Ireland to spread Christianity elsewhere, Columba founded a monastery in the then Doire Calgach, on the east side of the Foyle. According to oral and documented history, the site was granted to Columba by a local king. The monastery then remained in the hands of the federation of Columban churches who regarded Colmcille as their spiritual mentor. The year 546 is often referred to as the date that the original settlement was founded. However it is accepted that this was an erroneous date assigned by medieval chroniclers.[13] It is accepted that between the 6th century and the 11th century, Derry was known primarily as a monastic settlement.[13] Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ...


The town became strategically more significant during the Tudor conquest of Ireland and came under frequent attack, until in 1608 it was destroyed by Cahir O'Doherty, Irish chieftain of Inishowen. Cahir ODoherty (1587 - 1608) was the last Gaelic Lord of Inishowen in north-west Ireland. ...


Plantation

Planters organised by London livery companies through The Honourable The Irish Society arrived in the 1600s as part of the plantation of Ulster, and built the city of Londonderry across the Foyle from the earlier town, with walls to defend it from Irish insurgents who did not welcome the occupation. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Livery Companies are trade associations based in the City of London. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Plantation of Ulster was a planned process of colonisation which took place in the northern Irish province of Ulster during the early 17th century in the reign of James I of England. ...


This Londonderry was the first planned city in Ireland: it was begun in 1613, with the walls being completed 5 years later in 1618. The central diamond within a walled city with four gates was thought to be a good design for defence. The grid pattern chosen was subsequently much copied in the colonies of British North America.[14] The charter initially defined the city as extending three Irish miles (about 6.1 km) from the centre. A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... A mile is a unit of length, usually used to measure distance, in a number of different systems, including Imperial units, United States customary units and Norwegian/Swedish mil. ...


The modern city preserves the 17th century layout of four main streets radiating from a central Diamond to four gateways - Bishop's Gate, Ferryquay Gate, Shipquay Gate and Butcher's Gate. The city's oldest surviving building was also constructed at this time: the 1633 Plantation Gothic cathedral of St Columb. In the porch of the cathedral is an eloquent inscription: St Columbs Cathedral flying the Crimson Banner of the Apprentice Boys of Derry St Columbs Cathedral in the walled city of Londonderry, Northern Ireland is the mother church of the Church of Ireland Diocese of Derry and Raphoe and the parish church of Templemore. ...

If stones could speake, then London's prayse should sound, Who built this church and cittie from the grounde.

17th century upheavals

During the 1640s, the city suffered in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, which began with the Irish Rebellion of 1641, when the Gaelic Irish insurgents made a failed attack on the city. In 1649 the city and its garrison, which supported the republican Parliament in London, were besieged by Scottish Presbyterian forces loyal to King Charles I. The Parliamentarians besieged in Derry were relieved by a strange alliance of Roundhead troops under George Monck and the Irish Catholic general Owen Roe O'Neill. These temporary allies were soon fighting each other again however, after the landing in Ireland of the New Model Army in 1649. The war in Ulster was finally brought to an end when the Parliamentarians crushed the Irish Catholic Ulster army at the battle of Scarrifholis in nearby Donegal in 1650. The Wars of the Three Kingdoms were an intertwined series of conflicts that took place in Scotland, Ireland, and England between 1639 and 1651 at a time when these countries had come under the Personal Rule of the same monarch. ... The Irish Rebellion of 1641 began as an attempted coup détat by Irish Catholic gentry, but rapidly degenerated into bloody intercommunal violence between native Irish Catholics and English and Scottish Protestant settlers. ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The English parliament in front of the King, c. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, Scotland and Ireland from March 27, 1625 until his execution. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle by Sir Peter Lely, painted 1665–1666. ... Eoghan Rua Ó Néill, anglicised as Owen Roe ONeill (c. ... For the band, see New Model Army (band). ... The battle of Scarrifholis was fought in Donegal in north-western Ireland, on the 21st of June 1650, during the Irish Confederate Wars – part of the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G924789 Statistics Province: Ulster County: Population ( ) 2,339 (2006) Website: www. ...


During the Glorious Revolution, only Londonderry and nearby Enniskillen had a Protestant garrison by November 1688. An army of around 1,200 men, mostly "Redshanks" (Highlanders), under Alexander Macdonnell, 3rd Earl of Antrim, was slowly organised (they set out on the week William of Orange landed in England). When they arrived on 7 December 1688 the gates were closed against them and the Siege of Derry began. In April 1689, King James came to the city and summoned it to surrender. The King was rebuffed and the siege lasted until the end of July with the arrival of a relief ship. The Glorious Revolution, also called the Revolution of 1688, was the overthrow of King James II of England (VII of Scotland) in 1688 by a union of Parliamentarians and the Dutch stadtholder William III of Orange-Nassau (William of Orange), who as a result ascended the English throne as William... For other uses, see Enniskillen (disambiguation). ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1688 (MDCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... For context see the Williamite war in Ireland and Jacobitism. ...


18th and 19th centuries

The war memorial in the diamond, erected 1927
The war memorial in the diamond, erected 1927 [15]

The city was rebuilt in the 18th century with many of its fine Georgian style houses still surviving. The city's first bridge across the River Foyle in 1790. During the 18th and 19th centuries the port became an important embarkation point for Irish emigrants setting out for North America. Some of these founded the colonies of Derry and Londonderry in the state of New Hampshire. North American redirects here. ... Derry is the name of several places: In Northern Ireland of the United Kingdom: The city of Derry, or Londonderry County Derry, or County Londonderry In the Republic of Ireland River Derry and Derry Water River in County Wicklow Derry, County Sligo In the United States: Derry, New Hampshire, a... Londonderry is the name of several places: in the United Kingdom: County Londonderry or County Derry The city of Londonderry or Derry Londonderry County Borough Council now called Derry City Council Londonderry Port, the citys port Londonderry Eglinton Airport now called City of Derry Airport Londonderry (parliamentary borough) (historically... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ...


Also during the 19th century, it became a destination for migrants fleeing areas more severely affected by the Irish Potato Famine.[16]


Partition

During the Irish War of Independence, the area was rocked by sectarian violence, partly prompted by the guerilla war raging between the Irish Republican Army and the British Crown Forces, but also influenced by economic and social pressures. In July 1920, several thousand unionist ex-British Army servicemen mobilised to try to drive Catholics out of jobs they had taken during the First World War. Severe rioting ensued and the loyalists launched an assault on St Columb's Cathedral, which was resisted by armed IRA members. Many lives were lost and in addition many Catholics and Protestants were expelled from their homes during the communal unrest. After a week's violence, a truce was negotiated by local politicians on either side. Combatants Irish Republic United Kingdom Commanders Michael Collins Richard Mulcahy Cathal Brugha Important local IRA leaders Henry Hugh Tudor Strength Irish Republican Army c. ... This article is about the historical army of the Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Raising loyalist flags is common in the summer Ulster loyalism is a militant Unionist ideology held mostly by Protestants in Northern Ireland. ... St Columbs Cathedral flying the Crimson Banner of the Apprentice Boys of Derry St Columbs Cathedral in the walled city of Londonderry, Northern Ireland is the mother church of the Church of Ireland Diocese of Derry and Raphoe and the parish church of Templemore. ...


In 1921, following the Anglo-Irish Treaty and the partition of Ireland, it unexpectedly became a border city, separated from much of its natural economic hinterland in County Donegal. Signature page of the Anglo-Irish Treaty The Anglo-Irish Treaty, officially called the Articles of Agreement for a Treaty Between Great Britain and Ireland, was a treaty between the Government of the United Kingdom and representatives of the extra-judicial Irish Republic that concluded the Irish War of Independence. ... Statistics Province: Ulster Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East, Donegal South West County seat: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ...


During the Second World War Derry played an important part in the Battle of the Atlantic. Ships from the Royal Navy, the Canadian and other Allied navies were stationed in the city and the United States military established a base. The reason for such a degree of military activity was self-evident: Derry was the westernmost port in the United Kingdom - indeed, the westernmost Allied port in Europe - and as such was a crucial jumping-off point, together with Glasgow and Liverpool, for the so-called convoys that ran between Europe and North America. The large numbers of military personnel altered substantially the character of the city, bringing a sense of colour, cosmopolitanism and economic buoyancy to Derry in these years. At the conclusion of the War, 19 U-boats of the German Kriegsmarine came into the city's harbour at Lisahally to offer their surrender at the close of the war. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Battle of the Atlantic can refer to either of two naval campaigns, depending on context: World War I - First Battle of the Atlantic World War II - Second Battle of the Atlantic A Third Battle of the Atlantic was envisioned to be be part of any Third World War that arose... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The Kriegsmarine (or War Navy) was the name of the German Navy between 1935 and 1945, during the Nazi regime, superseding the Reichsmarine. ... Londonderry Port at Lisahally in Derry in Northern Ireland is the United Kingdom’s most westerly port and has capacity for 30,000 ton vessels as well as accepting cruise ships. ...


The Troubles

The "Free Derry" sign in the Bogside: "You are now entering Free Derry"
The "Free Derry" sign in the Bogside: "You are now entering Free Derry"
The Bogside area viewed from the walls
The Bogside area viewed from the walls

Catholics perceived themselves as suffering under Unionist government in Northern Ireland, both politically and economically. In the late 1960s the city became the flashpoint of disputes about institutional discrimination and gerrymandering. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1230x890, 176 KB) Description: mural in Derry. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1230x890, 176 KB) Description: mural in Derry. ... Free Derry was the name given to the self-declared autonomous republican region of Derry, Northern Ireland, following the Battle of the Bogside of August 12-August 14, 1969. ... The Bogside is a nationalist neighbourhood outside the city walls of Derry, Northern Ireland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1440x1080, 511 KB) [edit] Summary The Bogside area of Derry, taken by me SeanMack, Oct 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1440x1080, 511 KB) [edit] Summary The Bogside area of Derry, taken by me SeanMack, Oct 2005. ... This article is about the constituent country. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Gender equality Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The Gerry-Mander first appeared in this cartoon-map in the Boston Gazette, 26 March 1812 Gerrymandering is a form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ...


The civil rights demonstrations were declared illegal and then suppressed by the Royal Ulster Constabulary and Ulster Special Constabulary The events that followed the August 1969 Apprentice Boys parade resulted in the Battle of the Bogside, when Catholic rioters fought the police, leading to widespread civil disorder in Northern Ireland and is often dated as the starting point of the Troubles. Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) was name of the police force in Northern Ireland from 1922 to 2001. ... The Ulster Special Constabulary (USC) was a reserve force of the Royal Ulster Constabulary. ... É ... A mural by the Bogside Artists in Derry of a young boy in a gas mask holding a petrol bomb during the Battle of the Bogside, August 1969. ... For other uses, see Troubles (disambiguation) and Trouble. ...


On Sunday January 30, 1972, 13 unarmed civilians were shot dead by British paratroopers during a civil rights march in the Bogside area. Another 13 were wounded and one further man later died of his wounds. This event came to be known as Bloody Sunday. is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bogside is a nationalist neighbourhood outside the city walls of Derry, Northern Ireland. ... For other incidents referred to by this name, see Bloody Sunday. ...


Violence eased towards the end of the Troubles in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Irish journalist Ed Maloney claims in "The Secret History of the IRA" that republican leaders there negotiated a de facto ceasefire in the city as early as 1991. Whether this is true or not, the city did see less bloodshed by this time than Belfast or other localities.


The city was famously visited by a killer whale in November 1977 at the height of the troubles and was dubbed Dopey Dick by the thousands who came from miles around to see him.


In the three centuries since their construction, the city walls have been adapted to meet the needs of a changing city. The best example of this adaptation is the insertion of three additional gates - Castle Gate, New Gate and Magazine Gate - into the walls in the course of the nineteenth century. Today, the fortifications form a continuous promenade around the city centre, complete with cannon, avenues of mature trees and views across Derry. Historic buildings within the city walls include St Augustine's Church, which sits on the city walls close to the site of the original monastic settlement; the copper-domed Austin's department store, which claims to the oldest such store in the world; and the imposing Greek Revival Courthouse on Bishop Street. The red-brick late-Victorian Guildhall, also crowned by a copper dome, stands just beyond Shipquay Gate and close to the river front.


Governance

The local district council is Derry City Council, which consists of five electoral areas: Cityside, Northland, Rural, Shantallow and Waterside. As of 2005, the council's 30 members were composed of 14 Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) members, ten Sinn Féin, five Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), and one Ulster Unionist Party (UUP). The current mayor is DUP councillor Drew Thompson and his deputy is Patricia Logue of Sinn Féin.[17] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Derry City Council (Londonderry County Borough Council until 1984) is a district council in County Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ... Shantallow is an ancient townland now almost totally with the City of Londonderry / Derry. ... The Waterside is an urban neighbourhood on the east side of the River Foyle opposite the Cityside of Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... For pre-Arthur Griffith use of the political name, see Sinn Féin (19th century). ... This article is about the political party in Northern Ireland. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland. ...


The local authority boundaries correspond to the Foyle constituency of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and the Foyle constituency of the Northern Ireland Assembly. In European Parliament elections, it is part of the Northern Ireland constituency. Foyle is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Speaker of the House of Lords Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist... Foyle is a constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... The logo of the Northern Ireland Assembly, a six flowered linen or flax plant. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... Northern Ireland is a constituency of the European Parliament. ...


Coat of arms and motto

Derry's coat of arms
Derry's coat of arms

The devices on the city's arms are a skeleton and a three-towered castle on a black field, with the chief or top third of the shield depicting the arms of the City of London: a red cross and sword on white. In the centre of the cross is a gold harp. Image File history File links Derry_arms_2003. ... Image File history File links Derry_arms_2003. ... Motto: Domine dirige nos Latin: Lord, guide us Shown within Greater London Sovereign state Constituent country Region Greater London Status City and Ceremonial County Admin HQ Guildhall Government  - Leadership see text  - Mayor David Lewis  - MP Mark Field  - London Assembly John Biggs Area  - Total 1. ...


The blazon of the arms is as follows: This is an article about Heraldry. ...


Sable, a human skeleton Or seated upon a mossy stone proper and in dexter chief a castle triple towered argent on a chief also argent a cross gules thereon a harp or and in the first quarter a sword erect gules[18]


According to documents in the College of Arms in London and the Office of the Chief Herald of Ireland in Dublin, the arms of the city were confirmed in 1613 by Daniel Molyneux, Ulster King of Arms.[19] The College of Arms document states that the original arms of the City of Derry were ye picture of death (or a skeleton) on a moissy stone & in ye dexter point a castle and that upon grant of a charter of incorporation and the renaming of the city as Londonderry in that year the first mayor had requested the addition of a "chief of London".[20][21] The entrance of the College of Arms. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Office of the Chief Herald of Ireland, (sometimes incorrectly called the Office of Arms) is the Republic of Irelands authority on all heraldic matters relating to Ireland and is located at the National Library of Ireland. ... The office of the Chief Herald of Ireland, (sometimes, though incorrectly, called the Office of Arms) is the Republic of Irelands authority on all heraldic matters relating to Ireland and is located at the National Library of Ireland. ...


A number of theories have been advanced as to the meaning of the "old" arms of Derry, before the addition of the chief bearing the arms of the City of London:

  • It has been suggested that the castle is related to an early 14th century castle in nearby Greencastle belonging to the Anglo-Norman Earl of Ulster Richard de Burgh.[19]
  • The most popular theory about the skeleton is that it is that of a Norman De Burgh knight who was starved to death in the castle dungeons in 1332 on the orders of his cousin the above mentioned Earl of Ulster.[19] Another explanation put forward was that it depicted Cahir O'Doherty (Sir Charles O'Dogherty), who was put to death after the Derry was invested by the English army in 1608. During the days of Gerrymandering and discrimination against the Catholic population of Derry, Derry's Roman Catholics often used to claim in dark wit that the skeleton was a local waiting for help from the council bureaucracy.[19]

In 1979 Derry City Council commissioned a report into the city's arms and insignia, as part of the design process for an heraldic badge. The published report found that there was no basis for any of the popular explanations for the skeleton and that it was "purely symbolic and does not refer to any identifiable person".[22] Greencastle Harbour - by Irish Artist, Sheila McClean Greencastle Fort Greencastle Pier at Dusk Carrickarory Pier at Night Greencastle, Donegal (An Caisleán Nua in Irish) is a commercial fishing port in County Donegal in the northwest of Ireland. ... The title of Earl of Ulster has been created several times in the Peerages of Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... Norman conquests in red. ... The title of Earl of Ulster has been created several times in the Peerages of Ireland and the United Kingdom. ... Cahir ODoherty (1587 - 1608) was the last Gaelic Lord of Inishowen in north-west Ireland. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The Gerry-Mander first appeared in this cartoon-map in the Boston Gazette, 26 March 1812 Gerrymandering is a form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ... Heraldic badges were common in the Middle Ages particularly in England. ...


The 1613 records of the arms depicted a harp in the centre of the cross, but this was omitted from later depictions of the city arms, and in the Letters Patent confirming the arms to Londonderry Corporation in 1952.[23] In 2002 Derry City Council applied to the College of Arms to have the harp restored to the city arms, and Garter and Norroy & Ulster Kings of Arms accepted the seventeenth century evidence, issuing letters patent to that effect in 2003.[18] Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... Garter Principal King of Arms is the senior King of Arms, and the senior Officer of Arms of the College of Arms. ... Norroy and Ulster King of Arms is one of the senior Officers of Arms of the College of Arms, and the junior of the two provincial Kings of Arms. ...


The motto attached to the coat of arms reads in Latin, "Vita, Veritas, Victoria". This translates into English as, "Life, Truth, Victory".[19]


Geography

The River Foyle at night
The River Foyle at night

Derry is characterised by its distinctively hilly topography. The River Foyle forms a deep valley as it flows through the city, making Derry a place of very steep streets and sudden, startling views. The original walled city of Londonderry lies on a hill on the west bank of the River Foyle. In the past, the river branched and enclosed this wooded hill as an island; over the centuries, however, the western branch of the river dried up and became a low-lying and boggy district that is now called the Bogside. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Download high resolution version (1080x441, 225 KB)This is an image I took myself using an Olympus C8080W digital camera. ... Download high resolution version (1080x441, 225 KB)This is an image I took myself using an Olympus C8080W digital camera. ... The River Foyle at Night. ... The River Foyle at Night. ... The defensive wall of Braşov, Romania. ... The River Foyle at Night. ...


Today, modern Derry extends considerably north and west of the city walls and east of the river. The half of the city the west of the Foyle is known as the Cityside and the area east is called the Waterside. The Cityside and Waterside are connected by theCraigavon Bridge and Foyle Bridge. The district also extends into rural areas to the southeast of the city. The Waterside is an urban neighbourhood on the east side of the River Foyle opposite the Cityside of Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The Craigavon Bridge in 2005. ... The Foyle Bridge is a bridge in Derry/Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ...


This much larger city, however, remains characterised by the often extremely steep hills that form much of its character on both sides of the river. A notable exception to this lies on the north-eastern edge of the city, on the edge of Lough Foyle, where vast expanses of sea and mudflats were reclaimed in the middle of the nineteenth century. Today, this district is known as the Slob Lands and is protected from the sea by miles of sea walls and dikes. The area is an internationally important bird sanctuary.


Other important nature reserves lie at Ness Wood, some ten miles east of Derry; and at Prehen Wood, within the city's south-eastern suburbs.


Climate

Climate Table
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average daily maximum temperature (°C) 10 10 11 12 14 17 18 19 17 15 11 11 13.75
Average daily maximum temperature (°F) 50 50 52 54 57 63 64 66 63 59 52 52 56.75
Average daily minimum temperature (°C) 0 0 2 3 5 8 10 10 9 6 4 1 4.8
Average daily minimum temperature (°F) 32 32 36 37 41 46 50 50 48 43 39 34 40.7
Mean total rainfall (mm) 110 80 90 60 60 70 70 90 100 120 120 100 1070
Mean total rainfall (in) 4.3 3.1 3.5 2.4 2.4 2.8 2.8 3.5 3.9 4.7 4.7 3.9 42.1
Source: Yahoo! Weather

For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Celsius (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

Demography

Derry Urban Area (DUA), including the city and the neighbouring settlements of Culmore, New Buildings and Strathfoyle, is classified as a city by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) since its population exceeds 75,000. On census day (29 April 2001) there were 90,736 people living in Derry Urban Area. Of these, 27.0 per cent were aged under 16 years and 13.4 per cent were aged 60 and over; 48.3 per cent of the population were male and 51.7 per cent were female; 77.8 per cent were from a Roman Catholic background and 20.8 per cent were from a Protestant background; and 7.1 per cent of people aged 16-74 were unemployed. Culmore (Irish: Chuil Móir) is a large village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, close to Derry. ... New Buildings (also written Newbuildings) is a village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... Strathfoyle is a village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, about five miles north east of Derry. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The Derry Urban Area is the urban area that includes and surrounds the city or Derry/Londonderry in County Derry/County Londonderry in Ireland. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Topics in Christianity Preaching Prayer Ecumenism Relation to other religions Movements Music Liturgy Calendar Symbols Art Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ...


The mid-2006 population estimate for the wider Derry City Council area was 107,300.[4] Population growth in 2005/06 was driven by natural change, with net out-migration of approximately 100 people.[4] Derry City Council (Londonderry County Borough Council until 1984) is a district council in County Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ...


Londonderry was one of the few cities in Ireland to experience an increase in population during the Irish Potato Famine as migrants came to the city from other, more heavily affected areas.[16] The great majority of these migrants were Catholic.


Protestant minority

The "No Surrender" mural right outside the city wall: "Londonderry west bank loyalists still under siege no surrender"
The "No Surrender" mural right outside the city wall: "Londonderry west bank loyalists still under siege no surrender"

Concerns have been raised by the Protestant community over the increasingly divided nature of the city. During the course of the Troubles, it is estimated that as many as 15,000 Protestants fled the cityside due to safety concerns. Fewer than 500 Protestants are now living on the west bank of the River Foyle, compared to 18,000 in 1969,[24] with most on the Fountain Estate[25] and it is feared that the city could become permanently divided.[26][27] Londonderry No Surrender 2003-09-11, Copyright 2003 Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Londonderry No Surrender 2003-09-11, Copyright 2003 Kaihsu Tai File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Salle des illustres, ceiling painting, by Jean André Rixens. ... For other uses, see Loyalist (disambiguation). ...


However, concerted efforts have been made by local community, church and political leaders from both traditions to redress the problem. A conference to bring together key actors and promote tolerance was held in October 2006. Dr Ken Good, the Church of Ireland Bishop of Derry and Raphoe, said he was happy living on the cityside. "I feel part of it. It is my city and I want to encourage other Protestants to feel exactly the same", he said.


Support for Protestants in the district has been strong from the former SDLP city Mayor Helen Quigley. Cllr Quigley has made inclusion and tolerance key themes of her mayoralty. The Mayor Helen Quigley said it is time for "everyone to take a stand to stop the scourge of sectarian and other assaults in the city."[28] Helen Quigley is the Social Democratic and Labour Party politician from Northern Ireland Quigley is the current Mayor of Derry which makes her the most prominent member of the Derry City Council. ...


Economy

Du Pont production facility, 2007, Maydown
Du Pont production facility, 2007, Maydown

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 567 pixelsFull resolution (3248 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 567 pixelsFull resolution (3248 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ...

History

The economy of the district was based significantly on the textile industry until relatively recently. For many years women were often the sole wage earners working in the shirt factories while the men predominantly in comparison had high levels of unemployment.[29] This led to significant male emigration.[30] The history of shirt making in the city dates back as far as 1831 and is said to have been started by William Scott and his family who first exported shirts to Glasgow.[31] Within 50 years, shirt making in the city was the most prolific in the UK with garments being exported all over the world. It was known so well that the industry received a mention in Das Kapital by Karl Marx, when discussing the factory system: For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Das Kapital (Capital, in the English translation) is an extensive treatise on political economy written by Karl Marx in German. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

The shirt factory of Messrs. Tille at Londonderry, which employs 1,000 operatives in the factory itself, and 9,000 people spread up and down the country and working in their own houses.[32]

The industry reached its peak in the 1920s employing around 18,000 people.[33] In modern times however the textile industry declined due to in most part cheaper Asian wages.[34]


A long-term foreign employer in the area is Du Pont, which has been based at Maydown since 1958, its first European production facility.[35] Originally Neoprene was manufactured at Maydown and subsequently followed by Hypalon. More recently Lycra and Kevlar production units were active.[36] Thanks to a healthy world-wide demand for Kevlar which is made at the plant, the facility recently undertook a £40 million upgrade to expand its global Kevlar production. Du Pont has stated that contributing factors to its continued commitment to Maydown are "low labor costs, excellent communications, and tariff-free, easy access to the UK mainland and European continent." E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (NYSE: DD) was founded in July 1802 as a gun powder mill by Eleuthère Irénée du Pont on Brandywine Creek, near Wilmington, Delaware. ... Neoprene is the DuPont Chemical trade name for a family of synthetic rubbers based on polychloroprene. ... Hypalon is a trademark for a kind of synthetic rubber noted for its resistance to chemicals, temperature extremes, and ultraviolet light. ... Lycra is INVISTAs trademark for a synthetic polyurethane-based elastane textile with elastic properties of the sort known generically as spandex. As with other spandex materials, Lycra is commonly used in athletic or active clothing, such as clothes for cycling, swimwear, leotards and dancewear, as well as in underclothes. ... Kevlars molecular structure; BOLD: monomer unit; DASHED: hydrogen bonds. ...

Seagate production facility, 2005, 1 Disc Drive, Springtown Industrial Estate
Seagate production facility, 2005, 1 Disc Drive, Springtown Industrial Estate

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1440x796, 202 KB) Summary My own work - SeanMack - image of the Seagate factory in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1440x796, 202 KB) Summary My own work - SeanMack - image of the Seagate factory in Derry, Northern Ireland. ...

Inward investment

In the last 15 years there has been a drive to increase inward investment in the city, more recently concentrating on digital industries. Currently the three largest private-sector employers are American firms.[37] Economic successes have included call centres and a large investment by Seagate, which has operated a factory in the Springtown Industrial Estate since 1993. Seagate currently employs over 1,000 people in the Springtown premises, which produce more than half of the company's total requirement for hard drive read-write heads. Seagate can refer to: Seagate Technology, a high tech manufacturer Seagate, Brooklyn, a community in Brooklyn, USA Seagate, Friends of, the nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded to preserve the historic winter retreat of Gwendolyn and Powel Crosley in Sarasota, Florida, USA Seagate, North Carolina, a community in North Carolina... Typical hard drives of the mid-1990s. ...


A recent but controversial new employer in the area is Raytheon, Raytheon Systems Limited, was established in 1999, in the Ulster Science & Technology Park, Buncrana Road.[38] Although some local people welcomed the jobs boost some in the area objected to the jobs being provided by a firm involved heavily in the arms trade.[39] Following four years of protest by the Foyle Ethical Investment Campaign, in 2004 Derry City Council passed a motion declaring the district a "A 'No–Go' Area for the Arms Trade".[40] Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major American defense contractor and industrial corporation with core manufacturing concentrations in defense systems and defense and commercial electronics. ... The arms industry is a massive global industry. ...


Significant multinational employers in the region include Firstsource of India, DuPont, INVISTA, Stream International, Seagate Technology, Perfecseal, NTL, Raytheon and Northbrook Technology of the United States, Arntz Belting and Invision Software of Germany, and Homeloan Management of the UK. Major local business employers include Desmonds, Northern Ireland's largest privately-owned company, manufacturing and sourcing garments, E&I Engineering, St. Brendan's Irish Cream Liqueur and McCambridge Duffy, one of the largest insolvency practices in the UK.[41] This article is about E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company. ... INVISTAâ„¢ is the worlds largest integrated fiber, resin and intermediates company. ... Seagate Technology (NYSE: STX) is a major American manufacturer of hard drives, founded in 1979 and based in Scotts Valley, California. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Virgin Media, Telewest and Virgin. ... Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) is a major American defense contractor and industrial corporation with core manufacturing concentrations in defense systems and defense and commercial electronics. ... Northbrook Technology is a company based in Belfast, Derry and Strabane in Northern Ireland. ... Saint Brendans is a cream liqueur named after Saint Brendan. ...


Even though the city provides cheap labour by standards in Western Europe, critics have noted that the grants offered by the Northern Ireland Industrial Development Board have helped land jobs for the area that only last as long as the funding lasts.[42] This was reflected in questions to the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Richard Needham, in 1990.[43] It was noted that it cost £30,000 to create one job in an American firm in Northern Ireland. A Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, in the United Kingdom government structure, is a minister who is junior to a Minister of State who is then junior to a Secretary of State. ... For other persons of the same name, see Needham . ...


Critics of investment decisions affecting the district often point to the decision to build a new university building in nearby (predominately Protestant) Coleraine rather than developing the University of Ulster Magee Campus. Another major government decision affecting the city was the decision to create the new city of Craigavon outside Belfast, which again was detrimental to the development of Derry. Even in October 2005, there was perceived bias against the comparatively impoverished North West of the province, with a major civil service job contract going to Belfast. Mark Durkan, the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) leader and Member of Parliament (MP) for Foyle was quoted in the Belfast Telegraph as saying: WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Coleraine Borough UK Parliament: East Londonderry European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Coleraine Postal District(s): BT51, BT52 Population (2001) 24,042 Coleraine (from the Irish: Cúil Raithin meaning Ferny corner) is a large town... Magee Campus is one of four constituent campuses of the University of Ulster, the largest university on the island of Ireland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mark Henry Durkan (born in 1960) is a Roman Catholic nationalist politician in Northern Ireland and the leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...

The fact is there has been consistent under-investment in the North West and a reluctance on the part of the Civil Service to see or support anything west of the Bann, except when it comes to rate increases, then they treat us equally.[44]

In July 2005, the Irish Minister for Finance, Brian Cowen, called for a joint task force to drive economic growth in the cross border region. This would have implications for Derry and Tyrone, and Donegal across the border. Brian Cowen (Irish: Brian Ó Comhain, born 10 January 1960) is the current Taoiseach of Ireland. ...


Shopping

Austins department store
Austins department store

Derry is the north west's major shopping district, housing two large shopping centres along with numerous shop packed streets serving much of the greater county, as well as Tyrone and Donegal. Retail developments in Letterkenny have, however, lessened cross-border traffic from north County Donegal. Austins is a department store located in the Diamond of Derry, Northern Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Omagh Area: 3,155 km² Population (est. ... Statistics Province: Ulster Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East, Donegal South West County seat: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference C167188 Statistics Province: Ulster County: Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East Dialling Code: 074, +000 353 74 Area: 307. ...


The city centre has two main shopping centres; the Foyleside Shopping Centre (also Northern Ireland's largest shopping centre) which has 45 stores and 1430 parking spaces, and the Richmond Centre, which has 39 retail units. The Quayside Shopping Centre also serves the city-side and there is also Lisnagelvin Shopping Centre in the Waterside. These centres, as well as local-run businesses, feature numerous national and international stores. A retail park was recently built called Crescent Link Retail Park located in the Waterside and has many international chain stores, including Homebase, Curries, Carpet Right, PC World, Argos Extra, Toys R Us, Halfords, JJB, Pets at Home, MFI, Tesco Express, M&S Simply food and Land of Leather. In the short space that this site has been built, it has quickly grown to the second largest retail park in Northern Ireland (second only to Sprucefield in Lisburn).[45] It changed hands for more than £92m in October 2007.[45] Foyleside shopping centre. ... The Richmond Centre is a shopping centre in Derry, Northern Ireland. ...


It is also home to the world's oldest independent department store; Austins. Established in 1830, Austins predates Jenners of Edinburgh by 5 years, Harrods of London by 15 years and Macys of New York by 25 years.[46] The store's five-story Edwardian building is located in the city centre's Diamond. Austins is a department store located in the Diamond of Derry, Northern Ireland. ... Jenners - viewed from the Scott Monument The Royal Warrant outside Jenners Jenners Department Store is one of Britains oldest department stores, long family-run but recently brought under the ownership of House of Fraser. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Harrods is a department store on Brompton Road in Knightsbridge, London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Macys Department Store on Seventh Avenue in Manhattan Macys was founded in 1851 by Rowland Hussey Macy as a dry goods store in downtown Haverhill, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the state. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It is sometimes extended to include the period to the start of World War I in 1914 or even the end of the war in 1918. ...


Landmarks

Guildhall
Guildhall

There is a distinct architectural quality compared with other Irish cities. This quality can be primarily ascribed to the formal planning of the historic walled city of Londonderry within the walls. This is centred on the diamond with a collection of late Georgian, Victorian and Edwardian buildings maintaining the gridlines of the main thoroughfares (Shipquay Street, Ferryquay Street, Butcher Street and Bishop Street) to the city gates. St Columb's Cathedral does not follow the grid pattern reinforcing its civic status. The Cathedral was the first post-reformation cathedral built for an Anglican church. The construction of the Catholic St. Eugene's Cathedral in the Bogside in the nineteenth-century was another major architectural addition to the city. The more recent infill buildings within the walls are of varying quality and in many cases these were low quality hurriedly constructed replacements for 1970s bomb damaged buildings. The Townscape Heritage Initiative has funded restoration works to a number of key listed buildings and other older structures. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1370x2048, 392 KB) Guildhall, Derry, Northern Ireland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1370x2048, 392 KB) Guildhall, Derry, Northern Ireland. ...


There are many museums and sites of interest in and around Londonderry, including the Foyle Valley Railway Centre, the Amelia Earhart Centre And Wildlife Sanctuary, the Apprentice Boys Memorial Hall, Ballyoan Cemetery, The Bogside, numerous murals by the Bogside Artists, Derry Craft Village, Free Derry Corner, O'Doherty Tower (now home to part of the Tower Museum), the Guildhall, the Harbour Museum, the Museum of Free Derry, Chapter House Museum, the Workhouse Museum, the Nerve Centre, St. Columb's Park and Leisure Centre, St Eugene's Cathedral, Creggan Country Park, The Millennium Forum and the Foyle and Craigavon bridges. Amelia Mary Earhart (pronounced AIR-hart; 24 July 1897 – missing 2 July 1937, declared dead 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer, author and womens rights advocate. ... Apprentice Boys of Derry Crest The Apprentice Boys Of Derry are a Protestant fraternal society with a worldwide membership, founded in 1814. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The Bogside, looking down from the entrance to the city walls. ... A mural is a painting on a wall, ceiling, or other large permanent surface. ... The Bogside Artists are a trio of mural painters, living and working in Northern Ireland. ... Free Derry was the name given to the self-declared independent Bogside region of the city of Derry, Northern Ireland, following the Battle of the Bogside in 1969. ... The Nerve Centre is an entertainment venue, that was established in 1990 as an eviroment for youth culture in Derry, Northern Irelands second largest city. ... Creggan, is a large housing estate in Derry in Northern Ireland. ... The Foyle Bridge is a bridge in Derry/Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ... The Craigavon Bridge in 2005. ...


Future projects include the Walled City Signature Project, which intends to ensure that the city's walls become a world class tourist experience.[47]


Derry has seen a large boost to its economy in the form of tourism over the last few years. Cheap flights offered by budget airlines have enticed many people to visit the city. A number of camp-sites have since sprung up in the surrounding countryside, especially on the West side of the city towards Letterkenny, and towards Muff in the North-West. However, many people choose to camp in fields belonging to local farmers. Tourism mainly focuses around the pubs, mainly those of Waterloo Street. Other attractions include museums, a vibrant shopping centre and trips to the Giant's Causeway, which is approximately 50 miles (80 km) away. For other uses, see Giants Causeway (disambiguation). ...


Transport

The transport network is built out of a complex array of old and modern roads and railways throughout the city and county. The city's road network also makes use of two bridges to cross the River Foyle, the Craigavon Bridge and the Foyle Bridge, the longest bridge in Ireland. It also serves as a major transport hub for travel throughout nearby County Donegal. Image File history File links The Craigavon Bridge, the only double-decker road bridge in Europe. ... Image File history File links The Craigavon Bridge, the only double-decker road bridge in Europe. ... The Craigavon Bridge in 2005. ... The River Foyle at Night. ... The Craigavon Bridge in 2005. ... The Foyle Bridge is a bridge in Derry/Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Ulster Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East, Donegal South West County seat: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ...


In spite it being the second city of Northern Ireland, road and rail links to other cities are below par for its standing. Many business leaders claim that government investment in the city and infrastructure has been badly lacking. Some have stated that this is due to its outlying border location whilst others have cited a sectarian bias against the west of the province due to its high proportion of Catholics.[48][49] There is no motorway link with Belfast or Dublin. The rail link to Belfast has been downgraded over the years so that presently it is not a viable alternative to the roads for industry to rely on. There are currently plans for £1 billion worth a transport infrastructure investment in and around the district.[50] Sectarianism is an adherence to a particular sect or party or denomination, it also usually involves a rejection of those not a member of ones sect. ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Buses

City and suburban

Most public transport in Northern Ireland is operated by the subsidiaries of Translink. Originally the city's internal bus network was run by Ulsterbus, which still provides the city's connections with other towns in Northern Ireland. The city's buses are now run by Ulsterbus Foyle,[51] just as Translink Metro now provides the bus service in Belfast. The Ulsterbus Foyle network offers 13 routes across the city into the suburban areas, excluding an Easibus link which connects to the Waterside and Drumahoe,[52] and a free Rail Link Bus runs from the Waterside Railway Station to the city centre. All buses leave from the Foyle Street Bus Station in the city centre. Translink Translink is the brand name of the Northern Ireland Transport Holding Company (NITHCo), a public corporation of Northern Ireland charged to oversee the provision of public transport in the country. ... Ulsterbus is a public transport operator in Northern Ireland and operates bus services outside of Belfast. ... The Ulsterbus Foyle logo Ulsterbus Foyle is a division of Translink that operates bus services in Derry, Northern Irelands second city. ... Metro Logo Operated as Metro, Citybus Limited (pre 7 February 2005 name) is a bus company in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ...


Long distance

Long distance buses depart from Foyle Street Bus Station to destinations throughout Ireland. Buses are operated by both Ulsterbus and Bus Éireann on cross-border routes and also by Lough Swilly buses to Co. Donegal. There is a half-hourly service to Belfast every day, called the Maiden City Flyer, which is the Goldline Express flagship route. There are hourly services to Strabane, Omagh, Coleraine and Letterkenny, and nine services a day to bring people to Dublin. There is a daily service to Sligo, Galway, Shannon Airport and Limerick. Ulsterbus is a public transport operator in Northern Ireland and operates bus services outside of Belfast. ... Bus Éireann, or Irish Bus, provides bus services in the Republic of Ireland with the exception of those operated entirely within the Dublin Region, which are provided by Dublin Bus. ... Lough Swilly (Loch Súilí in Irish) in Ireland is a fjord-like body of water lying between the eastern side of the Inishowen Peninsula in County Donegal and the rest of northern Donegal. ... Statistics Province: Ulster County Town: Lifford Code: DL Area: 4,841 km² Population (2006) 146,956 Website: www. ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Strabane UK Parliament: West Tyrone European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling code: 028, +44 28 Post town: Strabane Postal district(s): BT82 Population (2006 est. ... , Omagh (from the Irish: An Ómaigh meaning The Sacred (or Virgin) Plain) is the county town of County Tyrone in Northern Ireland, situated where the rivers Drumragh and Camowen meet to form the Strule. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Coleraine Borough UK Parliament: East Londonderry European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Coleraine Postal District(s): BT51, BT52 Population (2001) 24,042 Coleraine (from the Irish: Cúil Raithin meaning Ferny corner) is a large town... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference C167188 Statistics Province: Ulster County: Dáil Éireann: Donegal North East Dialling Code: 074, +000 353 74 Area: 307. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G685354 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 13 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   17,892 [1]  24,096[1] Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference M300256 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Dáil Éireann: Galway West European Parliament: North-West Dialling Code: 091 Postal District(s): G Area: 50. ... Shannon International Airport (IATA: SNN, ICAO: EINN), or Aerfort na Sionna in Irish is one of Irelands primary three airports (along with Dublin Airport and Cork Airport). ... This article is about the city. ...


Railways

Northern Ireland Railways has a single route from Waterside station to Belfast via Bellarena, Castlerock, Coleraine, Ballymoney, Cullybackey, Ballymena, Antrim, Mossley West and Whiteabbey. The service, which had been allowed to deteriorate in the 1990s, has since been boosted by increased investment. 1906 reference Rail Map Northern Ireland Railways (NIR or NI Railways) – formerly, and very briefly, known as Ulster Transport Railways (UTR) – is the railway operator in Northern Ireland. ... Londonderry railway station Serves Town of Londonderry in County Londonderry It Is Served By Northern Ireland Railways To Belfast Central. ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... Bellarena is a village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland on the coastal road between Limavady and Coleraine. ... Castlerock is a small seaside town in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, UK. It is situated between Coleraine and Londonderry and is very popular with summer tourists, having numerous apartment blocks and two caravan sites. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: District: Coleraine Borough UK Parliament: East Londonderry European Parliament: Northern Ireland Dialling Code: 028, +44 28 Post Town: Coleraine Postal District(s): BT51, BT52 Population (2001) 24,042 Coleraine (from the Irish: Cúil Raithin meaning Ferny corner) is a large town... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 55. ... Cullybackey is a village in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ... , Ballymena (from the Irish: An Baile Meánach meaning middle townland) is a town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland and the seat of Ballymena Borough Council. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Whiteabbey is a small urban village area in Newtownabbey, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. ...


Currently, a plan has been put in place by the Department for Regional Development, for relaying of the track between Londonderry and Coleraine by 2013, which will include a passing loop, and the introduction of two new train sets.[53] The £86 million plan will reduce the journey time to Belfast by 30 minutes and allow commuter trains to arrive before 9am for the first time.[53] However, many still do not use the train, due to the fact that at over two hours it is slower centre-to-centre than the 100-minute Ulsterbus Goldline Express service.[54]

Railways in Ireland, 1906.
Railways in Ireland, 1906.

At one time, the city was served by four different systems which stretched throughout Northern Ireland, into Co. Donegal and deep into southern Ireland. At the turn of the last century, Clones was one of the major junctions from Londonderry, Omagh, and Belfast to north Leinster, in particular, the major market towns of Athlone, Cavan, and Mullingar. This back-bone rail infrastructure was administered by Midland Great Western Railway which also linked to other major centres namely, Sligo, Tullamore, via Clara, other destinations such as Dublin, Limerick, and other market centres of the south coast.[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3063x4167, 1297 KB) This work is in the public domain worldwide. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3063x4167, 1297 KB) This work is in the public domain worldwide. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Ulster County: Elevation: 71 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural: 321 The word clones is also used as the plural of clone. ... , Omagh (from the Irish: An Ómaigh meaning The Sacred (or Virgin) Plain) is the county town of County Tyrone in Northern Ireland, situated where the rivers Drumragh and Camowen meet to form the Strule. ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish grid reference N033420 Statistics Province: Leinster & Connacht County: Dáil Éireann: Westmeath European Parliament: East Dialling code: 090, +353 90 Elevation: 56 m Population (2006) 17,544 [2]  Website: www. ... Look up Cavan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the place in Canada, see Mullingar, Saskatchewan. ... The Midland Great Western Railway (MGWR) main line extended from Broadstone in Dublin to the Midlands (Athlone) and onwards to Galway and Clifden in what is now the Republic of Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference G685354 Statistics Province: Connacht County: Elevation: 13 m Population (2006)  - Town:  - Rural:   17,892 [1]  24,096[1] Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city. ...


Road network

The road network has historically seen under-investment and has lacked good road connections to both Belfast and Dublin for many years. Long overdue, the largest road investment in the north west's history is now taking place in the district with the construction of new dual-carriageways and roads to Dungiven and helping to reduce the time it takes to get to Belfast.[55] This development is bringing a direct dual-carriageway linking between Northern Ireland's two largest cities a step closer. The project is costing £250 million and is expected to be completed in 2015. In October 2006, the Irish Government announced that it was to invest 1,000 million in Northern Ireland;[56] and one of the planned projects was the complete upgrade of the A5 Derry-Omagh-Aughnacloy(-Dublin) road, around 90km (56 miles) long, to motorway standard.[57] It is yet unknown will these two separate projects interconnect at any point, although there has been calls for some form of connection between the two routes. In June 2008, Conor Murphy, Minister For Regional Development, announced that a study looking into the feasibility of connecting the A5 and A6 will occur.[50] Should it proceed, the scheme would most likely run from Drumahoe to South of Prehen along the South East of the City.[53] Dungiven (Irish: Dún Geimhín; meaning Givens fort) is a large village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, on the main Belfast to Derry road. ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... The Government (Irish: ) [ral̪ˠt̪ˠəs̪ˠ n̪ˠə heːɼən̪ˠ] is the cabinet that exercises executive authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... Motorway symbol in UK, Australia, Spain, France and Ireland. ... Conor Murphy (born 10 July 1963, Newry) is the Sinn Féin Member of Parliament for the Newry and Armagh constituency in Northern Ireland, which he represents as its MP and also as one of the Members of the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...


Air

City of Derry Airport, the council-owned commercial airport near Eglinton, has been growing in recent years with new investment in a new runway and £10 million towards redeveloping the site.[58] It is hoped that the new investment will add to the airport's limited array of domestic and international flights. At the end of 2008 work will begin on turning the A2 from Maydown to Eglinton and the airport into a dual carriageway, with completion estimated by 2010. The airport receives significant public subsidies. City of Derry Airport Entrance. ... , Eglinton (Irish: ) is a large village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... The A2 is a major road in Northern Ireland. ... Maydown is a small village in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, near to the city of Derry. ...


Flights depart mostly to airports in the UK and Ireland, such as Dublin, London Stansted, Liverpool, Nottingham, Glasgow Prestwick Airport, Glasgow International Airport and Bristol, though also serves some resorts on the southern coast of the Iberian peninsula and the Canary Islands during the summer. Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... Terminal building, designed by Sir Norman Foster Stansted Airport is a medium-sized passenger airport with a single runway, located in the English county of Essex about thirty miles north of London. ... Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL, ICAO: EGGP) is an airport serving the English city of Liverpool. ... Nottingham East Midlands Airport (IATA: EMA, ICAO: EGNX) is an airport in the East Midlands of England, near Castle Donington in Leicestershire. ... Glasgow Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick Airport (Scottish Gaelic: ) (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is an international airport serving Glasgow, situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Glasgow Airport redirects here. ... The passenger terminal at Bristol International Airport, Lulsgate Bristol International Airport (IATA airport code: BRS) is the main commercial airport serving Bristol and its surrounding lands in England, UK. History In 1927 a group of local businessmen raised £6,000 through public subscriptions to inaugurate a flying club at Filton... The Iberian Peninsula, or Iberia, is located in the extreme southwest of Europe, and includes modern day Spain, Portugal, Andorra and Gibraltar. ... This article is about the islands in the Atlantic Ocean. ...


Ryanair has also announced that there will be flights to and from the airport to London Luton Airport from October 2008.[59] This will be the second route offered to London from the city. , London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately 30 miles (48 km) north of London. ...


Aer Arann will return to the airport as of the 22 July 2008, operating the Public Service Order route between Derry and Dublin.[60]


Sea

Londonderry Port at Lisahally is the United Kingdom's most westerly port and has capacity for 30,000-ton vessels. The port played a vital part for the Allies in World War II during the war's longest running campaign, the Battle of the Atlantic, and saw the surrender of the German U-Boat fleet at Lisahally on 8 May 1945.[61] Londonderry Port at Lisahally in Derry in Northern Ireland is the United Kingdom’s most westerly port and has capacity for 30,000 ton vessels as well as accepting cruise ships. ... Battle of the Atlantic can refer to either of two naval campaigns, depending on context: World War I - First Battle of the Atlantic World War II - Second Battle of the Atlantic A Third Battle of the Atlantic was envisioned to be be part of any Third World War that arose... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Education

Magee College became a campus of the University of Ulster in 1969
Magee College became a campus of the University of Ulster in 1969

Derry is home to the Magee Campus of the University of Ulster, which was formerly Magee College. Given the affordability of housing in the city, the student population has boomed in recent years bringing a revival in the fortunes of the Magee Campus. The North West Institute of Further and Higher Education is also based in the city. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1440x1748, 462 KB) Summary My own work - SeanMack - image of Magee University - univeristy of Ulster, Derry. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1440x1748, 462 KB) Summary My own work - SeanMack - image of Magee University - univeristy of Ulster, Derry. ... The Magee College, is an English-medium higher education institution of the University of Ulster located in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The University of Ulster (UU) is a multi-centre university located in Northern Ireland and is the largest single university on the island of Ireland, discounting the federal National University of Ireland. ... The Magee College, is an English-medium higher education institution of the University of Ulster located in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The University of Ulster (UU) is a multi-centre university located in Northern Ireland and is the largest single university on the island of Ireland, discounting the federal National University of Ireland. ...


Secondary schools include St. Columb's College, Oakgrove Integrated College, St Cecilia's College, St. Joseph's Boys' School, Lisneal College, Foyle and Londonderry College, Thornhill College, Lumen Christi College and St. Peter's High School. There are also numerous primary schools. High School also refers to the highest form of classical riding, High School Dressage. ... St. ... Oakgrove Integrated College is a college / Secondary school based in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... St Cecilias College is a secondary school located in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... St. ... Lisneal College is a secondary school located in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... Foyle and Londonderry College (or FALC) is a co-educational voluntary grammar school in the city of Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... Thornhill College is the major Roman Catholic girls grammar school in Derry, Northern Ireland on the northern coast of the island of Ireland Famous alumni include Dana Rosemary Scallon. ... Founded in September 1997 , Lumen Christi College is a co-educational Catholic grammar school in Derry, Northern Ireland open to students of all faiths. ... St. ... A primary school in Český Těšín, Czech Republic. ...


Sports

The city is the home of many sporting establishments, teams and organisations, and football, both Association (soccer) and Gaelic are popular in the area. In soccer, the main teams are: Institute F.C. and Oxford United Stars F.C. who play in the Northern Ireland Irish League; Derry City F.C., who plays in the Republic of Ireland's FAI National League. In Gaelic football Derry GAA are the county team and play in the Gaelic Athletic Association's National Football League, Ulster Senior Football Championship and All-Ireland Senior Football Championship. They also field hurling teams in the equivalent tournaments. Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Institute F.C. is a Northern Ireland football club recently promoted into the Irish Premier League. ... For the English football team, see Oxford United F.C. Oxford United Stars F.C. is a Northern Ireland football club, founded in 1937, based in Derry. ... The Irish Football League (IFL), or Irish League, is a league of football (soccer) clubs in Northern Ireland. ... Derry City Football Club (Irish: , IPA: ) is an Irish football club based in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The FAI National League is the Republic of Irelands new national football league system created following the merging of the FAI and the League of Ireland. ... The Derry County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Doire) or Derry GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Derry. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... The National Football League (known for sponsorship reasons as the Allianz National Football League) is a Gaelic football tournament held annually between the county teams of Ireland, under the auspices of the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... The Ulster Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Ulster Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of football played in the province of Ulster in Ireland. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Football Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ...


There are also many gyms situated throughout the city, including Fitness First. Others include Pro Gym and Platinum also Extreme Fitness owned & run by Willie Lynch. Pro Gym is run by Dave Fox and Malika Zitouni. Dave is a native of Derry and is the Nabba Northern Ireland 1997/98 winner. Malika won the Nabba Universe Class 1 2006. Fitness First is a chain of health clubs that claims to be the largest in the United Kingdom, Europe, Australia and the Asia-Pacific region. ... Malika Zitouni (born December 12 1973) is a French-Algerian bodybuilder. ...


Gaelic games

There are many Gaelic games clubs in and around the city, for example Na Magha CLG, Steelstown GAC, Doire Colmcille CLG, Seán Dolans GAC and Slaughtmanus GAC. Na Magha CLG, of Derry, Northern Ireland are a Gaelic sports club in the Derry league of the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... Steelstown GAC (Irish:Bhaile Stíl) is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Derry. ... Senior Club Championships Doire Colmcille CLG is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Derry City. ... Senior Club Championships Seán Dolans GAC (Irish: CLG Seán Ó Dubhiain) is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Derry City. ... St. ...


Association football

In addition to the Derry City, Institute and Oxford United Stars, who all play in national leagues, a number of other clubs are based in the city. The local football league is the Derry and District League and teams from the city and surrounding areas participate, including Lincoln Courts, Don Bosco's F.C. and [[Trojans F.C.], also North West team like BBOB (Boys Brigade Old Boys) Image File history File links Psggame. ... Image File history File links Psggame. ... Derry City Football Club (Irish: , IPA: ) is an Irish football club based in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... Paris Saint-Germain FC, or PSG, is a French football club based in Paris. ... Brandywell Stadium The Brandywell Stadium, more commonly known as The Brandywell, is a football stadium located in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The UEFA Cup (also known as European Cup 3, CE3 or C3) is a football competition for European club teams, organized by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Don Boscos F.C.s current crest. ...


The Foyle Cup youth soccer tournament is held annually in the city. It has attracted many notable teams in the past, including Werder Bremen, IFK Göteborg and Ferencváros. The Foyle Cup is a youth soccer tournament held every year in Derry City. ... Werder Bremen is a German football club playing in Bremen, in the northwest German federal state of the same name. ... This article is about IFK Göteborgs football section. ... Ferencvárosi Torna Club (FTC), also known as Ferencváros, nicknamed Fradi, is one of the most popular sports clubs in Hungary, founded in 1899. ...


Boxing

There are many boxing clubs, the most well-known being The Ring Boxing Club, which is associated with Charlie Nash[62] and John Duddy,[63] amongst others. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... John Francis Duddy (born June 19, 1979, Derry, Northern Ireland) is a middleweight boxer. ...


Rugby

Rugby Union is also quite popular in the city, with the City of Derry Rugby Club situated not far from the city centre. YMCA RFC is another Rugby club and is based in Drumahoe which is just outside the city. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The City of Derry Rugby Club is a rugby union club, formed in 1881 in Derry currently playing rugby union in the AIB Division Three. ...


Culture

'Hands Across the Divide' sculpture, by Maurice Harron
'Hands Across the Divide' sculpture, by Maurice Harron

In recent years the city, and surrounding countryside, has become well-known for its artistic legacy producing such talents as the Nobel Prizewinning poet Seamus Heaney, the poet Seamus Deane, the playwright Brian Friel, the writer and music critic Nik Cohn, the artist Willie Doherty, the socio-political commentator and activist Eamonn McCann as well as bands such as The Undertones. The large political gable-wall murals of Bogside Artists, Free Derry Corner, the Foyle Film Festival, the Derry Walls, St Eugene's and St Columb's Cathedrals and the annual Halloween street carnival are popular tourist attractions. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1416 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Derry User talk:Cordless Larry Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1416 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Derry User talk:Cordless Larry Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Seamus Justin Heaney (IPA: ) (born 13 April 1939) is an Irish poet, writer and lecturer who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. ... Born to a Catholic nationalist family in Londonderry, Northern Ireland in 1940, Seamus Deane is a poet, critic and novelist. ... Brian Friel (born 9 January 1929) is a playwright and, more recently, director of his own works from Northern Ireland who now resides in County Donegal in the Republic of Ireland. ... Nik Cohn (also written Nick Cohn) is a British rock journalist. ... Willie Doherty (born 1959) is an Irish artist. ... Eamonn McCann (born in Derry in 1943) is an Irish journalist, author, and political activist. ... The picture cover of The Undertones 1979 Youve Got My Number (Why Dont You Use It!) single The Undertones are a Northern Irish rock band formed in Derry, Northern Ireland in 1975. ... The Bogside Artists are a trio of mural painters, living and working in Northern Ireland. ... Free Derry was the name given to the self-declared independent Bogside region of the city of Derry, Northern Ireland, following the Battle of the Bogside in 1969. ...


Media

Newspaper

The local papers the Derry Journal (known as the Londonderry Journal until 1880) and the Londonderry Sentinel reflect the divided history of the city: the Journal was founded in 1772 and is Ireland's second oldest newspaper;[64] the Sentinel newspaper was formed in 1829 when new owners of the Journal embraced Catholic Emancipation, and the editor left the paper to set up the Sentinel. The Derry Journal is a newspaper based in Derry, Northern Ireland, serving Co Londonderry as well as Co Donegal in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Londonderry Sentinal is a unionist-leaning newspaper based in Derry, Co Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the Penal Laws. ...


Radio

There are numerous radio stations receivable: the largest stations based in the city are BBC Radio Foyle and the commercial station Q102.9. BBC Radio Foyle is a BBC Northern Ireland radio station which serves North West of Northern Ireland. ... Q102. ...


Television

There is a locally based television station, C9TV, which is one of only two local or 'restricted' television services in Northern Ireland. This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ...


Night-life

The city's night-life is mainly centred on the weekend. Waterloo Street is central to this. It is a steep street lined with various pubs, both Irish traditional and modern. Live rock and traditional music can frequently be heard emanating from the pub-doors and windows whilst walking up or down the street at night. Derry also has a Wetherspoons outlet, which is popular with punters as a pre-club drinking destination, as well as Lloyds No. 1 Bar (also owned by Wetherspoons). The city is renowned for producing exceptionally talented musicians and many bands perform in venues around the city, for example the Smalltown America duo, Fighting with Wire and Jetplane Landing. Triggerman and Swanee River have resident slots at Mason's Bar, while numerous other young local and indeed international bands perform at the Nerve Centre. The Moon Under Water in Hounslow J. D. Wetherspoon plc (LSE: JDW) (commonly referred to as Wetherspoons or spoons) is a British pub chain founded by Tim Martin. ... Smalltown America is a London, UK based independent record label whose aim is to to cultivate a productive staff of music lovers, and a self-sustainable business model - through which artists can release the best records they can possibly produce. ... Fighting With Wire is an Alternative Rock and Punk band hailing from Derry, Northern Ireland. ... Jetplane Landing are a four piece band from Derry (Northern Ireland) and London (England). ... The Nerve Centre is an entertainment venue, that was established in 1990 as an eviroment for youth culture in Derry, Northern Irelands second largest city. ...


Events

  • The world-famous "Banks of the Foyle Hallowe’en Carnival" (known in Irish as Féile na Samhna) in Derry also prove a huge tourism boost for the city, the carnival is promoted as being the first and longest running Halloween carnival in the whole of Ireland,[65][66] It is the largest street party in Ireland with more than 40,000 ghoulish revellers taking to the streets annually.[67]
  • In March, the city hosts the Big Tickle Comedy Festival, which in 2006 featured Dara Ó Briain and Colin Murphy. In April the city plays host to City of Derry Jazz and Big Band Festival and in November the Foyle Film Festival, the biggest film festival in Northern Ireland.
  • The Instinct Festival is an annual youth festival celebrating the Arts. It is held around Easter and has proven a success in recent years.
  • Celtronic is a major annual electronic dance festival held at venues all around the city. The 2007 Festival featured the DJ, Erol Alkan.
  • On 9 December 2007 Derry entered the Guinness Book of Records when 13000 Santas gathered to break the world record beating previous records held by Liverpool and Las Vegas.[69]

Dara Ó Briain, (born February 4, 1972) (pronounced , Anglicised ), is an Irish comedian and television presenter. ... Colin Murphy presenting The Blizzard of Odd Colin Murphy is a Northern Irish comedian born in Downpatrick, County Down, Northern Ireland. ... TOMO-DACHI 2006 Tomo-Dachi is the largest anime convention on the island of Ireland[1] based in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Magee College, is an English-medium higher education institution of the University of Ulster located in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The University of Ulster (UU) is a multi-centre university located in Northern Ireland and is the largest single university on the island of Ireland, discounting the federal National University of Ireland. ... For context see the Williamite war in Ireland and Jacobitism. ... Apprentice Boys of Derry Crest The Apprentice Boys Of Derry are a Protestant fraternal society with a worldwide membership, founded in 1814. ... The Maiden City Festival occurs between 7th - 14th August every year in the walled city of Derry ( Londonderry). ... Radio 1s Big Weekend (previously known as One Big Weekend) is a music festival run by BBC Radio 1. ... Erol Alkan is a London-based electro DJ of Turkish descent. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

References in popular music

I was born in Londonderry
I was born in Derry City too
Oh what a special child
To see such things and still to smile
I know that there was something wrong
But I kept my head down and carried on.

The Divine Comedy "Sunrise"

In 1803 we sailed out to sea,
Out from the sweet town of Derry,
For Australia bound if we didn't all drown,
And the marks of our fetters we carried... For other uses see The Divine Comedy (disambiguation), Dantes Inferno (disambiguation), and The Inferno (disambiguation) Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino...

Bobby Sands "Back Home In Derry" Full lyrics

It is old but it is beautiful, and its colours they are fine.
It was worn at Derry, Aughrim, Enniskillen and the Boyne.
My father wore it as a youth in bygone days of yore.
And on the Twelfth I love to wear the sash my father wore Robert Gerard Sands (Irish: [1][2]), commonly known as Bobby Sands, (9 March 1954 – 5 May 1981), was a Provisional Irish Republican Army volunteer and member of the UK parliament who died on hunger strike whilst in HM Prison Maze (also known as Long Kesh) for the possession of firearms. ... For context see the Williamite war in Ireland and Jacobitism. ... The Battle of Aughrim was the decisive battle of the Williamite war in Ireland. ... The battle of Newtownbutler in 1689 was part of the Williamite war in Ireland. ... Combatants Jacobite Forces -6000 French troops, 19,000 Irish Catholic troops Williamite Forces -English, Scottish, Dutch, Danish, Huguenot and Ulster Protestant troops Commanders James VII and II William III of England Strength 25,000 36,000 Casualties ~1,500 ~750 William III (William of Orange) King of England, Scotland and...

Anon "The Sash"

...In the early morning the shirt factory horn called women from Creggan,
the Moor and the Bog.
While the men on the dole played a mother's role,
fed the children and then walked the dog.
And when times got tough there was just about enough.
But they saw it through without complaining.
For deep inside was a burning pride in the town I loved so well.
There was music there in the Derry air, like a language that we all could understand... The Sash is an Irish Protestant ballad commemorating the Protestant victory in the Williamite war in Ireland in 1690-91. ...

Phil Coulter "The Town I Loved So Well" Full lyrics

Phil Coulter (born 19 February 1942) is an Irish songwriter, performer and music producer from Northern Ireland. ...

Notable people

Main article: List of people from Derry

Notable people who were born or have lived in Derry include the poet and Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney, John Hume - Social Democratic and Labour Party founder and Nobel Peace Prize winner, Martin McGuinness - Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland, Martin O'Neill - Aston Villa manager, actress Amanda Burton, girl band member Nadine Coyle, and musician Feargal Sharkey. Seamus Justin Heaney (IPA: ) (born 13 April 1939) is an Irish poet, writer and lecturer who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. ... John Hume. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish, Danish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... James Martin Pacelli McGuinness MP MLA (Irish: ;[1] born in Derry on 23 May 1950) is the Deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland. ... The Office of the First Minister and the Deputy First Minister (OFMDFM) (Irish: Oifig an Chéad-Aire agus an LeasChéad-Aire, Ulster Scots: Offis o tha Heid Männystèr an tha Heid Männystèr Depute) is the Northern Ireland government department with overall responsibility for the... Martin Hugh Michael ONeill, OBE, (born March 1, 1952 in Kilrea, Northern Ireland) is a former Northern Ireland national football team captain who has previously managed Wycombe Wanderers, Norwich City, Leicester City and Celtic and is currently manager of Aston Villa. ... Aston Villa redirects here. ... Parkinson, Burton and Grant in 2001 This article is about the actress. ... Nadine Elizabeth Louise Coyle (born June 15, 1985, Derry, Northern Ireland) is a singer from the all-girl group Girls Aloud. ... Image:Feargal Buckley. ...


See also


Abbeys and priories in Northern Ireland is a link page for any abbey, priory, friary or other religious house in Northern Ireland Abbreviations and Key The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:- Trusteeship denoted as follows:- NM = National Monument Other abbreviations:- County Antrim County Armagh County Derry Derry: possible... Apprentice Boys of Derry Crest The Apprentice Boys Of Derry are a Protestant fraternal society with a worldwide membership, founded in 1814. ... Map of Ballynagalliagh. ... The Bogside is a nationalist neighbourhood outside the city walls of Derry, Northern Ireland. ... Derry City Football Club (Irish: , IPA: ) is an Irish football club based in Derry, Northern Ireland. ... The Derry County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Doire) or Derry GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Derry. ... Senior Club Championships Doire Colmcille CLG is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Derry City. ... This is a list page for towns in Northern Ireland. ... This is a list page for villages in Northern Ireland. ... Scouting in Londonderry is a part of the Scout Association in the United Kingdom, covering the County of Londonderry in Northern Ireland. ... Shantallow is an ancient townland now almost totally with the City of Londonderry / Derry. ...


References

  1. ^ This is the official Post Town as defined by Royal Mail.
  2. ^ BBC article
  3. ^ Ofcom report,page 14
  4. ^ a b c Statistics press notice: Mid-year population estimates Northern Ireland (2006). Northern Ireland Statistics & Research Agency (2007-07-31). Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  5. ^ Derry City Council, Re Application for Judicial Review [2007 NIQB 5 (25 January 2007)], http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/6297907.stm
  6. ^ Google Map Data Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  7. ^ Education/Oideachas BBC. Retrieved 14 July 2007.
  8. ^ 'Londonderry' Hudson, John. The British Library. Retrieved 2007-09-29.
  9. ^ a b c Aspects of Sectarian Division in Derry Londonderry - First public discussion: The Name Of this City? Retrieved [[2008-06-15].]
  10. ^ Derry Chamber of Commerce | Londonderry Chamber of Commerce
  11. ^ Change of District Name (Derry) Order 1984
  12. ^ Sections 7, 8 and 132 of the Local Government Act (Northern Ireland) 1972 (Eliz II 20 & 21 c.9)
  13. ^ a b c Lacey, Brian (1999). Discover Derry, City Guides. Dublin: The O'Brien Press Ltd. ISBN 0-86278-596-0. 
  14. ^ World Facts Index > United Kingdom > Londonderry worldfacts.us, 2005. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  15. ^ A Brief History of Derry Tim Lambert. Retrieved 2008-03-28
  16. ^ a b Johnson, James H. (1957). "The population of Londonderry during the Great Irish Famine". The Economic History Review 10 (2): 273–285. doi:10.2307/2590863. 
  17. ^ Local democracy: Elected members. Derry City Council. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  18. ^ a b Letters Patent certifying the arms of the City of Londonderry issued to Derry City Council, sealed by Garter and Norroy and Ulster Kings of Arms dated April 30, 2003
  19. ^ a b c d e Lacey, Brian (1999). Discover Derry, City Guides. Dublin: The O'Brien Press Ltd, pp. 72-73. ISBN 0-86278-596-0. 
  20. ^ Genealogical Office, Dublin: GO Ms 60, Sketches of arms by Richard Carney, fol. 47
  21. ^ College of Arms, London: The Arms of Peers of Ireland and some Commoners, fol. 133d (c.1652)
  22. ^ L E Rothwell, An inquiry initiated by Derry City Council into the ensigns armorial and related matters of the City of Londonderry
  23. ^ Letters Patent ratifying and confirming the arms of the City of Londonderry sealed by Garter and Norroy & Ulster Kings of Arms dated April 28, 1952
  24. ^ "Derry's Protestant exodus shock", Belfast Telegraph, 2008-01-01. Retrieved on 2008-03-27. 
  25. ^ Religion distribution in Derry, 1991. The Ireland Story. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  26. ^ "Catholics urged to support neighbours", BBC News, 2006-10-18. Retrieved on 2008-03-27. 
  27. ^ Peter Shirlow, Brian Graham, Amanda McMullan, Brendan Murtagh, Gillian Robinson and Neil Southern (2005). Population Change and Social Inclusion Study: Derry/Londonderry. Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister. Retrieved on 2008-03-27.
  28. ^ Taking a Stand Derry Journal Editorial 11 July 2006
  29. ^ Women, art and architecture appear to have achieved a rare symbiosis in a new project in Derry Declan Sheehan CIRCA 95, Spring 2001. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  30. ^ History of the Bogside Bloody Sunday Trust. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  31. ^ DERRYS ASSOCIATION WITH SHIRT MAKING www.geocities.com/historyofshirtmakinginderry. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  32. ^ Capital: A Critique of Political Economy, Vol. I. The Process of Capitalist Production. Part IV, Chapter XV Karl Marx. Charles H. Kerr and Co. Chicago, 1906. First published: 1867. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  33. ^ Lacey, Brian (1999). Discover Derry, City Guides. Dublin: The O'Brien Press Ltd, pp. 44. ISBN 0-86278-596-0. 
  34. ^ Thriving industry is no more: Glory days of shirt factories recalled Derry Journal Online, 2008-06-13. Retrieved 2008-06-15.
  35. ^ First European Plant – 1958 heritage.dupont.com. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  36. ^ Du Pont (UK) Ltd www.nics.gov.uk. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  37. ^ U.S.-Irish Business Summit Richard N. Haass, Director, Policy Planning Staff, Remarks to the U.S. – Irish Business Summit, Washington, DC. 6 September 2002. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  38. ^ Home > About Us > Londonderry Raytheon Company, 2004. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  39. ^ Protest over NI missile firm BBC News Online, 25 March 2003. Retrieved 27 August 2006.
  40. ^ Derry City Now A 'No–Go' Area for the Arms Trade www.indymedia.ie, 8 January 2004. Retrieved 19 July 2006
  41. ^ Derry - Regional City. Derry City Council. Retrieved on 2008-04-08.
  42. ^ Beyond the Troubles? - Chapter 8, Will there be peace? Peter Hadden, 1994. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  43. ^ House of Commons – Column 372 & 373 1 March 1990. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  44. ^ United front to tackle Hain on jobs snub for DerryBrendan McDaid, 25 October 2005. Retrieved 27 August 2006.
  45. ^ a b Crescent Link Retail Park bought for £92m Derry Journal Online, 2007-11-09. Retrieved 2008-06-15.
  46. ^ Austins in brief – the world's oldest independent department store Declan Hasson, www.austinsstore.com. Retrieved 2008-03-28
  47. ^ Walled City of Derry – Signature Project The Industry Website of the Northern Ireland Tourist Board. Retrieved 10 September 2006.
  48. ^ The Derry March – Background Information CAIN Web Service, 23 March 2006.Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  49. ^ NORTHERN IRELAND DURING THE 1960s Irelandseye.com, 1999–2006. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  50. ^ a b "Over £1billion transport investment planned for North West in Northern Ireland", eGov Monitor, 2008-06-13. Retrieved on 2008-06-18. 
  51. ^ The launch of Ulsterbus Foyle Link to press release for the launch of Ulsterbus Foyle. Retrieved 22 September 2006.
  52. ^ Foyle Area Ulsterbus routes Retrieved 2008-06-15
  53. ^ a b c McKinney, Seamus. "£86m upgrade to rail link will 'take half an hour off journey'", The Irish News, 2008-06-12. Retrieved on 2008-06-14. 
  54. ^ Doing business in County Londonderry Retrieved 2008-06-15
  55. ^ 75percent of the journey upon completion will be on either High Quality Dual Carriageway or Motorway Standard Roads.A6 Dualling Dungiven to Londonderry www.wesleyjohnston.com/roads. Retrieved 22 September 2006.
  56. ^ It's trick-or-treat time with Brown STEPHEN DEMPSTER, 24 October 2006, www.belfasttoday.net, Johnston Press Digital Publishing. Retrieved 31 October 2006.
  57. ^ Package would fund biggest-ever cross-border project www.breakingnews.ie, 22/03/2007. Retrieved 2007-06-09.
  58. ^ Story of investment £10 million pound investment in City of Derry Airport. Retrieved 22 September 2006.
  59. ^ Also as off June 2008 Ryanair has announced a second new route to Birmingham International Airport.Ryanair to Launch 12 New UK Routes Datamonitor. Retrieved 2008-06-15
  60. ^ Aer Arann drops Dublin-Kerry route and starts Dublin-Derry instead Retrieved 2008-06-15
  61. ^ Raise the U-boat: council plans to put Nazi sub in maritime museum Owen Bowcott, The Guardian. August 20 2007. Retrieved 2008-06-15.
  62. ^ Charlie Nash - "King of the Ring" Barry Flynn, Irish-Boxing.com, 2005-12-24. Retrieved 2008-03-28
  63. ^ Duddy enjoying life in the Big Apple Tomás Rohan, Irish-Boxing.com, 2005-01-05. Retrieved 2008-03-28
  64. ^ Lacey, Brian (1999). Discover Derry, City Guides. Dublin: The O'Brien Press Ltd, pp. 43. ISBN 0-86278-596-0. 
  65. ^ Banks of the Foyle Hallowe’en Carnival Derry City Council. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  66. ^ Masquerading as Subversion? Rebecca Pelan. Politics and Culture. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  67. ^ Ireland, home of Halloween Malcolm Rogers, The Irish Post. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  68. ^ Magee To Host Japanese Animation Convention news.ulster.ac.uk, 7 December 2005. Retrieved 5 September 2006.
  69. ^ Santa record bid attracts 13,000 BBC Website

Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the unrelated U.S. carrier, see Ryan International Airlines. ... There are two cities named Birmingham with international airports: See either Birmingham International Airport (UK) Birmingham International Airport (US) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Craigavon Bridge, one of the city's two bridges.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Derry
  • Guardian Unlimited Video of Andrew Maxwell exploring Derry and Donegal
  • Accents and dialects of the UK Speaker: Rita McClaughlin (b.1940/03/02; female, embroiderer) The British Library Board
  • Xpressions of Derry - an interactive galleria which comprises assorted images of Derry architecture, landscape and society.
  • Google satellite view of Derry, the Foyle and the Swilly
  • Derry City Council
  • Derry visitor information
  • Derry G.A.A.
  • Londonderry Chamber of Commerce
  • The Charters of Londonderry and Coleraine, 1613
  • Guildhall Press - publisher of the Derry Tourist Guide
This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... This article is about the country. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... This article is about the constituent country. ... This article is about the capital city of Northern Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ...

 
 

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