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Encyclopedia > Derby
Derby
Derby shown within England
Coordinates: 52°57′N 1°08′W / 52.95, -1.133
Sovereign state Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Constituent country Flag of England England
Region East Midlands
Ceremonial county Flag of DerbyshireDerbyshire
Admin HQ Derby City Centre
Settled AD 600
City Status 1977
Government
 - Type Unitary authority, City
 - Governing body Derby City Council
 - Leadership Leader & Cabinet
Area
 - U.A. & City 78.03 km² (30.1 sq mi)
Population (2006 est.)
 - U.A. & City 236,300
 - Density 3,028/km² (7,842.5/sq mi)
 - Urban 236,300
 - Ethnicity
(Office of National Statistics 2005 Estimate)[1]
85.8% White
8.9% S. Asian
2.2% Black British
1.1% Chinese and other
2.0% Mixed Race
Time zone Greenwich Mean Time (UTC+0)
Twin Cities
 -  Flag of GermanyOsnabrück Germany (since 1985)
Grid Ref. SK570400
ONS code 00FY
ISO 3166-2 GB-NGM
NUTS 3 UKF14

Derby (pronounced "dar-bee" /dˈɑːbɪ/) listen  is a city in the East Midlands of England. It lies on the banks of the River Derwent and is surrounded by the shire county of Derbyshire. In the 2001 census the population of the borough was 233,700, whilst that of the Derby Urban Area was 229,407. Measured by Urban Area, Derby is the 18th largest settlement in England. // Look up derby in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... One of the administrative counties of England File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article discusses states as sovereign political entities. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East Midlands is one of the regions of England and consists of most of the eastern half of the traditional region of the Midlands. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Image File history File links Derbyshire_flag. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... AD redirects here. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Office for National Statistics is the UK government agency charged with the collection and publication of government statistics. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... GMT redirects here. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... // This is a list of twin towns or sister cities — that is, pairs of towns or cities in different countries which have town twinning arrangements. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... , Osnabrück (IPA: ) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, some 80 km NNE of Dortmund, 45 km NE of Münster, and some 100 km due west of Hanover. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... The ISO 3166-2 codes for the United Kingdom correspond to the nations administrative divisions. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... The East Midlands is one of the regions of England and consists of most of the eastern half of the traditional region of the Midlands. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Derwent is a river in the county of Derbyshire, England. ... A shire county or non-metropolitan county in England, is a county level entity which is not a metropolitan county. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... This is a list of the largest cities and towns of England ordered by population. ...

Contents

Status

Traditionally, Derby is the county town of Derbyshire, although Derbyshire's administrative centre has in recent years been Matlock. On 1 April 1997 Derby City Council became again a unitary authority (a status it had held, as a County Borough, up until 1974), with the rest of Derbyshire administered from Matlock. Derby has two hospitals: the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary and the Derby City Hospital. In the United Kingdom a county is a historic type of subnational division; which by the Middle Ages had become established as a unit of local government. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... , Matlock is the county town of Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority, which has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Derby City General Hospital (DCGH) is one of two hospitals in the city of Derby, the other being the Derbyshire Royal Infimary. ...


History

Origins

The City has Roman, Saxon and Viking connections. The Roman camp of 'Derventio' was probably at Little Chester/Chester Green (grid reference SK353375); The site of the old Roman fort is at Chester Green, just south of local football (soccer) pitches. Later the town was one of the 'Five Boroughs' (fortified towns) of the Danelaw. The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Five Burghs or more usually The Five Boroughs or The Five Boroughs of the Danelaw were the five main towns of Danish Mercia. ... Gold: Danelaw The Danelaw, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles also known as the Danelagh, (Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a name given to a part of Great Britain, now northern and eastern England, in which the laws of the Danes[1] held predominance over those of the Anglo...

The Tower of Derby Cathedral, Englands third tallest (Anglican) cathedral church tower
The Tower of Derby Cathedral, Englands third tallest (Anglican) cathedral church tower[2]

The popular belief is that the name 'Derby' is a corruption of the Danish and Gaelic Djúra-bý (recorded in Anglo-Saxon as Deoraby) (Village of the Deer); however some assert that it is a corruption of the original Roman name 'Derventio'. The town was also named 'Darby' or 'Darbye' on some of the oldest maps, eg. Speed's 1610 map. The city is one of the few cities that has retained a name with a Viking origin, like York, which had the Viking name Jórvík. Derby recently celebrated its 2,000th year as a settlement. The Tower Derby Cathedral is a cathedral church in the City of Derby, England. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Old English redirects here. ... York shown within England Coordinates: , Sovereign state Constituent country Region Yorkshire and the Humber Ceremonial county North Yorkshire Admin HQ York City Centre Founded 71 City Status 71 Government  - Type Unitary Authority, City  - Governing body City of York Council  - Leadership: Leader & Executive  - Executive: Liberal Democrat  - MPs: Hugh Bayley (L) John...


New research (throughout 2004) into the history and archaeology of Derby has provided evidence that the Vikings and Anglo-Saxons probably co-existed, occupying two areas of land surrounded by water. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (c. 900) says that "Derby is divided by water". These areas of land were known as Norþworþig ("Northworthy", = "north enclosure") and Deoraby, and were at the "Irongate" (North) side of Derby[citation needed]. (Ron McKeown of Derby Heritage Development Trust has produced a recent paper on this subject.) The initial page of the Peterborough Chronicle. ...


The Middle Ages to the 18th century

During the Civil War of 1642-1646 the town was garrisoned by Parliamentary troops commanded by Sir John Gell, 1st Baronet, who was appointed Governor of Derby in 1643. These troops took part in the defence of Nottingham, the siege of Lichfield, the battle of Hopton Heath and many other engagements in Nottinghamshire, Staffordshire and Cheshire, as well as successfully defending Derbyshire against royalist armies. Sir John Gell, 1st Baronet (22 June 1593 – 26 October 1671) was a Parliamentarian politician and military figure in the English Civil War. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Litchfield. ... The Battle of Hopton Heath, in Staffordshire, was a battle of the First English Civil War, fought on Sunday 19 March 1643 between Parliamentarian forces led by Sir John Gell and Sir William Brereton and a Royalist force under Spencer Compton, 2nd Earl of Northampton. ...


Bonnie Prince Charlie made camp at Derby on 4 December 1745, whilst on his way south to seize the English crown. The Prince called at The George Inn on Irongate, where the Duke of Devonshire had set up his headquarters, and demanded billets for his 9000 troops. Charles Edward Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788), known in Scots Gaelic as Teàrlach Eideard Stiùbhairt, was the exiled claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and is now commonly known as Bonnie Prince Charlie. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... The George Inn, in Iron Gate, Derby was a coaching inn used by the Duke of Devonshire as his headquarters when commanding the Derbyshire Blues, in readiness for the invasion by Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) in 1745. ...

Statue of Bonnie Prince Charlie located on Cathedral Green
Statue of Bonnie Prince Charlie located on Cathedral Green

He stayed at Exeter House, Exeter Street where he held his "Council of War". A replica of the room containing actual wall panels from Exeter house is on display at the Central library located on the Wardwick in the City Centre. [2] He had received misleading information about an army coming to meet him south of Derby. Although he wished to continue with his quest, he was overruled by his fellow officers. He abandoned his invasion at Swarkestone Bridge, on the River Trent, just a few miles south of Derby. As a testement to his belief in his cause the Prince who on the march from Scotland had walked at the front of the column made the return journey on horseback at the rear of the bedraggled and tired army. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x780, 55 KB) Summary Bonnie Prince Charlie statue located at Cathedral Green in Derby. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (800x780, 55 KB) Summary Bonnie Prince Charlie statue located at Cathedral Green in Derby. ... Exeter House stood in Exeter Street, Derby up until 1854. ... Swarkestone Bridge Swarkestone is a village in Derbyshire, England. ... For other uses see Trent River. ...


Each year at the beginning of December, (usually the first weekend), the Charles Edward Stuart Society of Derby lead a weekend of activities culminating in a parade through the City Centre and a battle on Cathedral Green.


The Industrial Revolution

Derby and Derbyshire were centres of Britain's industrial revolution. In 1717 Derby was the site of the first water powered silk mill in Britain, built by John Lombe and George Sorocold after Lombe had reputedly stolen the secrets of silk-throwing from Piedmont in what is now Italy (he is alleged to have been poisoned by Piedmontese in revenge in 1722). The Derby Industrial Museum is housed in a former Silk Mill in Derby, England. ... John Lombe (1693 - 1722) was an inventor who patented 3 types of Silk machines, for winding, spinning and twisting. ... George Sorocold was an engineer in Derby in the eighteenth century. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ...


In 1759 Jedediah Strutt patented and built a machine called the Derby Rib attachment that revolutionised the manufacture of Hose. This attachment was used on the Rev. Lee's Framework knitting machine; it was placed in front of and worked in unison with Lee's Frame, to produce ribbed hose (stockings). The partners were Jedediah Strutt, William Woollatt had been joined in 1758 by John Bloodworth and Thomas Stafford, leading hosiers in Derby. The patent was obtained in January 1759; after three years Bloodworth and Stafford were paid off, and Samuel Need, hosier of Nottingham, joined the partnership; the firm was known as Need, Strutt & Woollatt. The patent expired in 1773, though the partnership continued until 1781, when Need died. Jedediah Strutt (1726 – 7 May 1797) was a hosier and cotton spinner from Belper, England. ... A stocking frame was a mechanical knitting machine used in the textiles industry. ...

Year Population[3]
1801 14,695
1851 48,506
1901 118,469
1921 142,824
1941 167,321
1951 181,423
1961 199,578
1971 219,558
1981 214,424
1991 225,296
2001 221,716

Messrs Wright, the bankers of Nottingham, recommended that Richard Arkwright apply to Strutt & Need for finance for his cotton spinning mill. The first mill opened in Nottingham in 1770; this was driven by horses. In 1771 Richard Arkwright, Samuel Need and Jedediah Strutt built the world's first water-powered cotton spinning mill at Cromford, Derbyshire, developing a form of power that was the catalyst for the industrial revolution. Richard Arkwright Sir Richard Arkwright, born (23 December 1732 – 3 August 1792) to Ellen and Thomas Arkwright, was an Englishman credited for inventing the spinning frame — later renamed the water frame following the transition to water power. ... Cromford, in Derbyshire, England, is a village that is one of the significant sites in the development of the Industrial Revolution. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ...


This was followed in Derbyshire by Jedediah Strutt's cotton spinning mills at Belper. They were: South Mill, the first, 1775; North Mill, 1784, which was destroyed by fire on 12 January 1803, and then rebuilt——it started work again at the end of 1804; West Mill, 1792, commenced working 1796; Reeling Mill, 1897; Round Mill, which took 10 years to build, from 1803 to 1813, and commenced working in 1816; and Milford Mills, 1778. The Belper and Milford mills were not built in partnership with Arkwright. These mills were all Strutt owned and financed. is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... , Belper is a town within the local government district of Amber Valley in Derbyshire, England. ... Milford is a village in Derbyshire, England, on the River Derwent, between Duffield and Belper on the A6 trunk road. ...


The Belper North Mill of 1804 built by William Strutt, Jedediah's son, is an iron-framed fire-proof building and is the only original Strutt Mill still standing today. It now serves as a Visitor Centre. Strutts North Mill built in 1803, to replace the original one destroyed by fire Belper North Mill is one of the Derwent Valley Mills designated UNESCO World Heritage Status in 2001. ...

Thomas Evans' mill at Darley Abbey (1783). Other famous 18th century figures with connections to Derby include Dr Johnson, the creator of the English dictionary, who married Elizabeth Porter at St. Werburgh's Church, Derby in 1735; the painter Joseph Wright, known as Wright of Derby, who was famous for his revolutionary use of light in his paintings and was an associate of the Royal Academy; and John Whitehurst, a famous clockmaker and philosopher. Erasmus Darwin, doctor, scientist, philosopher and grandfather of Charles Darwin was also to be found in Derby and Derbyshire at much the same time, though his practice was based in Lichfield, Staffordshire. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3840x2160, 3298 KB) Sir Richard Arkwright and Co, Masson Mills, Derbyshire Photographer: User:Justinc Now a textile and industrial museum. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3840x2160, 3298 KB) Sir Richard Arkwright and Co, Masson Mills, Derbyshire Photographer: User:Justinc Now a textile and industrial museum. ... Masson Mills, Derwent Valley Derwent Valley Mills is a World Heritage Site along the River Derwent in Derbyshire, England, designated in December 2001. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Darley Abbey has one of the oldest buildings in Derby in the form of the Abbey on Darley street. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... St. ... An Experiment on a Bird in an Air Pump (1768). ... The Royal Academy of Arts is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly, London, England. ... John Whitehurst (10th April 1713 - 18th February 1788) of Cheshire, England was a clockmaker and scientist, and made significant early contributions to geology. ... This article is about Erasmus Darwin who lived 1731–1802; for his descendants with the same name see Erasmus Darwin (disambiguation). ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Not to be confused with Litchfield. ... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ...


The beginning of the next century saw Derby emerging as an engineering centre, with manufacturers such as James Fox, who exported machine tools to Russia. James Fox (born 19 May 1939) is an English actor. ...


In 1840, the North Midland Railway set up its works in Derby and, when it merged with the Midland Counties Railway and the Birmingham and Derby Junction Railway, to form the Midland Railway, Derby became its headquarters. The North Midland Railway was a British railway company, which opened its line from Derby to Rotherham (Masborough) and Leeds in 1840. ... British Rail Engineering Limited (BREL) Derby consisted of two separate works; Derby Loco works, and Derby Carriage and Wagon works. ... The Sun Inn, Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, birthplace of the Midland Counties Railway, 1832 The Midland Counties Railway (MCR) was a railway company in the United Kingdom which existed between 1832 and 1844, connecting Nottingham, Leicester and Derby with Rugby and thence, via the London and Birmingham Railway, to London. ... The Birmingham and Derby Junction Railway was a British railway company. ... This article is about the historical British railway company. ...


The connection with the railway encouraged others, notably Andrew Handyside, Charles Fox and his son Francis Fox. A list of the structures these three built reads like a "Who's Who" of famous buildings. Andrew Handyside and Company was an iron founder in Derby in the nineteenth century. ... Charles Fox was a civil engineer in Derby in the nineteenth century. ... Francis Fox was an English civil engineer born in Derby in the nineteenth century. ...


Derby was one of the boroughs reformed by the Municipal Corporations Act 1835, and it became a county borough with the Local Government Act 1888. The borough expanded in 1877 to include Little Chester and Litchurch, and then in 1890 to include New Normanton and Rowditch. The borough did not increase substantially again until 1968, when under a recommendation of the Local Government Boundary Commission it was expanded into large parts of the rural district of Belper, Repton and South East Derbyshire. This vastly increased Derby's population from 132,408 in the 1961 census to 219,578 in the 1971 census.[3] The Municipal Reform Act 1835 required members of town councils (municipal corporations) to be elected by ratepayers and councils to publish their financial accounts. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... The Romans established a large fortified settlement, across the river at Little Chester, which they called Derventio. ... Repton was a rural district in Derbyshire, England from 1894 to 1974. ... South East Derbyshire was a rural district in Derbyshire, England from 1894 to 1974. ...

Derby Industrial Museum / Silk Mill World Heritage Site
Derby Industrial Museum / Silk Mill World Heritage Site

Despite being one of the areas of Britain furthest from the sea, Derby holds a special place in the history of marine safety - it was as MP for Derby that Samuel Plimsoll introduced his bills for a 'Plimsoll line' (and other marine safety measures). This failed on first introduction, but was successful in 1876 and contributed to Plimsoll's re-election as a deservedly popular MP. The Derby Industrial Museum is housed in a former Silk Mill in Derby, England. ... Memorial to Samuel Plimsoll on Victoria Embankment London Samuel Plimsoll (10 February 1824 – 3 June 1898) was a British politician and social reformer, now best remembered for having devised the Plimsoll line. ... The Plimsoll line is the mark on the hull of a ship that shows where the waterline is when the ship is loaded to full capacity according to the condition of the water at the point of loading. ...


Recent history (post 1900)

Derby was awarded city status on 7 June 1977 by Queen Elizabeth II to mark the 25th anniversary of her ascension to the throne.[4] The Queen presented the "charter scroll" in person on July 28, 1977.[5] Until then, Derby had been one of the few towns in England with a cathedral but not city status. is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Elizabeth IIs Silver Jubilee and her domestic and international visits proved very popular with her subjects. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ...


Derby has a number of public parks, many Victorian in origin. Darley and Derwent Parks, lie immediately north of the city centre and are home to owls, kingfishers and a wide variety of other wildlife. There is an attractive riverside walk and cycle path from Darley Park South to two other parks. West of the city centre is Markeaton Park, while to the north is Allestree Park and its lake. Derby also has the first public recreational park in the country, the Arboretum, to the south of the city centre. The arboretum was set up by philanthropic land owner and industrialist Joseph Strutt in 1840. The arboretum's web site states that the arboretum's design was the inspiration for the vision of great urban parks in the USA, notably Central Park in New York City. Derby Arboretum is a public arboretum and park in the city of Derby. ... Joseph Strutt (born 1749 in Essex; died 1802) was a British engraver and antiquary. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Derby holds an important position in the history of the Labour movement, because it was one of two seats (the other being Keir Hardie's in Merthyr Tydfil) gained by the recently formed Labour Representation Committee at the 1900 General Election. The MP was Richard Bell, general secretary of the Railway Servants Union. Bell was succeeded by Jimmy Thomas and he in turn by the distinguished polymath and Nobel Laureate Philip Noel-Baker. James Keir Hardie (15 August 1856 - 26 September 1915) was a Scottish socialist and labour leader, and one of the first two Labour Party Members of Parliament (MPs) elected to the UK Parliament after the establishment of the Labour Party. ... Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: ) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. ... The Labour Representation Committee (LRC) was formed on February 27, 1900, at a conference at which representatives of the main socialist groupings in the United Kingdom were present. ... Richard Bell (1859, Merthyr Tydfil—1 May 1930) was one of the first two British Labour Members of Parliament elected after the formation of the Labour Representation Committee in 1900. ... The National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT) is a trade union in the United Kingdom which unionises transport workers. ... James (Jimmy) Henry Thomas, (October 3, 1874 - January 21, 1949) was a British trade unionist and Labour politician. ... Philip John Noel-Baker, Baron Noel-Baker (November 1, 1889 – October 8, 1982) was a politician, diplomat, academic and outstanding amateur athlete who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1959. ...


Despite its strategic industries (rail and aero-engine), Derby suffered comparatively little wartime damage in WW1 or WW2 (contrast Bristol and Filton). This may in part have been due to the skilful jamming of the German radio-beam navigations systems (X-Verfahren and Knickelbein, camouflage and decoy techniques ('Starfish sites') were built, mainly south of the town, e.g. out in fields near Foremark (ref. Kirk, Felix & Bartnik, 2002, see talk; see also [4]). Foremark is a small manor or hamlet with a ruling Lords (in this case Baronet) country house - Foremarke Hall - in the countryside of southern Derbyshire, England and is near the hamlets of Ingleby, Ticknall, Milton and the Village of Repton, although its postal address is referred to as within...


Derby has also become a significant cultural centre for the deaf community in the UK. Many deaf people relocate to Derby because of its strong sign language-using community. It is estimated that the deaf population in Derby is at least three times higher than the national average, and that only London has a larger deaf population. The Royal School for the Deaf on Ashbourne Road used to provide education in British Sign Language and English. The word deaf can have very different meanings depending on the background of the person speaking or the context in which the word is used. ... Two sign language Intepreters working as a team for a school. ... British Sign Language (BSL) is the sign language used in the United Kingdom (UK), and is the first or preferred language of an unknown number of Deaf people in the UK (published estimates range from 30,000 to 250,000 but it is likely that the lower figures are more...


More recently Derby was granted the Fairtrade City status. Fairtrade Town is a status awarded by the Fairtrade Foundation in the United Kingdom and Channel Islands, describing an area which is committed to the promotion of Fairtrade-labelled goods. ...


Landmarks

Derby Cathedral has the second-highest cathedral tower in the country. In recent years, this has been home to a pair of breeding peregrine falcons[6] The Tower Derby Cathedral is a cathedral church in the City of Derby, England. ...


Derby Heritage Centre, formerly the Tudor Grammar School, told the story of Derby from Roman times till today. Unfortunately the owner, Richard Felix, has closed it so that he can focus on his television career. The Heritage Centre has now been converted into a hairdresser's salon. However the new owner has a great interest in local history and has preserved all of the building's original features. The Old Grammar School, St. ...


Derby Gaol is a visitor attraction based in the dungeons of the Derbyshire County Gaol which dates back to 1756. The term Derby Gaol historically refers to the five gaols in Derby, England. ...


Derby Industrial Museum is situated in Derby Silk Mill and shows the industrial heritage and technological achievement of Derby, including Rolls-Royce aero engines, railways, mining, quarrying and foundries. The Derby Industrial Museum is housed in a former Silk Mill in Derby, England. ... The Derby Industrial Museum is housed in a former Silk Mill in Derby, England. ... Rolls-Royce Limited was an British car and, later, aero-engine manufacturing company founded by Henry Royce and Charles Stewart Rolls on 15 March 1906 and was the result of a partnership formed in 1904. ...

Pickford's House Museum
Pickford's House Museum

Pickford's House Museum was built by architect Joseph Pickford in 1770. It was his home and business headquarters. Derby Museum and Art Gallery shows paintings by Joseph Wright, as well as fine Royal Crown Derby porcelain, local regiments and archaeology. Pickford also designed St Helen's House in King Street. Photo of Pickfords House Museum I took this photo on Tuesday May 11th for use on one of my websites - Derby Heritage Society website - I offer it here as copyright free at this resolution. ... Photo of Pickfords House Museum I took this photo on Tuesday May 11th for use on one of my websites - Derby Heritage Society website - I offer it here as copyright free at this resolution. ... Pickford expo Pickfords House Museum, No 41 Friar Gate Derby, is an elegant Georgian town house, built by the prominent architect Joseph Pickford in 1770. ... Joseph Pickford (1734-1782) was an English architect, one of the leading provincial architects in the reign of George III. Pickfords initial training was undertaken under the sculptor Joseph Pickford (his uncle), at his Hyde Park, London premises. ... Categories: Stub | Derbyshire ... An Experiment on a Bird in an Air Pump (1768). ... Royal Crown Derby is a porcelain factory, based in Derby, England. ... St Helens House is a Grade I listed building in Derby. ...


Westfield Derby (formerly The Eagle Centre) is the city's main indoor shopping centre. It opened on 9 October 2007 after major extension work costing £340 million. It contains a brand new food court, dominated by chains, and and a 12 screen cinema to be opened in spring 2008. It is already the subject of local controversy, since it has drawn trade away from the older parts of the city centre where independent shops have traditionally been located. Many have now gone out of business and others are struggling to survive. Moreover, in Westfield itself, a combination of high rents and rising rates have made it very difficult for smaller traders. [7]


The Revive Healthy Living Centre was opened on September 22nd by actress Gwen Taylor. This centre was built to provide excellent new and exiciting health initiatives for the area known as Derwent, Chaddesden, and Breadsall. It is unique as it is run by local residents and will continue to do so. It has a unique sedum/grass roof. It is already proving to be invaluable to the local residents


Much of the skyline of the inner city changed radically in 1968 when the inner ring road with its two new crossings of the River Derwent was built. The route of the ring road went through the magnificent St. Alkmund's church and its wonderful Georgian church yard, the only Georgian square in Derby. Both were demolished to make way for the road, a move still criticised today. Thus the editor (Elizabeth Williamson) of the 2nd edition of Pevsner for Derbyshire wrote:- '...the character and cohesion of the centre has been completely altered by the replacement of a large number of C18 houses in the centre by a multi-lane road. As a traffic scheme this road is said to be a triumph; as townscape it is a disaster.' The Derwent is a river in the county of Derbyshire, England. ... St Alkmunds Church was a magnificent Victorian building, which stood in a Georgian square between Bridgegate and Queen Street in Derby; this was the only Georgian square in the city. ... Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ...


Economy

This is a chart of trend of regional gross value added of Derby at current basic prices published (pp.240-253) by Office for National Statistics with figures in millions of British Pounds Sterling.

Year Regional Gross Value Added[5] Agriculture[6] Industry[7] Services[8]
1995 2,509 2 1,130 1,377
2000 3,965 1 1,819 2,145
2003 4,421 1 1,806 2,614

^  includes hunting and forestry


^  includes energy and construction


^  includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured


^  Components may not sum to totals due to rounding


Industry

Derby's two biggest employers, Rolls-Royce plc (commonly known in the area as 'Royce's') and the Toyota Motor Corporation, are both in the engineering manufacturing trade. Egg, the Internet and telephone bank, has its national base in Derby. Other companies of note include Bombardier who manufacture train systems and aircraft, and Alstom who manufacture large power plant boilers and heat exchangers. The Qibla Cola Company also has its home in Derby, based in the Normanton area. This article is about the aircraft engine company. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Egg Banking plc is a British internet bank, with headquarters in Derby, Dudley and London, England. ... For other uses, see Bombardier (disambiguation). ... Alstom (formerly GEC-Alsthom) (Euronext: ALO) is a large French company whose businesses are power generation, railway signalling; and manufacturing trains (e. ... A heat exchanger is a device for transferring heat from one fluid to another, where the fluids are separated by a solid wall so that they never mix. ... Qibla Cola is a cola-flavoured carbonated beverage. ...


As already noted, Derby was for many years a significant railway centre, being the former headquarters of the Midland Railway, with both British Rail workshops and research facilities in the town. Although much less important than in years gone by, train manufacture continues in Derby and Derby station retains an important strategic role in the rail network. Moreover many major rail manufacturers retain a presence and, as reported in the Derby Evening Telegraph, the city is favoured as a possible site for a new national railway centre.[8] This article is about the historical British railway company. ... This article is about the defunct entity British Railways, which later traded as British Rail. The History of rail transport in Great Britain is covered in its own article. ... It has been suggested that Tri Junct Station be merged into this article or section. ...


Among a number of IT houses, Derby was the home of Core Design, who developed the computer game Tomb Raider with its heroine Lara Croft. Core Design is a video game developer best known for creating the popular Tomb Raider series. ... For the movie staring Angelina Jolie, see Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. ... Lara Croft is a fictional British video game character and the heroine of the Tomb Raider series of video games, movies, and comic books. ...


Transport

Road

Derby's central location in England means it has extensive transport links with other areas of the country. The M1 motorway passes about ten miles to the east of the city, linking Derby southwards to the London area and northwards to Sheffield and Leeds. Other major roads passing through or near Derby include the A6 (historically the main route from London to Carlisle, also linking to Leicester and Manchester), A38 (Bodmin to Mansfield via Bristol and Birmingham), A50 (Warrington to Leicester via Stoke-on-Trent), A52 (Newcastle-under-Lyme to Mablethorpe, including Brian Clough Way linking Derby to Nottingham) and A61 (Derby to Thirsk via Sheffield and Leeds). The M1 motorway heading south towards junction 37 at Barnsley, South Yorkshire. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... This article is about the A6 road in England. ... For other uses, see Carlisle (disambiguation). ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... A38 passing under M50 in Worcestershire The A38 is a major trunk road in England. ... Bodmin (Cornish: Bosvenegh) is a town in Cornwall, England, UK, with a population of 12,778 (2001 census). ... , For other uses, see Mansfield (disambiguation). ... This article is about the English city. ... This article is about the British city. ... A50 west of junction 1 The Services on the A50 [1]. A50 close to Longton. ... This article is about the Borough in the north-west of England. ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... This page is about Stoke-on-Trent in England. ... The A52 is a major road in England. ... , For the larger local government district, see Borough of Newcastle-under-Lyme. ... , Mablethorpe is today known as a small seaside resort in East Lindsey on the coast of Lincolnshire, England. ... For the writer, see Bryan Clough. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... The A61 is a major road in England, running from Alfreton in Derbyshire to Thirsk in North Yorkshire. ... Thirsk is a small market town in Hambleton district of North Yorkshire, England. ...


Rail

As already noted, the railway has served Derby since 1840 being the junction of what were then the two main lines from London to Yorkshire and the North East. The present day station is Derby Midland with frequent expresses to London, the North East and South West, provided by East Midlands Trains and CrossCountry. There also remain small local stations at Peartree and Spondon, although services are fairly limited, especially at the former. Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... Derby Midland Station (often called Derby Station) is a main line railway station serving the city of Derby in England. ... Norwich will be at the eastern tip of the franchise area. ... This article is about CrossCountry trains. ... Peartree railway station is a railway station serving the districts of Pear Tree, Normanton and Osmaston in the city of Derby, England. ... Spondon railway station serves Spondon in Derbyshire. ...


The Great Northern Railway's "Derbyshire and North Staffordshire Extension" formerly ran through Derby Friargate Station, from Colwick and Nottingham to Egginton Junction. After closure, part of the route west of Derby was used by British Rail as a test track. Although few traces of the route now remain, the ornate cast iron bridge by Andrew Handyside across Friargate is still in place, as is his bridge over the river. The Great Northern Railway (GNR) was a British railway company, founded by the London & York Railway Act of 1846. ... Derby Friargate Station Was the main station in Derby on the Derby Friargate Line, or more accurately the Great Northern Railway. ... Colwick is a suburb in the east of Greater Nottingham in England. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... Egginton is a village in the local government district of South Derbyshire, England. ... Andrew Handyside and Company was an iron founder in Derby in the nineteenth century. ...


Air

East Midlands Airport is situated about fifteen miles (24 km) from Derby city centre, making Derby the closest city to the airport. Its proximity to Derby, the fact that the airport is in Leicestershire, and the traditional rivalry between the three cities (Derby, Leicester and Nottingham), meant that there was a great deal of controversy locally about the airport's decision to append Nottingham to its name in 2004. Later on, in 2006, Nottingham East Midlands Airport reverted to its previous name, seen by many to be a victory for both Derby and Leicester, and promoting a more unified East Midlands. The airport is served by several budget airlines, including bmibaby (for which East Midlands is a main base), Ryanair and easyJet, with services to a variety of internal and European destinations. East Midlands Airport[1] (IATA: EMA, ICAO: EGNX) is an airport in the East Midlands of England, near Castle Donington in Leicestershire. ... Leicestershire ( IPA: (RP), IPA: (locally)), abbreviation Leics. ... Boeing 737-200 of low-cost Irish airline Ryanair A low-cost carrier (also known as a no-frills or discount carrier) is an airline that offers low fares but eliminates most traditional passenger services. ... bmibaby is a British low-cost airline and a subsidiary of British Midland PLC. It flies to destinations in Europe from its main bases at East Midlands, Manchester, Cardiff, and Birmingham. ... Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of... EasyJet (LSE: EZJ), styled as easyJet, is a low cost airline officially known as easyJet Airline Company Limited, based at London Luton Airport. ...


Bus and coach

Derby's former bus station was an innovative art deco design by borough architect C.H. Aslin. Originally built in 1933, it was closed in 2005, and subsequently demolished, despite the protests of environmentalists and conservationists. The unique cafe building is planned to be rebuilt at Crich Tramway Museum. A new bus station is set to be built on the site as part of the Riverlights development. As a result of this work, services are currently using a number of temporary stops on streets around the Morledge area. The Derby Bus Station was the first purpose built bus terminus in the United Kingdom. ... Asheville City Hall. ...


Local bus services in and around Derby are run by a number of companies, but principally Trent Barton and Arriva Midlands. The city is not particularly well served by long distance coaches, although it is on National Express's London to Manchester and Yorkshire to the South West routes. Additionally a regional route between Manchester and Nottingham is run by Trent Barton's via it's TransPeak and Red Arrow services. trent barton is the result of merging Derbyshires Trent Buses with Nottinghamshires Barton. ... An Arriva Midlands Dennis Dart in Leicester Arriva Midlands is a division of Arriva. ... National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ...


Culture, entertainment and sport

The annual open-air concert at Darley Park is one of the biggest free concerts of its kind. It is one of many performances given throughout the year by Sinfonia Viva, a professional chamber orchestra based in Derby. The Derby Jazz group caters for the jazz interest in the city and is regarded as one of the UK's leading live jazz organizations. There is also a summer rock music festival 'Prom in the Park' which takes place in late July every year. For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ...

The newly restored Grove Street Lodge and "Grand Entrance" at the northern end of the Arboretum
The newly restored Grove Street Lodge and "Grand Entrance" at the northern end of the Arboretum

Derby Playhouse regularly received acclaim in the national press for its productions, particularly, in recent years, for its staging of shows by Stephen Sondheim. After a lengthy period of financial uncertainty, the theatre finally closed in February 2008. Stephen Joshua Sondheim (b. ...


QUADis a new centre for art and film currently under construction in Derby. Work has commenced on the QUAD building and is due to be complete in 2008. The new building will house two cinema screens showing the best in independent and Hollywood cinema, two gallery spaces housing contemporary visual arts, a digital studio, participation spaces, digital editing suites, artists studio and the bfi Mediatheque.


Derby Arboretum was the first public park in the country, and is thought to have been one of the inspirations for Central Park in New York. Although it suffered from neglect in the 1990s, it has recently undergone extensive improvement and renovation. Derby Arboretum is a public arboretum and park in the city of Derby. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ...


Famous Derby sporting institutions include Derby County Football Club, who were FA Cup winners in 1946, Football League champions in 1972 and again in 1975, and are currently members of the Premier League, having been promoted as Football League Championship playoff winners in 2006-07. They have played at Pride Park stadium since 1997, having previously based at the Baseball Ground. Current season Derby County Football Club are an English football club based in Derby. ... This article is about the English FA Cup. ... The Football League is an organisation representing 72 professional football clubs in England and Wales, and runs the oldest professional football league competition in the world. ... For other sports leagues which may be referred to by this name, see List of professional sports leagues. ... The Football League Championship (often referred to as The Championship for short, or the Coca-Cola Football League Championship for sponsorship reasons) is the highest division of The Football League and second-highest division overall in the English football league system after the Premier League. ... The new Wembley Stadium was completed in time for the 2006-07 seasons FA Cup Final. ... Pride Park is a business park on the outskirts of the city centre of Derby, UK. It includes Pride Park Stadium. ... The Baseball Ground was a stadium in Derby, UK. It was first used for baseball as the home of Derby County Baseball Club from 1890 until 1898 and then for football (soccer) as the home of Derby County F.C. from 1895 until 1997. ...


Derbyshire County Cricket Club are based at the County Ground in Derby and play almost all home matches there, although matches at Chesterfield were re-introduced in 2006. One of the designated first class county sides, they have won the County Championship once, in 1936. Derbyshire County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county of Derbyshire. ... The County Cricket Ground, usually shortened to County Ground and also known as the Racecourse Ground, is a cricket ground in Derby and has been the home of Derbyshire County Cricket Club since at least 1871. ... This article is about the English town. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The County Championship is the domestic first class cricket competition in the United Kingdom, mainly in England. ...


Derby also has clubs in both codes of rugby. In rugby union, Derby RFC play in Midlands Division Two East (the seventh level of English rugby) at their Haslams Lane ground. Rugby league team Derby City RLFC were formed in 1990. They play and train at the Asterdale Sports Centre, Spondon and compete in the Midlands Premier Division of the National Rugby League Conference. For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086[1], up until the modern era Spondon was a village separate from the city of Derby. ...


An American businessman introduced baseball to the town in the late 19th century, and built a stadium near the town centre. The attempt to establish baseball in Derby was unsuccessful, but the stadium survived for some 100 years afterwards as the home of Derby County Football Club. It was finally demolished in 2003, six years after Derby's relocation to Pride Park. Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... This article is about the sport. ...


The city of Derby has a burgeoning punk scene,[citation needed] and this is supported by many prominent punk, ska and hardcore bands playing the Vic Inn, a local biker pub. In recent years it has attracted many big names such as The Casualties, Agnostic Front, and U.K. Subs, as well as the many local punk and ska bands. Famous bands such as The Ordinary Boys, Snow Patrol and The View have played there.[citation needed] In addition to this, the Derby Punx Picnic is held annually at the Bass Recreation Ground. Here underground punk and ska bands perform late into the night. The Punx Picnic has become an event in recent years, the attendance rising from around 300 in 2005 to just over 1000 in 2006. The festival attracts punks from all over the East Midlands and the UK. In Derby there is also a thriving Jazz scene.[citation needed] This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Snow Patrol are a Grammy Award-nominated alternative rock band which formed in Scotland, with the majority of their members being from Bangor and Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... The View are a four piece indie rock band from Dryburgh, a district in Dundee, Scotland. ...


Shopping and Nightlife

Marketplace in the centre
Marketplace in the centre

Shopping in Derby is divided into two main sections. The first is a recently opened Westfield shopping centre, controlled by the Westfield Group. The second is the older section known as the Cathedral Quarter. This area includes a range of boutiques and coffee shops and is focused around the Cathedral. The Westfield Group is a multinational company that owns shopping centres in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. ...


Many cities offer a thriving night life and Derby is no exception, dominated by a number of clubs and bars.


Education

Like most of the UK, Derby operates a non-selective primary and secondary education system with no middle schools. Students attend infant and junior school (often in a combined primary school) before moving onto a comprehensive secondary school. Many secondaries also have sixth forms, allowing students to optionally continue their education by taking A Levels after the end of compulsory education at age 16. For those who want to stay in education but leave school, the large Derby College provides a number of post-16 courses. A primary school in Český Těšín, Poland Primary education is the first stage of compulsory education. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... A comprehensive school is a secondary school that does not select children on the basis of academic attainment or aptitude. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... England, Wales, Northern Ireland The sixth form, in the English, Welsh and Northern Irish education systems, is the term used to refer to the final two years of secondary schooling (when students are about sixteen to eighteen years of age), during which students normally prepare for their GCE A-level... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in England, Northern Ireland and Wales, usually taken by students during the optional final two years of secondary school (Years 12 & 13*, commonly called the Sixth Form except for Scotland), or at a separate sixth form... Derby College is a British further education (FE) centre with sites located within Derby and the surrounding area. ...


Outside the state sector, there are four fee-paying independent schools. Derby Grammar School was founded in 1994 and was for boys only, until 2007, when they accepted girls into the sixth form for the first time, who aim to continue the work and traditions of the former Derby School, closed in 1989, one of the oldest schools in England; Derby High School is for girls only at secondary level and for boys at primary level; and Ockbrook School is an independent school for girls aged 3-18 and boys aged 3-11. Lastly, Micheal House Steiner school can be found in Shipley, Heanor and caters for students from kindergarten age through to 16. An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ... Derby Independent Grammar School is an independent and selective Church of England secondary school at Littleover near the city of Derby. ... Derby School was for a long time a school for boys at Derby in the English Midlands, existing for most of that time as a grammar school. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Statistics Population: see parish Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SK425364 Administration Parish: Ockbrook and Borrowash District: Erewash Shire county: Derbyshire Region: East Midlands Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Derbyshire Historic county: Derbyshire Services Police force: Derbyshire Constabulary Ambulance service: East Midlands Post office and telephone... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ...


Derby also has a City Academy, Landau Forte College, partially state-funded, but also with business backing. It was one of fifteen City Technology Colleges set up by a Conservative government in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and it was converted into a City Academy in September 2006. A city academy is a type of British secondary school, of which one of the major architects was Andrew Adonis in his capacity as education advisor to the Prime Minister (now Lord Adonis, a junior Minister at the Department for Education and Skills) in the late 1990s. ... Landau Forte College is an Academy in Derby, England. ... In England, City Technology Colleges (CTCs) are independent schools which charge no fees as their recurrent costs are paid by the DfES and businesses within the private sector. ... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... A city academy is a type of British secondary school, of which one of the major architects was Andrew Adonis in his capacity as education advisor to the Prime Minister (now Lord Adonis, a junior Minister at the Department for Education and Skills) in the late 1990s. ...


Derby also has a number of special needs establishments including Ivy House School (which takes pupils from nursery to sixth form) and The Light House which is a respite facility for children and parents.


The University of Derby is the city's university. The University of Derby is a university in the city of Derby, England. ...


In 2003 the University of Nottingham opened a graduate entry medical school based in the Derby City hospital. The University of Nottingham Medical School at Derby was opened in September 2003 by Dr John Reid, the Secretary of State for Health. ...


Media

The Derby Evening Telegraph is the city's daily newspaper. In addition, two free newspapers, the Derby Trader and Derby Express, are delivered to households weekly. The daily freesheet 'Metro' is distributed in the city centre every morning, although this only has a very small amount of local content. Another local paper is the Derbyshire Times which is a weekly paper out every Thursday, however it mainly covers news from northern areas of the county. The Derby Echo is another, but this is only available to people who put their names down for it, and is out every week. Derby Evening Telegraphy The Derby Evening Telegraph is an afternoon tabloid newspaper printed and distrubuted in Derby, it costs 30p. ... The Derbyshire Times is a local newspaper published in northern Derbyshire. ...


BBC Radio Derby, the BBC's award-winning local station for Derbyshire and East Staffordshire, is based on St. Helen's Street in the city and offers a mixture of local, national and international news, features, music and sports commentaries. It has around 150,000 weekly listeners and is available locally on 104.5 FM and 1116 AM, on 95.3 FM in North and Mid Derbyshire and on 96.0 FM in the Buxton area, as well as being streamed on the internet. The BBC in Derby also have their own local website for the area which provides news, travel and weather information, as well as other features. Since 1983 Radio Derby has organised the Money Mountain Appeal, an annual on-air charity auction which has raised more than £1 million for local causes. Since July 2007, the BBC has managed Big Screen Derby in the Market Place in conjunction with Derby City Council and the University of Derby, as part of the BBC Big Screen project. BBC Radio Derby is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Derbyshire. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... The University of Derby is a university in the city of Derby, England. ... Public Space Broadcasting is a project involving the British Broadcasting Corporation, Philips and other technology providers and local councils to install LED screens with sound systems in prominent locations in historic city centres. ...


RAM FM, the independent local radio station for Derbyshire and East Staffordshire, is also based in the city and offers a mixture of adult contemporary music and entertainment, with regular news and traffic bulletins. It broadcasts on 102.8 FM, and is also streamed on the internet, and is listened to by around 120,000 people each week. RAM FM is part of the Gcap One Network, and hosts many big local events, such as the Darley Park Concert, The City Bonfire and Fireworks, The Christmas Lights Switch On, and the Race For Life, raising money for Cancer Research UK. Ram FM is a commercial radio station broadcasting to Derby and surrounding areas including Burton-upon-Trent and Matlock. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... Ram FM is a commercial radio station broadcasting to Derby and surrounding areas including Burton-upon-Trent and Matlock. ...


Trivia

  • Derby has been named "Ghost capital of Britain" with over 1,000 paranormal sightings recorded in recent years. [9]
  • Bold Lane car park in Derby is one of the top ten most secure places in the world according to a study published in a science magazine. [10]
  • Dracula first showed in Derby.
  • A person from Derby is called a Derbian or a Derbrarian.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Bold Lane is a multi-storey car park in Derby, Derbyshire, England named after the road on which it lies. ... This article is about the novel. ...

Districts of Derby

Derby is split up into 17 Wards.[9]

Ward Areas within the Ward
Abbey St Lukes and California, Derby
Allestree Allestree and Markeaton
Alvaston Alvaston, Litchurch and Wilmorton
Arboretum City Centre and Rose Hill
Blagreaves Blagreaves and Sunny Hill
Boulton Boulton
Chaddesden Chaddesden, Derwent Heights
Chellaston Chellaston, Shelton Lock and Allenton
Darley Darley Abbey and Little Chester (aka Chester Green)
Derwent Derwent
Littleover Littleover and Heatherton Village
Mackworth Mackworth
Mickleover Mickleover
Normanton Normanton and Pear Tree
Oakwood Oakwood
Sinfin Sinfin and Osmaston
Spondon Spondon

St. ... Allestree is a suburb of Derby, England. ... The Orangery at Markeaton Park. ... Alvaston is a suburb of Derby, England. ... Wilmorton is a small urban village, which sits between Alvaston and Osmaston. ... Rose Hill is an inner city suburb of Derby, England. ... Sunny Hill, Derby is situated mainly along the Stenson Road (which goes out to the hamlet of Stenson, on the Trent and Mersey Canal). ... Boulton is a district within the city of Derby, England. ... Chaddesden is a large suburb of Derby, United Kingdom, formerly known as Cedesdene. ... Derwent Heights is the name of a small private housing estate in Derby, United Kingdom, situated next to Chaddesden, which it is almost part of. ... Map sources for Chellaston at grid reference SK379301 Chellaston is a suburb of the City of Derby, which is located in the East Midlands in England in the United Kingdom. ... Map sources for Shelton Lock at grid reference SK375313 Shelton Lock is a small suburb located between Chellaston and Allenton to the south of Derby, England. ... Map sources for Allenton at grid ref. ... Darley Abbey has one of the oldest buildings in Derby in the form of the Abbey on Darley street. ... The Romans established a large fortified settlement, across the river at Little Chester, which they called Derventio. ... Derwent is the name of several rivers: Australia: Derwent River, Tasmania United Kingdom: River Derwent, Derbyshire, England; see also Upper Derwent Valley River Derwent, County Durham, England River Derwent, Cumbria, England, also the lake Derwent Water in the Lake District River Derwent, Yorkshire, England and also of one settlement: Derwent... Littleover, Derby, England Littleover is a large suburb of Derby, England situated between Rosehill, Normanton, Sunny Hill and Mickleover about two miles south west of Derby city centre. ... Heatherton Village is an area of Derby. ... The Mackworth Estate is a large council estate situated to the North-West of Derby near to Markeaton Park and the suburb of Mickleover. ... Mickleover, Derby, England Mickleover is located 2 miles west of the city centre and is the most westerly village of the City of Derby in the United Kingdom. ... Normanton is a southern suburb of the city of Derby in Derbyshire, England, situated approximately two miles south of the city centre. ... Oakwood is a modern housing estate in Derby, UK. It is one of the largest new housing estates in Europe and, as such, is a major settlement in its own right. ... Sinfin is a southern suburb of Derby. ... Map sources for Osmaston, Derby at grid reference SK365335 Osmaston is a suburb of the City of Derby, England. ... Mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086[1], up until the modern era Spondon was a village separate from the city of Derby. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/dissemination/LeadTableView.do?a=3&b=276826&c=derby&d=13&e=13&g=393297&i=1001x1003x1004&m=0&r=1&s=1206486754096&enc=1&dsFamilyId=1812
  2. ^ Derby Cathedral. You & Yesterday. Retrieved on 2008-02-04]].
  3. ^ Derby District: Total Population. A Vision of Britain Through Time. Great Britain Historical GIS Project. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  4. ^ London Gazette: no. 47246, page 7656, 14 June 1977. Retrieved on 2007-11-21.
  5. ^ Queen was met with gifts, flowers and some groans. The Times. July 29, 1977
  6. ^ Peregrine Project. Derby Council website. Retrieved on 2008-02-04.
  7. ^ Westfield Detby - About. westfieldderby.co.uk. Retrieved on 2008-02-04.
  8. ^ [1].
  9. ^ The Local Government Commission for England (June 2001). Periodic electoral review of Derby: Final recommendations for ward boundaries in Derby. Retrieved on 2008-02-04.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Places of interest

Darley Abbey has one of the oldest buildings in Derby in the form of the Abbey on Darley street. ... Derby Arboretum is a public arboretum and park in the city of Derby. ... The Derby Canal ran 14 miles from the Trent and Mersey Canal at Swarkestone to the Erewash Canal at Sandiacre, Derbyshire, England. ... The Tower Derby Cathedral is a cathedral church in the City of Derby, England. ... The Derby Industrial Museum is housed in a former Silk Mill in Derby, England. ... Derby Friargate Station Was the main station in Derby on the Derby Friargate Line, or more accurately the Great Northern Railway. ... Elvaston Castle (full name Elvaston Castle Country Park) is a country park in Derbyshire, England with 200 acres of woodlands, parkland and formal gardens. ... A photograph of one of the engines serving Markeaton Light Railway Markeaton Lady a steam engine, the other engine on this service is diesel powered. ... A scene on a heritage railway. ... // Pride Park Stadium is a football (soccer) stadium in the Pride Park business park on the outskirts of Derby city centre in the UK. It is owned by and is the home of Derby County F.C. The stadium holds 33,597 spectators. ... The Baseball Ground was a stadium in Derby, UK. It was first used for baseball as the home of Derby County Baseball Club from 1890 until 1898 and then for football (soccer) as the home of Derby County F.C. from 1895 until 1997. ... The Derwent is a river in the county of Derbyshire, England. ... St Helens House is a Grade I listed building in Derby. ...

Famous residents

Alan Bates as butler in Gosford Park (2001) Sir Alan Arthur Bates CBE, (February 17, 1934 – December 27, 2003) was a British actor. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Ronald Binge (1910 - 1979) was a British composer of light music. His best known compositions are probably Elizabethan Serenade and Sailing By - the latter notably from its use as the music which to this day is played at 0045 each morning, before the Shipping Forecast on BBC Radio 4. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Steve Bloomer Stephen Bloomer (January 20, 1874 - April 16, 1938) was an English footballer from 1892 until 1914. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For other persons named Henry Cavendish, see Henry Cavendish (disambiguation). ... A scientist, in the broadest sense, refers to any person that engages in a systematic activity to acquire knowledge or an individual that engages in such practices and traditions that are linked to schools of thought or philosophy. ... For the writer, see Bryan Clough. ... Soccer redirects here. ... William John Coffee (1774–1846) was an internationally renowned English artist and sculptor who worked in porcelain, plaster, and terra cotta. ... Daniel Parker Coke (born 17 July 1745, died at Derby, 6 December 1825), was an English barrister and member of parliament. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... William George Constable (born Derby, England, 27 October 1887, died Cambridge, Massachusetts, 3 February 1976, was an art historian and gallery director. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... John Cotton (1585–1652) The Reverend John Cotton (December 4, 1585 – December 23, 1652) was a highly regarded principal among the New England Puritan ministers, who also included John Winthrop, Thomas Hooker, Increase Mather (who became his son-in-law), John Davenport, and Thomas Shepard. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... For the record label, see Puritan Records. ... This article is about Erasmus Darwin who lived 1731–1802; for his descendants with the same name see Erasmus Darwin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... James Jamie Dobb (born Derby, 1972), is a former British motocross racer. ... Motocross often takes place in wet weather, leading to muddy scenes such as this and hence the term Scrambling. Photo from New Zealand. ... John Flamsteed - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Astronomer Royal is a senior post in the Royal Household of the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. ... Lianna Fowler is an English fashion model from Derby and the winner of Cycle 2 of Britains Next Top Model in 2006. ... Charles Fox was a civil engineer in Derby in the nineteenth century. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Francis Fox was an English civil engineer born in Derby in the nineteenth century. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... James Fox,fl 1780-1830, machine tool maker, was originally a butler in the service of the Rev. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sir Francis Seymour Haden (September 16, 1818 - June 1, 1910), was an English surgeon, best known as an etcher. ... Andrew Handyside and Company was an iron founder in Derby in the nineteenth century. ... Geoffrey William Hoon (born December 6, 1953) is a British politician. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Sir Robert George Howe GBE KCMG (born Derby, England, September 1893, died 22 June 1981) was a British diplomat who served as the last Governor-General of the Sudan from 1947 to 1955. ... Governor-General (or Governor General) is a term used both historically and currently to designate the appointed representative of a head of state or their government for a particular territory, historically in a colonial context, but no longer necessarily in that form. ... For other senses of this word, see Marathon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Running (disambiguation). ... Arms of Lord Melbourne William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, PC (15 March 1779–24 November 1848) was a British Whig statesman who served as Home Secretary (1830-1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835-1841), and a mentor of Queen Victoria. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ... John Lombe (1693 - 1722) was an inventor who patented 3 types of Silk machines, for winding, spinning and twisting. ... Stephen Marley is a British author and video game designer, best known for his Chia Black Dragon series. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A game designer is a person who designs games. ... Godfrey Meynell (VC, MC) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... White Town is a techno-pop act from the United Kingdom, and is the work of one man, Jyoti Mishra (TOO FUNNY!!). Mishra was born in Rourkela, India, on July 30, 1966, and has lived in England since the age of three. ... Sir Howard Newby was born in 1947 and grew up in Derby. ... In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often a course of study or a practical skill. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... Embley Park, now a school, was the family home of Florence Nightingale. ... This article is about the practice in general. ... Ben Pridmore, born October 14, 1976 in Boston, England, was the World Memory Champion in 2004. ... ... Samuel Richardson (August 19, 1689 – July 4, 1761) was a major 18th century writer best known for his three epistolary novels: Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded (1740), Clarissa: Or the History of a Young Lady (1748) and Sir Charles Grandison (1753). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Statue of Sir (Frederick) Henry Royce, standing outside the companys HQ at Moor Lane, Derby The statue inscription, brief life story of Frederick Henry Royce Sir Henry Royce (March 27, 1863 - April 22, 1933) was a pioneering car manufacturer, who with Charles Stewart Rolls founded the Rolls-Royce company. ... Rolls-Royce Limited was an British car and, later, aero-engine manufacturing company founded by Henry Royce and Charles Stewart Rolls on 15 March 1906 and was the result of a partnership formed in 1904. ... George Sorocold was an engineer in Derby in the eighteenth century. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other persons named Herbert Spencer, see Herbert Spencer (disambiguation). ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... A large hot dog with ketchup A hot dog is classified as a type of sausage or, alternatively, a sandwich on a suitably shaped bun with the sausage and condiments on it. ... Jedediah Strutt (1726 – 7 May 1797) was a hosier and cotton spinner from Belper, England. ... Sir Frank Whittle (June 1, 1907 - August 9, 1996) was a Royal Air Force officer who invented the jet engine in England while Hans von Ohain was inventing the same in Germany. ... Henry Wilmot was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... An Experiment on a Bird in an Air Pump (1768). ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Redirect page ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The Bogrolls are a two man pop/rock band from the UK. The band consists of John Lemmon and Nohl Grohl. ...

Twin cities

Along with Wigan, Derby is one of only two cities in the UK that exchanges envoys with one of its twin cities (Osnabrück). Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... , Osnabrück (IPA: ) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany, some 80 km NNE of Dortmund, 45 km NE of Münster, and some 100 km due west of Hanover. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... Kapurthala (Punjabi: ) is a city in Punjab state of India. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Coordinates: , Country Province Area (2006)  - Municipality 32. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Toyota (豊田市; -shi), or Toyota City, is a city located in the Mikawa region of Aichi, Japan, ESE of Nagoya. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Changzhi County (长治县) is a county in the prefecture of Changzhi (长治市) in the province of Shanxi of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Nearest settlements

Duffield, Belper, Heanor, Ilkeston, Ripley (Derbyshire Constabulary HQ), Langley Mill, Alfreton, Chesterfield, Matlock (Derbyshire County Council is based here), Bakewell, Long Eaton, Nottingham, Sandiacre, Beeston, Coalville, Loughborough, Castle Donington, Leicester, Burton-upon-Trent. 217. ... , Belper is a town within the local government district of Amber Valley in Derbyshire, England. ... Heanor is a town in the Amber Valley region of Derbyshire, England. ... Ilkeston is a town in Derbyshire, in the East Midlands region of England, on the River Erewash. ... // Ripley may refer to: Ripley is the surname of: Lieutenant Ellen Ripley, is a fictional character in the Alien movie series. ... Langley Mill is a small town in the Amber Valley district of Derbyshire. ... , Alfreton is a town in the Amber Valley, Derbyshire, although some parts of the town are in the Bolsover district and North East Derbyshire district. ... This article is about the English town. ... Matlock is the county town of Derbyshire, England, United Kingdom. ... Bakewell is a small market town in Derbyshire, England, deriving its name from Badecas Well. According to the UK 2001 census the civil parish of Bakewell had a population of 3,979. ... This article is about a town in England. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... , Sandiacre is a town in the Erewash district of Derbyshire, in England. ... Beeston is a town in the county of Nottinghamshire, England some 3 miles (5 km) south west of the centre of Nottingham. ... Coalville is a town in North West Leicestershire, England, with a population of about 30,000. ... Loughboroughs carillon Loughborough parish church The Brush engineering works Loughborough University Loughborough (pronounced locally as either , LUFF-burra or , LUFF-bruh, and more widely as [ˈlʌfˌb(ə)ɹə]) is a town in Leicestershire, central England with a population of 57,600 as of 2004. ... , Castle Donington is a village with a population of around 7000 in the North West of Leicestershire, close to Derby and Nottingham and on the edge of the National Forest. ... This article discusses Leicester in England. ... , Burton upon Trent, also known as Burton-on-Trent or simply Burton, is a large town straddling the River Trent in the east of Staffordshire, England. ...


External links

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Coordinates: 52°55′19″N, 1°28′33″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Derbi quiere dar un salto tecnológico y fabricar motos de mayor cilindrada- Lavanguardia.es - Noticias, actualidad, ... (581 words)
Derbi quiere dar un salto tecnológico y fabricar motos de mayor cilindrada
Derbi está ahora situada en el segmento de mercado dirigido al público más joven, con unas ventas de 96 millones de euros, con las que cerró el año 2002, pero el objetivo es aumentarlas un 10% durante el 2003.
Derbi se ha situado dentro de Piaggio como la marca joven y deportiva de este grupo europeo, que controla una cuota del mercado en la UE del 31%, pero la marca española defiende que en los actuales tiempos la juventud se prolonga de hecho hasta los 35 años y necesita por ello más cilindrada.
Getting acquainted with the Derbi Mulhacen (1098 words)
Scramblers have always appealed to me: they are the classic variant of allroads, while the frame geometry and suspension guarantees more fun on the road, the looks are more of a classic motorcycle, and often their weight is lower than that of modern allroads, which is always an advantage off the road.
Derbi did something different, and designed a modern Scrambler, with the low weight of a classic one.
Derbi was not present at Intermot 2006, but the German importer of Derbi was.
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