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Encyclopedia > Deoxynucleotide
Nucleotide codes
Code Equivalence Complement
Structure of Adenine Adenine is one of the two purine nucleobases used in forming nucleotides of the nucleic acids DNA and RNA. In DNA, adenine (A) binds to thymine (T) to assist in stabilizing the nucleic acid structures. In RNA, adenine binds to uracil (U). Adenine forms adenosine, a nucleoside... A A T or U
Cytosine Cytosine is one of the 5 main nucleobases used in storing and transporting genetic information within a cell. It is a pyrimidine derivative, with a heterocyclic aromatic ring and two substituents attached (an amine group at position 4 and a keto group at position 2). The nucleoside of cytosine... C C G
Guanine (2-amino-6-oxypurine) is one of the four main nucleobases found in nucleic acids (e.g., DNA and RNA). Guanine is a purine derivative and in Watson-Crick base pairing forms hydrogen bonds in the plane of the fused rings with cytosine. Guanine stacks vertically with the other... G G C
Thymine Thymine (C5H6N2O2, 2-oxy-4-oxy-5-methylpyrimidine, 2,4-dioxy-5-methylpyrimidine, 5-methyluracil) is one of the bases of the nucleic acid found in DNA. It can base pair with adenine. Thymine combined with deoxyribose creates the nucleoside thymidine. Thymidine can be phosphorylated with one, two or... T or Uracil Uracil is one of the four RNA bases, replacing thymine as found in DNA. Just like thymine, uracil can form a base pair with adenine via two hydrogen bonds, but it lacks the methyl group present in thymine. Uracil, in comparison to thymine, will more readily degenerate into cytosine... U T A
M A or C K
R A or G Y
W A or T W
S C or G S
Y C or T R
K G or T M
V A or C or G B
H A or C or T D
D A or G or T H
B C or G or T V
X or N A or C or G or T X

A nucleotide is a In chemistry, a monomer (from Greek mono one and meros part) is a small molecule that may become chemically bonded to other monomers to form a polymer. Examples of monomers are hydrocarbons such as the alkane, alkene, and alene (homologous) series. Other hydrocarbon monomers such as styrene and ethene form... monomer or the structural unit of nucleotide chains forming A nucleic acid is a complex, high-molecular-weight biochemical macromolecule composed of nucleotide chains that convey genetic information. The most common nucleic acids are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). Nucleic acids are found in all living cells and viruses. Nucleic acid, so called because of its prevalence... nucleic acids as Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a nucleic acid consisting of a string of covalently-bound nucleotides. It is biochemically distinguished from DNA by the presence of an additional hydroxyl group, attached to each pentose ring; as well as by the use of uracil, instead of thymine. One of the main functions... RNA and DNA replication Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid which is capable of carrying genetic instructions for the biological development of all cellular forms of life and many viruses. DNA is sometimes referred to as the molecule of heredity as it is inherited and used to propagate traits. During reproduction... DNA. A nucleotide consists of a Heterocyclic compounds are substances which contain a ring structure as found in benzene and the aromatic compounds, or aromatic hydrocarbons, but in which other atoms than carbon, such as sulfur, oxygen or nitrogen are found as part of the ring. Some examples are pyridine (C5H5N) and pyrimidine (C4H4N2). Note that... heterocyclic nucleobase, a A pentose is a monosaccharide with five carbon atoms. They either have an aldehyde functional group in position 1 (aldopentoses), or a ketone functional group in position 2 (ketopentoses). The aldopentoses have three chiral centres (asymmetric carbon atoms) and so 8 different stereoisomers are possible. The 4 D-aldopentoses are... pentose This article deals with sugar as food and as an important, widely traded commodity; the word also has other uses; see Sugar (disambiguation) A sugar is a form of carbohydrate; the most commonly used sugar is a white crystalline solid, sucrose; used to alter the flavor and properties (mouthfeel, perservation... sugar, and a In chemistry, a phosphate is a polyatomic ion or radical consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen. In the ionic form, it carries a -3 formal charge, and is denoted PO43-. In a biochemical setting, a free phosphate ion in solution is called inorganic phosphate, to distinguish it from... phosphate or polyphosphate In ecology functional groups are collections of organisms based on morphological, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, or environmental responses or on trophic criteria. In organic chemistry functional groups are submolecular structural motifs, characterized by specific elemental composition and connectivity, that confer reactivity upon the molecule that contains them. The following is a... group. Nucleotides also play important roles in Cells in culture, stained for keratin The cell is the structural and functional unit of all living organisms. Some organisms, such as bacteria, are unicellular, consisting of a single cell. Other organisms, such as humans, are multicellular, (humans have an estimated 100,000 billion = 1014 cells). The cell theory, first... cellular energy transport and transformations (notably For other uses of the initials ATP, see ATP (disambiguation) Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the nucleotide known in biochemistry as the energy transfer; that is, ATP is able to store and transport chemical energy within cells. ATP also plays an important role in the synthesis of nucleic... ATP and Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) are two important coenzymes found in cells. NADH is the reduced form and NAD+ is the oxidized form of NAD. NAD is used extensively in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle of cellular respiration. It forms... NAD+/NADH), and in enzyme regulation (see for example, A protein kinase is an enzyme that can transfer a phosphate group from a donor molecule (usually ATP) to an amino acid residue of a protein. The protein kinase mechanism is used in signal transduction for the regulation of enzymes: phosphorylation can activate (or inhibit) the activity of an enzyme... protein kinase).


The nucleobase can be a Purine is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound, consisting of a pyrimidine ring that is fused with an imidazole ring. The general term purines refers to substituted purines and their tautomers. Two of the bases in nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are purines. In DNA, these bases form hydrogen bonds with... purines or Pyrimidine is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound, which is similar to benzene and pyridine and that contains two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3 of the six-membered ring. Three bases of the nucleic acids, namely cytosine, thymine, and uracil, are pyrimidine derivatives. In DNA, these bases form hydrogen... pyrimidines, the sugar can be Deoxyribose Deoxyribose (more precisely 2-deoxyribose) is a five-carbon sugar (a pentose) derived from the pentose sugar ribose by the repacement of the hydroxyl group at the 2 position with hydrogen, leading to the net loss of an oxygen. Ribose forms a five member ring composed of four carbon... deoxyribose in DNA or Ribose Ribose is a five carbon sugar (pentose) that is critical to living creatures. It is a component of the RNA that is used for genetic transcription, and is related to deoxyribose which is a component of DNA. It is also a component of ATP, NADH, and several other chemicals... ribose in RNA, and the phosphate chain can be a monophosphate, diphosphate, or triphosphate. A nucleotide that lacks the phosphate group is called Nucleosides are glycosylamines made by attaching a nucleobase to a ribose ring. Examples of these include cytidine, uridine, adenosine, guanosine, thymidine and inosine. Nucleosides can be phosphorylated by specific kinases in the cell, producing nucleotides, which are the molecular building blocks of DNA and RNA. Nucleoside triphosphates are the energy... nucleoside.

Contents

Nomenclature

Nucleotide names are abbreviated into standard four-letter codes. The first letter is lower case and indicates whether the nucleotide in question is a ribonucleotide (r) or deoxyribonucleotide (d). The second letter indicates the nucleobase:

G: Guanine (2-amino-6-oxypurine) is one of the four main nucleobases found in nucleic acids (e.g., DNA and RNA). Guanine is a purine derivative and in Watson-Crick base pairing forms hydrogen bonds in the plane of the fused rings with cytosine. Guanine stacks vertically with the other... Guanine
A: Structure of Adenine Adenine is one of the two purine nucleobases used in forming nucleotides of the nucleic acids DNA and RNA. In DNA, adenine (A) binds to thymine (T) to assist in stabilizing the nucleic acid structures. In RNA, adenine binds to uracil (U). Adenine forms adenosine, a nucleoside... Adenine
T: Thymine Thymine (C5H6N2O2, 2-oxy-4-oxy-5-methylpyrimidine, 2,4-dioxy-5-methylpyrimidine, 5-methyluracil) is one of the bases of the nucleic acid found in DNA. It can base pair with adenine. Thymine combined with deoxyribose creates the nucleoside thymidine. Thymidine can be phosphorylated with one, two or... Thymine
C: Cytosine Cytosine is one of the 5 main nucleobases used in storing and transporting genetic information within a cell. It is a pyrimidine derivative, with a heterocyclic aromatic ring and two substituents attached (an amine group at position 4 and a keto group at position 2). The nucleoside of cytosine... Cytosine
U: Uracil Uracil is one of the four RNA bases, replacing thymine as found in DNA. Just like thymine, uracil can form a base pair with adenine via two hydrogen bonds, but it lacks the methyl group present in thymine. Uracil, in comparison to thymine, will more readily degenerate into cytosine... Uracil not present in DNA, but takes the place of Thymine in RNA

The third and fourth letters indicate the length of the attached phosphate chain (Mono-, Di-, Tri-) and the presence of a phosphate (P).


For example, deoxy-cytosine-triphosphate is abbreviated as dCTP.


Chemical structures

Nucleotides


Adenosine monophosphate
AMP

Adenosine diphosphate
ADP

Adenosine triphosphate
ATP

Guanosine monophosphate
GMP

Guanosine diphosphate
GDP

Guanosine triphosphate
GTP

Thymidine monophosphate
TMP

Thymidine diphosphate
TDP

Thymidine triphosphate
TTP

Uridine monophosphate
UMP

Uridine diphosphate
UDP

Uridine triphosphate
UTP

Cytidine monophosphate
CMP

Cytidine diphosphate
CDP

Cytidine triphosphate
CTP

Deoxynucleotides


Deoxyadenosine monophosphate
dAMP

Deoxyadenosine diphosphate
dADP

Deoxyadenosine triphosphate
dATP

Deoxyguanosine monophosphate
dGMP

Deoxyguanosine diphosphate
dGDP

Deoxyguanosine triphosphate
dGTP

Deoxythymidine monophosphate
dTMP

Deoxythymidine diphosphate
dTDP

Deoxythymidine triphosphate
dTTP

Deoxyuridine monophosphate
dUMP

Deoxyuridine diphosphate
dUDP

Deoxyuridine triphosphate
dUTP

Deoxycytidine monophosphate
dCMP

Deoxycytidine diphosphate
dCDP

Deoxycytidine triphosphate
dCTP

See also

  • This stylistic schematic diagram shows a gene in relation to the double helix structure of DNA and to a chromosome (right). Introns are regions often found in eukaryote genes which are removed in the splicing process: only the exons encode the protein. This diagram labels a region of only 40... Gene
  • Genetics (from the Greek genno γεννώ= give birth) is the science of genes, heredity, and the variation of organisms. Humans began applying knowledge of genetics in prehistory with the domestication and breeding of plants and animals. In modern research, genetics provides important tools in the investigation... Genetics
  • This article is about the biological chromosome. For information about chromosomes in genetic algorithms, see Chromosome (genetic algorithm). Figure 1: Chromosome. (1) Chromatid. One of the two identical parts of the chromosome after S phase. (2) Centromere. The point where the two chromatids touch, and where the microtubules attach. (3... Chromosome

External links

  • Abbreviations and Symbols for Nucleic Acids, Polynucleotides and their Constituents (http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/misc/naabb.html) ( The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) is an international non-governmental organization devoted to the advancement of chemistry. It has as its members national chemistry societies. It is the recognized authority in developing standards for the naming of chemical compounds, through its Interdivisional Committee on Nomenclature and... IUPAC)
  • Provisional Recommendations 2004 (http://www.iupac.org/reports/provisional/abstract04/BB-prs310305/Chapter10.pdf) (IUPAC)
A nucleic acid is a complex, high-molecular-weight biochemical macromolecule composed of nucleotide chains that convey genetic information. The most common nucleic acids are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). Nucleic acids are found in all living cells and viruses. Nucleic acid, so called because of its prevalence... Nucleic acids edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Template:Nucleic_acids&action=edit)

Nucleobases
Structure of Adenine Adenine is one of the two purine nucleobases used in forming nucleotides of the nucleic acids DNA and RNA. In DNA, adenine (A) binds to thymine (T) to assist in stabilizing the nucleic acid structures. In RNA, adenine binds to uracil (U). Adenine forms adenosine, a nucleoside... Adenine - Thymine Thymine (C5H6N2O2, 2-oxy-4-oxy-5-methylpyrimidine, 2,4-dioxy-5-methylpyrimidine, 5-methyluracil) is one of the bases of the nucleic acid found in DNA. It can base pair with adenine. Thymine combined with deoxyribose creates the nucleoside thymidine. Thymidine can be phosphorylated with one, two or... Thymine - Uracil Uracil is one of the four RNA bases, replacing thymine as found in DNA. Just like thymine, uracil can form a base pair with adenine via two hydrogen bonds, but it lacks the methyl group present in thymine. Uracil, in comparison to thymine, will more readily degenerate into cytosine... Uracil - Guanine (2-amino-6-oxypurine) is one of the four main nucleobases found in nucleic acids (e.g., DNA and RNA). Guanine is a purine derivative and in Watson-Crick base pairing forms hydrogen bonds in the plane of the fused rings with cytosine. Guanine stacks vertically with the other... Guanine - Cytosine Cytosine is one of the 5 main nucleobases used in storing and transporting genetic information within a cell. It is a pyrimidine derivative, with a heterocyclic aromatic ring and two substituents attached (an amine group at position 4 and a keto group at position 2). The nucleoside of cytosine... Cytosine
Purine is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound, consisting of a pyrimidine ring that is fused with an imidazole ring. The general term purines refers to substituted purines and their tautomers. Two of the bases in nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are purines. In DNA, these bases form hydrogen bonds with... Purine - Pyrimidine is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound, which is similar to benzene and pyridine and that contains two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3 of the six-membered ring. Three bases of the nucleic acids, namely cytosine, thymine, and uracil, are pyrimidine derivatives. In DNA, these bases form hydrogen... Pyrimidine -

Nucleosides are glycosylamines made by attaching a nucleobase to a ribose ring. Examples of these include cytidine, uridine, adenosine, guanosine, thymidine and inosine. Nucleosides can be phosphorylated by specific kinases in the cell, producing nucleotides, which are the molecular building blocks of DNA and RNA. Nucleoside triphosphates are the energy... Nucleosides
The chemical structure of adenosine Adenosine is a nucleoside formed when adenine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N9-glycosidic bond. Adenosine plays an important role in biochemical processes, such as energy transfer - as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) - as... Adenosine - Thymidine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when thymine is attached to a deoxyribose ring (also known as a deoxyribofuranose) via a β-N1-glycosidic bond. Thymidine can be phosphorylated with one, two or three phosphoric acid groups, creating respectively TMP, TDP or TTP (thymidine mono... Thymidine - Uridine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when uracil is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N1-glycosidic bond. If uracil is attached to a deoxyribose ring, it is known as a deoxyuridine. Categories: Nucleosides ... Uridine - Guanosine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when guanine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N9-glycosidic bond. Guanosine can be phosphorylated to become GDP (guanosine diphosphate) and GTP (guanosine triphosphate) among other things. If guanine is attached... Guanosine - Cytidine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when cytosine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N1-glycosidic bond. If cytosine is attached to a deoxyribose ring, it is known as a deoxycytidine. Categories: Nucleosides ... Cytidine
The chemical structure of adenosine Adenosine is a nucleoside formed when adenine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N9-glycosidic bond. Adenosine plays an important role in biochemical processes, such as energy transfer - as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) - as... Deoxyadenosine - Deoxythymidine - Uridine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when uracil is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N1-glycosidic bond. If uracil is attached to a deoxyribose ring, it is known as a deoxyuridine. Categories: Nucleosides ... Deoxyuridine - Guanosine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when guanine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N9-glycosidic bond. Guanosine can be phosphorylated to become GDP (guanosine diphosphate) and GTP (guanosine triphosphate) among other things. If guanine is attached... Deoxyguanosine - Cytidine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when cytosine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N1-glycosidic bond. If cytosine is attached to a deoxyribose ring, it is known as a deoxycytidine. Categories: Nucleosides ... Deoxycytidine
Ribose Ribose is a five carbon sugar (pentose) that is critical to living creatures. It is a component of the RNA that is used for genetic transcription, and is related to deoxyribose which is a component of DNA. It is also a component of ATP, NADH, and several other chemicals... Ribose - Deoxyribose Deoxyribose (more precisely 2-deoxyribose) is a five-carbon sugar (a pentose) derived from the pentose sugar ribose by the repacement of the hydroxyl group at the 2 position with hydrogen, leading to the net loss of an oxygen. Ribose forms a five member ring composed of four carbon... Deoxyribose

Nucleotides
Adenosine monophosphate, also known as AMP, is the product of adenosine condensation with a single phosphate group: AMP can be produced during ATP synthesis by the enzyme adenylate kinase by combining two ADP molecules: 2 ADP → ATP + AMP Or AMP may be produced by the hydrolysis of one high... AMP - TMP - UMP - GMP - Cytidine monophosphate, also known as 5-cytidylic acid and abbreviated CMP, is a nucleotide that is found in RNA. It is an ester of phosphoric acid with the nucleoside cytidine. CMP consists of the phosphate group, the pentose sugar ribose, and the nucleobase cytosine. See also Nucleoside Nucleotide DNA RNA... CMP
In biochemistry adenosine diphosphate (commonly called ADP) is a participating chemical in the reactions of intracellular energy transfers. See adenosine triphosphate for a description of the reactions, and also adenosine monophosphate Categories: Nucleotides ... ADP - TDP - UDP - GDP (guanosine diphosphate) is a chemical compound essential to signal transduction in living cells. It is created by the actions of GTPases on GTP. Categories: Stub | Nucleotides ... GDP - Cytidine diphosphate, abbreviated CDP, is a nucleotide. It is an ester of pyrophosphoric acid with the nucleoside cytidine. CDP consists of the pyrophosphate group, the pentose sugar ribose, and the nucleobase cytosine. See also Nucleoside Nucleotide DNA RNA Oligonucleotide Categories: Biochemistry stubs | Nucleotides ... CDP
For other uses of the initials ATP, see ATP (disambiguation) Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the nucleotide known in biochemistry as the energy transfer; that is, ATP is able to store and transport chemical energy within cells. ATP also plays an important role in the synthesis of nucleic... ATP - TTP - UTP - GTP (also known as guanylyl imidodiphosphate, guanosine-5-triphosphate, or guanosine triphosphate) is a chemical compound (nucleotide) that is incorporated into the growing RNA chain during synthesis of RNA and used as a source of energy during synthesis of proteins. GTP is also essential to signal transduction in living cells... GTP - CTP
Structure of cAMP Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, cyclic AMP or 3-5-cyclic adenosine monophosphate) is a molecule that is important in many biological processes; it is derived from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). cAMP is a second messenger, used for intracellular signal transduction, such as transferring the effects of hormones like... cAMP - Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a second messenger derived from GTP. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a cyclic nucleotide derived from guanosine triphosphate (GTP). cGMP acts as a second messenger much like cyclic AMP, most notably by activating intracellular protein kinases in response to the binding of membrane-impermeable peptide... cGMP

Deoxynucleotides
dAMP - dTMP - dUMP - dGMP - Cytidine is a molecule (known as a nucleoside) that is formed when cytosine is attached to a ribose ring (also known as a ribofuranose) via a β-N1-glycosidic bond. If cytosine is attached to a deoxyribose ring, it is known as a deoxycytidine. Categories: Nucleosides ... dCMP
dADP - dTDP - dUDP - dGDP - dCDP
dATP - dTTP - dUTP - dGTP - dCTP

A nucleic acid is a complex, high-molecular-weight biochemical macromolecule composed of nucleotide chains that convey genetic information. The most common nucleic acids are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). Nucleic acids are found in all living cells and viruses. Nucleic acid, so called because of its prevalence... Nucleic acids
DNA replication Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a nucleic acid which is capable of carrying genetic instructions for the biological development of all cellular forms of life and many viruses. DNA is sometimes referred to as the molecule of heredity as it is inherited and used to propagate traits. During reproduction... DNA - Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a nucleic acid consisting of a string of covalently-bound nucleotides. It is biochemically distinguished from DNA by the presence of an additional hydroxyl group, attached to each pentose ring; as well as by the use of uracil, instead of thymine. One of the main functions... RNA - The interaction of mRNA in a eukaryote cell. RNA is created in the transcription; after splicing and polyadenylation it is transported to the cytoplasm, and translation occurs in a ribosome. Messenger RNA (mRNA) is RNA that carries information from DNA to the ribosome sites of protein synthesis in the cell... mRNA - A non-coding RNA (ncRNA) is any RNA molecule that functions without being translated into a protein. A commonly used synonym is small RNA (sRNA). Less-frequently used synonyms are non-messenger RNA (nmRNA), small non-messenger RNA (snmRNA), and functional RNA (fRNA). The DNA sequence from which a non... ncRNA - The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. The correct title is miRNA. In genetics, a miRNA (micro-RNA) is a form of single-stranded RNA which is typically 20-25 nucleotides long, and is thought to regulate the expression of other genes. miRNAs are RNA... miRNA - rRNA - shRNA - Small interfering RNA (siRNA) are a class of 20-25 nucleotide-long RNA molecules that interfere with the expression of genes. These are produced as part of the RNA interference (RNAi) process by the enzyme Dicer. External links siDirect: a web-based online software system for computing siRNA sequences Paper... siRNA - Transfer RNA (abbreviated tRNA) is a small RNA chain (74-93 nucleotides) that transfers a specific amino acid to a growing polypeptide chain at the ribosomal site of protein synthesis during translation. It has sites for amino-acid attachment and codon (a particular sequence of 3 bases) recognition. The codon... tRNA - Oligonucleotides are short sequences of nucleotides (RNA or DNA), typically with twenty or fewer base pairs. See also: polynucleotide ... Oligonucleotide


  Results from FactBites:
 
Deoxynucleotides can replace dideoxynucleotides in minisequencing by arrayed primer extension | Archive | ... (241 words)
Scientific literature describing arrayed primer extension and other array-based minisequencing technologies consistently cite the requirement for four fluorescent dideoxynucleotides (with concomitant absence/inactivation of deoxynucleotides) to ensure single-base extension and thus sequence-specific intensity data that can be interpreted as a base call or genotype.
We present compelling evidence thatfluorescent deoxynucleotides can reliably be used in microarray minisequencing experiments, generating fluorescent sequence extension intensity profiles that are homologous to the single-base extensions obtained with terminator dideoxynucleotides.
Due to the almost 10-fold higher costs (and limited fluorophore choice) of many commercially available fluorescent dideoxynucleotides, compared to fluorescent deoxynucleotides, as well as other potentially constraining intellectual property and licensing issues, this hitherto dismissed microarray chemistry represents an important reevaluation in the field of array-based genotyping and related enzymology.
DNA sequencing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1646 words)
The oligonucleotide primer is extended using a DNA polymerase, an enzyme that replicates DNA.
Included with the primer and DNA polymerase are the four deoxynucleotide bases (DNA building blocks), along with a low concentration of a chain terminating nucleotide (most commonly a di-deoxynucleotide).
As the DNA strand is elongated the DNA polymerase catalyses the joining of deoxynucleotides to the corresponding bases.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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