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Encyclopedia > Denmark
Kongeriget Danmark
Kingdom of Denmark
Flag of Denmark
Flag Coat of arms
Mottonone
(Royal motto: Guds hjælp, Folkets kærlighed, Danmarks styrke
"The Help of God, the Love of the People, the Strength of Denmark")
AnthemDer er et yndigt land (national)

Royal anthemKong Christian (royal)
Location of  Denmark  (orange)

– on the European continent  (camel & white)
– in the European Union  (camel)                 [ Legend] Denmark is a country in Europe. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Denmark_coa. ... The Dannebrog. ... The National Coat of Arms of Denmark consists of three crowned blue lions accompanied by nine red hearts, all in a golden shield. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The use of a royal motto (Danish: valgsprog) is an old tradition among Danish monarchs, dating back at least 500 years. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a countrys government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Der er et yndigt land (There is a Lovely Land) is the (civil) national anthem of Denmark. ... A royal anthem is a patriotic song, much like a national anthem that recognizes the nations monarch. ... Kong Kristian (King Christian) is the royal anthem of Denmark. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 710 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Denmark ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Capital
(and largest city)
Copenhagen
55°43′N, 12°34′E
Official languages Danish1
Demonym Danish
Government Parliamentary democracy and Constitutional monarchy
 -  Monarch Margrethe II
 -  Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen
Consolidation (prehistoric) 
EU accession 1 January 1973
Area
 -  Total 43,094 km² (134th²)
16,639² sq mi 
 -  Water (%) 1.6²
Population
 -  2008 estimate 5,475,791 (108th)
 -  Density 129.16/km² (78th²)
334.53/sq mi
GDP (PPP) 2006 estimate
 -  Total $198.5 billion (45th)
 -  Per capita $37,000 (6th)
GDP (nominal) 2006 estimate
 -  Total $256.3 billion (27th)
 -  Per capita $46,600 (6th)
Gini (1997) 24.7 (low) (1st)
HDI (2004) 0.943 (high) (14th)
Currency Danish krone (DKK)
Time zone CET² (UTC+1)
 -  Summer (DST) CEST² (UTC+2)
Internet TLD .dk2,3
Calling code +454
1 Co-official with Greenlandic in Greenland, and Faroese in the Faroe Islands. German is recognised as a protected minority language in the South Jutland (Sønderjylland) area of Denmark. Danish is recognized as a protected minority language in the Schleswig-Holstein region of Germany.
² For Denmark excluding the Faroe Islands and Greenland.
³ The TLD .eu is shared with other European Union countries.
4 The Faroe Islands use +298 and Greenland uses +299.

The Kingdom of Denmark (Danish: , IPA: [ˈd̥ænmɑɡ̊], (archaic:) IPA: [ˈd̥anmɑːɡ̊]), commonly known as Denmark, is a country situated in the Scandinavian region of northern Europe. It is the southernmost of the Nordic countries. The mainland is bordered to the south by Germany; Denmark is located to the southwest of Sweden and the south of Norway. Denmark borders both the Baltic and the North Sea. The country consists of a large peninsula, Jutland (Jylland) and a large number of islands, most notably Zealand (Sjælland), Funen (Fyn), Vendsyssel-Thy, Lolland, Falster and Bornholm as well as hundreds of minor islands often referred to as the Danish Archipelago. Denmark has long controlled the approach to the Baltic Sea, and these waters are also known as the Danish straits. The Faroe Islands and Greenland are autonomous provinces of Denmark with home rule. Not to be confused with capitol. ... Most Danes today trace their heritage to a Germanic people who have inhabited Denmark since prehistoric times. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... An official language is a language that is given a special legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... A parliamentary system, or parliamentarism, is distinguished by the executive branch of government being dependent on the direct or indirect support of the parliament, often expressed through a vote of confidence. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not... This is a list of Danish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queen of Denmark, including Regents of the Kalmar Union. ... Margrethe II (Margrethe Alexandrine Þórhildur Ingrid) (born 16 April 1940) is the Queen regnant of Denmark. ... This is a list over the heads of government in Denmark, from the establishment of a constitutional monarchy in 1849 until present. ... Anders Fogh Rasmussen , also: (born January 26, 1953) is the current Prime Minister of Denmark (in Danish Statsminister, meaning Minister of State). ... Austria Poland Belgium Bulgaria Cyprus Czech   Rep. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 10,000 km² and 100,000 km². ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... Map of countries by population for the year 2007 This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... PPP of GDP for the countries of the world (2003). ... There are three lists of countries of the world sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) (the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... This article includes two lists of countries of the world[1] sorted by their gross domestic product (GDP) at purchasing power parity (PPP) per capita, the value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year divided by the average population for the same year. ... World map of GDP (Nominal and PPP). ... Per capita is a Latin phrase meaning for each head. ... Map of countries by 2006 GDP (nominal) per capita (IMF, October 2007). ... Graphical representation of the Gini coefficient The Gini coefficient is a measure of inequality of income distribution or inequality of wealth distribution. ... World map of the Gini coefficient This is a list of countries or dependencies by Income inequality metrics, sorted in ascending order according to their Gini coefficient. ... This page talks about Human Development Index, for other HDIs see HDI (disambiguation) World map indicating Human Development Index (2007). ... This talks about the countries in the Human Development Index, for information on the Human Development Index, please Click Here World map indicating Human Development Index (2007) (Colour-blind compliant map) For red-green color vision problems. ... ISO 4217 Code DKK User(s) Denmark, Greenland, Faroe Islands 1 Inflation 1. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Summer Time (CEST) is one of the names of UTC+2 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... UTC redirects here. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .dk is the country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Denmark. ... This is a list of country calling codes defined by ITU-T recommendation E.164. ... Denmark uses, in the main, an eight digit numbering plan, with no area codes. ... Schleswig-Holstein is the northernmost of the 16 Bundesländer in Germany. ... Image File history File links ‎ Warning: This file type may contain malicious code; by executing it, your system may be compromised. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Political map of the Nordic countries and associated territories. ... For other uses, see Baltic (disambiguation). ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ... Flag of Vendsyssel. ... Lolland (formerly spelled Laaland) is the fourth largest island of Denmark, with an area of some 1,243 square kilometers. ... Falster is a Danish island. ... Denmark Region Hovedstaden Bornholms Regionskommune 588 km² (227 mi²)  - coordinates , , 43,040 () since January 2003 CET (UTC+1)  -  CEST (UTC+2) Bornholm Island (far right) in Denmark : www. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... The Danish straits are the three channels connecting the Baltic sea to the North Sea through the Kattegat and Skagerrak. ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ...


Denmark is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system of government. It is a member of NATO and the European Union, having joined the European Economic Community in 1973. The national capital and the largest city is Copenhagen. Originally a seafaring nation relying on fishing, farming and trade, Denmark experienced steady industrialization in the 19th and 20th centuries and developed the Scandinavian model welfare state. In 2006 and 2007, surveys[1] ranked Denmark as "the happiest place in the world," based on standards of health, welfare, and education. In 2007 Copenhagen was ranked the third most liveable city in the world by Monocle magazine.[2] Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... The Scandinavian welfare model is often used as a general term for the way in which Denmark, Sweden and Norway have chosen to organise and finance their social security systems, health services and education. ... There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ...

Contents

Etymology

The etymology of the word Denmark, and especially the relationship between Danes and Denmark and the unifying of Denmark as a single Kingdom is a subject that attracts some debate.[3][4] The debate is centered primarily around the prefix 'Dan' and whether it refer to the Dani or a historical person Dan and the exact meaning of the -mark ending. The issue is further complicated by a number of references to various Dani people in Scandinavian or other places in Europe in ancient Greek and Roman accounts (like Ptolemy, Jordanes and Gregory of Tours), as well as some medieval literature (like Adam of Bremen, Beowulf, Widsith and Poetic Edda). The Danes were an ancient North germanic tribe residing in modern day southern Sweden and on the Danish islands. ... Look up Dan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... Saint Gregory of Tours (c. ... Adam of Bremen (also: Adam Bremensis) was one of the most important German medieval chroniclers. ... This article is about the epic poem. ... Widsith is an Old English poem of 144 lines. ... The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. ...


Most handbooks derive[5] the first part of the word, and the name of the people, from a word meaning "flat land", related to German Tenne "threshing floor", English den "cave", Sanskrit dhánuṣ- "desert" . The -mark is believed to mean woodland or borderland (see marches), with probable references to the border forests in south Schleswig,[6] maybe similar to Finnmark, Telemark or Dithmarschen.[7] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... Mark or march (or various plural forms of these words) are derived from the Frankish word marka (boundary) and refer to a border region, e. ... The region of Schleswig (former English name: Sleswick, Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig, Low German: Sleswig, North Frisian: Slaswik or Sleesweg) covers the area about 60 km north and 70 km south of the border between Germany and Denmark. ... County NO-20 Region Nord-Norge Administrative centre Vadsø County mayor   Area  - Total  - Percentage Ranked 1 48,618 km² 15. ... For other uses, see Telemark (disambiguation). ... Dithmarschen (IPA: ) is a district in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ...


Mythological explanations

Some of the earliest descriptions of the origin of the word 'Denmark', describing a territory, are found in the Chronicon Lethrense (12th century), Svend Aagesen (late 12th century), Saxo Grammaticus (early 13th century) and the Ballad of Eric (mid 15th century). There are however many more Danish annals and yearbooks containing various other details, similar tales in other variations, other names or spelling variations, and so on. Chronicon Lethrense (Danish: Lejrekrøniken English: Chronicle of Lejre/Leire) is a small Danish Medieval work from the 12th century written in Latin. ... Svend Aagesen (or Sven; also known as Aggessøn, Aggesøn or Aggesen; the most correct name is probably Sven Aggesen, in Latin Sveno Aggonis; born somewhere around 1140-1150, death unknown) is most famous, in Denmark at least, for making one of the first attempts to write a coherent... Saxo, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857 – 1945) Saxo Grammaticus (estimated. ...


The Chronicon Lethrense explains that when the Roman Emperor Augustus went against Denmark in the time of David, Denmark consisted of the territory Jutland, Funen, Zealand, Møn, Falster, Lolland and Skåne, but was not called Denmark (Dania) because they were governed by the Swedish king Ypper.[8] He had three sons, Nori, Østen and Dan. Dan was sent to govern Zealand, Møn, Falster and Lolland, which became known jointly as Videslev. When the Jutes were fighting Emperor Augustus they called upon Dan to help and upon victory made him king of Jutland, Fuen, Videslev and Skåne. After a council about what to call this new united land, they named it Denmark (Dania) after the new king, Dan. Saxo relates that the legendary Danish King Dan, son of Humbli, gave the name to the Danish people, though he does not expressly state that he also is the origin of the word "Denmark". Rather he tells that England ultimately derives its name from Dan’s brother Angle. As a side note, however, Saxo also tells that the Norman historian Dudo of Saint-Quentin had already written that the Danish people and Denmark derived their name from the Dacian people of modern day Romania and northern Bulgaria. From Dudo we hear that Rollo was expelled from Dacia and went to Scania with six boats. In the Ballad of Eric we hear that the Gothic king Humli set his son Dan to rule the settlers of a territory called Vetala, and after Dan, Vetala was named Denmark, Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... Møn is a municipality, and also an island, in south Denmark, in the county of Storstrøm. ... Falster is a Danish island. ... Lolland (formerly spelled Laaland) is the fourth largest island of Denmark, with an area of some 1,243 square kilometers. ... Scania (SkÃ¥ne in Swedish  ) is a geographical region of Sweden on the southernmost tip of the Scandinavian peninsula, a historical province (landskap)[1] of the Kingdom of Sweden, since 1997 a county (Län) of Sweden, before 1658 part of the Kingdom of Denmark. ... Dan is the name of one or more legendary kings of the Danes in medieval Scandinavian texts. ... For the coarse vegetable textile fiber, see Jute. ... Dan I was the progenitor of the Danish royal house according to Saxo Grammaticuss Gesta Danorum. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... Dudo, or Dudon was a Norman historian, and dean of Saint-Quentin, where he was born about 965. ... Dacian kingdom during the reign of Burebista, 82 BC The Dacians (Lat. ... Rollo on the Six Dukes statue in the Falaise town square. ... For other uses, see Dacia (disambiguation). ... Look up Gothic, goth, Goth in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Earliest occurrences

The Jelling Stones, commonly referred to as Denmark's "birth certificate", seen from the north with "Gorm's Mound" in the background.
The Jelling Stones, commonly referred to as Denmark's "birth certificate", seen from the north with "Gorm's Mound" in the background.

The earliest mention of a territory called "Denmark" is found in King Alfred the Great's modified translation into Old English of Paulus Orosius' Seven Books of History Against The Pagans ["Historiarum adversum Paganos Libri Septem"], written by Alfred when king of Wessex in the years 871-899. In a passage introduced to the text by Alfred, we read about Ohthere from Hålogaland’s travels in the Nordic region, during which 'Denmark [Denamearc] was on his [port side]... And then for two days he had on his [port side] the islands which belong to Denmark'.[9] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 205 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jelling stones ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 205 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jelling stones ... Mary Elizabeth Winblad (1895-1987) birth certificate A birth certificate is a vital record that documents the birth of a child. ... Gorm the Old (Gorm den Gamle) was King of Denmark in the mid-900s. ... For the 10th century Bishop of Sherborne, see Alfred (bishop). ... Old English redirects here. ... Paulus Orosius (c. ... For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ... A map in Norwegian of the voyage of Ohthere. ... Port is the nautical term (used on boats and ships) that refers to the left side of a ship, as perceived by a person facing towards the bow (the front of the vessel). ...


The earliest mention of the word "Denmark" within Denmark itself is found on the two rune stones at Jelling, believed to have been erected by Gorm the Old (c. 955) and Harald Bluetooth (c. 965). The larger stone of the two is often cited as Denmark's birth certificate, though both use the word "Denmark", in the form of (acc.) tanmaurk [ˈdanmɒrk] (large Jelling stone) and (gen.) tanmarkaR [ˈdanmarkaɽ] (small Jelling stone).[10] The inhabitants of Denmark are there called tani [ˈdanɪ] ("Danes" in the acc.). Burial mound in Jelling churchyard Northern burial mound and church in Jelling churchyard Jelling is a town located in Jelling municipality near Vejle, Denmark on the Jutland peninsula. ... Gorm the Old (Gorm den Gamle) was King of Denmark in the mid-900s. ... Harold Bluetooth Gormson (Danish Harald Blåtand, Norwegian Harald Blåtann) (ca 935- November 1, 986), sometimes Harold II, succeeded his father Gorm the Old as king of Denmark in 958 (or 959) and was king of Norway for a few years, probably around 970. ... The accusative case (abbreviated ACC) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The accusative case (abbreviated ACC) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb. ...


In the Song of Roland, estimated to have been written between 1040 and 1115, though the oldest manuscript dates to 1140-1170, the first mention of the legendary Danish hero Holger Danske appears, who is specifically mentioned, several times, as "Holger of Denmark" (Oger de Denemarche) Eight phases of The Song of Roland in one picture. ... Ogier the Dane (known in Danish Holger Danske) as is a fictional hero who first appears in the Old French chanson de geste. ...


History

Main article: History of Denmark
Hankehøj, by Johan Lundbye. A Danish down. Note the glacial character of the terrain and the burial mound of an early chief in the centre.
Hankehøj, by Johan Lundbye. A Danish down. Note the glacial character of the terrain and the burial mound of an early chief in the centre.
A photo of the Gundestrup cauldron.
A photo of the Gundestrup cauldron.

The earliest archaeological findings in Denmark date back to 130,000 – 110,000 BC in the Eem interglacial period.[11] People have inhabited Denmark since about 12,500 BC and agriculture has been in evidence since 3,900 BC.[12] The Nordic Bronze Age (1,800–600 BC) in Denmark was marked by burial mounds, which left an abundance of findings including lurs and the Sun Chariot. During the Pre-Roman Iron Age (500 BC – AD 1), native groups began migrating south, although[12] the first Danish people came to the country between the Pre-Roman and the Germanic Iron Age,[13] in the Roman Iron Age (AD 1–400). The Roman provinces maintained trade routes and relations with native tribes in Denmark and Roman coins have been found in Denmark. Evidence of strong Celtic cultural influence dates from this period in Denmark and much of northwest Europe and is among other things reflected in the finding of the Gundestrup cauldron. Historians believe that before the arrival of the precursors to the Danes, who came from the east Danish islands (Zealand) and Skåne and spoke an early form of north Germanic, most of Jutland and some islands were settled by Jutes. They were later invited to the British Isles as mercenaries by Brythonic king Vortigern, and were granted the south-eastern territories of Kent, the Isle of Wight, among other areas, where they settled. They were later absorbed or ethnically cleansed by the invading Angles and Saxons, who formed the Anglo-Saxons.[14] The remaining population in Jutland assimilated in with the Danes, due territorial expansions from the south and the east, and the Jutes being initially weakened after their emigrations. This is a history of the Kingdom of Denmark and the areas comprising modern day Denmark. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1747, 368 KB) Description: Title: de: Hankehøj Technique: de: Leinwand Dimensions: de: 35 × 41 cm Country of origin: de: Dänemark Current location (city): de: Kopenhagen Current location (gallery): de: Hirschsprungske Samling Other notes: de: Landschaftsmalerei Source: The Yorck Project... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x1747, 368 KB) Description: Title: de: Hankehøj Technique: de: Leinwand Dimensions: de: 35 × 41 cm Country of origin: de: Dänemark Current location (city): de: Kopenhagen Current location (gallery): de: Hirschsprungske Samling Other notes: de: Landschaftsmalerei Source: The Yorck Project... Hankehøj, by Johan Thomas Lundbye Johan Thomas Lundbye (September 1, 1818-April 25, 1848) was a promising young Danish painter and graphic artist, known for his animal and landscape paintings who died at the age of 29. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1004x800, 1034 KB) Gundestrupkarret (the Gundestrup Cauldron). ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1004x800, 1034 KB) Gundestrupkarret (the Gundestrup Cauldron). ... A photo of the Gundestrup cauldron. ... Archaeology of Denmark The first submerged settlement excavated in Denmark was the Tybrind Vig site. ... BC may stand for: Before Christ (see Anno Domini) : an abbreviation used to refer to a year before the beginning of the year count that starts with the supposed year of the birth of Jesus. ... The last interglacial period (between the ice ages), approx. ... Map of the Nordic Bronze Age culture, ca 1200 BC The Nordic Bronze Age (also Northern Bronze Age) is the name given by Oscar Montelius (1843-1921) to a period and a Bronze Age culture in Scandinavian pre-history, ca 1800 BC - 600 BC, with sites that reached as far... Alternate meanings of barrow: see Barrow_in_Furness for the town of Barrow in Cumbria, England; also Barrow, Alaska in the U.S.; also River Barrow in Ireland. ... See Lurs for other uses Lur is a name given to two distinct types of wind musical instrument. ... The Sun Chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. ... A map of the area covered by the Pre-Roman Iron Age, ca 500 BC-1 AD The Pre-Roman Iron Age (also called the Celtic Iron Age) (ca 600 BC or 500 BC - ca 1 AD) designates the earliest part (i. ... AD redirects here. ... The Germanic Iron Age is the name given to the period 400 CE–800 AD in Northern Europe, and it is part of the continental Age of Migrations. ... Roman Bronze figurine, Öland, Sweden The Roman Iron Age (1-400) is the name that Swedish archaeologist Oscar Montelius gave to a part of the Iron Age in Scandinavia, Northern Germany and the Netherlands. ... Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120. ... A photo of the Gundestrup cauldron. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... The Flag of SkÃ¥ne (also known as Scania in English) is the southernmost historical province (landskap) and County (Län) of Sweden. ... A North Germanic language is any of several Germanic languages spoken in Scandinavia, parts of Finland and on the islands west of Scandinavia. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... For the coarse vegetable textile fiber, see Jute. ... This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... Vortigern (also spelled Vortiger and Vortigen, and in Welsh Gwrtheyrn), was a 5th century warlord in Britain, a leading ruler among the Britons (Brythons). ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... White cliffs of Dover in England White cliffs of Rugen down the Baltic coast from Schleswig The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestor of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig, Germany. ... For other uses, see Saxon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... The Danish nation is a concept closely connected to 19th century ethnic nationalism. ... The German term Völkerwanderung (lit. ...


The exact origins of the Danish nation have been lost in history. However, a short note[15] about the Dani in "The Origin and Deeds of the Goths" from 551 by historian Jordanes is believed by some to be an early mention of the Danes,[16] one of the ethnic groups from whom the modern Danish people are descended. The Danevirke defense structures were built in phases from the 3rd century forward,[17] and the sheer size of the construction efforts in 737 are attributed to the emergence of a Danish king.[17] The new runic alphabet was first used at the same time and Ribe, the oldest town of Denmark, was founded about 700 AD. The Origin and Deeds of the Goths (Latin: De origine actibusque Getarum), commonly referred to as Getica, was written by Jordanes, probably in Constantinople, and was published in AD 551. ... Languages Danish Religions Predominantly Lutheran; small minorities of other faiths; secular Related ethnic groups Norwegians, Swedes, Icelanders, Faroese and, to a lesser extent, English and all Germanic ethnic groups The term Dane may refer to: People with a Danish ancestral or ethnic identity, whether living in Denmark, emigrants, or the... // For the town in New Zealand, see Dannevirke. ... Technical note: Due to technical limitations, some web browsers may not display some special characters in this article. ... Ribe (German: Ripen) is the name of the oldest town of Denmark. ...


Viking age

The Ladby ship, the only ship burial found in Denmark
The Ladby ship, the only ship burial found in Denmark
Main article: Viking age

During the 8th-11th centuries, the Danes were known as Vikings, together with Norwegians and Swedish Geats. Viking explorers first discovered and settled Iceland in the 9th century, on their way toward the Faroe Islands. From there, Greenland and Vinland (Newfoundland) were also settled. Utilizing their great skills in shipbuilding they raided and conquered parts of France and the British Isles. But they also excelled in trading along the coasts and rivers of Europe, running trade routes from Greenland in the north to Constantinople in the south via Russian rivers. The Danish Vikings were most active in the British Isles and Western Europe, and they raided, conquered and settled parts of England (their earliest settlements included Danelaw, Ireland, France, Normandy). The Ladby ship is a major ship burial, of the type also represented by the boat chamber grave of Hedeby and the ship burials of Oseberg, Borre, Gokstad and Tune in South Norway, all of which date back to the 9th and 10th centuries. ... Viking Age is the term denoting the years from about 800 to 1066 in Scandinavian History[1][2][3]. // The Vikings have been much maligned in European history, due in large part to their violent attacks on Christians in the first centuries of their excursions out of Scandinavia. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... The term Norwegians may refer to: People with a Norwegian ancestral or ethnic identity, whether living in Norway, emigrants, or the descendents of emigrants. ... Geats (Gautar Old Norse or Götar in Swedish) is the Old English spelling of the name of a Scandinavian people living in Götaland, land of the Geats, currently within the borders of modern Sweden. ... For the historical novel by George Mackay Brown, which depicts Leif Eiríkssons voyage, see Vinland (novel). ... This article is about the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... This article explains the archipelago in north-western Europe. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Gold: Danelaw The Danelaw, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles also known as the Danelagh, (Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), is a name given to a part of Great Britain, now northern and eastern England, in which the laws of the Danes[1] held predominance over those of the Anglo... For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ...


In the early 8th century, Charlemagne's Christian empire had expanded to the southern border of the Danes, and Frankish sources (F.ex. Notker of St Gall) provide the earliest historical evidence of the Danes. These report a King Gudfred, who appeared in present day Holstein with a navy in 804 AD where diplomacy took place with the Franks; In 808, the same King Gudfred attacked the Obotrite, a Wend people and conquered the city of Reric whose population was displaced or abducted, to Hedeby; In 809, King Godfred and emissaries of Charlemagne failed to negotiate peace and the next year, 810, King Godfred attacked the Frisians with 200 ships. The oldest parts of the defensive works of Dannevirke near Hedeby at least date from the summer of 755 and were expanded with large works in the 10th century. The size and amount of troops needed to man it indicates a quite powerful ruler in the area, which might be consistent with the kings the Frankish sources. In 815 AD, Emperor Louis the Pious attacked Jutland apparently in support of a contender to the throne, perhaps Harald Klak, but was turned back by the sons of Godfred, who likely were the sons of the above mentioned Godfred. At the same time Saint Ansgar traveled to Hedeby and started the Catholic Christianization of Scandinavia. For the American band, see Charlemagne (band). ... Notker of St. ... King Godfrid (ruled 804 - 810), was a Danish or Viking king, the younger son of King Sigfred. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... King Godfrid (ruled 804 - 810), was a Danish or Viking king, the younger son of King Sigfred. ... The Obotrites (German: Abodriten, Polish: Obodryci) were a group of Slavic peoples related to the Wends. ... WEND-FM (106. ... Reric (also Rerik) was an old Slav trading settlement, probably on the coast of the Baltic Sea. ... Hedeby (Haithabu in Old Norse; Heidiba in Latin; in Germany the name Haithabu is frequently used) was a Danish settlement and trading centre on the southern Baltic Sea coast of the Jutland Peninsula at the head of a narrow, navigable inlet, the Schlei (Danish: Slien) in the province of Schleswig... The Frisians are an ethnic group of northwestern Europe, inhabiting an area known as Frisia. ... Dannevirke (Danes work), is a rural service town in the southern Hawkes Bay area of New Zealand. ... Hedeby (Haithabu in Old Norse; Heidiba in Latin; in Germany the name Haithabu is frequently used) was a Danish settlement and trading centre on the southern Baltic Sea coast of the Jutland Peninsula at the head of a narrow, navigable inlet, the Schlei (Danish: Slien) in the province of Schleswig... Louis the Pious, contemporary depiction from 826 as a miles Christi (soldier of Christ), with a poem of Rabanus Maurus overlaid. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... Harald Klak Halvdansson (b. ... Ansgar, etching by Hugo Hamilton (1830) Saint Ansgar, Anskar or Oscar, (September 8?, 801–February 3, 865) was an Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen. ... Hedeby (Haithabu in Old Norse; Heidiba in Latin; in Germany the name Haithabu is frequently used) was a Danish settlement and trading centre on the southern Baltic Sea coast of the Jutland Peninsula at the head of a narrow, navigable inlet, the Schlei (Danish: Slien) in the province of Schleswig... For the purposes of this article the Christianization of Scandinavia refers to the process of conversion to Christianity of the Scandinavian and Nordic peoples, starting in the 8th century with the arrival of missionaries in Denmark and ending in the 18th century with the conversion of the Inuits and the...


The Danes were united and officially Christianized in 965 AD by Harald Blåtand, the story of which is recorded on the Jelling stones. The exact extent of Harald's Danish Kingdom is unknown, although it's reasonable to believe that it stretched from the defensive line of Dannevirke, including the Viking city of Hedeby, across Jutland, the Danish isles and into southern present day Sweden; Scania and perhaps Halland and Blekinge. Further more the Jelling stones attests that Harald had also "won" Norway. The son of Harald, Sweyn Forkbeard mounted a series of wars of conquest against England, which was completed by Svend's son Canute the Great by the middle of the 11th century. The reign of Canute the Great (Danish:Knud) represented the peak of the Danish Viking age. King Knud's North Sea Empire included Denmark (1018), Norway (1028), England (1035) and held strong influence over the north-eastern coast of Germany. Harold Bluetooth Gormson (Danish Harald Blåtand, Norwegian Harald Blåtann) (ca 935- November 1, 986), sometimes Harold II, succeeded his father Gorm the Old as king of Denmark in 958 (or 959) and was king of Norway for a few years, probably around 970. ... The Jelling stones are massive carved Rune stones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. ... Hedeby (Haithabu in Old Norse; Heidiba in Latin; in Germany the name Haithabu is frequently used) was a Danish settlement and trading centre on the southern Baltic Sea coast of the Jutland Peninsula at the head of a narrow, navigable inlet, the Schlei (Danish: Slien) in the province of Schleswig... Scania (SkÃ¥ne in Swedish  ) is a geographical region of Sweden on the southernmost tip of the Scandinavian peninsula, a historical province (landskap)[1] of the Kingdom of Sweden, since 1997 a county (Län) of Sweden, before 1658 part of the Kingdom of Denmark. ... is a historical province (landskap) on the western coast of Sweden. ... Blekinge is the name of a geographical region in Sweden which can refer to: Blechingia, or Blekinge - a historical Province of Sweden Blekinge County, or Blekinge län - a current County of Sweden This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Sweyn I Forkbeard (actually Svein Otto Haraldsson; in Danish, Svend Tveskæg, originally Svend Tjugeskæg or Tyvskæg) (circa 960 - February 3, 1014). ... Canute the Great, or Canute I, also known as Cnut in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den Store, Danish: Knud den Store) (died November 12, 1035) was a Viking king of England and Denmark, and Norway, and of... Canute the Great, or Canute I, also known as Cnut in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den Store, Danish: Knud den Store) (died November 12, 1035) was a Viking king of England and Denmark, and Norway, and of...


Following the death of Canute the Great Denmark and England was divided. Sweyn Estridsen's son, Canute II and IV, depending on whose royal line is being figured, raided England for the last time in 1075. He planned another invasion to take the throne of England from an aging William I. He called up a fleet of 1000 Danish ships, 60 Norwegian long boats, with plans to meet with another 600 ships under Duke Robert of Flanders in the summer of 1086. Canute, however, was beginning to realize that the imposition of the tithe on Danish peasants and nobles to fund the expansion of monasteries and churches and a new head tax (Danish:nefgjald) had brought his people to the verge of rebellion. Canute took weeks to arrive at Struer where the fleet had aseembled, but he found only the Norwegians still there. The Danes had waited so long for the king that they began to starve and sailed home in disgust.


Canute thanked the Norwegians for their patience and then went from assembly to assembly (Danish:landsting) outlawing any sailor, captain, or soldier who refused to pay a fine which amounted to more than a years harvest for most farmers. When the king refused to back down, the peasants in Vendsyssel went on a rampage burning royal properties and murdering the hated tax collectors. Canute and his housecarls fled south with a growing army of rebels on his heels. Canute fled to the royal property outside the town of Odense on Funen with his two brothers. The peasants on funen weren't any happier with Canute than anyone else and charged after the king. Canute and his brother, Prince Benedict, fled to St Albans Priory for sanctuary. Canute took communion realizing his days were numbered. After several attempts to break in and then bloody hand to hand fighting in the church, Benedict was cut down and Canute struck in the head by a large stone and then speared from the front. He died at the base of the main altar July 10 1086. And there the Benedictines buried him.


When Queen Edele came to take Canute's body to Flanders, a wonderful light shone around the church and it was taken as a sign that Canute should remain where he was. People flocked to his grave when it was reported that the blind had received their sight, the lame walked, and deaf heard. His brother Olaf, who succeeded Canute, had a short reign and Denmark was plagued with famine so often that Olaf will forever be known as Olaf Hunger. Canute was canonized in 1101, and St Canute's Cathedral became one of Scandinavia's most popular pilgrimage sites in the Middle Ages.


The death of St Canute marks the end of the great Viking Age. Never again would massive flotillas of Scandinavians meet each year to ravage the rest of Christian Europe. Denmark was thoroughly Christian, though for generations Danes quietly held onto old customs that are vague reminders of pre-Christian times.


Medieval Denmark

From the Viking age towards the end of the 13th century, the kingdom of Denmark consisted of Jutland, north from the Eider River and the islands of Zealand, Funen, Bornholm, Skåne, Halland and Blekinge. From the end of the 13th century the lands between the Eider River and the river Kongeåen were separated from the kingdom as two vassal duchies of Schleswig and Holstein. In 1658 Skåne, Halland and Blekinge were ceded to Sweden. Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... The Eider (-German; Danish: Ejderen; Latin: Egdor or Egdore) is the longest river of the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ... Denmark Region Hovedstaden Bornholms Regionskommune 588 km² (227 mi²)  - coordinates , , 43,040 () since January 2003 CET (UTC+1)  -  CEST (UTC+2) Bornholm Island (far right) in Denmark : www. ... The Flag of SkÃ¥ne (also known as Scania in English) is the southernmost historical province (landskap) and County (Län) of Sweden. ... is a historical province (landskap) on the western coast of Sweden. ... Blekinge is the name of a geographical region in Sweden which can refer to: Blechingia, or Blekinge - a historical Province of Sweden Blekinge County, or Blekinge län - a current County of Sweden This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... The Eider (-German; Danish: Ejderen; Latin: Egdor or Egdore) is the longest river of the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. ... The river KongeÃ¥ (in German Königs Au) defines the border between North and South Jutland in Jutland in Denmark. ... A duchy is a territory, fief, or domain ruled by a duke or duchess. ... The region of Schleswig (former English name: Sleswick, Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig, Low German: Sleswig, North Frisian: Slaswik or Sleesweg) covers the area about 60 km north and 70 km south of the border between Germany and Denmark. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... The Flag of SkÃ¥ne (also known as Scania in English) is the southernmost historical province (landskap) and County (Län) of Sweden. ... is a historical province (landskap) on the western coast of Sweden. ... Blekinge is the name of a geographical region in Sweden which can refer to: Blechingia, or Blekinge - a historical Province of Sweden Blekinge County, or Blekinge län - a current County of Sweden This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same...


Following the end of the 11th century, Denmark underwent a transition from a patchwork of regional chiefs (Danish:jarls) with a weak and semi-elected royal institution, into a realm which more reflected European feudalism, with a powerful king ruling through an influential nobility. The period is marked by internal strife and the generally weak geopolitical position of the realm, which for long stretches fell under German influence. The period also featured the first of large stone buildings (mostly churches), a deep penetration by the Christian faith, the appearance of monastic orders in Denmark and the first written historical works such as the Gesta Danorum ("Deeds of the Danes"). German political as well as religious influence firmly ended in the last decades of the 12th century under the rule of King Valdemar the Great and his foster brother Absalon Hvide, Archbishop of Lund; through successful wars against Wend peoples of northeast Germany and the German Empire. Roland pledges his fealty to Charlemagne; from a manuscript of a chanson de geste Feudalism, a term first used in the early modern period (17th century), in its most classic sense refers to a Medieval European political system comprised of a set of reciprocal legal and military obligations among the... Bishop Asgar, etching by the Danish-Norwegian illustrator Louis Moe (1857—1945) Gesta Danorum (Deeds of the Danes) is a work of Danish history, by 12th century author Saxo Grammaticus (Saxo the Grammarian). It is the most ambitious literary undertaking of medieval Denmark. ... Valdemar I of Denmark (1131 - 1182), also known as Valdemar the Great, was King of Denmark from 1157 until 1182. ... Statue of Absalon in Copenhagen Absalon (c. ...   IPA: is a city in SkÃ¥ne in southern Sweden. ... WEND-FM (106. ... For German colonial territories, see German Colonial Empire. ...

The tomb of Margrethe I in Roskilde Cathedral.
The tomb of Margrethe I in Roskilde Cathedral.

A high point was reached during the reign of Valdemar II, who led the formation of a Danish "Baltic Sea Empire", which by 1221 extended control from Estonia in the east to Norway in the north. In this period several of the "regional" law codes were given; notably the Code of Jutland from 1241, which asserted several modern concepts like right of property; "that the king cannot rule without and beyond the law"; "and that all men are equal to the law". Following the death of Valdemar II in 1241 and to the ascension of Valdemar IV in 1340, the kingdom was in general decline due to internal strife and the rise of the Hanseatic League. The competition between the sons of Valdemar II, had the longterm result that the southern parts of Jutland were separated from the kingdom of Denmark and became semi-independent vassal duchies/counties. Image File history File linksMetadata Roskilde_Margrethe1_grave. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Roskilde_Margrethe1_grave. ... Roskilde Cathedral Roskilde Cathedral (Danish: Roskilde Domkirke), in the city of Roskilde on the Island of Zealand (Sjælland) in eastern Denmark was the first Gothic cathedral to be built of brick and its construction encouraged the spread of this Brick Gothic style throughout Northern Europe. ... Valdemar the Victorious redirects here. ... Text of the Codex Holmiensis manuscript. ... Valdemar the Victorious redirects here. ... Valdemar Atterdag (c. ... Carta marina of the Baltic Sea region (1539). ... Valdemar the Victorious redirects here. ...


During the reign of Valdemar IV and his daughter Margrethe I, the realm was re-invigorated and following the Battle of Falköping, Margrethe I had her sister's son, Eric of Pomerania crowned King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden after the signing of the union charter of Kalmar (The Kalmar Union), Trinity Sunday 1397. Much of the next 125 years of Scandinavian history revolves around this union, with Sweden breaking off and being re-conquered repeatedly. The issue was for practical purposes resolved on the June 17, 1523 as Swedish King Gustav Vasa conquered the city of Stockholm. Denmark and Norway remained in a personal union until the Congress of Vienna, 1814. Valdemar Atterdag (c. ... Margaret I Queen of Denmark and Norway, Regent of Sweden (1353 - October 28, 1412) was born in Vordingborg Castle, the daughter of Valdemar IV of Denmark. ... Eric of Pomerania A caricature of the king, the only contemporary likeness of him in existence Eric of Pomerania, Erik af Pommern, Erik VII (Danish title), Erik av Pommern (Eirik III) (Norwegian title) Erik av Pommern (Eric XIII) (Swedish title) or Eryk Pomorski (Polish title), was adopted by Margaret I... The Kalmar Union flag. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events April - Battle of Villalar - Forces loyal to Emperor Charles V defeat the Comuneros, a league of urban bourgeois rebelling against Charles in Spain. ... Gustav Vasa, originally Gustav Eriksson Vasa (May 12, 1496–September 29, 1560) was King of Sweden from 1523 until his death. ... The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819. ...


The Protestant Reformation came to Scandinavia in 1520s. On Easter Sunday 1525 Hans Tausen, a monk in the Order of St John's Hospitalers, proclaimed aloud the need for Luther's reforms in the Catholic Church. His sermon was the beginning of a ten year struggle which would change Denmark forever. Tausen was hustled off to a monastery in Viborg in northern Jutland where he would be isolated and away from Copenhagen and the court. Tausen simply preached through the window of his locked chamber. At first curious Danes came to hear the strange new ideas that Tausen was preaching. Within weeks Tausen was freed by his loyal followers and then a Franciscan abbey church was broken open so Viborgers could hear God's word under a roof. Luther's ideas were accepted so rapidly that the local bishop and other churchmen in Viborg were unable to cope. In many churches the mass was celebrated alongside Lutheran sermons and then Tausen's version of Luther's teachings began to spread to other parts of Jutland. Within a year Tausen was the personal chaplain of King Frederik I. Frederik tried to balance the old and new ideas insisting that they coexist; it lasted only as long as Frederik did. Reformation redirects here. ...


A mob stormed Our Lady Church in Copenhagen in 1531 tearing down statues, destroying side altars, artwork, and relics that had accumulated through its long history. Similar events happened through the country, although for the most part the change was peaceful. The majority of common people saw the reduced influence and wealth of the church as a liberating thing, but their new found influence wasn't to last long.


At the death of Frederick I two claimants to the throne, one backed by Protestant Lũbeck and the other by Catholic nobles caused a civil war known as the Count's Feud (Danish:Grevens Fejde]]. The massacre of Skipper Clement's peasant army at Aalborg brought an end of the war with the pro-Lutheran party firmly in charge. Denmark became officially Lutheran in 1536. Denmark's Catholic bishops were arrested and imprisoned. Abbeys, nunneries, monasteries and other church properties were confiscated by local nobility and the crown. Monks, nuns, and clergy lost their livlihood. The bishops who agreed to marry and not stir up trouble were given former church lands as personal estates. Catholic influence remained longest in northern Jutland, where change permeated slowly. The Reformation in Denmark helped prepare the people and institutions for the Age of Enlightenment which was soon to follow. The Counts Feud (Danish Grevens Fejde), also called the Counts War, was a civil war that raged in Denmark in 1534–1536 and brought about the Reformation in Denmark. ... Skipper Clement (Klemen Andersen) (c. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ...


Modern history

Map of Denmark
Map of Denmark

King Christian IV attacked Sweden in the 1611–13 Kalmar War but failed to accomplish his main objective of forcing Sweden to return to the union with Denmark. The war led to no territorial changes, but Sweden was forced to pay a war indemnity of 1 million silver riksdaler to Denmark, an amount known as the Älvsborg ransom.[18] King Christian used this money to found several towns and fortresses, most notably Glückstadt (founded as a rival to Hamburg), Christiania (following a fire destroying the original city), Christianshavn, Christianstad, and Christiansand. Christian also constructed a number of buildings, most notably Børsen, Rundetårn, Nyboder, Rosenborg, a silver mine and a copper mill. Inspired by the Dutch East India Company, he founded a similar Danish company and planned to claim Sri Lanka as a colony but the company only managed to acquire Tranquebar on India's Coromandel Coast. In the Thirty Year's War, Christian tried to become the leader of the Lutheran states in Germany, but suffered a crushing defeat at the Battle of Lutter resulting in a Catholic army under Albrecht von Wallenstein occupying and pillaging Jutland. Denmark managed to avoid territorial concessions, but Gustavus Adolphus' intervention in Germany was seen as a sign that the military power of Sweden was on the rise while Denmark's influence in the region was declining. In 1643, Swedish armies invaded Jutland and in 1644 Skåne. In the 1645 Treaty of Brømsebro, Denmark surrendered Halland, Gotland, the last parts of Danish Estonia, and several provinces in Norway. In 1657, King Frederick III declared war on Sweden and marched on Bremen-Verden. This led to a massive Danish defeat and the armies of King Charles X Gustav of Sweden conquered both Jutland, Funen and much of Zealand before signing the Peace of Roskilde in February 1658 which gave Sweden control of Skåne, Blekinge, Trøndelag and the island of Bornholm. Charles X Gustav quickly regretted not having destroyed Denmark completely and in August 1658 he began a two-year long siege of Copenhagen but failed to take the capital. In the following peace settlement, Denmark managed to maintain its independence and regain control of Trøndelag and Bornholm. Map of Denmark from CIA World Factbook, with three bridges drawn in using The Gimp. ... Map of Denmark from CIA World Factbook, with three bridges drawn in using The Gimp. ... The coronation of King Christian IV, painted by Otto Bache, 1887. ... Kalmar War The Kalmar War lasted from 1611 to 1613. ... War reparations refer to the monetary compensation intended to cover damage or injury during a war. ... This article is about the chemical element. ... The Riksdaler was the name of the currency used in Sweden until 1873 when it was replaced with the krona as an effect of the Scandinavian Monetary Union. ... Flag of Glückstadt Map of the River Elbe, showing Glückstadt Glückstadt, a town of Germany in Schleswig-Holstein, on the right bank of the Elbe river, at the confluence of the small river Rhin, and 28 miles NW of Altona, on the railway from Itzehoe to Elmshorn. ... For other uses, see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Norway. ... The Church of Our Saviour (Vor Frelser Kirke) in the Christianshavn city district, Copenhagen, Denmark. ... Kristianstad is a municipality and city in Scania in southernmost Sweden. ... County District Sørlandet Municipality NO-1001 Administrative centre Kristiansand Mayor (2004) Per Sigurd Sørensen(H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 287 277 km² 259 km² 0. ... Børsen (The Stock Exchange) is a building in Copenhagen built by Christian IV in 1620-1640. ... RundetÃ¥rn. ... Nyboder is situated close to the train station Østerport in the Østerbro District of Copenhagen, Denmark. ... Rosenborg Castle Rosenborg Castle is a small castle situated at the centre of the Danish capital, Copenhagen. ... Kongsberg (lit. ... Kupfermühle / Kobbermølle Kupfermühle (Danish: Kobbermølle, both names meaning copper mill) is a village located north of Flensburg in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. ... This article is about the trading company. ... The Danish East India Company (in Danish Dansk Ostindisk Kompagni) was founded in 1616, following a privilege of the Danish king Christian IV. It was focused on trade with India and had its base in Tranquebar. ... Tranquebar, 1600. ... Districts along the Coromandel Coast Map of the coast (French) The Coromandel Coast is the name given to the southeastern coast of the Indian peninsula. ... The victory of Gustavus Adolphus at the Battle of Breitenfeld (1631) The Thirty Years War was a conflict fought between the years 1618 and 1648, principally on the territory of todays Germany, but also involving most of the major continental powers. ... Lutheranism is a major branch of Protestant Christianity that identifies with the teachings of the sixteenth-century German reformer Martin Luther. ... The Battle of Lutter (Lutter am Barenberge) took place during the Thirty Years War on 27th August 1626 between the forces of the Protestant Christian IV of Denmark and those of the Catholic League. ...   (also Waldstein; Czech: ;[1] September 24, 1583 – February 25, 1634)[2] was a Bohemian soldier and politician who gave his services (an army of 30,000 to 100,000 men) during the Danish Period of the Thirty Years War to Ferdinand II for no charge except the right to plunder... Gustav II Adolph Gustav II Adolph (December 9, 1594 - November 6, 1632) (also known as Gustav Adolph the Great, under the Latin name Gustavus Adolphus or the Swedish form Gustav II Adolf) was a King of Sweden. ... The Hannibal war, Hannibal controversy or Torstenson War was a short period of conflict between Sweden and Denmark/Norway which occurred in 1643 to 1645 during the waning days of the Thirty Years’ War. ... The Treaty of Brömsebro of August 13, 1645 ended the Torstenson War between Sweden and Denmark-Norway, which had begun in 1643. ...   is a county, province and municipality of Sweden and the second largest island in the Baltic Sea after Zealand. ... King Frederick III Frederick III (March 28, 1609 – February 19, 1670) was King of Denmark and Norway from 1648 until his death. ... Bremen-Verden was a dominion of Sweden from 1648 to 1719, when it was ceded to Hanover in the Treaty of Stockholm. ... Charles X or Karl X Gustav (1622-Sweden, son of John Casimir, Margrave of Pfalz-Zweibrücken, and Catherine, sister of Gustavus Adolphus, was born at the Castle of Nyköping on November 8, 1622. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... The Treaty of Roskilde was signed on February 26, 1658 in the Danish city Roskilde, whereby the king of Denmark-Norway sacrificed nearly half his territory to save the rest. ... The Flag of SkÃ¥ne (also known as Scania in English) is the southernmost historical province (landskap) and County (Län) of Sweden. ... Blekinge is the name of a geographical region in Sweden which can refer to: Blechingia, or Blekinge - a historical Province of Sweden Blekinge County, or Blekinge län - a current County of Sweden This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... Trøndelag is the name of a geographical region in the middle of Norway, consisting of the two counties Nord-Trøndelag and Sør-Trøndelag. ... Denmark Region Hovedstaden Bornholms Regionskommune 588 km² (227 mi²)  - coordinates , , 43,040 () since January 2003 CET (UTC+1)  -  CEST (UTC+2) Bornholm Island (far right) in Denmark : www. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ...


Denmark tried to regain control of Skåne in the Scanian War (1675–79) but it ended in failure. Following the Great Northern War (1700–21), Denmark managed to restore control of the parts of Schleswig and Holstein ruled by the house of Holstein-Gottorp in 1721 and 1773, respectively. Denmark prospered greatly in the last decades of the 18th century due to its neutral status allowing it to trade with both sides in the many contemporary wars. In the Napoleonic Wars, Denmark originally tried to pursue a policy of neutrality to continue the lucrative trade with both France and the United Kingdom and joined the League of Armed Neutrality with Russia, Sweden and Prussia. The British considered this a hostile act and attacked Copenhagen in both 1801 and 1807, in one case carrying off the Danish fleet, in the other, burning large parts of the Danish capital. These events mark the end of the prosperous Florissant Age and resulted in the Dano-British Gunboat War. British control over the waterways between Denmark and Norway proved disastrous to the union's economy and in 1813, Denmark-Norway went bankrupt. The post-Napoleonic Congress of Vienna demanded the dissolution of the Dano-Norwegian union, and this was confirmed by the Treaty of Kiel in 1814. Denmark-Norway had briefly hoped to restore the Scandinavian union in 1809, but these hopes were dashed when the estates of Sweden rejected a proposal to let Frederick VI of Denmark succeed the deposed Gustav IV Adolf and instead gave the crown to Charles XIII. Norway entered a new union with Sweden which lasted until 1905. Denmark kept the colonies of Iceland, Faroe Islands and Greenland. Apart from the Nordic colonies, Denmark ruled over Danish India (Tranquebar in India) from 1620 to 1869, the Danish Gold Coast (Ghana) from 1658 to 1850, and the Danish West Indies (the U.S. Virgin Islands) from 1671 to 1917. Scanian War (Danish: SkÃ¥nske Krig Swedish: SkÃ¥nska kriget) was the Nordic part of the Franco-Dutch War (1672-1678). ... Combatants Sweden Ottoman Empire (1710–1714) Ukrainian Cossacks Russia Denmark-Norway Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Saxony after 1718 Prussia Hanover Commanders Charles XII of Sweden Ahmed III Ivan Mazepa Peter the Great Frederick IV of Denmark Augustus II the Strong Strength 77,000 in the beginning of the war. ... The region of Schleswig (former English name: Sleswick, Danish: Sønderjylland or Slesvig, Low German: Sleswig, North Frisian: Slaswik or Sleesweg) covers the area about 60 km north and 70 km south of the border between Germany and Denmark. ... Holstein (Hol-shtayn) (Low German: Holsteen, Danish: Holsten, Latin and historical English: Holsatia) is the southern part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, between the rivers Elbe and Eider. ... Holstein-Gottorp or Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp was a duchy consisting of areas within Schleswig and Holstein, in present-day Denmark and Germany. ... Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Anthem Preußenlied, Heil dir im Siegerkranz (both unofficial) The Kingdom of Prussia at its greatest extent, at the time of the formation of the German Empire, 1871 Capital Berlin Government Monarchy King  - 1701 — 1713 Frederick I (first)  - 1888 — 1918 William II (last) Prime minister  - 1848 Adolf Heinrich von Arnim... Combatants Great Britain Denmark-Norway Commanders Admiral Sir Hyde Parker Lord Nelson Olfert Fischer, Steen Bille Strength Nelson: 12 ships of the line, 5 frigates, 7 bombs, 6 others Parker (reserve): 8 ships of the line Fischer: 7 ships of the line, 10 others Bille: 17 ships, 1 land battery... Combatants United Kingdom Denmark Commanders James Gambier Ernst Peymann Casualties 42 killed, 145 wounded, 24 missing[1] 5,000 soldiers and militia[1] The Second Battle of Copenhagen, (16 August - 5 September 1807) was a British attack on the civilian population of Copenhagen in order to seize the Danish fleet. ... The Royal Danish Navy (or Kongelige Danske Marine in Danish) is the sea-based branch of The Danish Defence force. ... Battle between the frigate HMS Tartar and Norwegian gunboats near Bergen in 1808 The Gunboat War (1807-1814) was the naval conflict between Denmark-Norway against the British navy during the Napoleonic Wars. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819. ... The Treaty of Kiel, was a settlement between Sweden and Denmark-Norway on January 14, 1814, whereby the Danish king, a loser in the Napoleonic wars, ceded Norway to the king of Sweden, in return for the Swedish holdings in Pomerania. ... Cleric, Knight, and Workman: the three estates in medieval illumination The estates of the realm were the broad divisions of society, usually distinguishing nobility, clergy, and commoners recognized in the Middle Ages, and also later, in some parts of Europe. ... King Frederick VI. King Frederick VI of Denmark and Norway (January 28, 1768 – December 3, 1839), reigned as King of Denmark from 1808 to 1839, and as king of Norway from 1808 to 1814. ... For other people and places of the same name, see Gustaf Adolf (disambiguation). ... Charles XIII (Swedish: ) (7 October 1748 - 5 February 1818), was King of Sweden from 1809 and King of Norway (where he was known as Karl II) from 1814 until his death. ... Danish India is a term for the former colonies of Denmark in India, which included the town of Tranquebar in present-day Tamil Nadu state, and the Nicobar Islands, currently part of Indias union territory of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. ... Tranquebar, 1600. ... The Danish Gold Coast was a part of the Gold Coast (roughly present-day Ghana), which is on the West African Gulf of Guinea (hence the territory is sometimes called Danish Guinea), which was colonized by the Danes, first by the Danish West India Company (a chartered company), later as... The Danish West Indies or Danish Antilles, (DWI, Dansk Vest Indien) are a former colony of Denmark in the Caribbean, now known as the U.S. Virgin Islands. ...

Den Grundlovsgivende Rigsforsamling (The Constitutional Assembly. The Assembly created The Danish constitution), 1860–1864 painting by Constantin Hansen.
Den Grundlovsgivende Rigsforsamling (The Constitutional Assembly. The Assembly created The Danish constitution), 1860–1864 painting by Constantin Hansen.

The Danish liberal and national movement gained momentum in the 1830s, and after the European Revolutions of 1848 Denmark peacefully became a constitutional monarchy on 5 June 1849. After the Second War of Schleswig (Danish: Slesvig) in 1864, Denmark was forced to cede Schleswig and Holstein to Prussia, in a defeat that left deep marks on the Danish national identity. After these events, Denmark returned to its traditional policy of neutrality, also keeping Denmark neutral in World War I. Following the defeat of Germany, the Versailles powers offered to return the then-German region of Schleswig-Holstein to Denmark. Fearing German irredentism, Denmark refused to consider the return of the area and insisted on a plebiscite concerning the return of Schleswig. The two Schleswig Plebiscites took place on 10 February and 14 March, respectively. On 5 July 1920 after the plebiscite and the King's signature (6 July) on the reunion document, Northern Schleswig (Sønderjylland) was recovered by Denmark, thereby adding 163,600 inhabitants and 3,984 km². The reunion day (Genforeningsdag) is celebrated every year 15 June on Valdemarsdag. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (832x559, 39 KB) Den Grundlovgivende Rigsforsamling - painting by Constantin Hansen The fathers of the Danish constituion assembled in Copenhagen on October 23, 1848 The painting was painted by Constantin Hansen on commission from whole salesman Alfred Hage File links The following... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (832x559, 39 KB) Den Grundlovgivende Rigsforsamling - painting by Constantin Hansen The fathers of the Danish constituion assembled in Copenhagen on October 23, 1848 The painting was painted by Constantin Hansen on commission from whole salesman Alfred Hage File links The following... The Constitutional Act of the Kingdom of Denmark (Danish: Danmarks Riges Grundlov) was introduced on June 5, 1849 and effectively put an end to the absolute monarchy which had been introduced in 1660. ... A company of Danish artists in Rome, 1837 Hvilende Model, 1839 Carl Christian Constantin Hansen (Constantin Hansen) (November 3, 1804-1880) was one of the painters associated with the Golden Age of Danish Painting. He was born in Rome, the son of portrait painter Hans Hansen. ... The European Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations or the Year of Revolution, were a revolutionary wave which erupted in Sicily and then, further triggered by the revolutions of 1848 in France, soon spread to the rest of Europe and as far afield as... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants Prussia Austria German Confederation Denmark Commanders Friedrich Graf von Wrangel Christian Julius De Meza replaced by George Daniel Gerlach on February 29 Strength At the outbreak of war: 61,000 158 guns Later reinforcements: 20,000 64 guns[1] 38,000 100+ guns[2] Casualties 1,700+ killed, wounded... Schleswig-Holstein and the other Provinces of Prussia in the German Empire. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... This article is about the Treaty of Versailles of June 28, 1919, which ended World War I. For other uses, see Treaty of Versailles (disambiguation) . The Treaty of Versailles (1919) was a peace treaty that officially ended World War I between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany. ... irredentism is position advocating annexation of territories administered by another state on the grounds of common ethnicity and/or prior historical possession, actual or alleged. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... The Schleswig Plebiscites were two plebiscites, organized according to section XII, articles 109 to 114 the Treaty of Versailles of June 28, 1919, in order to determine the future border between Denmark and Germany. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Germany's invasion of Denmark on 9 April 1940 – codenamed Operation Weserübung – met only two hours of military resistance before the Danish government surrendered. Economic co-operation between Germany and Denmark continued until 1943, when the Danish government refused further co-operation and the Navy sank most of the Danish fleet and sent as many of their officers as they could to Sweden. During the war, the government was extremely helpful towards Jews living in the country, and the resistance managed to get most of the Jews to Sweden and safety. Denmark led many "inside operations" or sabotage against the German facilities. Iceland severed ties to Denmark and became an independent republic, and in 1948 the Faroe Islands gained home rule. After the war, Denmark became one of the founding members of the United Nations and NATO and in 1973, along with Britain and Ireland, joined the European Economic Community (now the European Union) after a public referendum. Greenland gained home rule in 1979. An invasion is a military action consisting of armed forces of one geopolitical entity entering territory controlled by another such entity, generally with the objective of conquering territory, or altering the established government. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Germany Denmark Norway Operation Weserübung was the German codename for Nazi Germanys assault on Denmark and Norway during World War II and the opening operation of the Norwegian Campaign. ... Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... UN redirects here. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The Danish European Communities membership referendum was held in Denmark on October 2, 1972, with 63. ...


Politics

Main article: Politics of Denmark

The Kingdom of Denmark is a constitutional monarchy. As stipulated in the Danish Constitution, the monarch is not answerable for his or her actions, and his or her person is sacrosanct. The monarch appoints and dismisses the Prime Minister and other ministers. Before being validated through royal assent, all bills and important government measures must be discussed in Statsrådet, a privy council headed by the monarch. The Danish privy council's protocols are secret. The Folketing in session. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A constitutional monarchy or limited monarchy is a form of government established under a constitutional system which acknowledges an elected or hereditary monarch as head of state, as opposed to an absolute monarchy, where the monarch is not...

While executive authority belongs to the monarch (as head of state), legislative authority is vested in the executive (Prime Minister) and the Danish parliament conjointly. Judicial authority lies with the courts of justice. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (453x618, 50 KB) Margrethe II of Denmark from sv:Wikipedia 30 september 2004 kl. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (453x618, 50 KB) Margrethe II of Denmark from sv:Wikipedia 30 september 2004 kl. ... Margrethe II (Margrethe Alexandrine Þórhildur Ingrid) (born 16 April 1940) is the Queen regnant of Denmark. ... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ...


Executive authority is exercised on behalf of the monarch by the prime minister and other cabinet ministers who head departments. The cabinet, including the Prime Minister, and other ministers collectively make up the government. These ministers are responsible to Folketinget (the Danish Parliament), the legislative body, which is traditionally considered to be supreme (that is, able to legislate on any matter and not bound by decisions of its predecessors). This is a list over the heads of government in Denmark, from the establishment of a constitutional monarchy in 1849 until present. ... Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen retained his parliamentary support in the 2005 Danish parliamentary election, and was able to continue as head of his government. ... The Folketing, or Folketinget, is the name of the national parliament of Denmark. ...


The Folketing is the national legislature. It has the ultimate legislative authority according to the doctrine of parliamentary sovereignty, however questions over sovereignty have been brought forward because of Denmark’s entry into the European Union. In theory however, the doctrine prevails. Parliament consists of 179 members elected by proportional majority. Parliamentary elections are held at least every four years, but it is within the powers of the Prime Minister to call one at his discretion before this period has elapsed. On a vote of no confidence the parliament may force a single minister or the entire government to resign. “Sovereign” redirects here. ... A Motion of No Confidence, also called Motion of Non Confidence is a parliamentary motion traditionally put before a parliament by the opposition in the hope of defeating or embarrassing a government. ...


The Danish political system has traditionally generated coalitions. Most Danish post-war governments have been minority coalitions ruling with parliamentary support.[19]


Since November 2001, the Danish Prime Minister has been Anders Fogh Rasmussen from the Venstre party, a center-right liberal party. The government is a coalition consisting of Venstre and the Conservative People's Party, with parliamentary support from the Danish People's Party (Dansk Folkeparti). The three parties obtained a parliamentary majority in the 2001 elections and maintained it virtually unchanged in the 2005 election. On 24 October 2007 an early election was called by the Prime Minister for 13 November. Following the election the Danish People's party was strengthened while Mr. Anders Fogh Rasmussen's Venstre lost 6 mandates and the Conservative Party retained the same amount of seats in Parliament as prior to the election. The result ensured that Anders Fogh Rasmussen could continue as Prime Minister for a third term. Anders Fogh Rasmussen , also: (born January 26, 1953) is the current Prime Minister of Denmark (in Danish Statsminister, meaning Minister of State). ... Venstre[1] (IPA: , in Danish literally: Left), full name: Venstre, Danmarks Liberale Parti (Venstre, Liberal Party of Denmark) is the largest political party in Denmark, founded with a basis on free market Liberalism, now a right-of-centre party. ... The Conservative Peoples Party (Danish: Det Konservative Folkeparti), also known as Conservatives (Konservative) is a Danish political party. ... The Danish Peoples Party (Danish: Dansk Folkeparti) is a social conservative, nationalist, far right political party in Denmark. ... The Danish Parliamentary Election of 2001 held on November 20, 2001 saw a dramatic change in the political composition of the Danish parliament or Folketing. ... Legislative elections were held in Denmark on February 8, 2005. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Wikinews has related news: Danish Prime Minister calls an election for 2007 Election posters in Copenhagen. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Denmark
Map showing the location of Denmark including the Faroe Islands and Greenland (pdf)
Map showing the location of Denmark including the Faroe Islands and Greenland (pdf)

Denmark's northernmost point is Skagens point (the north beach of the Skaw) at 57° 45' 7" northern latitude, the southernmost is Gedser point (the southern tip of Falster) at 54° 33' 35" northern latitude, the westernmost point is Blåvandshuk at 8° 4' 22" eastern longitude, and the easternmost point is Østerskær at 15° 11' 55" eastern longitude. This is in the archipelago Ertholmene 18 kilometres northeast of Bornholm. The distance from east to west is 452 kilometres (281 mi), from north to south 368 kilometres (229 mi). To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require rewriting and/or reformatting. ... Image File history File links Arctic. ... Image File history File links Arctic. ... The sand-engulfed Buried Church (tilsandede kirke) at Skagen. ... Gedser is a town at the southern tip of the Danish island of Falster. ... Falster is a Danish island. ... BlÃ¥vandshuk is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in Ribe County on the Jutland peninsula in south-west Denmark. ... Østerskær is a town in Denmark that is officially the easternmost point of the country, at 15° 11 55 eastern longitude. ... Ertholmene, sometimes called Christiansø, is a small archipelago situated approx. ... Denmark Region Hovedstaden Bornholms Regionskommune 588 km² (227 mi²)  - coordinates , , 43,040 () since January 2003 CET (UTC+1)  -  CEST (UTC+2) Bornholm Island (far right) in Denmark : www. ...


Denmark consists of the peninsula of Jutland (Jylland) and 443 named islands (1419 islands above 100 m² in total (2005)).[20] Of these, 76 are inhabited, with the largest being Zealand (Sjælland) and Funen (Fyn). The island of Bornholm is located somewhat east of the rest of the country, in the Baltic Sea. Many of the larger islands are connected by bridges; the Øresund Bridge connects Zealand with Sweden, the Great Belt Bridge connects Funen with Zealand, and the Little Belt Bridge connects Jutland with Funen. Ferries or small aircraft connect to the smaller islands. Main cities are the capital Copenhagen (on Zealand), Århus, Aalborg and Esbjerg (in Jutland) and Odense (on Funen). A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula is a piece of land that is bordered on three or more sides by water. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ... Denmark Region Hovedstaden Bornholms Regionskommune 588 km² (227 mi²)  - coordinates , , 43,040 () since January 2003 CET (UTC+1)  -  CEST (UTC+2) Bornholm Island (far right) in Denmark : www. ... For other uses, see Baltic (disambiguation). ... The Oresund Bridge The Oresund Bridge (joint Danish/Swedish hybrid name: Øresundsbron) is a combined two-track rail and four-lane road bridge across the Oresund strait. ... The Great Belt Bridge The Great Belt Bridge (Danish: Storebæltsbroen) is a suspension bridge that is part of the fixed link across the Great Belt in Denmark. ... The New Little Belt Bridge is a suspension bridge in Denmark. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... For the Aarhus convention on public participation, see Aarhus Convention. ... View of Aalborg railroad station from J.F. Kennedys Square, 2004 Aalborg (help· info) is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in North Jutland County on the Jutland peninsula in northern Denmark. ... Old watertower in Esbjerg View to Esbjerg harbour from the watertower (May 2005) Map of the municipality Esbjerg is a municipality (Danish, kommune) in Region Syddanmark (South Denmark Region) on the west coast of the Jutland peninsula in southwest Denmark. ... Odense is the third largest city in Denmark with 145,554 inhabitants (Odense city January 1, 2004) and the capital of the island of Funen. ...


The country is flat with little elevation; having an average height above sea level of only 31 metres (102 ft) and the highest natural point is Møllehøj, at 170.86 metres (560.56 ft). Other hills in the same area southwest of Århus are Yding Skovhøj at 170.77 metres (560.27 ft) and Ejer Bavnehøj at 170.35 metres (558.89 ft).[21] The area of inland water is: (eastern Denmark) 210 km² (81 sq mi); (western D.) 490 km² (189 sq mi). The millstone marking the top of Møllehøj Møllehøj is the highest natural point in Denmark at 170. ... Yding Skovhøj in Skanderborg municipality, Jutland is one of Denmarks highest points. ... Ejer Bavnehøj is the third-highest natural point in Denmark (171 m). ...


Denmark is split into 443 named islands which results in a long coastline, 7,314 kilometres (4,544 mi).[22] A perfect circle enclosing the same area as Denmark would have a circumference of only 742 kilometres (461 mi). Another feature that shows the close connection between the land and ocean is that no location in Denmark is farther from the coast than 52 kilometres (32.3 mi). The size of the land area of Denmark cannot be stated exactly since the ocean constantly erodes and adds material to the coastline, and because of human land reclamation projects (to counter erosion). On the southwest coast of Jutland, the tide is between 1 and 2 metres (3 to 6.5 ft), and the tideline moves outward and inward on a 10 kilometres (6 mi) stretch.[23]

Denmark seen from space.
Denmark seen from space.

The climate is in the temperate zone. The winters are not particularly cold with mean temperatures in January and February of 0.0 °C and the summers are cool with mean temperature in August 15.7 °C.[24] There is a lot of wind, which is stronger during the winter and weaker during the summer. Denmark has an average of 170 rainy days. The greatest rainfall comes in November.[25] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x676, 271 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Denmark Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1000x676, 271 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Denmark Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... In geography, temperate latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar circles. ...


Because of Denmark's northern location, the length of the day with sunlight varies greatly. There are short days during the winter with sunrise coming around 9:30 a.m. and sunset 4:30 p.m., as well as long summer days with sunrise at 3:30 a.m. and sunset at 10 p.m.[26] The shortest and longest days of the year have traditionally been celebrated. The celebration for the shortest day corresponds roughly with Christmas (Danish: jul) and modern celebrations concentrate on Christmas Eve, 24 December. The Norse word jól is a plural, indicating that pre-Christian society celebrated a season with multiple feasts.[27] Christianity introduced the celebration of Christmas, resulting in the use of the Norse name also for the Christian celebration. Efforts by the Catholic Church to replace this name with kristmesse were unsuccessful. The celebration for the longest day is Midsummer Day, which is known in Denmark as sankthansaften (St. John's evening).[28] Celebrations of Midsummer have taken place since pre-Christian times.[29] Prism splitting light High Resolution Solar Spectrum Sunlight in the broad sense is the total spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation given off by the Sun. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Midsummer may refer to the period of time centered upon the summer solstice and the diverse celebrations of it around the world, but more often refers to European celebrations that accompany the summer solstice, or to Western festivals that take place in June and are usually related to Saint John... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ...


Regions and municipalities

For the administrative divisions used until 2006, see Counties of Denmark.

Denmark is divided into five regions (Danish: regioner, singular: region) and a total of 98 municipalities. The regions were created on 1 January 2007 as part of the 2007 Danish Municipal Reform to replace the country's traditional thirteen counties (amter). At the same time, smaller municipalities (kommuner) were merged into larger units, cutting the number of municipalities from 270 to 98. The most important area of responsibility for the new regions is the national health service. Unlike the former counties, the regions are not allowed to levy taxes, and the health service is primarily financed by a national 8% (sundhedsbidrag) tax combined with funds from both government and municipalities. Each Regional Council consists of 41 elected politicians elected as part of the 2005 Danish municipal elections. Administrative division of Denmark. ... Denmark is divided into 13 counties (amter), and 271 municipalities (kommuner). ... Denmark is divided into 13 counties (amter), and 271 municipalities (kommuner): Copenhagen County comprise the municipalities in metropolitan Copenhagen, except Copenhagen Municipality and Frederiksberg Municipality. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (500x611, 73 KB) Terms of use: All images are the property of Nordregio. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (500x611, 73 KB) Terms of use: All images are the property of Nordregio. ... Administrative division of Denmark. ... Denmark is divided into 13 counties (amter), and 271 municipalities (kommuner). ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Denmark is divided into 13 counties (amter), and 271 municipalities (kommuner): Copenhagen County comprise the municipalities in metropolitan Copenhagen, except Copenhagen Municipality and Frederiksberg Municipality. ... An Amt is a name for subnational administrative units used in some northern European countries. ... A commune is an administrative subdivision of various European and African countries, including Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, Poland, Romania, Senegal, and the Scandinavian countries. ...


Most of the new municipalities have a population of least 20,000 people, although a few exceptions were made to this rule.


The Ertholmene archipelago (96 inhabitants (2008)) is neither part of a municipality, nor a region but belongs to the Ministry of Defence.[30] Ertholmene, sometimes called Christiansø, is a small archipelago situated approx. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... The Ministry of Defence of Denmark (Danish: Forsvarsministeriet) is a ministry in the Danish government. ...


Greenland and the Faroe Islands are also parts of the Kingdom of Denmark, as members of Rigsfællesskabet but have autonomous status and are largely self-governing, and are each represented by two seats in the parliament. Rigsfællesskabet (literally: the Community of the Realm) is an unofficial Danish term for the relationship between Denmark and its two self-governing areas, the Faroe Islands and Greenland. ...

Country/Region Population Area (km²) Density (Pop per km²)
Flag of Denmark Denmark 5,475,791 43,094 127
Flag of the Faroe Islands Faroe Islands (Denmark) 47,017 1,399 34
Flag of Greenland Greenland (Denmark) 56,916 2,175,600 0.026

Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Faroe_Islands. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greenland. ...

Economy

Main article: Economy of Denmark

Denmark's market economy features very efficient agriculture, up-to-date small-scale and corporate industry, extensive government welfare measures, average European living standards[31][32], a stable currency, and high dependence on foreign trade. Denmark is a net exporter of food and energy and has for a number of years had a balance of payments surplus while battling an equivalent of approximately 39% of GNP foreign debt or more than 300 billion DKK [33]. Also of importance is the sea territory of more than 105,000 km² (40,000+ sq mi). Denmarks industrialized market economy depends on imported raw materials and foreign trade. ... A market economy (also called a free market economy or a free enterprise economy) is an economic system in which the production and distribution of goods and services take place through the mechanism of free markets (though completley useless to some dumbasses) guided by a free price system. ... External debt (or foreign debt) is that part of the government debt of a country which is owed to creditors outside the country. ...


The Danish economy is highly unionised; 75% of its labour force are members of a trade union.[34] Most trade unions take part in the organized system of trade unions, the organization at the highest level being the so-called LO, the Danish Confederation of Trade Unions. However, increasing numbers in the labour force choose not to become members of a trade union or to become members of one of the trade unions outside the organized system (often referred to as the yellow, in Danish gule, trade unions). The Danish Confederation of Trade Unions (Danish: Landsorganisationen i Danmark or LO) is an umbrella organisation for Danish trade unions, founded January 3, 1898. ...


Relationships between unions and employers are generally cooperative: unions often have a day-to-day role in managing the workplace, and their representatives sit on most companies' board of directors. Rules on work schedules and pay are negotiated between unions and employers, with minimal government involvement. The unemployment rate for December 2007 was 2.7%, for a total of 74,900 persons, a reduction by 112,800 persons — 2,400 per month — or 60% since December 2003.[35] The Eurostat unemployment number for December 2007 is 3.1%, the next lowest in the EU after the Netherlands (2.9%). It should however be noted that this has been achieved by employing more than 38% [36] of the total workforce in public sector jobs, placing an enormous strain on the private sector and resulting in the world's highest taxes.[37]Another measure of the situation on the labour market is the employment rate, that is the percentage of people aged 15 to 64 (i.e. the working age group) in employment out of the total number of people aged 15 to 64. The employment rate for Denmark in 2006 was 77.4% according to Eurostat. Of all countries in the world, only Switzerland with 77.9% and Iceland with 84.6% had a higher employment rate. [38] Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... The Statistical Office of the European Communities (Eurostat) is the statistical arm of the European Commission, producing data for the European Union and promoting harmonisation of statistical methods across the member states. ... Employment rate : The proportion of working age adults employed. ...


The number of unemployed is forecast to be 65,000 in 2015. The number of people in the working age group, less disability pensioners etc., will grow by 10,000 to 2,860,000, and jobs by 70,000 to 2,790,000.[39] Parttime jobs included.[40] Because of the present high demand and short supply of skilled labour, for instance for factory and service jobs, including hospital nurses and physicians, the annual average working hours have risen, especially compared with the economic downturn 1987 – 1993.[41] Increasingly, service workers of all kinds are in demand, i.e. in the postal services and as bus drivers, and academics.[41] In the fall of 2007, more than 250,000 foreigners are working in the country, of which 23,000 still residing in Germany or Sweden. According to TV2 (Denmark),3 January 2007, 66,000 jobs are not filled, but sometimes this regards jobs for which there isn't even labour available in Germany.[42]


Denmark's national currency, the krone (plural: kroner), is de facto linked to the Euro through ERMII.[43] The exchange rate is very steady at approx. 7.45 kroner per euro. Currently the krone converts to American dollars at a rate of about USD 0.21 per krone (about 4.7 kroner per dollar). (Exchange rates updated April 2008) ISO 4217 Code DKK User(s) Denmark, Greenland, Faroe Islands 1 Inflation 1. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... The European exchange rate mechanism (or ERM) was a system introduced by the European Community in March 1979, as part of the European Monetary System (EMS), to reduce exchange-rate variability and achieve monetary stability in Europe, in preparation for Economic and Monetary Union and the introduction of a single... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


The government has met the economic convergence criteria for participating in the third phase (the common European currency — the Euro) of the Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union (EMU), but Denmark, in a September 2000 referendum, rejected The Monetary Union. The Government of Fogh Rasmussen, re-elected in November 2007, announced a new referendum on the euro for 2008 or 2009 at the latest.[44] For the concept in general, see economic and monetary union. ... The Danish euro referendum of September 28, 2000 was a referendum on whether Denmark should join the third stage of the European Monetary Union, adopting the euro as currency to replace the Danish krone. ...


The level of unemployment benefits is dependent on former employment and at times also on membership of an unemployment fund, which is almost always -but need not be- administered by a trade union, and the previous payment of contributions. However, the largest share of the financing is still carried by the central government and is financed by imposing the world's highest taxes on the workforce, and only to a minor degree from earmarked contributions.


The Danish welfare model is accompanied by a taxation system that is both broad based (25% VAT, not including excise, duty and tax) and with world record income tax rates (minimum tax rate for adults is 42% scaling to over 60% except for the residents of Ertholmene that escape the otherwise ubiquitous 8% healthcare tax fraction of the income taxes). Other than the income taxes, the most infamous tax is the registration tax imposed on private vehicles, approximately tripling the price by first adding 25% VAT to the import price of the vehicles and then 180% registration tax on top. Lately (July, 2007) this has been changed slightly in an attempt to favor more fuel efficient cars but maintaining the average taxation level more or less unchanged and as a byproduct complicating the duty laws in this area and adding to public sector bureaucracy[45]. Ertholmene, sometimes called Christiansø, is a small archipelago situated approx. ...


Denmark is home to many multi-national companies, among them: A. P. Moller-Maersk Group (Maersk — international shipping), Lego (children's toys), Bang & Olufsen (hi-fi equipment), Carlsberg (beer), Vestas (wind turbines), and the pharmaceutical companies Lundbeck and Novo Nordisk. The A.P. Moller-Maersk Group (Danish: A.P. Møller-Mærsk Gruppen) is an international business conglomerate involved in a variety of business sectors, primarily transportation. ... For other uses, see Lego (disambiguation). ... Logo of Bang & Olufsen Beolit 39 from 1938, B&O:s first Radio in Bakelite Bang & Olufsen (B&O) is a Danish company that designs and manufactures high end audio products, television sets, and telephones. ... Note: Carling beer is not produced by the Carlsberg brewery. ... Vestas is a Danish company that designs, manufactures, and sells wind turbines. ... A tall tower holds a wind turbine aloft where winds are consistently stronger. ... A pharmaceutical company, or drug company, is a commercial business whose focus is to research, develop, market and/or distribute drugs, most commonly in the context of healthcare. ... H. Lundbeck A/S (also known as Lundbeck) is a Danish international pharmaceutical company engaged in the research and development, production, marketing and sale of drugs for the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders. ... Novo Nordisk (OMX: NOVO B, NYSE: NVO) manufactures and markets pharmaceutical products and services. ...


Main exports include: Animal Foodstuffs, Chemicals, Dairy Products, Electronic Equipment, Fish, Furniture, Leather, Machinery, Meat, Oil and Gas, and Sugar.[46]


Transport

Main article: Transport in Denmark
The Great Belt Fixed Link, seen from the Zealand side.
The Great Belt Fixed Link, seen from the Zealand side.

Significant investment has been made in recent decades in building road and rail links between Copenhagen and Malmö, Sweden (the Øresund Bridge), and between Zealand and Funen (the Great Belt Fixed Link). The Copenhagen Malmö Port was also formed between the two cities as the common port for the cities of both nations. // Railways total: 2,859 km (508 km privately owned and operated) standard gauge: 2,859 km 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1085 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Denmark Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1085 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Denmark Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... The Great Belt Fixed Link (Danish: Den faste Storebæltsforbindelse) is the fixed link between the Danish islands of Zealand and Funen across the Great Belt. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... Motto: FrÃ¥n arbetarstad till kunskapsstad (eng: From industrial city to knowledge city) Location of Malmö in northern Europe Coordinates: , Country  Sweden Municipality Malmö Municipality County SkÃ¥ne County Province Scania (SkÃ¥ne) Charter 13th century Government  - Mayor Illmar Reepalu Area  - City 335. ... The Oresund Bridge The Oresund Bridge (joint Danish/Swedish hybrid name: Øresundsbron) is a combined two-track rail and four-lane road bridge across the Oresund strait. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ... The Great Belt Fixed Link (Danish: Den faste Storebæltsforbindelse) is the fixed link between the Danish islands of Zealand and Funen across the Great Belt. ... The Copenhagen Malmö Port is the trans-national port authority for the cities of Copenhagen, Denmark and Malmö, Sweden. ...


The main railway operator is Danske Statsbaner (Danish State Railways) for passenger services and Railion for freight trains. The railway tracks are maintained by Banedanmark. Copenhagen has a small Metro system and the greater Copenhagen area has an extensive electrified suburban railway network. Danske Statsbaner (Danish State Railways), usually referred to as DSB, is the largest Danish train operating company. ... Railion is a European (mainly German) railroad cargo carrier. ... Banedanmark (previously Banestyrelsen) is a Danish company responsible for most of the Danish railway network, including maintenance and construction work, but not train operation. ... The Copenhagen Metro, known simply as the Metro, is a rail rapid transit system serving Copenhagen and Frederiksberg, Denmark. ... The S-Train (S-tog) network is the commuter train network of Metropolitan Copenhagen, Denmark. ...


Denmark's national airline (together with Norway and Sweden) is Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) and Copenhagen Airport is the country's largest airport, and also the biggest hub in Scandinavia. Scandinavian Airlines System or SAS is a multi-national airline for Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and the leading carrier in the Scandinavian countries, based in Stockholm, Sweden and owned by SAS AB. It is a founding member of the Star Alliance. ... Copenhagen Airport (Danish: , Swedish: ) (IATA: CPH, ICAO: EKCH) is the major airport serving Copenhagen, Denmark, though also serving Malmö, Sweden. ...


A ferry link to the Faroe Islands is maintained by Smyril Line. Other international ferry services are mainly operated by DFDS (to Norway and the UK) and Scandlines (to Germany and Sweden). The old Norröna in Tórshavn Harbour, 1997 Smyril Line is a Faroese shipping company, linking the Faroe Islands with neighbouring countries. ... DFDS Headquarters in Copenhagen, Denmark. ... External links Scandlines - Official site Categories: | | | ...


Demographics

According to numbers from Statistics Denmark the majority (91,1%) of Denmark’s population of over 5.4 million as of January 1, 2007 is of Danish descent.[47] Of the remaining 8.9% who are immigrants or descendent from recent immigrants in particular arriving since a law, Udlændingeloven (Alien law) was passed by parliament in 1983 and which allowed family (re)union immigration, many come from South Asia or the Middle East. There are also small groups of Inuit from Greenland and Faroese. During recent years, anti-immigration sentiment has resulted in some of the toughest immigration laws in the European Union.[48][49] Nevertheless, the number of residence permits granted related to labour and to people from within the EU/EEA has increased since implementation of new immigration laws in 2001.[50] However, the number of immigrants allowed into Denmark for family reunification decreased 70% between 2001 and 2006 to 4 198.[51] During the same period the number of asylum permits granted has decreased by 82.5% to 1 095, reflecting a 84% decrease in asylum seekers to 1 960.[52] Most Danes today trace their heritage to a Germanic people who have inhabited Denmark since prehistoric times. ... The Kingdom of Denmark has only one official language, Danish, the national language of the Danish people, but there are several minority languages spoken through the territory. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... For other uses, see Inuit (disambiguation). ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ...  EFTA countries (except Switzerland)  EU countries Together these form the EEA. The European Economic Area (EEA) came into being on January 1, 1994 following an agreement between the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and the European Union (EU). ...


Denmark’s population (as at 1 January 2008) was 5,475,791, giving Denmark a population density of 129.16 inhabitants per km2 (334.53 inh/sq mi).[53] As in most countries, the population is not distributed evenly. Although the land area east of the Great Belt only makes up 9,622 km² (3,715 sq mi), 22.7% of Denmark's land area, as of 1 January 2008 it has 45% (2,465,348) of the population. The average population density of this area is 256.2 inhabitants per km² (663.6 per sq mi). The average density in the west of the country (32,772 km²/12,653 sq mi) is 91.86/km² (237.91 per sq mi) (3,010,443 people) (2008). The straits of Denmark. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


The median age is 39.8 years with 0.98 males per female. 98.2% of the population is literate (age 15 and up). The birth rate is 1.74 children born/woman (2006 est.), which will be reflected in a drop in the ratio of workers to retirees. Despite the low birth rate, the population is still growing at an average annual rate of 0.33%.[54] This article is about the statistical concept. ...


Danish is the official language and is spoken throughout the country. English and German are the most widely spoken foreign languages. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ...


Religion

Burial mound from the 900s in Jelling churchyard
Burial mound from the 900s in Jelling churchyard

According to official statistics from January 2006, 83.0%[55] of Danes are members of the Lutheran state church, the Danish National Church (Den Danske Folkekirke), also known as the Church of Denmark. According to article 6 of the Constitution, the Royal family must belong to this Church. 3% of the Danish population adhere to Islam, and other religions in Denmark include non-Lutheran Christian denominations. The oldest state recognised religious societies and churches are: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 200 KB) suedlicher Grabhuegel an der Kirche in Jelling (DK). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 200 KB) suedlicher Grabhuegel an der Kirche in Jelling (DK). ... Burial mound in Jelling churchyard Northern burial mound and church in Jelling churchyard Jelling is a town located in Jelling municipality near Vejle, Denmark on the Jutland peninsula. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Church in Holte The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Denmark (the church of Denmark or the peoples church of Denmark) (Danish:Den Danske Folkekirke) is a state church and is the largest Christian church in Denmark. ... The Danish Royal Family includes The Queen of Denmark and her family. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Of the religions in Denmark, the most prominent is the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Denmark. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...

Religion, religious societies and churches do not need to be state-recognised in Denmark and can be granted the right to perform weddings etc. without this recognition.


According to the most recent Eurobarometer Poll 2005,[56] 31% of Danish citizens responded that "they believe there is a god", whereas 49% answered that "they believe there is some sort of spirit or life force" and 19% that "they do not believe there is any sort of spirit, god, or life force". According to a 2005 study by Zuckerman, Denmark has the third highest proportion of atheists and agnostics in the world, estimated to be between 43% and 80%.[57][58] Eurobarometer is a series of surveys regularly performed on behalf of the European Commission since 1973. ...


After Iceland, Denmark is the 2nd most acceptant country of the theory of biological evolution.[59] This article is about evolution in biology. ...


Education

Old main building of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark's oldest and largest university
Old main building of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark's oldest and largest university
Main article: Education in Denmark

The Danish education system provides access to primary school, secondary school and most kinds of higher education (universities etc.). About 99% of the general population attend compulsory elementary school (lasting 9 to 10 years); 86% attend secondary school and 41% pursue further education. By law, all college education in Denmark must not charge tuition or fees. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Danish Education System is a sophisticated system designed to educate the people of Denmark. ... The Folkeskole (English: ) is one type of school in Denmark, covering the entire period of compulsory education. ... Secondary education in Denmark (in Danish: ungdomsuddannelse, youth education) usually takes two to four years and is attended by students between the ages of 15 to 20. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ...


Primary school in Denmark is "den Danske Folkeskole" (translated: "the Danish Public School"). It goes from 1st-10th grade (10th grade is optional, as is the introductory børnehaveklasse ("kindergarten class")). In Denmark one can also go to Friskole ("free school") or Privatskole ("private school"): i.e. schools that are not under the administration of the municipalities; e.g. Christian schools or Waldorf Schools. The Programme for International Student Assessment, coordinated by the OECD, currently ranks Denmark's education as the 24th best in the world, being neither significantly higher nor lower than the OECD average.[6] The Folkeskole (English: ) is one type of school in Denmark, covering the entire period of compulsory education. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Denmark is divided into 13 counties (amter), and 271 municipalities (kommuner). ... A Christian school is a school run on Christian principles or by a Christian organization. ... Waldorf Schools were developed for Emit Molt of the Waldorf Astoria Tobacco Company in 1919 by Rudolf Steiner. ... The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a triennial world-wide test of 15-year-old schoolchildrens scholastic performance, the implementation of which is coordinated by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). ... The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international organization of those developed countries that accept the principles of representative democracy and a free market economy. ...


Following graduation from Folkeskolen, there are several other educational opportunities, including Gymnasium (academically oriented upper secondary education), Higher Preparatory Examination (HF) (similar to Gymnasium, but one year shorter), Higher Technical Examination Programme (HTX) (with focus on Mathematics and engineering), and Higher Commercial Examination Programme (HHX) (with a focus on trade and business), as well as vocational education, training young people for work in specific trades by a combination of teaching and apprenticeship. The Gymnasium offers a 3-year general upper secondary programme which builds on the 9th-10th form of the Folkeskole and leads to the upper secondary school exit examination. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The Higher Preaparatory Examination (HF) is a 2-year general upper secondary programme building on to the 10th form of the Folkeskole and leading to the higher preparatory examination (the HF-examination), which qualifies for admission to higher education, subject to the special entrance regulations applying to the individual higher... In Denmark, the Higher Technical Examination Programme (HTX) is a 3-year vocationally oriented general upper secondary programme which builds on the 9th-10th form of the Folkeskole. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... The HHX-Programme Types of Institutions In Denmark, the HHX-programmes are offered at the business colleges, of which there are approximately 50 distributed all over the country. ... Vocational secondary education in Denmark (Danish: ) takes place at special state-funded vocational schools (erhvervsskoler), most of which are either technical schools (tekniske skoler) or business colleges (handelsskoler). ... It has been suggested that Artisan#Artisan guilds be merged into this article or section. ... Apprenticeship is a system of training a new generation of skilled crafts practitioners, which is still popular in some countries. ...


Gymnasium, HF, HTX and HHX aim at qualifying students for higher education in universities and colleges. The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ...


Denmark has several universities; the largest and oldest are the University of Copenhagen (founded 1479) and University of Aarhus(founded 1928). This is a list of universities in Denmark Contents // Categories: University stubs | Lists of colleges and universities | Danish stubs | Denmark ... Main campus on Frue Plads. ... Aarhus Universitet or the University of Aarhus is a university based in Ã…rhus, Denmark. ...


Folkehøjskolerne, ("Folk high schools") introduced by politician, clergyman and poet N.F.S. Grundtvig in the 19th century, are social, informal education structures without tests or grades but emphasising communal learning, self-discovery, enlightenment, and learning how to think.[60] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Popular education. ... Nikolaj Frederik Severin Grundtvig (September 8, 1783, Udby, Sjælland, Denmark, –September 2, 1872, Copenhagen) was a Danish teacher , writer, poet, philosopher, historian, minister, and even politician. ...


Culture

Windmills and yellow brick houses accent the gently rolling meadowlands of Denmark.
Windmills and yellow brick houses accent the gently rolling meadowlands of Denmark.
Main article: Culture of Denmark
See also: List of Danes

Hans Christian Andersen is known beyond Denmark for his fairy tales, such as The Emperor's New Clothes, The Little Mermaid, and The Ugly Duckling. Karen Blixen (pen name: Isak Dinesen), Nobel laureate author Henrik Pontoppidan, Nobel laureate physicist Niels Bohr, the comedic pianist Victor Borge and the philosopher Søren Kierkegaard have also made a name for themselves outside Denmark. Image File history File links Karlebo, Sjælland, Denmark. ... Image File history File links Karlebo, Sjælland, Denmark. ... The Culture of Denmark is inherently hard to define. ... This is a list of well known Danes: // Main article: List of Danish actors Mads Mikkelsen. ... For other uses, see Hans Christian Andersen (disambiguation). ... The emperor in procession by Edmund Dulac For other uses, see The Emperors New Clothes (disambiguation). ... For the 1989 Disney animated film, see The Little Mermaid (1989 film). ... For other uses, see The Ugly Duckling (disambiguation). ... Baroness Karen von Blixen-Finecke (April 17, 1885 – September 7, 1962), née Karen Dinesen, was a Danish author also known under her pen name Isak Dinesen. ... Henrik Pontoppidan (July 24, 1857 – August 21, 1943) was a realist writer who shared with Karl Gjellerup the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1917 for his authentic descriptions of present-day life in Denmark. ... Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. ... This article is about the Danish humorist and musician. ... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (IPA: , but usually Anglicized as ;  ) 5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. ...


The capital city of Copenhagen includes the Tivoli gardens, the Amalienborg Palace (home of the Danish monarchy), and The Little Mermaid sculpture.[61] For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... Tivoli Gardens is a famous amusement park and pleasure garden in Copenhagen, Denmark. ... Amalienborg seen from the Copenhagen Operahouse. ... The Little Mermaid in Copenhagen A statue of The Little Mermaid sits on a rock in the Copenhagen harbour in Churchill Park. ...


The second biggest city in Denmark is Aarhus. Aarhus is an old Viking Age city and one of the oldest cities in the country. The biggest cathedral in Denmark and the second biggest cathedral in Northern Europe is Aarhus Cathedral. For the Aarhus convention on public participation, see Aarhus Convention. ... Viking Age is the term denoting the years from about 800 to 1066 in Scandinavian History[1][2][3]. // The Vikings have been much maligned in European history, due in large part to their violent attacks on Christians in the first centuries of their excursions out of Scandinavia. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Northern Europe Northern Europe is the northern part of the European continent. ... Ã…rhus Cathedral Altar by Bernt Notke Medieval fresco in typical Danish style. ...


Historically, Denmark, like its Scandinavian neighbors, has been one of the most socially progressive cultures in the world. For example, in 1969, Denmark was the first country to legalize pornography.[62] And in 1989, Denmark enacted a registered partnership law, being the first country in the world to grant same-sex couples nearly all of the rights and responsibilities of marriage.[63] Civil unions were introduced in Denmark by law on June 7, 1989, the worlds first such law. ...


Cinema

Main article: Cinema of Denmark

The three big internationally important waves of Danish cinema have been: Danish cinema pioneer Peter Elfelt, a photographer, was the first Dane to make a film. ...

  • The erotic melodrama of the silent era.
  • The increasingly explicit sex films of the 1960s and 1970s.
  • The Dogme95-movement of the late 1990s.

Danish filmmakers of note include: Dogme 95 is a movement in filmmaking developed in 1995 by the Danish directors Lars von Trier, Thomas Vinterberg, Kristian Levring, and Søren Kragh-Jacobsen. ...

A locally popular film genre is the charmingly simplistic "folkekomedie" (folk comedy), which originated in the 1930s and gained widespread dominance from the 1950s until the 1970s, usually scorned by critics and loved by the audience. Notable folkekomedie-films include Barken Margrethe (1934), De røde heste (1950), Far til fire (1953) and Olsen-banden (1968). Carl Theodor Dreyer (February 3, 1889 - March 20, 1968) was a Danish film director. ... Erik Balling (born November 29, 1924) is the director and, together with Henning Bahs, the creator of the Danish slapstick movie series Olsen Gang. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Scene from the fourteenth and last Olsen Gang film (1998). ... Gabriel Axel Gabriel Axel (b. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Babettes Feast (Danish: Babettes gæstebud) is an Academy Award winning 1987 Danish movie. ... Bille August (born November 9, 1948) is a Danish film and television director. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Pelle the Conqueror (Danish: Pelle Erobreren; Swedish: Pelle Erövraren) is a 1987 film that tells the story of two Swedish immigrants to Denmark, a father and son, who try to build a new life for themselves. ... Thomas Vinterberg at 40th Karlovy Vary International Film Festival Thomas Vinterberg (born May 19, 1969) is a Danish film director who, along with Lars von Trier, co-founded the Dogme 95 movement in filmmaking, which established rules for simplifying movie production. ... Dogme 95 is a movement in filmmaking developed in 1995 by the Danish directors Lars von Trier, Thomas Vinterberg, Kristian Levring, and Søren Kragh-Jacobsen. ... Lars von Trier (born Lars Trier, April 30, 1956) is a Danish film director. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Dancer in the Dark is an award-winning musical film drama released in 2000. ... Dogme 95 is a movement in filmmaking developed in 1995 by the Danish directors Lars von Trier, Thomas Vinterberg, Kristian Levring, and Søren Kragh-Jacobsen. ... Scene from the fourteenth and last Olsen Gang film (1998). ...


Since the 1980s, Danish filmmaking has been almost completely controlled by the state through The Danish Film Institute, which was founded in 1972. This has resulted in a much criticized lack of innovation (Dogme95 happened in spite of strong resistance from the Film Institute) and frequent accusations of nepotism and cronyism, but also a high level of professionalism even if more or less reserved for a few selected genres and production companies (mainly Nordisk Film, Zentropa and Nimbus Film).[7] Dogme 95 is a movement in filmmaking developed in 1995 by the Danish directors Lars von Trier, Thomas Vinterberg, Kristian Levring, and Søren Kragh-Jacobsen. ... Look up nepotism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... Nordisk Film is an Egmont electronic media production and distribution group that employs 1,090 people in six countries. ... // Denmarks third largest film production company. ...


Danish cinema remains highly respected internationally, and Danish films (today almost exclusively consisting of social realist dramas, social realist comedies, children's films and documentaries) receive many awards at major international film festivals.


Sports

Main article: Sports in Denmark

The most popular sport in Denmark is football (soccer). Sailing and other water sports are popular, as are indoor sports such as badminton, handball and various forms of gymnastics. In Denmark there is also a small group of people doing motorsport, but with some success. The most successful driver on the 24 Hours of Le Mans race ever, with seven 1st places is Tom Kristensen, who comes from Denmark. In speedway Denmark has won several World Championships. Other notable Danish sportspeople include American football's National Football League all-time leading scorer Morten Andersen, cyclists Bjarne Riis, Rolf Sørensen, and Michael Rasmussen, badminton-player Peter Gade and Camilla Martin, table tennis-player Michael Maze, poker Hall of Fame player Gus Hansen and football players Michael and Brian Laudrup and Peter Schmeichel. Teenager Caroline Wozniacki is rising up the rankings on the WTA tennis tour. Denmark is also the home and birthplace of former WBA & WBC Supermiddleweight boxing champion, Mikkel Kessler. Sports are popular in Denmark, and its citizens participate in and watch a wide variety. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... This article is about the sport. ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... Tom Kristensen can refer to two different people. ... Motorcycle speedway, normally referred to as Speedway, is a motorcycle sport that involves usually 4 and sometimes up to 6 riders competing over 4 laps of an oval circuit. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... NFL redirects here. ... Morten Andersen (born August 19, 1960 in Copenhagen, Denmark) is an American football placekicker. ... Bjarne LykkegÃ¥rd Riis (born April 3, 1964), nicknamed the Eagle from Herning (Danish: Ørnen fra Herning), is a Danish former professional road bicycle racer who won the 1996 Tour de France, and is now the team owner and manager of Danish UCI ProTour outfit Team CSC. Other career highlights... Rolf Sørensen (born 20 April 1965) is a former Danish professional road bicycle racer. ... Michael Rasmussen (born June 1, 1974 in Tølløse) is a Danish professional road bicycle racer who rides for Dutch team Rabobank. ... This article is about the sport. ... Peter Gade (born December 14, 1976) born Peter Gade Christensen is a professional badminton player from Terndrup, Denmark. ... Ping Pong redirects here. ... Michael Maze (born September 1, 1981) is a male table tennis player from Fakse, Denmark. ... For the domestic fireplace tool, see fireplace poker. ... Gustav Hansen (born February 13, 1974 outside Copenhagen, Denmark) is a professional poker player who lives in Monaco. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Michael Laudrup (born June 15, 1964) is a Danish former professional football player. ... Brian Laudrup (born February 22, 1969 in Vienna, Austria) is a former Danish professional football (soccer) player, who won the 1992 European Football Championship (Euro 1992) with the Denmark national team, and he was a vital part of that Rangers FC team which dominated the Scottish Premier League in the... Peter BolesÅ‚aw Schmeichel MBE (IPA: , born 18 November 1963 in Gladsaxe, Denmark) is a retired Danish professional footballer who played as a goalkeeper, and was voted the Worlds Best Goalkeeper in 1992 and 1993. ... Caroline Wozniacki (born July 11, 1990, Odense) is a Danish tennis player. ... Mikkel Kessler (born March 1, 1979) is a Danish professional boxer. ...


Music

Main article: Music of Denmark

Denmark has long been a center of cultural innovation. Its capital, Copenhagen, and its multiple outlying islands have a wide range of folk traditions, while an extensive recording industry has produced pop stars and a host of performers from a multitude of genres. The famous drummer Lars Ulrich from Metallica is from Denmark. Among other names, the '90's pop band Aqua as well as current (March 2008) US hitlist top name Ida Corr also come from Denmark. Denmark is a Nordic country that has long been a center of cultural innovation. ... Lars Ulrich (born December 26, 1963) is the drummer and co-founder of Metallica. ... Metallica is a Grammy Award-winning American heavy metal/thrash metal band formed in 1981[1] and has become one of the most commercially successful musical acts of recent decades. ... Aqua is a Danish dance-pop group, perhaps best known for their 1997 breakthrough single Barbie Girl. The group formed in 1989, and achieved huge success across the globe in the late 1990s and early 2000s. ... Ida Corr (* 1977 in Ã…rhus) is a Danish singer. ...


Food

Open sandwich: Fried plaice with remoulade and lemon on dark rye bread
Open sandwich: Fried plaice with remoulade and lemon on dark rye bread
Main article: Cuisine of Denmark

The cuisine of Denmark, like that in the other Nordic countries (Finland, Norway, Iceland, and Sweden), as well as that of northern Germany, its neighbour to the south, consists mainly of meat and fish. This stems from the country's agricultural past, as well as its geography and climate of long, cold winters. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The cuisine of Denmark, like that in the other Scandinavian countries (Sweden and Norway), as well as that of northern Germany, its neighbor to the south, is traditionally heavy and rich in fat, consisting mainly of carbohydrates, meat and fish. ... Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ...


Traditional Danish food includes frikadeller (fried meatballs, often served with potatoes and various sorts of gravy), karbonader/krebinetter (another sort of fried meatballs), steaks and so on, usually eaten with potatoes. Fish is also widely eaten, especially on the west coast of Jutland. A traditionally favourite condiment, remoulade, is eaten with french fries, on fried plaice, on salami or roast beef sandwiches. Smoked fish dishes (herring, mackerel, eel) from local smoking houses or røgerier, especially on the island of Bornholm, are increasingly popular. Frikadeller (pronounced freg-a-deluh in Danish) are the Danish version of meatballs, and are an extremely popular dish in Denmark. ... Jutland Peninsula Jutland (Danish: Jylland; German: Jütland; Frisian Jutlân; Low German Jötlann) is the western, continental part of Denmark as well as one of the three historical Lands of Denmark, dividing the North Sea from the Kattegat and the Baltic Sea. ... Salt, sugar and pepper are the most essential condiments in Western cuisine. ... Remoulade or rémoulade is a popular condiment in many countries, and was invented in France. ... French fries in a bowl. ... Binomial name Pleuronectes platessa Plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) are an abundant and commercially important flatfish occurring on the sandy bottoms of the European shelf. ... Salami Salami is cured sausage, fermented and air-dried. ... Sunday roast consisting of roast beef, roast potatoes, vegetables and Yorkshire pudding A dinner of roast beef, potatoes, and green beans Roast beef (is a cut of beef which is roasted in an oven. ... Species Clupea alba Clupea bentincki Clupea caspiopontica Clupea chrysotaenia Clupea elongata Clupea halec Clupea harengus Clupea inermis Clupea leachii Clupea lineolata Clupea minima Clupea mirabilis Clupea pallasii Clupea sardinacaroli Clupea sulcata Herrings are small, oily fish of the genus Clupea found in the shallow, temperate waters of the North Atlantic... Mackerel is a common name applied to a number of different species of fish, mostly, but not exclusively, from the family Scombridae. ... For other uses, see Eel (disambiguation). ... Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on Smoking Smoking is the process of flavoring, cooking, or preserving food by exposing it to the smoke from burning or smoldering plant materials, most often wood. ... Denmark Region Hovedstaden Bornholms Regionskommune 588 km² (227 mi²)  - coordinates , , 43,040 () since January 2003 CET (UTC+1)  -  CEST (UTC+2) Bornholm Island (far right) in Denmark : www. ...


One of the most interesting aspects of Danish food is the wide variety of attractive open rugbrød (Rye-bread) sandwiches or smørrebrød traditionally served for the mid-day meal or frokost. This usually starts with fish such as marinated herring, smoked eel or hot fried breaded plaice. Then come meat sandwiches such as cold roast beef with remoulade and fried onions, roast pork and crackling with red cabbage, hot veal medallions, Danish meat balls (frikadeller) or liver paté with bacon and mushrooms. Some typically Danish items are Sol over Gudhjem, literally 'sun over Gudhjem', consisting of smoked herring, chives and with raw egg yolk (the "sun") on top; or Dyrlægens natmad, 'vet's late-night bite', with liver paté, saltmeat (corned veal), onions and jellied consommé. Finally cheese is served with radishes, nuts or grapes. Lager beer accompanied by small glasses of snaps or aquavit are the preferred drinks for a Danish frokost. Rugbrød (Danish, rye bread) is the most commonly used bread in Denmark. ... Danish cuisine, like that in the other Scandinavian countries (Sweden and Norway), as well as that of northern Germany, its neighbor to the south, is traditionally heavy and rich in fat, being predominated by carbohydrates, meat and fish. ... Species Clupea alba Clupea bentincki Clupea caspiopontica Clupea chrysotaenia Clupea elongata Clupea halec Clupea harengus Clupea inermis Clupea leachii Clupea lineolata Clupea minima Clupea mirabilis Clupea pallasii Clupea sardinacaroli Clupea sulcata Herrings are small, oily fish of the genus Clupea found in the shallow, temperate waters of the North Atlantic... For other uses, see Eel (disambiguation). ... Remoulade or rémoulade is a popular condiment in many countries, and was invented in France. ... Crackling consists of cooked pork rind that has had salt rubbed into it and that has been scored with a sharp knife. ... Cultivar Group Brassica oleracea Capitata Group The Red Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. ... Filet Mignon is a steak cut of beef taken from the tenderloin, or psoas major of the steer or heifer. ... Frikadeller (pronounced freg-a-deluh in Danish) are the Danish version of meatballs, and are an extremely popular dish in Denmark. ... Leverpostej (Danish, pronounced leh-wer-po-sty), leverpostei (Norwegian), leverpastej (Swedish) or leverpastei (Dutch) is a pâté made of pork liver, which is a popular spread in northern Europe. ... Allinge-Gudhjem is a municipality in Denmark, on the island of Bornholm in the Baltic Sea. ... Leverpostej (Danish, pronounced leh-wer-po-sty), leverpostei (Norwegian), leverpastej (Swedish) or leverpastei (Dutch) is a pâté made of pork liver, which is a popular spread in northern Europe. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lager is a well attenuated beer brewed in cool conditions using a slow-acting brewers yeast, known as a bottom-fermenting yeast, and then stored (or lagered) for a period in cool conditions to clear away particles and certain flavour compounds to produce a clean taste. ... A bottle and glass of Linie brand akvavit. ...


Military

Denmark's armed forces are known as the Danish Defence Force (Danish: Det Danske Forsvar). During peacetime, the Ministry of Defence (FM) in Denmark employs, in four branches, 15,460 in the Royal Danish Army, 5,300 in the Royal Navy, 6,050 in the Danish Air Force and more than 55,000 in the Danish Home Guard (Danish: Hjemmeværnet) following completion of their conscript service. The armed forces of the Kingdom of Denmark, known as The Danish Defence (Danish: Det Danske Forsvar) is charged with the defense of the Kingdom of Denmark. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Alternate cover US 1979 and 2002 reissue cover, also known as paint spatter cover For the military meaning, see Armed forces. ... The Royal Danish Army is the army of Denmark. ... The Royal Danish Navy (or Kongelige Danske Marine in Danish) is the sea-based branch of The Danish Defence force. ... History The Danish armed forces received 38 Supermarine Spitfire H. F. Mk. ... The Danish Home Guard (Danish: Hjemmeværnet) HJV is the fourth service of the Danish military, concerned exclusively with the defence of Danish territory. ...


The Danish army has 350-450 soldiers in Kosovo and around 600 in Afghanistan. Between 2003 and 2007, there were approx. 450 soldiers in Iraq.[64] Seven Danish soldiers were killed during the deployment in Iraq, which at the end of July, 2007 saw the force reduced to a small fleet of support helicopters.[65] For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ...


See also

Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... This is a history of the Kingdom of Denmark and the areas comprising modern day Denmark. ... Archaeology of Denmark The first submerged settlement excavated in Denmark was the Tybrind Vig site. ... Viking Age is the term denoting the years from about 800 to 1066 in Scandinavian History[1][2][3]. // The Vikings have been much maligned in European history, due in large part to their violent attacks on Christians in the first centuries of their excursions out of Scandinavia. ... The Kalmar Union flag. ... Denmark had a colonial empire from the 18th century until the 20th. ... Denmark-Norways possessions c. ... The Scandinavian Monetary Union (Swedish: Skandinaviska myntunionen, Danish: Skandinaviske møntunion) was a monetary union formed by Sweden and Denmark on May 5, 1873 by fixing their currencies against gold at par to each other. ... The rescue of the Danish Jews occurred during Denmarks occupation by Nazi Germany during World War II. When German authorities in Denmark ordered that Danish Jews be arrested and deported to Germany in October 1943, many Danes and Swedes took part in a collective effort to evacuate the roughly... Stamp of 1969, commemorating the 750th anniversary of the Flag of Denmark, used at Odense just a few weeks after issuance This article is an overview of the postage stamps and postal history of Denmark. ... This is a list of Danish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queen of Denmark, including Regents of the Kalmar Union. ... These are lists of towns in Denmark and its self-governing administrative divisions the Faroe Islands and Greenland. ... List of Trees cultivated in Denmark by genera Firs - see Abies of Denmark Maples - see Acer of Denmark Horse-chestnuts Tree of Heaven Alders Snowy Mespils Birches Hornbeams The Hickories The Chestnuts some plants are hardy. ... The Folketing [], or Folketinget, is the national parliament of Denmark. ... Denmark is divided into 13 counties (amter), and 271 municipalities (kommuner): Copenhagen County comprise the municipalities in metropolitan Copenhagen, except Copenhagen Municipality and Frederiksberg Municipality. ... Danish foreign policy is founded upon four cornerstones: the United Nations, NATO, the EU, and Nordic cooperation. ... The Danish Supreme Court is the highest civil and criminal court responsible for the administration of justice in Denmark. ... The Folketing in session. ... This article lists political parties in Denmark. ... The Social Democrats (Socialdemokraterne), is a Danish political party. ... Det Radikale Venstre (literally: The Radical Left, but officially translated by the party as Danish Social Liberal Party), is a social liberal party in Denmark. ... The Conservative Peoples Party (Danish: Det Konservative Folkeparti), also known as Conservatives (Konservative) is a Danish political party. ... The Socialist Peoples Party (Danish: Socialistisk Folkeparti, SF) is a Danish socialist and Green politicial party. ... The Danish Peoples Party (Danish: Dansk Folkeparti) is a social conservative, nationalist, far right political party in Denmark. ... Venstre[1] (IPA: , in Danish literally: Left), full name: Venstre, Danmarks Liberale Parti (Venstre, Liberal Party of Denmark) is the largest political party in Denmark, founded with a basis on free market Liberalism, now a right-of-centre party. ... The Red-Green Alliane () is a left-wing political party in Denmark. ... Politics of Denmark See also Politics of Denmark Categories: Election related stubs | Elections in Denmark | Danish stubs ... The Council of State (Statsrådet) The Council of State (Statsrådet) is the Danish Privy Council. ... This is a list of Danish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queen of Denmark, including Regents of the Kalmar Union. ... This is the Danish monarchs family tree from 1047 to the present ruler, queen Margrethe II of Denmark. ... The Danish Royal Family includes The Queen of Denmark and her family. ... Coat of arms of Frederick IV of Denmark and Norway surrounded by the collars of the Order of the Elephant and the Order of the Dannebrog. ... The Order of the Dannebrog is an Order of Denmark, instituted in 1671. ... This is a partial list of Danish companies, companies headquartered in Denmark: A.P. Moller-Maersk Group Arla Foods (Dutch-Danish-Swedish) Bang & Olufsen (B&O) BoConcept Carlsberg Coop Norden (joint Danish, Norwegian and Swedish owned) DALI Danisco Danish Crown Danske Bank Dansk Supermarked Group DSB Group Ecco Sko FDB... Telephones - main lines in use: 3. ... The Culture of Denmark is inherently hard to define. ... The cuisine of Denmark, like that in the other Scandinavian countries (Sweden and Norway), as well as that of northern Germany, its neighbor to the south, is traditionally heavy and rich in fat, consisting mainly of carbohydrates, meat and fish. ... Notable Danish authors Hans Christian Andersen Herman Bang Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen) Jens Fink-Jensen Peter Høeg Johannes Vilhelm Jensen Søren Kierkegaard Peter Kjaerulff Svend Aage Madsen Martin Andersen Nexø Klaus Rifbjerg Villy Sørensen Categories: Danish writers ... The Modern Break-Through (Danish: Det moderne Gennembrud) is the normal name of the strong movement of naturalism and debating liteature of Scandinavia 1870-90 which replaced romanticism. ... Denmark is a Nordic country that has long been a center of cultural innovation. ... This is a list of holidays in Denmark. ... This is a list of well known Danes: // Main article: List of Danish actors Mads Mikkelsen. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Danish Supreme Court is the highest civil and criminal court responsible for the administration of justice in Denmark. ... Windmills, antique (pictured) and modern, accent the gently rolling meadowlands of Denmark. ... The FællesrÃ¥det for Danmarks Drengespejdere (FDD, Danish Scout Council) is the national Scouting federation of Denmark. ... The Jante Law (Danish and Norwegian: Janteloven; Swedish: Jantelagen; Finnish: Janten laki; Faroese: Jantulógin) is a concept created by the Norwegian/Danish author Aksel Sandemose in his novel A refugee crosses his tracks (En flygtning krydser sit spor, 1933), where he portrays the small Danish town Jante, modelled upon...

Footnotes

  1. ^ ABC News: Great Danes: The Geography of Happiness
  2. ^ BBC NEWS | World | Norway rated most peaceful nation
  3. ^ Kristian Andersen Nyrup, Middelalderstudier Bog IX. Kong Gorms Saga
  4. ^ Indvandrerne i Danmarks historie, Bent Østergaard, Syddansk Universitetsforlag 2007, ISBN 978-87-7674-204-1, pp. 19-24
  5. ^ J. de Vries, Altnordisches etymologisches Wörterbuch, 1962, 73; N.Å. Nielsen, Dansk etymologisk ordbog, 1989, 85-96.
  6. ^ Navneforskning, Københavns Universitet Udvalgte stednavnes betydning.
  7. ^ Asernes æt Daner, Danir, Vandfolket
  8. ^ The 'David' referred to here appears to be David, the ancient king of the Israelites: of course this is wildly anachronistic, but it is fairly typical of such sources, which commonly sought to push national or dynastic origins as far back as possible.
  9. ^ Thorpe, B., The Life of Alfred The Great Translated From The German of Dr. R. Pauli To Which Is Appended Alfred's Anglo-Saxon Version of Orosius, Bell, 1900, p. 253.
  10. ^ The dative form tąnmarku [ˈdanmarkʊ] is found on the contemporaneous Skivum stone.
  11. ^ Michaelsen (2002), p. 19.
  12. ^ a b Nielsen, Poul Otto (May 2003). Denmark: History, Prehistory. Royal Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved on 2006-05-01.
  13. ^ Busck and Poulsen (ed.) (2002), p. 20.
  14. ^ See Jutes, Anglo-Saxons
  15. ^ Jordanes; translated by Charles C. Mierow (April 22, 1997). The Origin and Deeds of the Goths, chapter III. Retrieved on 2006-05-01.
  16. ^ Busck and Poulsen (ed.) (2002), p. 19.
  17. ^ a b Michaelsen (2002), pp. 122–23.
  18. ^ Kalmarkriget 1611-1613. Svenskt Militärhistoriskt Bibliotek. Retrieved on 2007-05-04.(Swedish)
  19. ^ Radikale ved historisk skillevej. Berlingske Tidende (2007-06-17). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  20. ^ Landet i tal — Største øer. National Survey and Cadastre of Denmark (2003-09-23). Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  21. ^ Dahlgaard, Jørgen. "Danmarks nye top" (PDF). Aktuel Naturvidenskab 2005 (1): 2. Retrieved on 2007-02-03. 
  22. ^ Nature & Environment. Denmark.dk. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  23. ^ Nationalencyklopedin, (1990)
  24. ^ Klimanormaler for Danmark. Danish Meteorological Institute. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
  25. ^ Lerbech Jensen, Mogens (2006). Climate. Denmark. Gyldendal Leksikon. Retrieved on May 1, 2006.
  26. ^ Copenhagen, Denmark — Sunrise, sunset, dawn and dusk times for the whole year. Gaisma. Retrieved on May 2, 2006.
  27. ^ Store Danske Encyklopædi (2004), CD-ROM edition, entry Jul.
  28. ^ Store Danske Encyklopædi (2004), CD-ROM edition, entry Sankthansaften
  29. ^ Store Danske Encyklopædi (2004), CD-ROM edition, entry Majskikke.
  30. ^ Michael Kjær, Jonas. "Christiansø betaler ikke sundhedsbidrag", dr.dk, 2006-11-15. Retrieved on 2007-08-12. (Danish)
  31. ^ [1]Human Development Report 2007/2008
  32. ^ [2]List of countries by Human Development Index
  33. ^ Statens Gæld og Låntagning. Statistics Denmark.
  34. ^ Fuller, Thomas. "Workers and bosses: Friends or foes?", International Herald Tribune, January 11, 2005. Retrieved on May 1. 
  35. ^ Ledigheden faldt til 2,7 pct.. Statistics Denmark.
  36. ^ [3]Beskæftigelsesindikator på grundlag af ATP-indbetalinger.
  37. ^ [4]Denmark wins highest tax competition
  38. ^ Total employment rate
  39. ^ Madsen, Bjarne; Svend Lundtorp (2006). Arbejdsmarkedet på Sjælland og øerne i 2015. Akf forlaget, 10. ISBN 87-7509-801-6. Retrieved on 2007-02-03. 
  40. ^ Statistikbanken.dk, tables AB513+ BESK11+12+13.
  41. ^ a b Nüchel, Jens; Lars Erik Skovgaard. "Danskere arbejder mere og mere", Business.dk, Berlingske Tidende, 2006-12-13. Retrieved on 2007-02-03. 
  42. ^ http://politiken.dk/erhverv/article441694.ece Udlændinge passer hvert 10. job
  43. ^ Denmark and the euro. Danmarks Nationalbank (2006-11-17). Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  44. ^ "Denmark to have second referendum on euro", 2007-11-22. Retrieved on 2007-11-22. 
  45. ^ Registration tax for cars. Skatteministeriet (2008-03-24).
  46. ^ Denmark - Atlapedia Online
  47. ^ (Danish)Stadig flere polske indvandrere
  48. ^ Danes' Anti-Immigrant Backlash Marks Radical Shift. Retrieved on 2007-01-28. Retrieved on May 1..
  49. ^ Denmark gets tough on immigrants..
  50. ^ Tal og fakta på udlændingeområdet 2006
  51. ^ Tal og fakta på udlændingeområdet 2006
  52. ^ Tal og fakta på udlændingeområdet 2006
  53. ^ (Danish)Nyt fra Danmarks Statistik
  54. ^ Denmark. The World Factbook. CIA (2008-01-23). Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  55. ^ (Danish) Membership Lutheran state church
  56. ^ Eurobarometer on Social Values, Science and technology 2005 - page 11. Retrieved on 2007-05-05.
  57. ^ Zuckerman, Phil. The Largest Atheist / Agnostic Populations.
  58. ^ Martin (ed.), Michael (2005). "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns", The Cambridge Companion to Atheism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
  59. ^ "Public Acceptance of Evolution" (11 August 2006). Science 313 (5788): 765-766. doi:10.1126/science.1126746.  (See the chart)
  60. ^ The Danish Folkehøjskole. www.scandinavica.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-28.
  61. ^ Copenhagen Walking Tours (2007-05-25). Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  62. ^ Denmark — An Overview. Retrieved on 2007-09-22.
  63. ^ Same-Sex Marriage FAQ
  64. ^ Ventura County Reporter - ~THE COUNT~
  65. ^ [5]Helicopter unit for Iraq

Jan de Vries (born 1890 in Amsterdam, died 1964 in Utrecht) was a Dutch scholar of Germanic linguistics and Germanic mythology, ordinarius 1926 to 1945 at Leiden University. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... United Monarchy - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The dative case is a grammatical case generally used to indicate the noun to whom something is given. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the coarse vegetable textile fiber, see Jute. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Berlingske Tidende is a Danish broadsheet newspaper published Monday to Sunday. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Survey and Cadastre of Denmark (Danish: Kort & Matrikelstyrelsen), short KMS, is the Danish state owned central agency responsible for surveying, mapping and land registering of all of Denmark, Greenland, the Faroe Islands and all waters associated with these. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Danish Meteorological Institute (Danish: Danmarks Meteorologiske Institut) is the official Danish meteorological institute, administrated by the Ministry of Transport and Energy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Berlingske Tidende is a Danish broadsheet newspaper published Monday to Sunday. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Danmarks Nationalbank (English: National Bank of Denmark - in Danish often simply Nationalbanken) is the central bank of Denmark. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • (Danish) Busck, Steen and Poulsen, Henning (ed.), "Danmarks historie — i grundtræk", Aarhus Universitetsforlag, 2002, ISBN 87-7288-941-1
  • (Danish) Michaelsen, Karsten Kjer, "Politikens bog om Danmarks oldtid", Politikens Forlag (1. bogklubudgave), 2002, ISBN 87-00-69328-6
  • (Swedish) Nationalencyklopedin, vol. 4, Bokförlaget Bra Böcker, 2000, ISBN 91-7024-619-X

External links

Denmark Portal
Find more about Denmark on Wikipedia's sister projects:
Dictionary definitions
Textbooks
Quotations
Source texts
Images and media
News stories
Learning resources
  • Official Portal of Denmark
  • Denmark travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Krak printable mapsearch(outline of municipality visible but does not print out!)(Danish)
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica's Denmark country page
  • Google news Denmark
  • History of Denmark: Primary Documents
  • Old Denmark in Cyberspace - Information about Denmark - the Danes
  • Satellite image of Denmark at the NASA Earth Observatory
  • Summary vital statistics about Denmark covering 1901 and forwards from Statistics Denmark
  • Statistics Denmark Statistics free of charge
  • Various statistics from Statistics Denmark statistikbanken.dk
  • Newest releases from Statistics Denmark (Danish, English)
  • Ministry of the Environment National Survey and Cadastre (Danish, English)

Coordinates: 56°N 10°E / 56, 10   Of the emerging democracies in central and eastern Europe, Czechia has one of the most developed industrialized economies. ... Tourism, petroleum transhipment, and offshore finance are the mainstays of the Netherlands Antillean economy, which is closely tied to the outside world. ... The United Kingdom has the fifth largest gross domestic product in the world in terms of market exchange rates and the sixth largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). ... A Special Administrative Region (SAR) of the Peoples Republic of China is an administrative division of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... For the Chinese civilization, see China. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Denmark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3713 words)
Denmark borders the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, and consists of a peninsula named Jutland (Jylland) attached to Northern Germany, the islands of Funen (Fyn), Zealand (Sjælland), Bornholm (Bornholm) and many smaller islands, often referred to as the Danish Archipelago.
Denmark is divided into 13 counties (amter, singular: amt), and, as of 1 January 2006, 270 municipalities (kommuner, singular kommune).
Denmark is a net exporter of food and energy and has a comfortable balance of payments surplus and zero net foreign debt.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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