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Encyclopedia > Demonym

A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. In English, the name of a people's language is often the same as this word, e.g., the "French" (language or people). Some places, particularly smaller cities and towns, may not have an established word for their residents; toponymists have a particular challenge in researching these. See also ethnonym. Toponymy is the taxonomic study of place names, their origins and their meanings. ... An ethnonym (Gk. ...

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Suffix demonyms

The English language uses several models to create demonyms. The most common is to add a suffix to the end of the location's name. These may be modelled after Late Latin, Semitic or Germanic suffixes, such as: The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up affix in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Vulgar Latin (in Latin, sermo vulgaris) is a blanket term covering the vernacular dialects of the Latin language spoken mostly in the western provinces of the Roman Empire until those dialects, diverging still further, evolved into the early Romance languages — a distinction usually assigned to about the ninth century. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ...

  • -an (America → American, India → Indian, San Diego → San Diegan, Rome → Roman, Singapore → Singaporean)
  • -ian (Brazil → Brazilian, TorontoTorontonian, Paris → Parisian, Athens → Athenian, Ukraine → Ukrainian, Lithuania → Lithuanian, Gibraltar → Gibraltarian)
  • -ine (Florence -Latin Florentia- → Florentine, Argentina → Argentine)
  • -ite (IsraelIsraelite (or "Israeli," depending on the usage; see below), Moscow → Muscovite) (mostly cities)
  • -er (New England → New Englander, Middle East → Middle Easterner, New Zealand → New Zealander, London → Londoner)
  • -eno (Los Angeles → Angeleno or Los Angeleno; adapted from the standard Spanish suffix eño, as in Salvadoreño)
  • -ish (Britain → British, Denmark → Danish) (mostly countries)
    • "-ish" is usually only proper as an adjective. Thus many common "-ish" forms have irregular demonyms. (Spain/Spanish/Spaniard; Denmark/Danish/Dane; England/English/English(wo)man; Judea/Jewish/Jew or Judean; Poland/Polish/Pole)
  • -iard (Spain → Spaniard, Savoy → Savoyard)
  • -ese (China → Chinese, Japan → Japanese, Vienna → Viennese, the Tyrol → Tyrolese, Sudan → Sudanese, Malta → Maltese)
    • "-ese" is also usually only proper as an adjective, or to refer to the entirety. Thus, "a Chinese person" or "the Chinese people" can be used in place of "a Chinese" and "the Chinese" respectively.
    • Used mostly for East Asian and Francophone locations, from the similar-sounding French suffix -ais(e), which is originally from the Latin adjectival ending -ensis, designating origin from a place: thus Hispaniensis (Spanish), Danensis (Danish), etc.
  • -i (Iraq → Iraqi, Pakistan → Pakistani, Bengal → Bengali), DeshDesi, (mostly Middle Eastern and South Asian locales)
  • -i (Allemanni, Helvetii) (Latinate plural ending applied to the many peoples they encountered)
  • -ic (Hispania → Hispanic, TurkTurkic (cf. Turkish)) (a Latinate suffix widely used outside ethnonyms (e.g., chemical compounds) which with regard to people is mostly used adjectivally (Semite vs. Semitic, Arab/Arabian vs. Arabic) to refer to a wider ethnic or linguistic group (Turkic vs. Turkish, Finnic vs. Finnish)).
  • -iot(e) (Cyprus → Cypriot, PhanarPhanariote), especially for Greek locations.

San Diego redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... A Torontonian is a person who lives in, or was from Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... “The Twelve Tribes” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the country in the Americas; for other uses, see El Salvador (disambiguation). ... Map of the southern Levant, c. ... Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Tyrol Austria-Hungary in 1914, showing Tirol–Vorarlberg as the left-most province, coloured cream Capital Meran (Merano), until 1848 Government Principality Historical era Middle Ages  - Created County 1140  - Bequeathed to Habsburgs 1363 or 1369  - Joined Council of Princes 1582  - Trent, Tyrol and... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bengal (Bengali: বঙ্গ Bôngo, বাংলা Bangla, বঙ্গদেশ Bôngodesh or বাংলাদেশ Bangladesh), is a historical and geographical region in the northeast of South Asia. ... Desh (hindi:देश) Derived from Sanskrit word (देशः) this word means country In the context of the history of Maharashtra, the Marathi people, and of the Maratha Empire or Maratha Confederacy, founded by Shivaji as the Hindawi Swaraj (Hindu Free State), Desh is an abbreviation... This article is about the South Asian people. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... The Alamanni, Allemanni or Alemanni, were a Germanic tribe, first mentioned by Dio Cassius when they fought Caracalla in 213. ... Helvetia on a 25 centime Swiss postage stamp, 1881 Helvetia is the Roman name for an ancient region of central Europe occupying a plateau between the Alps and the Jura Mountains. ... The Modern English adjectival suffix -ic was first seen as a suffix in English during the Middle English period. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Iberian Peninsula. ... Hispanic flag, not widely used. ... This article is about the various peoples speaking one of the Turkic languages. ... The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean to Siberia and Western China, and are traditionally considered to be part of the proposed Altaic language family. ... Geographical distribution of Finno-Ugric (Finno-Permic in blue, Ugric in green). ... Fanar (formerly Phanar) is a neighborhood in Istanbul, Turkey (formerly Constantinople). ... An image of the extravagance attributed to Phanariotes in Wallachia: Nicholas Mavrogenes riding through Bucharest in a deer-drawn carriage (late 1780s) Phanariotes, Phanariots, or Phanariote Greeks (Greek: Φαναριώτες, Romanian: FanarioÅ£i) were members of those prominent Greek families residing in Phanar[1] (Φανάρι, modern Fener),[2] the chief Greek quarter of...

Adjectives as placenames

Some placenames originated as adjectives. In such cases the placename and the demonym often are the same word, sometimes specialized in form.

  • Argentina: properly Tierra Argentina (Land of Silver) or República Argentina (Argentine Republic), from Latin argentum (silver). In English, the Spanish form Argentina is used for the country, the parallel English form Argentine as demonym and general adjective. The adjectival forms of Argentinean or Argentinian are common, acceptable alternatives.[1]
  • Philippines: properly Philippine Islands (Spanish: Islas Filipinas), named for King Philip II of Spain. Here, in contrast, the English form is used for the archipelago and the Spanish masculine adjective Filipino as demonym and general adjective.

This dual function is very common in French, where for example Lyonnais means either the region or an inhabitant of Lyon. The Philippine islands is a commonly mistaken description for the Philippines. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the... This article is about the French city. ...


Irregular forms

In some cases, both the location's name and the demonym are produced by suffixation, for example England and English and English(wo)man (derived from the Angle tribe). In some cases the derivation is concealed enough that it is no longer morphemic: FranceFrench or FlandersFlemish.


A native of Halifax, Nova Scotia is called a Haligonian for unclear reasons. A native of Colchester, UK is called a Colcestrian, without the h present in the name of the town. Another example is the name of the natives of Pegswood in Northumberland, England, which is 'Pegswardian', another irregular demonym. Inhabitants of some other English towns have demonyms derived from their archaic Latin names, such as Manchester - Mancunian. A native of Melbourne, Victoria is a Melburnian, from a fanciful Latinization of the city's name, "Melburnia". Halifax skyline at night Halifax neighbourhoods and boundaries of former city in relation to Halifax Regional Municipality Halifax, founded in 1749, is a community and former city in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. ... For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ... Pegswood is a village in Northumberland, England. ... Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre. ... VIC redirects here. ...


A person from Glasgow is called a "Glaswegian." For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ...


A native of Liverpool is called a Liverpudlian. However, they are sometimes called Scousers. Inhabitants of Hartlepool, by the same token, are known as Hartlepudlians. For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... This article is about the accent. ... , Hartlepool is a North Sea port in North East England. ...


Often the singular name for one of the people is the base form, and the country name, if it exists, is derived therefrom (Switzer (derived from the German Schweizer, "a Swiss man") → Switzerland, ArabArabia, CroatCroatia, DaneDenmark). For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). ...


In a few cases, demonyms are recent borrowings from other languages or adapted in a process of linguistic mutation where English demonyms are similar to those of other languages (KosovoKosovan (English demonym) → Kosovar (Albanian demonym also used in English), Bosnian MuslimBosniak (based on the Bosnian demonym Bošnjak)).


In a few cases, the name of the country is not at all related to the name of the people (NetherlandsDutch), usually because the two words originate from different languages. In this example, English uses a term derived from Middle Dutch (Dietsch) which is considered archaic in the contemporary Dutch language (see Netherlands (terminology)). Linguistically speaking, Middle Dutch is no more than a collective name for closely related languages or dialects which were spoken and written between about 1150 and 1500 in the present-day Dutch-speaking region. ... Dietsch (Diets in modern Dutch) is a colloquial word for the Middle Dutch language. ... The Netherlands is known under various terms both in English and other languages. ...


In the case of most Canadian provinces and territories and U.S. states, it is unusual to use demonyms as attributive adjectives (for example "Manitoba maple", not "Manitoban maple"); thus they are generally used only predicatively ("Ben Franklin was Pennsylvanian") or substantively ("Eight Virginians have become President of the United States.") There are some exceptions - the attributive adjective for Alaska is widely held to be Alaskan and in addition, to a less than universal degree, exceptions exist especially with respect to Alberta (Albertan), Texas (Texan) and Hawaii (Hawaiian). Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states which have membership of the federation known as the United States of America (USA or U.S.). The separate state governments and the U.S. federal government share sovereignty. ... Portrait of Benjamin Franklin Dr. Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706–April 17, 1790) was an American journalist, publisher, author, philanthropist, abolitionist, public servant, scientist, librarian, diplomat, and inventor. ... The Pennsylvanian is an epoch of the Carboniferous period lasting from roughly 325 Ma to 299 Ma (million years ago). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) None[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth–Arlington Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ...


In the case of someone from Newcastle, the term Novocastrian is used. In this case, the demonym once again comes from the Latin for the city, Novum Castrum. // Newcastle refers primarily to the following places: Newcastle upon Tyne, England Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Newcastle (or New Castle) can refer to the following places: Newcastle, New South Wales Division of Newcastle, an electoral district in the Australian House of Representatives, in New South Wales, located around the city. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ...


In the case of someone from Sydney in New South Wales, it is standard to use the demonym Sydneysider. This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... “NSW” redirects here. ... Sydneysider, or Sydneyite is the term used to refer to residents of Sydney, the capital city of New South Wales, Australia. ...


Demonyms can be nouns or adjectives. In many cases the noun and adjective forms are the same (Canadian/Canadian); in other cases they are different (Spaniard/Spanish, Slovene/Slovenian, Flemings/Flemish). In linguistics, a noun or noun substantive is a lexical category which is defined in terms of how its members combine with other grammatical kinds of expressions. ... In grammar, an adjective is a word whose main syntactic role is to modify a noun or pronoun (called the adjectives subject), giving more information about what the noun or pronoun refers to. ... Flemings (Dutch: Vlamingen) are inhabitants of Flanders in the widest sense of the term, i. ... The term Flemings (Dutch: ) denotes the majority population in Flanders (the northern half of Belgium). ...


In some of the latter cases the noun is formed by adding -man or -woman (English/Englishman/Englishwoman, Irish/Irishman/Irishwoman, Chinese/Chinese man/Chinese woman, versus the archaic or derogatory terms Chinaman/Chinawoman). This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Official language None; English is de facto Capital London Capitals coordinates 51° 30 N, 0° 10 W Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831... Irish ethnicity is common in the world, as many people are descended from Ireland or share an Irish heritage. ... A wrist spin ball bowled by a left handed bowler in cricket. ... A wrist spin ball bowled by a left handed bowler in cricket. ...


An inhabitant of the U.S. state of Michigan is commonly known as a Michigander, though the more regular alternative Michiganian is increasingly used. Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Largest metro area Metro Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ...


A resident of the U.S. state of Indiana is known as a Hoosier. According to Webster's New International Dictionary, 1993, a person who is a native or resident of Connecticut is a "Connecticuter". For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... A Hoosier is a resident or native of the U.S. state of Indiana, but used as a slang term for redneck in other parts of the country, especially in Missouri, Illinois and Arkansas. ...


It is generally held that a native of Western Australia is a West Australian, the rationale possibly being that a qualifier within an adjectival phrase is better expressed as an appositional noun. The currency of “West Australian” is supported by the existence of a major newspaper of the same name. Slogan or Nickname: Wildflower State or the Golden State Other Australian states and territories Capital Perth Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Ken Michael Premier Alan Carpenter (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 15  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2005-06)  - Product ($m)  $107,910 (4th)  - Product per capita  $53,134/person...


A resident of the U.S. state of Maryland is known as a Marylander. This word is pronounced with 3 syllables "mare-lund-er" not "ma-ry-land-er." A resident of the state of New York is known as a New Yorker. Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... This article is about the state. ... New Yorker may refer to: the magazine, The New Yorker a resident of New York City the hotel New Yorker a named passenger train operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad between Detroit, MI and New York, NY This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that...


A resident of the U.S. state of Wisconsin is known as a Wisconsinite. Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to...


A resident of the city of Mumbai, India, irrespective of gender is known as a Mumbaikar. Plural, Mumbaikars. , “Bombay” redirects here. ... Mumbaikar is a term used to describe Bombayites after Bombay was renamed to Mumbai. ...


A resident of the city of Cambridge, Mass. (or Cambridge, England) is known as a Cantabrigian. Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... This article is about Cambridge, England; see also other places called Cambridge. ...


Double forms

Some regions and populaces also have double forms, as the concepts of nation and state are diverging once more. Hence, one whose genetic ancestors were from Britain is a Briton, whereas one with a passport from the country is considered British. The Franks settled France, but the citizens are French. This may be the case for states which were formed or dissolved relatively recently. As in the examples below, another reason for double forms of demonyms may be in relation to historical, cultural or religious issues. For other uses, see Nation (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see State (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ...

  • Norse gods but Norwegian - Norwegian being the ordinary adjective for Norway, but Norse being generally used to describe ancient Scandinavian culture.
  • Israelite but Israeli - Israelite pertaining to the ancient tribes and kingdom of Israel; Israeli pertaining to the modern nation of the same name.

Due to the flexibility of the international system, the opposite is often also true, where one word might apply to multiple groups. The U.S. Department of State states that 98% of the Austrian population is ethnically German[2], while the CIA World Factbook contradicts this by saying Austrians are a separate group (see Various terms used for Germans)[3]. A child born in the United States to a Turkish family would be considered American, both by law, and by much of the general populace; however, if the child had been born in Germany, the law, and many of the people, would consider him a Turk. Some countries go so far as to explicitly recognize a difference between citizenship and nationality, e.g., Russia. A listing of Greek mythological beings. ... Ode on a Grecian Urn is a poem by John Keats, first published in January 1820, inspiration for which is considered to be a visit by Keats to the exhibition of Greek artifacts accompanying the display of the Elgin Marbles at the British Museum. ... Norse gods Divided between the Æsir and the Vanir, and sometimes including Jotun, the dividing line between these groups is less than clear. ... “The Twelve Tribes” redirects here. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ... There are many alternative ways to describe the people of Germany, though the official designated nationality as well as the standard noun is German. ... Jus soli (Latin for right of the territory), or birthright citizenship, is a right by which nationality or citizenship can be recognised to any individual born in the territory of the related state. ... Jus sanguinis (Latin for right of blood) is a right by which nationality or citizenship can be recognised to any individual born to a parent who is a national or citizen of that state. ... “Citizen” redirects here. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ...


In fiction

Literature and science have created a wealth of demonyms that are not directly associated with a cultural group, such as Martian for hypothetical people of Mars (credited to scientist Percival Lowell), Earthling (from the diminutive -ling, ultimately from Old English -ing meaning 'descendant') as a possible name for the people of Earth (as also "Terran" and "Terrene" and "terrestrial"), and Lilliputians from the island of Lilliput in the satire Gulliver's Travels. This article is about hypothetical native inhabitants of the planet Mars. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Percival Lowell (March 13, 1855 – November 12, 1916) was an author, mathematician, and esteemed astronomer who fueled speculation that there were canals on Mars, founded the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, and formed the beginning of the work and theories that led to the discovery of Pluto 14 years after... The word earthling refers to a being of terrestrial or terran origin, specifically of Earth. ... A diminutive is a formation of a word used to convey a slight degree of the root meaning, smallness of the object or quality named, encapsulation, intimacy, or endearment. ... Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Lilliput and Blefuscu are two island nations that appear in the 1726 novel Gullivers Travels by Jonathan Swift. ... First Edition of Gullivers Travels Gullivers Travels (1726, amended 1735), officially Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. ...


Cultural problems

Some peoples, especially cultures that were overwhelmed by European colonists, have no commonly accepted demonym, or have a demonym that is the same as the name of their (current or historical) nation. Examples include Iroquois, Aztec, Māori, and Czech. Such peoples' native languages often have differentiated forms that simply did not survive the transfer to English. In Czech, for example, the language is Čeština, the nation is Česko or Česká republika, and the people are Češi. For other uses, see Iroquois (disambiguation). ... Aztec is a term used to refer to certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who achieved political and military dominance over large parts of Mesoamerica in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries, a period referred to as the Late post-Classic... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... Czech (čeÅ¡tina []) is one of the West Slavic languages, along with Slovak, Polish, Pomeranian (Kashubian), and Lusatian Sorbian. ... Motto (Czech) Truth prevails Anthem Czech Republic() – on the European continent() – in the European Union() [] Capital (and largest city) Prague Official languages Czech (de facto)1 Demonym Czech Government Republic  -  President Václav Klaus  -  Prime Minister Mirek Topolánek Independence (formed 9th century)   -  October 28, 1918   -  January 1, 1993  Accession... Czechs (Czech: ÄŒeÅ¡i) are a western Slavic people of Central Europe, living predominantly in the Czech Republic. ...


The demonym for citizens of the United States of America suffers a similar problem, because "American" may ambiguously refers to both the USA and North and South America. United Statian is awkward in English, but it exists in Spanish (estadounidense), French (étatsunien(ne)), Portuguese (estado-unidense or estadunidense), Italian (statunitense), and also in Interlingua (statounitese). US American (for the noun) and US-American (when used as a compound modifier preceding a noun) is another option, and is a common demonym in German (US-Amerikaner), though almost unheard of in English. Latin Americans (who are the most affected by this use of American) also have yanqui (Yankee) and the euphemism norteamericano/norte-americano (North American, which includes the USA, Mexico, Canada, and several other countries). Frank Lloyd Wright proposed Usonian, similar to the Esperanto noun Usonano and adjective usona (from Usono, the name for the country). In the spirit of Sydneysider, Statesider is also a possibility. See main article: Use of the word American. North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... This article is about the auxiliary language created by the International Auxiliary Language Association. ... For the Major League Baseball team, see New York Yankees. ... Euphemism is the substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant to the listener; or in the case of doublespeak, to make it less troublesome for the speaker. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was one of the worlds most prominent and influential architects. ... This article is about the language. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Use of the word American in the English language differs between historical, geographical and political contexts. ...


The 2007 Miss Teen USA contestant Caitlin Upton, who gained international notoriety for her otherwise nonsensical response to a question posed during the pageant, referred to the people of the United States as "U.S. Americans." Caitlin Upton (born March 27, 1989) is an American fashion model and beauty queen from Lexington, South Carolina. ...


The demonyms for the Caribbean nations Dominican Republic and Dominica, though pronounced differently, are spelled the same way, Dominican. The former country's demonym is the ordinary English adjective "dominican", stressed on the second syllable. The demonym for Dominica, like the name of the country, is stressed on the third syllable: IPA: [ˌdɒmɪˈniːkən].


References

  1. ^ Definition of Argentina from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary with audio pronunciations, thesaurus, Word of the Day, and word games.. Definition of Argentina. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (2007-08-28). Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  2. ^ U.S. Department of State. U.S. Department of State. U.S. Department of State (2007-08-28). Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  3. ^ CIA World Factbook. CIA World Factbook. CIA World Factbook (2007-08-28). Retrieved on 2007-08-28.

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Look up demonym, gentilic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Demonym - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (779 words)
A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place.
Some peoples, especially cultures that were overwhelmed by European colonists, have no commonly accepted demonym, or have a demonym that is the same as the name of their (current or historical) nation.
Although many English-speakers are not aware of it, the demonym for citizens of the United States of America suffers a similar problem when translated into many foreign languages, because "American" ambiguously refers to both the USA and to the two American continents.
List of adjectival forms of place names - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (430 words)
The following is a partial list of adjectival forms of place names in English and their demonymic equivalents, which denote the people or the inhabitants of the places.
American convention states that the -an form is reserved for the demonym, not the adjective.
(5) There is no adjective or demonym explictly for the Republic of Ireland as distinct from the entire island of Ireland.
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