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Encyclopedia > Demographics of Scotland

Scotland covers an area of 78,782km² or 30,341mi², giving it a population density of 64 people/km². Around 70% of the country's population live in the Central Lowlands - a broad, fertile valley stretching in a northeast-southwest orientation between the cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, and including major settlements such as Stirling, Falkirk, Perth and Dundee. Other concentrations of population include, the northeast coast of Scotland - principally surrounding the city of Aberdeen and its environs, and around Inverness. The Highlands of Scotland have the lowest population density at 8 people/km². The City of Glasgow has the highest population density at 3,292 people/km². Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... A square mile is an Imperial unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (5,280 feet, 1,760 yards, 1,609. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... The Central Belt of Scotland is a common term used to describe the area of highest population density within Scotland. ... Fljótsdalur in East-Iceland A valley is a landform, which can range from a few square miles (square kilometers) to hundreds or even thousands of square miles (square kilometers) in area. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ), Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic, is the second-largest city in Scotland and its capital city. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Broad St at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area called Top of the Town by locals on a rare snowy day Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... Falkirk (An Eaglais Bhreac in Scottish Gaelic) is a town in central Scotland. ... The Royal Burgh of Perth (Peairt in Scottish Gaelic) is a large burgh in central Scotland. ... The Royal Burgh of Dundee (Gaelic: Dùn Dèagh) is Scotlands third largest city, with a population of 154,674 (2001), and one of Scotlands 32 council areas. ... This article is about the Scottish city. ... Inverness (Inbhir Nis in Scottish Gaelic) is the only city in the Scottish Highlands. ... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ...


Estimating the population of Scotland, as well as recording births, deaths and marriages in Scotland is overseen by the General Register Office for Scotland (GROS), headed by the Registrar-General for Scotland. Under the terms of the Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Scotland) Act 1965, the Registrar-General must present an annual report of demographic trends to Scottish Ministers (previously the Secretary of State for Scotland prior to devolution). In conjunction with the rest of the United Kingdom a decadal census of population is carried out - the last one being 2001, the next taking place in 2011. Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Birth is the process in mammals by which a fetus is expelled from the body of its mother. ... This page deals with the cessation of life. ... This article is about the marriage ceremony. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Logo of the General Register Office General Register Office for Scotland is a government agency, accountable to Scottish ministers, that administers the registration of births, deaths, marriages, divorces and adoptions, and is responsible for the statutes relating to the formalities of marriage and conduct of civil marriage. ... The current Registrar-General is Duncan McNiven ... The Registration of Births, Deaths and Marriages (Scotland) Act 1965, was an act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which set the framework for the registration of births, deaths and marriages in Scotland. ... The current Registrar-General is Duncan McNiven ... The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of the legislature (ie. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... For devolution as a term sometimes misapplied to evolution, see devolution (fallacy) Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2011 (MMXI) will be a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

People on Buchanan Street in Glasgow. Scotland's population is getting older as many baby boomers approach retirement
People on Buchanan Street in Glasgow. Scotland's population is getting older as many baby boomers approach retirement

Contents

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1712x2288, 784 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Glasgow Buchanan Street Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/Glasgow ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1712x2288, 784 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Glasgow Buchanan Street Wikipedia:List of images/Places/Europe/United Kingdom/Cities/Glasgow ... Buchanan Street looking southward. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... A baby boom is defined as a period of increased birth rates relative to surrounding generations. ...


Population data

Total residents:

  • 5,094,800 (2005 est)
  • 5,078,400 (2004 est)
  • 5,057,400 (2003 est)
  • 5,054,800 (2002 est)
  • 5,062,011 (2001 est)
  • 5,083,000 (1991 est)
  • 5,180,200 (1981 est)
  • 5,234,000 (1971 est)
  • 5,201,000 (1961 est)

Figures from the decennial Census are as follows- Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ...

  • 1801 1,608,420
  • 1811 1,805,864
  • 1821 2,091,521
  • 1831 2,364,386
  • 1841 2,620,184
  • 1851 2,888,742
  • 1861 3,062,294
  • 1871 3,360,018
  • 1881 3,735,573
  • 1891 4,025,647
  • 1901 4,472,103
  • 1911 4,760,904
  • 1921 4,882,497
  • 1931 4,842,554
  • 1951 5,096,000

According to the annual estimates of the General Register Office of Scotland, in 2005, Scotland had a total resident population of 5,094,800 - an increase of 16,400 on the previous year and an increase of 40,000 since mid-2002. The total population was split between 2,456,109 males and 2,638,691 females. General Register Office of Scotland is a government agency, accountable to Scottish ministers, that registers births, deaths and marriages in Scotland. ... Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ...


Birth rate: 10.7 births/1,000 population (2005 est.)


Death rate: 11.0 deaths/1,000 population (2005 est.)


Net migration rate: 4.1 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2005 est.)


Population growth rate: 0.4% (2005 est.)


Sex ratio:
at birth: 1.04 male(s)/female
under 15 years: 1.04 male(s)/female
15-64 years: 0.94 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.88 male(s)/female
total population: 0.93 male(s)/female (2005 est.)


Infant mortality rate: 4.9 deaths/1,000 live births (2005 est.)


Life expectancy at birth:
total population: 76.8 years
male: 74.2 years
female: 79.3 years (2005 est.)


Total fertility rate: 1.6 children born/woman (2005 est.)


Religions: Protestant, Roman Catholic, Muslim, Judaism


Languages: English, Scots and Gaelic The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Scots or Lallans (Eng: Lowlands), sometimes called Lowland Scots to distinguish it from the Gaelic language of the Highlands, is a West Germanic language used in Scotland, parts of Northern Ireland, and border areas of the Republic of Ireland, where it is known in official circles as Ulster Scots or... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ...


Marriages: 32,154 (2004 est.)


Literacy:
definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 99%
male: 99%
female: 99% (2005 est)


Nationality noun

  • Scot(s)

adjective

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Scots may refer to: The Scots language People from Scotland Scottish ethnicity, histroically people of Dalriada, a Gaelic-speaking kingdom in western Scotland Scots (ethnic group) Scottish Gaelic language, sometimes Scots outside of Scotland This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...

Population Projections

Since the census of 2001, the Scottish Executive and leading academics in Scotland, have expressed concern over the falling number of births in Scotland and the ageing and declining of the population, a process which has been taking place over recent decades. Scotland's population reached its peak in the mid-1970's, and has slowly declined since that time to its current total of 5.1m. The major reason is seen to be due to significant out-migration from Scotland - particularly to the rest of the United Kingdom - although recent years have seen that trend reversed with significant in-migration to Scotland from the rest of the United Kingdom [1]. Similarly, since 2004 there has been a large influx of arrivals from the new EU accession states such as Poland, Czech Republic, Lithuania and Latvia, contributing to the recent growth of the population. The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Hans Baldung Grien: The Ages And Death, c. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... On May 1, 2004, ten new states acceded to the European Union bringing the number of member states to twenty-five (25). ...


Compounding the problem of a declining and ageing population, in Scotland is falling fertility and birth rates - a feature common to much of Europe. Scotland's population is also getting older - as the large quotient of individuals born in the post war period - 1950s and 1960s near retirement. A common fear amongst commentators is the strain this could pose to the nation's resources, with a smaller working population generating insufficient resources, to support a high number of retirees and dependents. Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Fertility is the ability of people or animals to produce healthy offspring in abundance. ... Birth is the process in animals by which an offspring is expelled from the body of its mother. ... Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... The 1950s were a decade that spanned the years 1950 through 1959. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ...


In 2002 according to GROS, the number of births in Scotland was the lowest ever recorded with 51,270 live births recorded. This, has however steadily risen with 53,957 births recorded in 2004, and an even higher number of births in 2005 [2]. Since 1997 Scotland has generally experienced a natural decrease in population, with an excess of deaths over births. In 2004, for example, there were 4012 more deaths than births. For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... General Register Office of Scotland is a government agency, accountable to Scottish ministers, that registers births, deaths and marriages in Scotland. ... Birth is the process in mammals by which a fetus is expelled from the body of its mother. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Birth is the process in mammals by which a fetus is expelled from the body of its mother. ... Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This page deals with the cessation of life. ... Birth is the process in mammals by which a fetus is expelled from the body of its mother. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Scottish Executive has responded to these demographic trends by setting up the Fresh Talent - Working in Scotland Scheme open to foreign (non-EU) graduates from Scotland's universities allowing them a 2 year residency period after graduation.[3] The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ... Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony. ...


Within Scotland itself there is significant regional variation in patterns of population growth, with areas such as Aberdeenshire (1.1%) Edinburgh (0.9%), Clackmannanshire (0.8%) Falkirk (1.1%), Perth and Kinross (0.6%) and West Lothian (0.6%) seeing the largest increases in population, between 2004 and 2005. Conversely Aberdeen City (-0.5%), West Dunbartonshire (-0.6%) and East Dunbartonshire (-0.6%) have seen the largest falls in population. The Highlands have also seen a significant rise in population over recent years, compared with the last 200 years, in which the area lost large volumes of people, due to persistently high rates of emigration particularly to places such as Canada, the United States, Australia and New Zealand. Countries by population growth rate Population growth is changing of the amount of population over time. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ), Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic, is the second-largest city in Scotland and its capital city. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Falkirk (An Eaglais Bhreac in Scottish Gaelic) is a town in central Scotland. ... Perth and Kinross (Peairt agus Ceann Rois in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area. ... West Lothian or Linlithgowshire (Lodainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy area. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Scottish city. ... West Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ... East Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... A memorial statue in Hanko, Finland, commemorating the thousands of emigrants who left the country to start a new life in the United States Emigration is the act and the phenomenon of leaving ones native country to settle abroad. ...


In December 2005, GROS published a series of population projections which showed that Scotland's population is expected to rise between now and the year 2038, with both the numbers of births and deaths expected to drop. Immigration is expected to remain steady, positive and constant.[4] Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... General Register Office of Scotland is a government agency, accountable to Scottish ministers, that registers births, deaths and marriages in Scotland. ... Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s 2020s - 2030s - 2040s 2050s 2060s 2070s 2080s Years: 2033 2034 2035 2036 2037 - 2038 - 2039 2040 2041 2042 2043 The year 2038 (MMXXXVIII) in the Gregorian calendar corresponds to 5798 to 5799 in the Hebrew calendar. ...


Council Area Population Estimates

Further information: Subdivisions of Scotland
Area Population Estimates in Scotland (2005)
Local Council Area Population Estimates (as at 30 June 2005) % change 2004 - 2005
Aberdeen City 202,370 -0.5
Aberdeenshire 235,440 +1.1
Angus 109,170 +0.6
Argyll and Bute 90,870 -0.4
Clackmannanshire 48,630 +0.8
Dumfries and Galloway 148,340 +0.3
Dundee City 142,170 +0.2
East Ayrshire 119,400 -0.3
East Dunbartonshire 105,960 -0.6
East Lothian 91,800 +0.2
East Renfrewshire 89,600 0.0
Edinburgh 457,830 +0.9
Eilean Siar 26,370 +0.4
Falkirk 149,150 +1.1
Fife 356,470 +0.6
Glasgow 578,790 +0.2
Highland 213,590 +1.1
Inverclyde 82,130 -0.4
Midlothian 79,190 -0.5
Moray 88,120 +0.5
North Ayrshire 135,830 -0.1
North Lanarkshire 323,420 +0.2
Orkney Islands 19,590 +0.5
Perth and Kinross 138,400 +0.6
Renfrewshire 170,000 -0.4
Scottish Borders 109,730 +0.4
Shetland Islands 22,000 +0.3
South Ayrshire 111,780 -0.1
South Lanarkshire 306,280 +0.3
Stirling 86,930 +0.6
West Dunbartonshire 91,400 -0.6
West Lothian 163,780 +0.6

For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils. They have been in use since April 1, 1996, under the provisions of the Local Government etc. ... Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the Scottish city. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Angus (Aonghas in Gaelic) is one of the traditional counties and also one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland and a Lieutenancy area. ... Argyll and Bute (Earra-Ghaidheal agus Bòd in Gaelic) is both one of 32 unitary council areas; and a Lieutenancy Area in Scotland. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Dumfries and Galloway (Dùn Phris agus Gall-Ghaidhealaibh in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland. ... For other uses see Dundee (disambiguation) Dundee is Scotlands fourth largest city, population 154 674 (2001), situated on the North bank of the Firth of Tay. ... Logo of East Ayrshire Council East Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... East Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ... East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area. ... East Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ), Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic, is the second-largest city in Scotland and its capital city. ... The Outer Hebrides or Western Isles (Scottish Gaelic: Na h-Eileanan Siar), also traditionally known as the Outer Isles, comprise an island chain off the west coast of Scotland. ... Falkirk (An Eaglais Bhreac in Scottish Gaelic) is a town in central Scotland. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... For other uses, see Inverclyde (disambiguation). ... The central portions of the old province of Lothian in Scotland, centred around Edinburgh, became known as Midlothian, Scotland. ... Moray (Moireibh in Gaelic), one of the 32 unitary council regions (or areas) of Scotland, lies in the north-east of the country and borders on the regions of Aberdeenshire and Highland. ... North Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir a Tuath in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... North Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Tuath in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... The Orkney Islands, usually called simply Orkney, are one of the 32 council areas of Scotland. ... Perth and Kinross (Peairt agus Ceann Rois in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area. ... Renfrewshire (Siorrachd Rinn Friù in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority regions in Scotland. ... Scottish Borders (Crìochan na h-Alba in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... The Shetland Islands, also called Shetland (archaically spelled Zetland) formerly called Hjaltland, comprise one of 32 council areas of Scotland. ... South Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of Ayrshire. ... South Lanarkshire (Siorrachd Lannraig a Deas in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, covering the southern part of the traditional county of Lanarkshire. ... Broad St at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area called Top of the Town by locals on a rare snowy day Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... West Dunbartonshire (Siorrachd Dhùn Bhreatainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary authority areas in Scotland. ... West Lothian or Linlithgowshire (Lodainn an Iar in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy area. ...

See also

Motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within Europe Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Scotland is one of the four constituent nations of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Census 2001 is the name by which the national census conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001 is known. ... The phrase Italian-Scots, or Scots-Italian, designates an ethnic minority of Scottish and Italian descent. ...

References

  • Registrar-General's Mid-2004 Population Estimates for Scotland
  • Registrar-General's Mid-2005 Population Estimates for Scotland
  • Registrar-General's Annual Review of Demographic Trends for Scotland
  • Small Area Population Estimates of Scotland

External links

Topics on Scotland
History Timeline | Prehistoric Scotland | Scotland in the High Middle Ages | Wars of Scottish Independence | Scottish Enlightenment | Colonisation | Acts of Union 1707 | Jacobitism | Highland Clearances | Lowland Clearances
Politics Political parties | Elections | Scottish Parliament | Scottish Executive | First Minister of Scotland | Secretary of State for Scotland | Scotland Office
Religion Church of Scotland | General Assembly | Roman Catholicism | Scottish Episcopal Church
Law Courts of Scotland | Lord President | Crown Office | Lord Advocate | Solicitor General | Procurator Fiscal
Geography Geology | Climate | Mountains and hills | Islands | Lochs
Economy Companies | Bank of Scotland | Royal Bank of Scotland | North Sea oil | Scotch whisky | Tourism | Harris Tweed
Demographics Scottish Gaelic language | Scots language | Scottish English | Highland English | Burghs
Culture Education | Hogmanay | Innovations & discoveries | Music | Sport
Symbols Flags (National Flag | Royal Standard) | Royal Arms) | Tartan | Bagpipes

 
 

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