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Encyclopedia > Demographic history of Vojvodina

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Vojvodina's demographic history reflects its rich history and its former location at the border of the Ottoman and Habsburg empires and at the confluence of various peoples, making it a hotbed of invasion, colonization, and assimilation processes. Currently there are more than 25 ethnic groups living in Vojvodina and six official languages. Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem At the height of its power (1683) Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI... The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ...

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Demographic history

The area of Vojvodina had been inhabited since the Paleolithic period. Before the Roman conquest in the 1st century BC, Indo-European peoples of Illyrian, Thracian and Celtic origin inhabited the region. Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... The Paleolithic or Palaeolithic (Greek παλαιός paleos=old and λίθος lithos=stone or the Old Stone Age) was the first period in the development of human technology of the Stone Age. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... Indo-Europeans are speakers of Indo-European languages. ... Illyria Illyria (disambiguation) Illyria (Anc. ... The Thracians were an Indo-European people, inhabitants of Thrace and adjacent lands (present-day Bulgaria, Romania, northeastern Greece, European Turkey and northwestern asiatic Turkey, eastern Serbia and parts of Republic of Macedonia). ... A Celtic cross. ...


During the Roman rule, original inhabitants were heavily Romanized, later to become known by the name of Vlachs. After the end of the Roman rule, the Romanized inhabitants of the area escaped to Balkanic mountains (where they mixed with South Slavic Serbs and Croats) as well as to the Transylvanian mountains (where they later were known as Romanians). [1] Vlachs (also called Wallachians, Wlachs, Wallachs, Olahs or Ulahs) is a blanket term covering several modern Latin peoples descending from the Latinised population in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. ... Balkan peninsula with northwest border Isonzo-Krka-Sava The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe a region of southeastern Europe. ... Countries inhabited by South Slavs (in black) Distribution of Slavic peoples by language The South Slavs are a southern branch of the Slavic peoples that live in the Balkans, the southern Pannonian Plain and the eastern Alps. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Map of Romania with Transylvania in yellow Transylvania (Romanian: or Transilvania; Hungarian: ; German: ; Serbian: or Erdelj / Ердељ) is a historical region in the center of Romania. ...


Vojvodina was invaded by Turanic nomads such as the Huns and Avars, as well as Germanic Gepids and Langobards, so after their military decayed, they were quickly absorbed by the local population, without leaving much ethnic traces in population of the region. The Huns were a confederation of Eurasian tribes who appeared in Europe in the 4th century, the most famous person being Attila. ... Map showing the location of Avar Khaganate, c. ... The Gepids (Latin Gepidae) were a Germanic tribe most famous in history for defeating the Huns after the death of Attila. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ...


During the early medieval migrations, Slavs (Severans, Abodrites, Braničevci, Timočani and Serbs) settled today's Vojvodina in the 6th and 7th centuries, [2] but pockets of Romanised population remained in the area. [citation needed] Until the Hungarian conquest in the 10th century, the region had dominant Slavic population. The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Severans (people of/from the North) were a Slavic tribal union occupying areas from the west Pannonian plain to the Black Sea in the 6th to 9th century. ... The Obotrites (sometimes Abodrites, Obodrites) were a group of Slavic peoples who had in the 6th century settled in the regions later known as Mecklenburg and Schleswig-Holstein in what is now north-eastern Germany. ... The Braničevci were an medieval Slavic tribe that lived in the territory of present-day Serbia, in the regions of Braničevo and Banat. ... The Timočani were an medieval Slavic tribe that lived in the territory of present-day Serbia, around Timok river, as well as in the regions of Banat and Syrmia. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... This Buddhist stela from China, Northern Wei period, was built in the early 6th century. ... The 7th century is the period from 601 - 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ...


The region was conquered by the Hungarian Principality (later Hungarian Kingdom) in the 10th century, and Hungarians started to settle in the area. Hungarians mainly settled in northern part of the region, where they lived mixed with Slavs. Until the late 12th and early 13th century, the region was mainly populated by Slavs, after which the ethnic relations changed in favour of Hungarians. The presence of Slavs in the area increased again in the 14th century with the arrival of many Serbs from the south. The larger number of Hungarians settled in the region since the 13th century. During the Hungarian rule, much of the native local Slavs were Hungarized. By the opinion of some researchers, the non-Hungarized descendants of these local Slavs are present-day Šokci. [3] See also the history of Europe, the history of present-day nations and states, Hungary before the Magyars, and Hungary. ... The Kingdom of Hungary (Hungarian: Magyar Királyság) is the name of a multiethnic kingdom that existed in Central Europe from 1000 to 1918. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Magyarization or Magyarisation is the common name given to a number of forced assimilation policies applied by the Hungarian authorities at different times in history. ... Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of Slavonia, Baranja, Syrmia and western Bačka. ...

Indo-European peoples in Vojvodina in ancient times
Indo-European peoples in Vojvodina in ancient times
Slavs in Vojvodina in the 9th century, before the Hungarian conquest
Slavs in Vojvodina in the 9th century, before the Hungarian conquest
Slavs and Hungarians in the 10th century, after the Hungarian conquest
Slavs and Hungarians in the 10th century, after the Hungarian conquest
Slavs and Hungarians in the 10th century, after the Hungarian conquest, according to Hungarian author Dr. György Györffy
Slavs and Hungarians in the 10th century, after the Hungarian conquest, according to Hungarian author Dr. György Györffy
Slavs and Hungarians in the 12th century
Slavs and Hungarians in the 12th century
Slavs and Hungarians in the 13th century.
Slavs and Hungarians in the 13th century.
Ethnic territory of the South Slavs between 16th and 18th century
Ethnic territory of the South Slavs between 16th and 18th century
Ethnic map of Vojvodina based on the 2002 census municipality data
Ethnic map of Vojvodina based on the 2002 census municipality data
Ethnic map of Vojvodina based on the 2002 census settlement data
Ethnic map of Vojvodina based on the 2002 census settlement data

Though Serbs were part of the aboriginal Slavic population in the territory of Vojvodina (especially in Srem), an increasing number of Serbs began settling from the 14th century onward. By 1483, according to a Hungarian source, [citation needed] as much as half of the population of the Vojvodina territory at the time would have been made up of Serbs. Because of the presence of the large Serb population, in many historical records and maps, which were written and drawn between 15th and 18th centuries, territory of present day Vojvodina was named Rascia (Raška, Serbia) and Little Raška (Little Serbia). Image File history File links Indo_Europeans_Vojvodina. ... Image File history File links Indo_Europeans_Vojvodina. ... Image File history File links Slavs_Vojvodina. ... Image File history File links Slavs_Vojvodina. ... Image File history File links Slavs_Hungarians04. ... Image File history File links Slavs_Hungarians04. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x1200, 707 KB) Slavs and Hungarians in Vojvodina in the 10th century, after the Hungarian conquest, according to Dr. György Györffy I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1500x1200, 707 KB) Slavs and Hungarians in Vojvodina in the 10th century, after the Hungarian conquest, according to Dr. György Györffy I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Slavs_Hungarians07. ... Image File history File links Slavs_Hungarians07. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (849x524, 32 KB)Slavs and Hungarians in the late 12th century according to some Hungarian sources. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (849x524, 32 KB)Slavs and Hungarians in the late 12th century according to some Hungarian sources. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (865x512, 35 KB)historic map (self made) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (865x512, 35 KB)historic map (self made) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Vojvodina_ethnic2002. ... Image File history File links Vojvodina_ethnic2002. ... vojvodina ethnic map This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... vojvodina ethnic map This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Events The São Tomé settlement is founded. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Raci (Раци, Rác, Ratzen, Ratzians, Rasciani) was a name used to designate Serbs and Bunjevci. ... RaÅ¡ka (Raschka, Rascia, Rassa) was the central and most successful medieval Serbian state (or župa, area ruled by a župan) that unified neighboring Serbian tribes into the main medieval Serbian state in Balkans. ... Motto: none Anthem: Bože pravde (English: God of Justice) Capital (and largest city) Belgrade Serbian, cyrillic script1 Government Republic  - Prime Minister Vojislav KoÅ¡tunica  - President Boris Tadić Establishment    - Formation 814   - First Serbian Uprising 1804   - Internationally recognized July 13, 1878   - Kingdom of SCS created December 1, 1918   - SCG dissolved June...


The Ottoman Empire took control of Vojvodina in the 16th century, and this caused a massive depopulation of the region. Most of the Hungarians and many local Slavs fled from the region and escaped to the north. The majority of those who left in the region were Serbs, mainly now engaging either in farming either in Ottoman military service. Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem At the height of its power (1683) Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ...


Under Ottoman policy, many Serbs were newly settled in the region. During the Ottoman rule, most of the inhabitants of the Vojvodina region were Serbs. In that time, villages were mostly populated with Serbs, while cities were populated by Muslims and Serbs. A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ...


The Habsburg Monarchy took control of Vojvodina among other lands by the treaties of Karlovci (1699) and Požarevac (1718). Following the establishment of the Habsburg rule, the Muslim population fled from the region. During the Habsburg administration, many new Serb settlers from the Ottoman Empire immigrated to the region. In 1687, the northern parts of the region were settled by ethnic Bunjevci. The Habsburg Monarchy, often called Austrian Monarchy or simply Austria, are the territories ruled by the Austrian branch of the House of Habsburg, and then by the successor House of Habsburg-Lorraine, between 1526 and 1867/1918. ... The Treaty of Karlowitz was signed in 1699 in Sremski Karlovci (a city in modern-day Serbia and Montenegro) (German: Karlowitz, Turkish:Karlofça), concluding the Austro-Ottoman War of 1683–1697 in which the Ottoman side was defeated. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... The Treaty of Passarowitz was the peace treaty signed in Požarevac, Serbia (German: Passarowitz, Turkish Pasarofça, Hungarian: Pozsarevác) on July 21, 1718 between the Ottoman Empire on one side and the Habsburg Monarchy of Austria and the Republic of Venice on the other. ... // The Funj warrior aristocracy deposes the reigning mek and places one of their own ranks on the throne of Sennar. ... Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region situated in northern Serbia (Vojvodina province) and southern Hungary (B...


Many other non-Serb colonists also settled in the territory of present day Vojvodina during the 18th and 19th century. They were mainly Germans and Hungarians, but also Rusyns, Slovaks, Romanians, and others. Because of this colonization, Serbs lost the absolute ethnic majority in the region, and Vojvodina became one of the most ethnically diverse regions of Europe. Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ...


Still, Serbs remained the largest ethnic group in the region. According to 1910 census, Serbs comprised 33.8% of the population in the territory of present day Vojvodina. After Serbs, the most numerous ethnic groups were Hungarians (28.1%) and Germans (21.4%). 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


In 1918, Vojvodina became part of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes and new Serb settlers started to come to the region. As the consequence of the Second World War events, most of the German population fled from the region after this war and they were replaced with Serb and Montenegrin colonists. According to the 1948 census, Serbs were absolute majority in Vojvodina again (51%), and this percent rose to 65% in 2002 census. The multiethnic character of the region is also preserved. 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Republic of Serbia   â€“Vojvodina   â€“Kosovo (UN admin. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


17th, 18th and 19th century data

1690

In 1690, about 210,000 Serbs lived in Vojvodina (excluding Srem). In this time, almost entire population of the region was composed of Serbs, also including some Šokci.


1715

According to the Austrian census in Bačka from 1715, Serbs, Bunjevci, and Šokci comprised 97.6% of population. Bačka (Serbian: Бачка or Bačka, Hungarian: Bácska, Croatian: Bačka, Slovak: Báčka, German: Batschka) is an area of the Pannonian plain lying between the rivers Danube and Tisa. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region situated in northern Serbia (Vojvodina province) and southern Hungary (B... Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of Slavonia, Baranja, Syrmia and western Bačka. ...


1720

The 1720 census in Bačka recorded 104,569 citizens, including:

  • 76,000 Orthodox Serbs (73%)
  • 22,000 Bunjevci and Šokci (21%)
  • 5,019 Hungarians
  • 750 Germans

After the Treaty of Passarowitz (1718), the first Austrian census recorded in (western) Banat about 20,000 citizens, mostly Serbs.


1820

The 1820 census in Bačka recorded 387,914 citizens, including:

  • 170,942 Serbs, Bunjevci, and Šokci (44%)
  • 121,688 Hungarians (31%)
  • 91,016 Germans (23%)

Results of different censa in Vojvodina between 1880 and 2002

1880 census

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 416,116 35.5
Germans 285,920 24.4
Hungarians 265,287 22.6
Croats, Bunjevci & Šokci 72,486 6.2
Romanians 69,668 5.9
Slovaks 43,318 3.7
Rusyns & Ukrainians 9,299 0.8
Others 10,635 0.9
TOTAL 1,172,729 100

1890 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region situated in northern Serbia (Vojvodina province) and southern Hungary (B... Šokci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Šokci, singular Šokac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of Slavonia, Baranja, Syrmia and western Bačka. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 457,873 34.4
Hungarians 324,430 24.4
Germans 321,563 24.2
Croats, Bunjevci & Šokci 80,404 6
Romanians 73,492 5.5
Slovaks 49,834 3.7
Rusyns & Ukrainians 11,022 0.8
Others 12,525 1
TOTAL 1,331,143 100

1900 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region situated in northern Serbia (Vojvodina province) and southern Hungary (B... Šokci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Šokci, singular Šokac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of Slavonia, Baranja, Syrmia and western Bačka. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 483,176 33.7
Hungarians 378,634 26.4
Germans 336,430 23.5
Croats, Bunjevci & Šokci 80,901 5.6
Romanians 74,718 5.2
Slovaks 53,832 3.8
Rusyns & Ukrainians 12,663 0.9
Others 12,394 0.9
TOTAL 1,432,748 100

1910 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region situated in northern Serbia (Vojvodina province) and southern Hungary (B... Šokci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Šokci, singular Šokac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of Slavonia, Baranja, Syrmia and western Bačka. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 510,186 33.8
Hungarians 424,555 28.1
Germans 323,779 21.4
Romanians 75,223 5
Slovaks 56,689 3.7
Croats 34,089 2.3
Rusyns 13,479 0.9
Others 72,804 4.8

1921 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 526,134 34.7
Hungarians 370,040 24.4
Germans 333,272 22
Croats 122,684 8.1
Romanians 65,197 4.3
Slovaks 58,273 3.8
Rusyns 13,664 0.9
Others 25,182 1.7

1931 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 528,000 33
Hungarians 413,000 26
Germans 343,000 21
Croats 120,000 7
Romanians 78,000 5
Slovaks & Czechs 67,000 4
Rusyns 21,000 1
Jews 21,000 1
Others 37,000 2

1941 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 577,067 35.3
Hungarians 465,920 28.5
Germans 318,259 19.4
Croats 105,810 6.5
Others 169,311 10.3

1948 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 841,246 50.6
Hungarians 428,932 25.8
Croats 134,232 8.1
Slovaks 72,032 4.3
Romanians 59,263 3.6
Germans 31,821 1.9
Montenegrins 30,589 1.9
Rusyns and Ukrainians 22,083 1.3
Macedonians 9,090 0.5
Roma 7,585 0.4
Slovenes 7,223 0.4
Russians 5,148 0.3
Czechs 3,976 0.3
Bulgarians 3,501 0.2
Yugoslavs 1,050 0.1
Others 5,441 0.3

1953 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian and Montenegrin: Црногорци / Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 865,538 50.9
Hungarians 435,179 25.6
Croats 127,027 7.5
Slovaks 71,153 4.2
Romanians 57,218 3.4
Montenegrins 30,516 1.8
Rusyns 23,038 1.4
Macedonians 11,622 0.7
Others 78,254 4.6

1961 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian and Montenegrin: Црногорци / Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 1,017,713 54.9
Hungarians 442,560 23.9
Croats 145,341 7.8
Slovaks 73,830 4
Romanians 57,259 3.1
Montenegrins 34,782 1.9
Rusyns 23,038 1.4
Macedonians 11,622 0.7
Others 83,480 4.4

1971 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian and Montenegrin: Црногорци / Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 1,089,132 55.8
Hungarians 423,866 21.7
Croats 138,561 7.1
Slovaks 72,795 3.7
Romanians 52,987 2.7
Montenegrins 36,416 1.9
Rusyns 20,109 1
Macedonians 16,527 0.8
Germans 7,243 0.4
Others 94,897 4.9

1981 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian and Montenegrin: Црногорци / Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 1,107,375 54.4
Hungarians 385,356 18.9
Croats 119,157 5.9
Slovaks 69,549 3.4
Romanians 47,289 2.3
Montenegrins 43,304 2.1
Rusyns & Ukrainians 24,306 1.2
Germans 3,808 0.2
Others 234,628 11.6

1991 census N.B.: the third largest ethnic group in 1991 census were Yugoslavs (about 8%), but in this listing they are counted in the "other" category. Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian and Montenegrin: Црногорци / Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...

Ethnicity Number %
Serbs 1,151,353 57.2
Hungarians 340,946 16.9
Croats 74,226 3.7
Slovaks 63,941 3.2
Montenegrins 47,289 2.3
Romanians 38,832 1.9
Rusyns 17,889 0.9
Macedonians 16,641 0.8
Others 263,970 13.1

2002 census Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian and Montenegrin: Црногорци / Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ...

Number %
TOTAL 2,031,992 100
Serbs 1,321,807 65.05
Hungarians 290,207 14.28
Slovaks 56,637 2.79
Croats 56,546 2.78
Yugoslavs 49,881 2.45
Montenegrins 35,513 1.75
Romanians 30,419 1.5
Roma 29,057 1.43
Bunjevci 19,766 0.97
Rusyns 15,626 0.77
Macedonians 11,785 0.58
Ukrainians 4,635 0.23
Muslims (by nationality) 3,634 0.18
Germans 3,154 0.16
Slovenes 2,005 0.1
Albanians 1,695 0.08
Bulgarians 1,658 0.08
Czechs 1,648 0.08
Russians 940 0.05
Gorani 606 0.03
Bosniaks 417 0.02
Vlachs 101 0
Others 5,311 0.26
Regional identity 10,154 0.5
Undeclared 55,016 2.71
Unknown 23,774 1.17

Serbs (Serbian: Срби or Srbi) are a South Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... Montenegrins (Serbian and Montenegrin: Црногорци / Crnogorci) are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region situated in northern Serbia (Vojvodina province) and southern Hungary (B... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ... Muslims by nationality was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe people who spoke Serbo-Croatian language and professed Islam that werent identified as one of the other nations. ... Gorani or Gorançe or Goranska are a Slavic ethnic group living in Gora region, just south of Prizren in the territory of Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro, north-western Macedonia in the Šar-planina region near Tetovo, as well as in north-eastern Albania, most notably in the village os... The Bosniaks (Bosnian: Bošnjaci, IPA: ) are a South Slav people living mainly in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Sandžak region of Serbia and Montenegro, with a smaller autochthonous population also present in Kosovo. ... Vlach folk dance from Timočka Krajina Vlachs (Vlach/Romanian: Vlahi, Serbian: Власи or Vlasi) are an ethnic group of Serbia, culturally and lingustically cognate to Romanians. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Future demographic trends

The general demographic trend in Vojvodina is a low natural increase of population. According to the 1991 census, the average years of age of the population of the province were 37.7. However, the average years of age were different among various ethnic groups. The largest ethnic group, Serbs, had average years of age of 37.4. Other ethnic groups mostly had even larger average years of age: Romanians 41.9, Hungarians 41.2, Slovaks 40.1, Croats 41, etc. The opposite case were three ethnic groups with younger population: Roma 26, Albanians 29 and Muslims by nationality 29.


According to the 1991 census, the natural increase of population in Vojvodina was -1.8%, while in 1997 it was -4%. Since the percent needed just for the simple maintenance of the existing number of population is 2.3, it is expected that Vojvodina soon will have to import a labour.


Knowing the difference between increase/decrease of Serb and Hungarian populations, it is expected that ethnic relations in northern Vojvodina will drastically change in the next 50 years: until 2050, the total number of Hungarians in Vojvodina will decrease to less than 100,000. Until 2020, Serbs will replace Hungarians as largest ethnic group in the municipality of Bečej, until 2030 in the municipalities of Subotica, Bačka Topola, and Čoka, and until 2050 in the municipality of Mali Iđoš. In 2050, the only remaining municipalities with Hungarian majority in Vojvodina will be Kanjiža, Senta, and Ada.


See also

This is the history of Vojvodina. ... Ethnic groups of Vojvodina Ethnic map of Vojvodina Serbs – Serbs constitute an absolute majority of people in Vojvodina. ... Serbs in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census The Serbs are the largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Montenegrins are the sixth largest etnic community in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Hungarians in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census Hungarians or Magyars are a second largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province, Serbia and Montenegro. ... Slovaks in Vojvodina according to the 2002 census Slovaks in Vojvodina Slovaks are the third largest ethnic group in the Vojvodina province of Serbia. ... Romanians (Romanian: Românii din Serbia, Serbian: Rumuni or Румуни) are a recognised national minority in Serbia, numbering 34,576 according to 2002 census. ... Pannonian Rusyns or simply Rusyns (Ruthenians) is the name of a Slavic minority in Serbia and Croatia. ... Bunjevci (Bunjevac, Serbian and Croatian: Bunjevci/Буњевци, singular Bunjevac/Буњевац, pronounced as Bunyevtzi and Bunyevatz, also in Hungarian: bunyevácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group originally from the Dinaric Alps region, now mostly living in the Bačka region situated in northern Serbia (Vojvodina province) and southern Hungary (B... Å okci (Croatian & Serbian Latin: Å okci, singular Å okac, Serbian Cyrillic: Шокци, singular Шокац, pronounced as Shoktzi and Shokatz, also in Hungarian: Sokácok) are a South Slavic ethnic group living in various settlements along the Danube and Sava rivers in the historic regions of Slavonia, Baranja, Syrmia and western Bačka. ... This is demographic history of Novi Sad. ...

References

  1. Dr Dušan J. Popović; Srbi u Vojvodini; knjige 1-3; Novi Sad; 1990.
  2. Dr Branislav Bukurov; Bačka, Banat i Srem; Novi Sad; 1978.
  3. Milan Tutorov; Banatska rapsodija - istorika Zrenjanina i Banata; Novi Sad; 2001.
  4. Borislav Jankulov; Pregled kolonizacije Vojvodine u XVIII i XIX veku; Novi Sad - Pančevo; 2003.
  5. Lazo M. Kostić; Srpska Vojvodina i njene mannine; Novi Sad; 1999.

Notes

  1. ^ Trajan Stojanović, Balkanska civilizacija, Beograd, 1995.
  2. ^ Dr. Drago Njegovan, Prisajedinjenje Vojvodine Srbiji, Novi Sad, 2004.
  3. ^ Mile Nedeljković, Leksikon naroda sveta, Beograd, 2001.

External links

  • The Ethnic Structure of the Population in Vojvodina
  • Ethnic structure of the population of the present territory of Vojvodina (1880-1991)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Demographic history of Vojvodina (0 words)
Vojvodina's demographic history reflects its rich history and its former location at the border of the Ottoman and Habsburg empires and at the confluence of various peoples, making it a hotbed of invasion, colonization, and assimilation processes.
Vojvodina was invaded by Turanic nomads such as the Huns and Avars, as well as Germanic Gepids and Langobards, but after their military defeat, they were quickly absorbed by the local population, without leaving much ethnic traces in population of the region.
Though Serbs were part of the aboriginal Slavic population in the territory of Vojvodina (especially in Srem), an increasing number of Serbs began settling from the 14th century onward.
Demographic history of Vojvodina - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article (0 words)
Vojvodina was invaded by Turanic nomads such as the Huns and Avars, as well as Germanic Gepids and Langobards, but they were not in great numbers, so after their military decayed, they were quickly absorbed by the local population, without leaving much ethnic traces in population of the region.
Parts of Vojvodina were conquered by the Hungarian Kingdom in the 10th century, and Hungarians started to settle in the region.
The northern parts of Vojvodina were populated with Bunjevci, who settled in the region in the 16th century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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