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Encyclopedia > Demographic history of Kosovo

This article is part of the series:
Republic of Serbia Image File history File links Coat_of_arms_of_Serbia. ... Serbia and Montenegro  -Serbia    -Kosovo and Metohia    -Vojvodina  -Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  - Total  - % water 88,361 km² n/a Population  - Total (1998)  - Density 11,206,847 126. ...

Contents

The Regions of Serbia // Present day regions Serbia map Today, Serbia is divided into three regions: Vojvodina, autonomous province (capital city: Novi Sad) Kosovo and Metohija, autonomous province (capital city: Pristina) Central Serbia, the part of Serbia that is neither in Kosovo nor in Vojvodina, and which is not an... Okruzi are the Districts of Serbia. ... Serbia was formerly an autonomous principality (1817–1878), independent principality (1878–1882), independent kingdom (1882–1918), part of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (1918–1941) (since 1929 the Kingdom of Yugoslavia), nazi occupied puppet state (1941–1944), socialist republic within Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (1945–1992) and... This is the history of Vojvodina. ... This article describes history of Kosovo. ... Politics of Serbia and Montenegro takes place in a framework of a federal parliamentary republic, with a multi-party system. ... The current Serbian government was formed on March 3, 2004 with the appointment of Vojislav Kostunica as the Prime Minister. ... Telephones - main lines in use: 2,685,400 (2004) Telephones - mobile cellular: 4,729,600 (2004) Telephone system: general assessment: NA domestic: NA international: country code - 381; satellite earth station - 1 Intelsat (Atlantic Ocean) Radio broadcast stations: AM 113, FM 194, shortwave 2 (1998) Television broadcast stations: more than 771... Serbian culture refers to the culture of Serbia as well as the culture of Serbians in other parts of the former Yugoslavia and elsewhere in the world. ... Ethnic map of Serbia // Demographics of Serbia Population of Serbia (including Kosovo) Serbs 66% Albanians 17% Hungarians 3. ... Vojvodinas demographic history reflects its rich history and its former location at the border of the Ottoman and Habsburg empires and at the confluence of various peoples, making it a hotbed of invasion, colonization, and assimilation processes. ... This is a list of cities in Serbia and Montenegro. ... This is a list of villages in Serbia which have articles. ... This is a list of places in Serbia, including both cities and villages. ... This is part of the list of places in Serbia, including both cities and villages. ... This article is 200 KB or more in size. ... This is a list of mountains in Serbia and Montenegro. ... Geographical regions in Serbia This is a list of some of Geographical regions in Serbia. ...


Ottoman Rule

14th century

The Dečani Charter from 1330[citation needed] contained detailed list of households and chartered villages in Metohija and northwestern Albania: Dečani/Дечани (Serbian) is a town in eastern Kosovo, widely known for the Visoki Dečani monastery of the Serb Orthodox Church. ... Events The Bulgars under Michael III are beaten by the Serbs at Velbuzhd, and large parts of Bulgaria fall to Serbia. ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ...

3 of 89 settlements were Albanian, the other being non-Albanian.
Out of the 2,166 farming homesteads and 2,666 houses in cattle-grazing land, 44 were registrated as Albanian (1,8%). Others were registered as Slavic i. e. Serbian.

The non-Serbian population of Kosovo didn't exceed 2% by the end of the 14th century.[citation needed] Slav, Slavic or Slavonic can refer to: Slavic peoples Slavic languages Slavic mythology Church Slavonic language Old Church Slavonic language Slav, a former Jewish settlement in the Gaza Strip. ... ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ...


15th century

1455: Turkish cadastral tax census (defter)[1] of the Brankovic dynasty lands (covering 80% of present-day Kosovo) recorded 480 villages, 13,693 adult males, 12,985 dwellings, 14,087 household heads (480 widows and 13,607 adult males). By ethnicity: ... no changes . ... Cadastral is a term used in surveying and public administration, and refers to the division of land into units for surveying, taxation or administrative purposes. ... A tax (also known as a duty) is a financial charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... Defter was a cadastral tax census carried out by the Ottoman Empire. ... Despot Đurađ Branković (Cyrillic: Ђурађ Бранковић, Hungarian: György Brankovics, ruled 1427 - 1456) was a Serbian monarch who built Smederevo. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ...

  • 12,985 Serbian dwellings present in all 480 villages and towns
  • 75 Vlach dwellings in 34 villages
  • 46 Albanian dwellings in 23 villages
  • 17 Bulgarian dwellings in 10 villages
  • 5 Greek dwellings in Lauša, Vučitrn
  • 1 Jewish dwelling in Vučitrn
  • 1 Croat dwelling

1487: A census of the House of Branković Ottoman Serbs (in the Serbian language Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people living chiefly in Serbia and Montenegro and Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Vlachs (also called Wlachs, Wallachs, Olahs) are the Romanized population in Central and Eastern Europe, including Romanians, Aromanians, Istro-Romanians and Megleno-Romanians, but since the creation of the Romanian state, this term was mostly used for the Vlachs living south of the Danube river. ... Jews (Hebrew: יהודים, Yehudim) are followers of Judaism or, more generally, members of the Jewish people (also known as the Jewish nation, or the Children of Israel), an ethno-religious group descended from the ancient Israelites and converts who joined their religion. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina (where theyre one of the constitutive nations). ... Events Richard Fox becomes Bishop of Exeter. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Söğüt (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanl...

  • Vučitrn district:
  • 16,729 Christian housing (412 in Priština and Vučitrn)
  • 117 Moslem households (94 in Priština and 83 in rural areas)
  • Ipek district:
  • Rural areas:

Vučitrn (Вучитрн; Albanian: Vushtrri), is the name of a town, which is the seat of a municipality, situated in north-eastern part of the province of Serbia called Kosovo. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ. ... The City Center Prishtinë/Prishtina (Albanian) or Приштина/PriÅ¡tina (Serbian) , the largest and capital city of the province of Kosovo, a United Nations-administered territory. ... Vučitrn (Вучитрн; Albanian: Vushtrri), is the name of a town, which is the seat of a municipality, situated in north-eastern part of the province of Serbia called Kosovo. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The City Center Prishtinë/Prishtina (Albanian) or Приштина/PriÅ¡tina (Serbian) , the largest and capital city of the province of Kosovo, a United Nations-administered territory. ... Üsküdar (ancient Scutari) was a city in Bithynia in Anatolia. ... Peć (Serbian: Пећ; Albanian Pejë or Peja) is a city located in the western part of Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro, at 40°66′N 20°31′E. It had a population of 81,800 as of 2003. ... Peć (Serbian: Пећ; Albanian Pejë or Peja) is a city located in the western part of Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro, at 40°66′N 20°31′E. It had a population of 81,800 as of 2003. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... Dečani/Дечани (Serbian) is a town in eastern Kosovo, widely known for the Visoki Dečani monastery of the Serb Orthodox Church. ... The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus Christ. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ...

17th - 18th century

The Great Turkish War of 1683-1699 between the Ottomans and the Habsburgs led to the flight of a substantial part of Kosovan Serbian population to Austrian held Vojvodina and the Military Frontier - over 180,000 Serbs; 20,000 Serbs left Prizren alone. Following this an influx of Moslem Albanian[2] from the highlands (Malesi) occurred, mostly into Metohija. The process continued in 18th century[2]. The Great Turkish War was a series of conflicts between the Ottoman Empire and European powers at the time (joined into a Holy League) during the second half of the 17th century. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Söğüt (1299-1326), Bursa (1326-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanl... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia      â€“ Vojvodina   â€“ Montenegro Kosovo (UN administration) Official languages Serbian, Hungarian, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Rusyn1 Capital Novi Sad Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  21,500 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)  â€“ Density  2,031,992  94. ... Military Frontier (Military Border, Military Krajina, Vojna Krajina, Војна Крајина, Militärgrenze, Confiniaria militaria) was a borderland of Habsburg Austria which acted as the cordon sanitaire against the Turks from the Middle Ages (Croatian Krajina) or from the late 17th and 18th centuries (Slavonian and Banat Krajina) until the 19th century. ... View of Prizren Prizren (Albanian Prizren/Prizreni, Serbian: Призрен/Prizren) is a historical city located in a United Nations-administered territory of Kosovo, but factually under the Provisional Self-Government) at 42. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ...


The same was repeated during the Second Migration of Serbs in 1737. Events 12 February — The San Carlo, the oldest working opera house in Europe, is inaugurated. ...


19th century

19th century data about the population of Kosovo tend to be rather conflicting, giving sometimes numerical superiority to the Serbs and sometimes to the Albanians. The Ottoman statistics are regarded as unreliable, as the empire counted its citizens by religion rather than nationality, using birth records rather than surveys of individuals. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A study in 1838 by an Austrian physician, dr. Joseph Müller found Metohija to be mostly Slavic (Serbian) in character.[3] Müller gives data for the three counties (Bezirke) of Prizren, Peć and Đakovica which roughly covered Metohija, the portion adjacent to Albania and most affected by Albanian settlers. Out of 195,000 inhabitants in Metohija, Müller found: | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ... View of Prizren Prizren (Albanian Prizren/Prizreni, Serbian: Призрен/Prizren) is a historical city located in a United Nations-administered territory of Kosovo, but factually under the Provisional Self-Government) at 42. ... Peć (Serbian: Пећ; Albanian Pejë or Peja) is a city located in the western part of Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro, at 40°66′N 20°31′E. It had a population of 81,800 as of 2003. ... Gjakova, also Djakovica, (Serbian cyrillic: Ђаковица, Albanian Gjakova) is a city located in Kosovo, at 42. ... Metohija (Serbian: Метохија) also spelled Metohia, is a large western basin in Kosovo. ...

Müller's observations on towns: A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catholicism. ... Janjevci (Janjevs) are inhabitants of the Kosovo town of Janjevo and surrounding villages, located near Pristina as well as villages centered on Letnica near Vitina (Papare, Vrmez, Vrnavo Kolo). ...

Map published by French ethnographer G. Lejean[4] in 1861 shows that Albanians lived on around 57% of the territory of today's province while a similar map, published by British travellers G. M. Mackenzie and A. P. Irby[4] in 1867 shows slightly less; these maps don't show which population was larger overall. Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


A study done in 1871 by Austrian colonel Peter Kukulj[5] for the internal use of the Austro-Hungarian army showed that the mutesarifluk of Prizren (corresponding largely to present-day Kosovo) had some 500,000 inhabitants, of which: 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... View of Prizren Prizren (Albanian Prizren/Prizreni, Serbian: Призрен/Prizren) is a historical city located in a United Nations-administered territory of Kosovo, but factually under the Provisional Self-Government) at 42. ...

It is estimated that between 200,000 and 400,000 Serbs were cleansed out of the Vilayet of Kosovo between 1876 and 1912, especially during the Greek-Ottoman War in 1897.[6] Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ... The term Circassians is term derived from the Turkic Cherkess, and is not the self-designation of any people. ... Vilayet of Kosovo, 1875-1878 Vilayet of Kosovo, 1881-1912 The Vilayet of Kossovo was how the present region of Kosovo was known to English speakers before becoming a part of the independent Serbia just a few years before the beginning of World War I. The word Vilayet in Turkish... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Greco-Turkish War of 1897, also called the Thirty Days War, was a war between Greece and the Ottoman Empire. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Maps published by German historian Kiepert[4] in 1876, J. Hahn[4] and Austrian consul K. Sax[4], show that Albanians live on most of the territory of today's province, however they don't show which population is larger. According to these, the regions of Kosovska Mitrovica and Kosovo Polje were settled mostly by Serbs, whereas most of the terrirory of western and eastern parts of today's province was settled by Moslem Albanians. Heinrich Kiepert (July 31, 1818 - April 21, 1899), German geographer, was born at Berlin. ... 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Mitrovica (Косовска Митровица; Albanian Mitrovica or Mitrovicë) is a city located in the north of Kosovo, the southern province of Serbia, at 42. ... Kosovo Polje (Косово поље, Albanian: Fushë Kosovë) is a municipal located in Kosovo, at 42. ...


An Austrian statistics[7] published in 1899 estimated: 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Aromanian shepherd in traditional clothes, photo from the early 1900s. ... The term Circassians is term derived from the Turkic Cherkess, and is not the self-designation of any people. ... The Roma people (pronounced rahma, singular Rom, sometimes Rroma, and Rrom) along with the closely related Sinti people are commonly known as Gypsies in English, and as Tsigany in most of Europe. ...

20th century

British journalist H. Brailsford estimated[8] that two-thirds of the population of Kosovo was Albanian and one-third Serbian. The most populous western districts of Djakovica and Pec were said to have between 20,000 and 25,000 Albanian households, as against some 5,000 Serbian ones. Map of Alfred Stead[9], published in 1909, shows that similar numbers of Serbs and Albanians were living in the territory. Henry Noel Brailsford (1873 - 1958) was the most prolific British left-wing journalist of the first half of the 20th century. ... Đakovica (Cyrillic: Ђаковица) (in Albanian Gjakova or Gjakovë) is a city located in Kosovo, at 42. ... PEC can have the following meanings Punjab Engineering College, Chandigarh Pakistan Engineering Concil Pakistan Engineering Congress Prince Engineering Center at Oklahoma Christian University This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


German scholar Gustav Weigand gave the following statistical data about the population of Kosovo[2], based on the pre-war situation in Kosovo in 1912: 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

Metohija with the town of Djakovica is furthermore defined as almost exclusively Albanian by Weigand. Priština (Приштина) (Serbian) or Prishtinë/Prishtina (Albanian indefinite/definite form) is the capital city of the province called Kosovo and Metohia, located in the south of Serbia at 42°65 N, 21°17 E. The population is 204,500 as of 2003. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... View of Prizren Prizren (Serbian Cyrillic Призрен; Albanian Prizreni) is an historic city located in Kosovo at 42. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Vučitrn (Вучитрн; Albanian: Vushtrri), is the name of a town, which is the seat of a municipality, situated in north-eastern part of the province of Serbia called Kosovo. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... UroÅ¡evac (Урошевац, Albanian: Ferizaj) is a town located in the province of Kosovo in Serbia and Montenegro at 42. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Gjilan (Albanian language) or Gnjilane (Serbian:Гњилане), is a city located in Kosovo, at 42. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Mitrovica may refer to more than one place in Serbia and Montenegro: Kosovska Mitrovica Sremska Mitrovica This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Đakovica (Cyrillic: Ђаковица) (in Albanian Gjakova or Gjakovë) is a city located in Kosovo, at 42. ...


The Ottomans conducted a population census in the Viyalet of Kosovo, just before its fall[citation needed]:

The population composition changed a lot in the 20th century. Expulsion of Albanians took place continuously, according to an ill-famous document, prepared by the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts leading member, Vaso Čubrilović, in the document called "Iseljavanje Arnauta" (from Serbian "Expulsion of Arnauts")[2]. Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The term Circassians is term derived from the Turkic Cherkess, and is not the self-designation of any people. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ... Aromanians (also called: Arumanians or Macedo-Romanians; in Aromanian they call themselves Arumâni, Armâni, Ramani, Rumâni or Aromâni) are a people living throughout the southern Balkans, especially in northern Greece, Albania, the Republic of Macedonia and Bulgaria, and as an emigrant community in Romania (Dobrogea). ... After World War II terms, expulsion was a euphemism for ethnic cleansing of territories settled by Germans. ... The Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts (Serbian: Српска академија наука и уметности) was founded in 1886 as the Serbian Royal Academy of Sciences and Arts. ... Vaso ÄŒubrilović was born in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1897. ...


Serbia and Yugoslavia

Balkan Wars and World War I-World War II

Retaking of Kosovo by Serbia in 1912 resulting in suppression of the local Albanian population and ethnic cleansing of some regions[10]. Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia      â€“ Vojvodina      â€“ Kosovo (UN admin. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

  • 1921 a total of 439,010 inhabitants [citation needed] whereof 280,440 (64.1%)[11] Albanians

A map of the Serbian census of 1921* shows that most of the terrirory was settled by Albanians, with Serbian enclaves around Prizren, Sredska Zupa and Pristina. Religion on the largest part of the territory was Islam with Eastern Orthodox enclaves around Kosovska Mitrovica, Pristina and Gnjilane[12]. 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... View of Prizren Prizren (Albanian Prizren/Prizreni, Serbian: Призрен/Prizren) is a historical city located in a United Nations-administered territory of Kosovo, but factually under the Provisional Self-Government) at 42. ... Prishtinë/Prishtina (Albanian indefinite/definite form) or Priština (Приштина) (Serbian) is the capital city of Kosovo, a landlocked province of Serbia located at 42°65′ N 21°17′ E. It is estimated that the current population of Prishtina is as high as 500,000. ... Islam(Arabic: ; ) is a monotheistic religion based on the Quran. ... ... Mitrovica (Косовска Митровица; Albanian Mitrovica or Mitrovicë) is a city located in the north of Kosovo, the southern province of Serbia, at 42. ... Prishtinë/Prishtina (Albanian indefinite/definite form) or Priština (Приштина) (Serbian) is the capital city of Kosovo, a landlocked province of Serbia located at 42°65′ N 21°17′ E. It is estimated that the current population of Prishtina is as high as 500,000. ... Gjilan (Albanian language) or Gnjilane (Serbian:Гњилане), is a city located in Kosovo, at 42. ...

  • 1931 552,064 total inhabitants[citation needed] whereof 347,213 (62.8%) [11] Albanians

Colonisation programmes were implemented by the Serbian authorities in the periods between 1922 and 1929, and 1933 and 1938 leading to the settlement of some 10,000 Serbian families, mostly in northern Kosovo, Kosovo Polje and along the Lab River.[11] 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Kosovo Polje (Косово поље, Albanian: Fushë Kosovë) is a municipal located in Kosovo, at 42. ... The Lab (Albanian: Llap; Serbian Cyrillic: Лаб) is a river in western part of Kosovo and Metohija, south Serbia. ...


An agreement on the emigration of some 200,000 Albanians and Turks was signed with the Republic of Turkey in 1938. As Turkey pulled out of the agreement at an early stage for fear of not being able to accommodate the immigrants, only 4,000 Muslims left the province.[11]


However, The Yugoslav authorities conducted a census on the region of Kosovo - estimating 125,000 Albanians in 1939. [citation needed] The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a kingdom in the Balkans which existed from the end of World War I until World War II. It occupied an area made up of the present-day states of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro, Republic of Macedonia, and most of present-day Slovenia... For other uses, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


World War II-1968

Most of the teritorry of today's province is occupied by Italian-controlled Greater Albania, massacres of some 10,000[citation needed]Serbs, ethnic cleansing of about 80[13] to 100,000[13] or more[14] (including all of the colonists[11][14]) and settling of 100,000[13] of Albanians from Albania. United in 1861, Italy has significantly contributed to the cultural and social development of the entire Mediterranean area, deeply influencing European culture as well. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ...

1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...

1968-1989: Autonomy

After the province gained autonomy, local provincial Statistical office given authority over census whereas the rest of the country's census was under the tutelage of the Federal Statistical Commission. Allegations of census rigging (for the 1971 and 1981) by Turk, Muslim and Roma minorities who claim forceful Albanization[citation needed]. Serb claims Albanians drastically overincreased their own numbers. Nothing could be substantiated though because the Kosovo Statistical offices were under exclusive Albanian control which was against the national norm at the time which dicated that census takers had to be of different nationalities (i.e. one Albanian and one Serb not both Albanian as was the case in the two following censa). Muslims by nationality was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe people who spoke Serbo-Croatian language and professed Islam that werent identified as one of the other nations. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ... Albanisation (or Albanization) is a term used to describe a cultural change in which something ethnically non-Albanian is made to become Albanian. ...


1971: 1,243,693 total inhabitants[15] 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ...

Albanians take ever-increasing control of Autonomous province with the introduction of the 1974 Constitution of SFRY. Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Slavic Muslims are Slavs who observe the Islamic faith. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... Constitution of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) and its predecessor, Federal Peoples Republic of Yugoslavia (FPRY) was developed after the World War II as follows: Constitution of FLRY, adopted on January 31, 1946 Constitutional Law of the FLRY, adopted on January 13, 1953 Constitution of SFRY, adopted...

1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...

1989-1999: Centralized Yugoslav Control

Ethnic map of Kosovo
Ethnic map of Kosovo

Yugoslav Central Government reasserts control over Kosovo in 1989. 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x680, 88 KB)Kosovo ethnic map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x680, 88 KB)Kosovo ethnic map File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Official Yugoslav statistical results, almost all Albanians and some Roma, Muslims boyott the census following a call by Ibrahim Rugova to boycott Serbian institutions. 1991 359,346 total population Muslims by nationality was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe people who spoke Serbo-Croatian language and professed Islam that werent identified as one of the other nations. ... Ibrahim Rugova (December 2, 1944 – January 21, 2006) was the President of Kosovo and its leading political party, the Democratic League of Kosovo (LDK). ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia      â€“ Vojvodina      â€“ Kosovo (UN admin. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Official Yugoslav statistical corrections and projections, with the help of previous census results (1948-1981): Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Muslims by nationality was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe people who spoke Serbo-Croatian language and professed Islam that werent identified as one of the other nations. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Janjevci (Janjevs) are inhabitants of the Kosovo town of Janjevo and surrounding villages, located near Pristina as well as villages centered on Letnica near Vitina (Papare, Vrmez, Vrnavo Kolo). ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...


1,956,196 Total population[3]

The corrections should not taken to be fully accurate. The number of Albanians is sometimes regarded as being an underestimate. On the other hand, it is sometimes regarded as an overestimate, being derived from earlier censa which are believed to be overestimates. The Statistical Office of Kosovo states that the quality of the 1991 census is "questionable." [4]. Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Muslims by nationality was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe people who spoke Serbo-Croatian language and professed Islam that werent identified as one of the other nations. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ... Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a south Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...


In September 1993, the Bosniak parlament returned their historical name Bosniaks, during the regime of communist Yugoslavia, made as a compromise between a Moslem Communist leader Hamdija Pozderac and the Serbian communists. Some Kosovar Muslims have started using this term to refer to themselves since. 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Hamdija Pozderac (pronounced: hamdiya pozděratz) was a Bosnian politician and the president of Bosnia and Herzegovina from 1971 - 1974. ...


1995 Hivzi Islami's estimate

In the year of 1995, Dr. Hivzi Islami of the Prishtina Demographic Department for Kosovo conducted an unofficial census estimate for Kosova. There was a total of around 2,200,000 Kosovar inhabitants according to the department: Priština (Приштина) (Serbian) or Prishtinë/Prishtina (Albanian indefinite/definite form) is the capital city of the province called Kosovo and Metohia, located in the south of Serbia at 42°65 N, 21°17 E. The population is 204,500 as of 2003. ...

  • Albanians - around 1,960,000 (89.9%); 1,360,000 without the diaspora
  • Serbs - around 140,000 (6.3%)
  • Muslims - around 40,000 (1.9%)
  • Roma - around 40,000 (1.9%)
  • Turks - around 8,000 (0.3%)
  • Montenegrins - around 7,000 (0.3%)
  • others - around 5,000 (0.2%)

The same department counted in the list of all Albanian diaspora that had the Yugoslav citizenship - a list of around 500,000 ethnic Albanians with Yugoslav citizenship living abroad: Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...

Refugees in the second half of 1998

Just before the 13 October 1998, UNHCR estimated that there were around 200,000 misplaced people in Kosovo in the civil war that already engulphed half of the province. Of that, some 120,000 were displaced abroad (forming 80% of FRJ's displaced diaspora): October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years). ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) (established December 14, 1950) protects and supports refugees at the request of a government or the United Nations and assists in their return or resettlement. ...

Official language Serbian written in Cyrillic alphabet1 Capital Belgrade2 President3 Svetozar Marović Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 105th 102,350 km² 0. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia      â€“ Vojvodina      â€“ Kosovo (UN admin. ... Motto: None Anthem: Oj, svijetla majska zoro Capital Podgorica Largest city Podgorica Official language(s) Serbian of the Ijekavian dialect1 Government Republic - President - Prime Minister Filip Vujanović Milo Đukanović Independence - Declared Dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro June 3, 2006 Area    - Total 13,812 km² (157th)   5,333 sq mi   - Water... A common understanding of Western Europe in modern times. ...

1998 Federal Secretariat of Information

In 1998 the Federal Secretariat of Information in Belgrade estimated a pre-term population census for the Autonomous Province of Kosovo and Metohija listing around 1,378,980 citizens:

Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Montenegrins are a South Slavic people who are primarily associated with the Republic of Montenegro. ... Yugoslav was an ethnic designation used by some people in former Yugoslavia, which continues to be used in some of its successor countries. ...

Kosovo War refugees

The total list of countries to which the refugees refuged and in what numbers:

abroad: Motto: None Anthem: Oj, svijetla majska zoro Capital Podgorica Largest city Podgorica Official language(s) Serbian of the Ijekavian dialect1 Government Republic - President - Prime Minister Filip Vujanović Milo Đukanović Independence - Declared Dissolution of Serbia and Montenegro June 3, 2006 Area    - Total 13,812 km² (157th)   5,333 sq mi   - Water... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia      â€“ Vojvodina      â€“ Kosovo (UN admin. ...

other countries to which Kosovars refuged: Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ...

1999-present: UN administration

During the Kosovo War in 1999, over 700,000 ethnic Albanians[19] and around 100,000 ethnic Serbs were forced out of the province to neighbouring Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Serbia. After the United Nations took over administration of Kosovo following the war, the vast majority of the Albanian refugees returned. The term Kosovo War or Kosovo Conflict is often used to describe two sequential and at times parallel armed conflicts (a civil war followed by an international war) in the southern Serbian province called Kosovo (officially Kosovo and Metohia), part of the former Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. ... United Nations - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Many non-Albanians - chiefly Serbs and Roma - fled or were expelled, mostly to the rest of Serbia at the end of the war, with further refugee outflows occurring as the result of sporadic ethnic violence. The number of registered refugees is around 250,000[20]. The non-Albanian population in Kosovo is now about half of its pre-war total. The largest concentration of Serbs in the province is in the north, but many remain in Kosovo Serb enclaves surrounded by Albanian-populated areas. Also, according to Macedonian and Serbian sources, the Gorani people, living on the south-most tip of the Kosovo are systematically oppressed and denied their minority rights [21][22]. Kosovo Serb Enclaves are the few remaining areas of the Serbian province of Kosovo where Serbs, Roma and other non-Albanians live. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia      â€“ Vojvodina      â€“ Kosovo (UN admin. ... Gorani or Gorançe or Goranska are a Slavic ethnic group living in Gora region, just south of Prizren in the territory of Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro, north-western Macedonia in the Å ar-planina region near Tetovo, as well as in north-eastern Albania, most notably in the village os...


A large number of Albanians have moved into Kosovo since 1999, due to the complete liberalization of the Kosovo-Albania border. The veracity of this claim is unclear; the Statistical Office of Kosovo states that "there are at present no reliable statistics on migration in Kosovo."[citation needed]


The 2000 Living Standard Measurement Survey by Statistical Office of Kosovo (rejected by Belgrade[23]): Total population estimated between 1,8 and 2,0 million, however, it was boycotted largely by non-Albanians.[24] This article is about the year 2000. ...

The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) estimates the population at 2.0 to 2.2 million people, extrapolating from voter registration data recorded by the UNMIK Department of Local Administration in 2000. [5] Serbs (Serbian: Срби, Srbi) are a south Slavic people who live mainly in Serbia-Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and, to a lesser extent, in Croatia. ... Muslims by nationality was a term used in Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to describe people who spoke Serbo-Croatian language and professed Islam that werent identified as one of the other nations. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... The Roma people (singular Rom; sometimes Rroma, Rrom), often referred to as Gipsies, are a heterogeneous ethnic group who live primarily in Southern and Eastern Europe, Western Asia, Latin America, southern states of North America and the Middle East. ...


Some estimates by Albanian demographers estimate a population of 2.4 million Albanians living in Kosovo today. This is regarded by most independent observers as an overestimate as it would imply a total population of some 2.5-2.6 million people in Kosovo, much higher than other estimates.


See also

Albanians in Kosovo in 1991 The Albanians are the largest ethnic group in Kosovo. ... Serbs in Kosovo in 1991 Serbs are the second largest ethnic group in Kosovo. ...

References

  1. ^ The original Turkish-language copy of the census is stored in Istanbul's archives. However, in 1972 the Sarajevo Institute of Middle Eastern Studies translated the census and published an analysis of it Kovačević Mr. Ešref, Handžić A., Hadžibegović H. Oblast Brankovića - Opširni katastarski popis iz 1455., Orijentalni institut, Sarajevo 1972. Subsequently others have covered the subject as well such as Vukanović Tatomir, Srbi na Kosovu, Vranje, 1986.
  2. ^ a b c Gustav Weigand, Ethnographie von Makedonien, Leipzig, 1924; Густав Вайганд, Етнография на Македония (Bulgarian translation)
  3. ^ Dr. Joseph Müller, Albanien, Rumelien und die Österreichisch-montenegrinische Gränze, Prag, 1844
  4. ^ a b c d e H.R. Wilkinson, Maps and Politics; a review of the ethnographic cartography of Macedonia, Liverpool University Press, 1951
  5. ^ Das Fürstenthum Serbien und Türkisch-Serbien, eine militärisch-geographische Skizze von Peter Kukolj, Major im k.k.Generalstabe, Wien 1871
  6. ^ http://www.kosovo.net/sk/history/kosovo_origins/ko_chapter2.html
  7. ^ Detailbeschreibung des Sandzaks Plevlje und des Vilajets Kosovo (Mit 8 Beilagen und 10 Taffeln), Als Manuskript gedruckt, Vien 1899, 80-81.
  8. ^ H. N. Brailsford, Macedonia, Its Races and Their Future, London, 1906
  9. ^ Servia by the Servians, Compiled and Edited by Alfred Stead, With a Map, London (William Heinemann), 1909. (Etnographical Map of Servia, Scale 1:2.750.000).
  10. ^ Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. (1914). Report of the International Commission To Inquire into the Causes and Conduct of the Balkan Wars. Washington: The Carnegie Endowment.
  11. ^ a b c d e Vickers, Miranda. Between Serb and Albanian - A History of Kosovo. New York: Columbia University Press, 1998 (quoting the official publications of the results of the 1921 and 1931 censuses in the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes / the Kingdom of Yugoslavia)
  12. ^ Zec, Stevan, "Maps of our dividings political atlas of Yugoslav countries in XX century", Beograd : Beogradsko mašinsko-grafičko preduzeće, 1991.
  13. ^ a b c
  14. ^ a b
  15. ^ a b c
  16. ^ a b
  17. ^ a b Official Yugoslav censa results 1948-1981
  18. ^
  19. ^ BBC: [1]
  20. ^ UNHCR: 2002 Annual Statistical Report: Serbia and Montenegro, pg. 9
  21. ^ http://www.realitymacedonia.org.mk/web/news_page.asp?nid=1981
  22. ^ http://www.rastko.org.yu/rastko-gora/index.php
  23. ^ People's Daily: Belgrade to Reject Results of U.N.-Conducted Census in Kosovo
  24. ^ Living Standard Measurement Survey 2000, Statistical Office of Kosovo - see also Kosovo and its Population

  Results from FactBites:
 
Demographic history of Kosovo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1963 words)
The non-Serbian population of Kosovo didn't exceed 2% by the end of the 14th century.
that two-thirds of the population of Kosovo was Albanian and one-third Serbian.
Colonisation programmes were implemented by the Serbian authorities in the periods between 1922 and 1929, and 1933 and 1938 leading to the settlement of some 10,000 Serbian families, mostly in northern Kosovo, Kosovo Polje and along the Lab River.
Kosovo (1912 words)
Kosovo Polje (Kosovo Field) is just a small field which was the site of the Battle of Kosovo; when the communist government changed the name of the province to Kosovo in 1968, they also started pushing "Kosovo Polje" as the name of entire region.
Kosovo's international status is anomalous in that although it is formally a province of the Republic of Serbia, actual administration is presently conducted by the United Nations with no involvement on the part of the Serbian governments (under Security Council resolution 1244 of 10 June 1999; see Security Council Resolutions 1999 (http://www.un.org/Docs/scres/1999/sc99.htm)).
The Assembly of Kosovo was elected in November 2001 and Ibrahim Rugova was elected as president in March 2002.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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