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Encyclopedia > Demodocus (Odyssey character)

In the Odyssey, Demodocus (Greek Δημοδόκος, Demodokos) is a poet who often visits the court of Alcinous, king of the Phaeacians on the island of Scherie. During Odysseus' stay on Scherie Demodocus performs three narrative songs. Two of these, from the cycle of the Trojan War, are Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: , Odusseia) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... In Greek mythology, Alcinous (sometimes with the diacritical mark Alcinoüs; also transliterated as Alkínoös) was a son of Nausithous and father of Nausicaa and Laodamas with Arete. ... In Greek mythology, Scheria, Skhería, or Phaeacia, is an island, the land of the Phaeacians. ... Nausicaa takes Odysseus to the palace Σχερία (Scheria, Skhería) or Phaeacia was a phantom island mentioned in the Greek mythology and literature as the homeland of the Phaeacians and the last destination of Odysseus before coming back home to Ithaca. ... Head of Odysseus from a Greek 2nd century BC marble group representing Odysseus blinding Polyphemus, found at the villa of Tiberius at Sperlonga Odysseus (Greek Odusseus), pronounced /oʊˈdɪs. ... The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor, by the armies of the Achaeans (Mycenaean Greeks), after Paris of Troy stole Helen from...

Both of these performances are curtailed because Odysseus (who has not yet revealed his identity) is distressed at reliving his own experiences in this way.[1] Demodocus' other song, which is performed in the market-place of Scherie to the accompaniment of dancing, is The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (1821–1859) (Musée Fabre) In Greek mythology, Achilles, also Akhilleus or Achilleus (Ancient Greek ) was a hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homers Iliad, which takes for its theme, not the War... The fall of Troy by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769) From the collections of the granddukes of Baden, Karlsruhe The Trojan War was waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor, by the armies of the Achaeans (Mycenaean Greeks), after Paris of Troy stole Helen from...

This amusing tale gives pleasure to all its hearers.[2] In Greek mythology, Ares (in Greek: - Aris (Battle Strife))[1] is the son of Zeus (king of the gods) and Hera. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 Aphrodite (Greek: Ἀφροδίτη, pronounced in English as and in Ancient Greek as ) was the Greek goddess of love, lust, beauty, and sexuality. ...


Demodocus is described as blind: "A servant presently led in the famous bard Demodokos, whom the muse had dearly loved, but to whom she had given both good and evil, for though she had endowed him with a divine gift of song, she had robbed him of his eyesight".[3] It may well have been on the basis of this portrayal, seen as a self-portrait, that Homer (usually identified as the author of the Odyssey) was said by many later Greeks to have been blind. In Greek mythology, the Muses (Greek , Mousai: from the Proto-Indo-European root *men- think, from which mind and mental are also derived[1]) are nine goddesses or spiritual guides who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing... Homer (Greek: , Hómēros) was a legendary early Greek poet and aoidos (singer) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Odyssey 8.536–538.
  2. ^ Odyssey 8.367–369.
  3. ^ Odyssey 8.62–64, translated by Samuel Butler.

Samuel Butler Samuel Butler (December 4, 1835 - June 18, 1902) was a British writer best known for his satire Erewhon and his posthumous novel The Way Of All Flesh. ...

See also


 
 

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