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Encyclopedia > Democratic Progressive Party
Democratic Progressive Party
Chairman Yu Shyi-kun (on leave, with Chai Trong-Rong as acting chairperson)
Founded September 1986
Headquarters Taipei, Republic of China
Political ideology Liberalism, Center-left, Taiwanese Nationalism,
Taiwan independence
Domestic affiliation Pan-Green Coalition
Int'l affiliation Liberal International
Website www.dpp.org.tw

The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Traditional Chinese: 民主進步黨; Simplified Chinese: 民主进步党; abbreviated to 民進黨 or 民进党; Hanyu Pinyin: Mínjìndǎng) is a major political party in the Republic of China which has traditionally been associated with the pan-green coalition and Taiwan independence although it has moderated its stance as it has gained control of the presidency. The DPP is a member of Liberal International and a founding member of the Council of Asian Liberals and Democrats. It represented Taiwan in the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organisation. While the DPP is often classified as liberal and its opposition as conservative, these classifications do not necessarily correlate to views regarding such issues as economic policy or the role of government in society. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Yu Shyi-kun (游錫堃, pinyin: Yóu XíkÅ«n) (born April 25, 1948), a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party, is Chairman of the Democratic Progressive Party in Taiwan, ROC. He previously served as Premier of the Republic of China from 2002 to 2005. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Taipei (disambiguation). ... The Republic of China is commonly known as Taiwan or Chinese Taipei, and it is not to be confused with the Peoples Republic of China. ... Liberalism is an ideology, philosophical view, and political tradition which holds that liberty is the primary political value. ... The term center-left has two distinct meanings in politics: Center-left can be used to describe a moderately left-wing political party. ... Localization or Taiwanization (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: pún-thó͘-hòa) is a political term used within Taiwan to emphasize the importance of Taiwans culture rather than to regard Taiwanese as solely an appendage of China. ... Taiwan independence movement (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p Å«n-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a right-wing political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan. ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... Liberal International is a political international for international liberal parties. ... Traditional Chinese characters are one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Simplified Chinese characters (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; also Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) refer to one of two standard Chinese character sets of printed contemporary Chinese written language, officially simplified by the government of the Peoples Republic of China in an attempt to promote literacy. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... The Republic of China is commonly known as Taiwan or Chinese Taipei, and it is not to be confused with the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Pan-Green Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿联盟; pinyin: ) or Pan-Green Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛綠軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛绿军; pinyin: ), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the minor Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... Taiwan independence movement (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p Å«n-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a right-wing political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan. ... The Election for the 10th-term President and Vice-President of the Republic of China (第十任中華民國總統、副總統選舉), the second ever direct elections for President and Vice President of the Republic of China on Taiwan and the 10th... Liberal International is a political international for international liberal parties. ... The Council of Asian Liberals and Democrats is a regional organization of liberal and democratic political parties in Asia. ... Logo of the UNPO The Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO) is a democratic, international organization. ...

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Contents

Image File history File links Zhongwen. ... 漢字 / 汉字 Chinese character in Hanzi, Kanji, Hanja, Hán Tự. Red in Simplified Chinese. ...

History

The DPP has its roots in the liberal opposition to the Kuomintang's former one-party rule structure (officially the Tangwai - or "outside-the-party" - movement). This movement culminated in the formation of the DPP on September 28, 1986, although the nascent party remained technically illegal until 1991. It was founded mainly by family members and defense lawyers of political prisoners, strongly inclined to transform the political situation. Initially, the party did not actively support Taiwan independence (a move that could have led to its crackdown by the government) and had mainlanders among its ranks. Its platform was pro-environmentalist and pro-democracy. After many of its demands – such as the direct election of the president of the Republic of China and a Legislative Yuan wholly elected by the Taiwanese electorate – were met, the party shifted its focus towards the promotion of Taiwan independence in the 1990s, which the more liberal political atmosphere at the time permitted. The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung1-kuo2 Kuo2-min2-tang3)[1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China, now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in... The Tangwai (黨外; pinyin: dăng wài; literally, outside the party) movement was a political movement in the Republic of China on Taiwan in the mid-1970s and early 1980s. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mainlanders are Chinese people who live, or were born, in mainland China as opposed to Hong Kong, Macao, Singapore, or Taiwan. ... The Presidential Building is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is partially obscured by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ...


Once the DPP had representation in the Legislative Yuan (LY), the party used the legislature as a forum to challenge the government. However it did not emerge as a formidable force until 1991, when the elderly LY members elected from the mainland provinces in 1948 retired. Fears that the DPP would one day take control of the legislature led then-President Lee Teng-hui to push through a series of amendments to strengthen presidential power (for example, the premier of the Republic of China would no longer have to be confirmed by the Legislative Yuan). The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is partially obscured by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is 李 (Li). ... The President of the Executive Yuan (行政院長), colloquially referred to as the Premier (閣揆), is the head of the Executive Yuan, the executive branch of the Republic of China, which currently administers Taiwan. ...

Flag of the Democratic Progressive Party

Unfortunately for the KMT, the DPP took control of the presidency with the election of Chen Shui-bian in 2000, ending more than half a century of KMT rule in Taiwan. Chen softened the party's stance on independence to appeal to moderate voters and appease the United States and placate China and promised not to change the ROC state symbols or declare formal independence as long as the People's Republic of China did not attack Taiwan. Image File history File links Democratic_Progressive_Party_of_Taiwan_flag. ... Image File history File links Democratic_Progressive_Party_of_Taiwan_flag. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The Four Noes and One Without (Chinese: 四不一沒有; pinyin: sì bù, yī méiyǒu) is a pledge by President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian made in his inauguration speech on 20 May 2000 concerning the political status of Taiwan. ...


The DPP became the largest party having reached a plurality in the Legislative Yuan for the first time in 2002 following the 2001 legislative election. However, a majority coalition between the KMT, People's First Party, and Chinese New Party (collectively known as the pan-blue coalition) prevented it from taking control of the chamber. The Election for the 5th Legislative Yuan (第五屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan was held on December 1, 2001. ... The People First Party (親民黨, pinyin: Qīnmíndǎng) is a conservative political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The New Party (新黨, xīndăng), formerly the Chinese New Party (CNP; 中華新黨, zhōnghúa xīndăng), is a political party in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ...


In 2004, Chen Shui-bian was re-elected by a narrow margin following a controversial assassination attempt on him only hours before the election. Chen narrowly won the election over Lien Chan. Lien Chan demanded a recount the following morning. A judicial recount under the jurisdiction of a special panel of the High Court began on 10 May 2004 and ended on May 18, 2004. It was conducted by about 460 teams situated in 21 courthouses across the Taiwan area. Each team was comprised of seven members – one judge, two members each from the district court and the local government election authorities, and two witnesses each representing the plaintiff (pan-blue alliance) and the defendant (pan-green alliance). Any disputed votes were sent to High Court in Taipei for verification. After the recount, Chen was confirmed the winner of the election by a smaller margin (25,563 from 29,518). Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (131st in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (139th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The DPP suffered a significant election defeat in nationwide local and county elections in December 2005. The pan-blue coalition captured 16 of 23 county and city government offices under the leadership of popular Taipei mayor and KMT Party Chairman Ma Ying-jeou. Throughout the campaign, the DPP was dogged by allegations of corruption, dissatisfaction with the economy, and infighting among party supporters. Many former DPP leaders, members, and supporters expressed dissatisfaction with the failure of Chen to deliver on promises of reform. Graphic depiction of the city mayor / county magistrate election results (blue=KMT; green=DPP; orange=PFP; yellow=CNP; gray=independent; white=no election) Comparison of Pan-Blue vs. ...


The results led to a shake up of party leadership. Su Tseng-chang resigned as DPP chairman soon after election results were announced. Su had pledged to step down if the DPP lost either Taipei County or failed to win 10 of the 23 mayor/magistrate positions. Vice President Annette Lu was appointed acting DPP leader. Presidential Office Secretary-General Yu Shyi-kun was elected in a three-way race against legislator Chai Trong-rong and Wong Chin-chu with 54.4% of the vote. Su Tseng-chang (蘇貞昌, pinyin: Sū Zhēnchāng; born July 28, 1947) is a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party. ... Hsiu-lien Annette Lu (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (born June 7, 1944) is the incumbent vice president of the Republic of China and member of the Democratic Progressive Party. ... Yu Shyi-kun (游錫堃, pinyin: Yóu Xíkūn) (born April 25, 1948), a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party, is Chairman of the Democratic Progressive Party in Taiwan, ROC. He previously served as Premier of the Republic of China from 2002 to 2005. ...


Premier Frank Hsieh, DPP election organizer and former mayor of Kaohsiung (the city at the center of the MRT scandal) twice tendered a verbal resignation immediately following the election, but his resignation was not accepted by President Chen until January 17, 2006 after the DPP chairmanship election had concluded. The former DPP Chairman Su Tseng-chang was appointed to replace Hsieh as premier. Hsieh and his cabinet resigned en masse on January 24 to make way for Su and his new cabinet. President Chen had offered the position of Presidential Office Secretary-General (vacated by Yu) to the departing premier, but Hsieh declined and left office criticizing President Chen for his tough line on dealing with the PRC. Frank Chang-ting Hsieh (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsieh Chang Ting; : Siā Tiông-têng or Chiā Tiông-têng) (born May 18, 1946 in Dadaocheng, Datong District, Taipei), a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party, was the mayor of Kaohsiung City until his... January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Policies

Programs supported by the DPP include social welfare policies involving the rights of women, senior citizens, children, labour, indigenous peoples, farmers, and other disadvantaged sectors of the society. Furthermore its platform includes a legal and political order based on human rights and democracy; balanced economic and financial administration; fair and open social welfare; educational and cultural reform; independent defence and peaceful foreign policy.


The primary political axis in Taiwan involves the issue of Taiwan independence versus Chinese reunification. Although this is often portrayed in binary terms, both the major coalitions have developed positions that aim at a moderate core to the point where the differences between them can be quite subtle. Taiwan independence movement (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p ūn-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a right-wing political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan. ... Chinese (re)unification (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a goal of Chinese nationalism that refers to the reunification of all of Greater China under a single political entity. ...


The current official position of the party is that the Republic of China is an independent and sovereign state whose territory consists of Taiwan and other smaller associated islands and whose sovereignty derives from the people living on Taiwan, based on the "Resolution on Taiwan's Future" in 1999. It considers Taiwan independence to be a fact making a formal declaration of independence unnecessary. The DPP rejects the one China principle as the basis for talks with the People's Republic of China and advocates a Taiwanese identity which is separate from the identity of Mainland China. The DPP argues that its efforts to promote Taiwan identity are merely an effort to normalize a Taiwanese identity repressed during years of what its supporters consider "outside" rule. The Republic of China is commonly known as Taiwan or Chinese Taipei, and it is not to be confused with the Peoples Republic of China. ... Resolution on Taiwans Future is a document ratified by the Democratic Progressive Party during its eighth annual national assembly in May 1999. ... Taiwan independence movement (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p ūn-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a right-wing political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan. ... The One-China policy (Chinese: 一個中國; pinyin: yī gè Zhōngguó) is the principle that there is one China and both mainland China and Taiwan are part of that China. ...


In contrast, the pan-blue coalition agrees that the ROC is an independent and sovereign state not part of the People's Republic of China, but argues that a one China principle can be used as the basis for talks with the Mainland. The opposition also opposes Taiwan independence, and argues that efforts to establish a Taiwanese identity separated from the Chinese identity are unnecessary and needlessly provocative. The opposition also asserts that at times these efforts from DPP are radical and becomes "fascist" (to which they later apologised) and "racist". At the other end of the political spectrum, the acceptance by the DPP of the symbols of the Republic of China is opposed by the Taiwan Solidarity Union. The Pan-Blue Coalition (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍聯盟; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝联盟; Hanyu Pinyin: ), or Pan-Blue Force (Traditional Chinese: 泛藍軍; Simplified Chinese: 泛蓝军; Hanyu Pinyin: ), is a political coalition in Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the smaller New Party (CNP). ... The One-China policy (Chinese: 一個中國; pinyin: yī gè Zhōngguó) is the principle that there is one China and both mainland China and Taiwan are part of that China. ... Taiwan independence movement (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oē-jī: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p ūn-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a right-wing political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan. ... Fascism (in Italian, fascismo), capitalized, was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... 1. ... The Republic of China is commonly known as Taiwan or Chinese Taipei, and it is not to be confused with the Peoples Republic of China. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ...


The first years of the DPP as the ruling party gave rise to questions on whether the DPP as a self-styled Taiwanese nationalist party was adequately sensitive to the ethnographic character of Taiwanese society, which in addition to arrivals from different eras and different regions of mainland China, also includes aboriginal minorities. It is sometimes accused of practicing Hoklo chauvinism. Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution. ... Hoklo (Chinese: 福佬人; Pinyin: Fúlǎo Rén; POJ: Ho̍h-ló-lâng/Hō-ló-lâng) primarily refers to the largest of the four subethnic and ethnic groups in Taiwan. ... Chauvinism is extreme and unreasoning partisanship on behalf of a group to which one belongs, especially when the partisanship includes malice and hatred towards a rival group. ...


The People's Republic of China has traditionally maintained an extremely hostile position toward the DPP, but has moderated its position somewhat since 2003 in order to prevent a backlash. The PRC has stated that regardless of the positions that the DPP has taken in the past that it will talk to the DPP if it accepts the "1992 consensus". The Consensus of 1992 (Chinese:九二共識; literally, 92 Consensus) describes an alleged agreement that both Mainland China and Taiwan belong to one China with both sides having different interpretations over the meaning of that term. ...


Structure

The party is composed of a number of factions such as the New Tide faction (新潮流系), the Formosa faction, the Justice Alliance faction (正義連線系) and Welfare State Alliance faction (福利國系). Each faction advocates slightly different policies, but many of the factions are generational consisting of different groups which entered the party at different times. The party is particularly strong in southern Taiwan, especially among farmers and among speakers of Taiwanese (Minnan). Most of its supporters also tend to be middle class[citation needed]. The party also draws on support from supporters of Taiwan independence although here it must compete with the more hardline Taiwan Solidarity Union. Taiwanese (pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân-oÄ“ or Tâi-gí; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: TáiyÇ”, Táiwānhuà) is a dialect of Min Nan Chinese spoken by about 70% of Taiwans population. ... Taiwan independence movement (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , Pe̍h-oÄ“-jÄ«: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p Å«n-tōng; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a right-wing political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ...


The National Party Congress selects, for two year terms, the 30 members of the Central Executive Committee and the 11 members of the Central Review Committee. The Central Executive Committee, in turn, chooses the 10 members of the Central Standing Committee.


Though the DPP is the single largest party in the Legislative Yuan, the pan-blue alliance holds the majority. The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is partially obscured by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: fàn lán jūn), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the tiny New Party (CNP). ...


Three former DPP party chairmen: Lin Yi-hsiung on January 24, 2006[1], Shih Ming-teh on November 14, 2000[2] and Hsu Hsin-liang in 1999 renounced their DPP memberships. Hsu Hsin-liang has been a vocal critic of Chen Shui-bian for being unfaithful to the DPP's vision of reform. Lin Yi-hsiung (b. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Shih Ming-teh (Chinese: ; pinyin: , a. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hsu Hsin-liang (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , born May 27, 1941) is a Taiwanese politician, formerly Chairman of the Democratic Progressive Party, but now a supporter of the Pan-Blue Coalition. ...


On May 24, 2006, Chao Chien-ming, President Chen Shui-bian's son-in-law was taken into custody by Taipei police on charges of insider stock trading and embezzlement. The latest wave of scandals in the DPP administration have disturbed the public and opposition leaders are calling for the resignation or recall of Chen Shui-bian, although there has been no evidence at all of the president's involvement with any of the DPP scandals. May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Chao Chien-ming (趙建銘 b. ...


On July 23, 2006, at the party's general assembly, the delegates passed a resolution requiring the disbanding of all factions[3]. The factions have since stated that they will comply with the resolution. July 23 is the 204th day (205th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 161 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


List of Chairpersons

  1. Chiang Peng-chian (1986–1987)
  2. Yao Chia-wen (1987–1988)
  3. Huang Shin-cheih (1988–1991)
  4. Hsu Hsin-liang (1991–1994)
  5. Shih Ming-teh (1994–1996)
  6. Hsu Hsin-liang (1996–1998)
  7. Lin Yi-hsiung (1998–2000)
  8. Frank Hsieh (2000–2002)
  9. Chen Shui-bian (2002–2005)
  10. Su Tseng-chang (2005)
  11. Yu Shyi-kun (since 2006, currently on leave during presidential campaign, with Chai Trong-Rong as acting chairperson)

Hsu Hsin-liang (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: , born May 27, 1941) is a Taiwanese politician, formerly Chairman of the Democratic Progressive Party, but now a supporter of the Pan-Blue Coalition. ... Shih Ming-teh (Chinese: ; pinyin: , a. ... Lin Yi-hsiung (b. ... Frank Chang-ting Hsieh (Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hsieh Chang Ting; : Siā Tiông-têng or Chiā Tiông-têng) (born May 18, 1946 in Dadaocheng, Datong District, Taipei), a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party, was the mayor of Kaohsiung City until his... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Su Tseng-chang (蘇貞昌, pinyin: Sū Zhēnchāng; born July 28, 1947) is a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party. ... Yu Shyi-kun (游錫堃, pinyin: Yóu Xíkūn) (born April 25, 1948), a Taiwanese politician of the Democratic Progressive Party, is Chairman of the Democratic Progressive Party in Taiwan, ROC. He previously served as Premier of the Republic of China from 2002 to 2005. ...

References & notes

  1. ^ Huang, Jewel. "Former DPP chairman leaves party", Taipei Times, Monday, January 25, 2006, p. 1. (in English) 
  2. ^ Low, Stephanie. "Shih Ming-te says `goodbye' to DPP despite call to stay", Taipei Times, Wednesday, November 15, 2000, p. 3. (in English) 
  3. ^ Huang, Jewel. "DPP votes to do away with factions", Taipei Times, Monday, July 24, 2006, p. 1. (in English) 

January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 24 is the 205th day (206th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 160 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

See also

This is an overview of parties that adhere more or less (explicitly) to the ideas of political liberalism and is therefore a list of liberal parties around the world. ... The Republic of China (ROC) currently has jurisdiction over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, and the Pescadores Islands (Penghu) and several smaller islands. ... Political parties in Taiwan lists political parties in Taiwan (Republic of China). ... This article is part of or related to the Liberalism series Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | Liberalism by country | Taiwanese political parties ... Resolution on Taiwans Future is a document ratified by the Democratic Progressive Party during its eighth annual national assembly in May 1999. ... Wang Shu-hui (王淑慧) is a legislator for the Democratic Progressive Party in Taiwan. ...

External links

  • Official website
Flag of the Republic of China Politics of the Republic of China
v  d  e
 
Constitution of the Republic of China - Three Principles of the People
———
President - Vice President - Premier
Executive Yuan | Legislative Yuan | Judicial Yuan | Control Yuan | Examination Yuan
———
Political parties | Elections
Pan-Blue Coalition: Kuomintang | People First Party | New Party
Pan-Green Coalition: Democratic Progressive Party | Taiwan Solidarity Union
———
Political status | Legal status | Chinese reunification | Taiwan independence movement

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