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Encyclopedia > Democratic Party (United States)
Democratic Party
Democratic Party logo
Party Chairman Howard Dean
Senate Leader Harry Reid
House Leader Nancy Pelosi (speaker)
Steny Hoyer (majority leader)
Founded 1824 (modern)
1792 (historical)
Headquarters 430 South Capitol Street SE
Washington, D.C.
20003
Political ideology American Liberalism
American Progressivism
Social liberalism
Political position Fiscal: Moderate
Social: Center-left
International affiliation None
Color(s) Blue (unofficial)
Website www.democrats.org
United States of America

This article is part of the series:
Politics and government of
the United States
Image File history File links Democratslogo. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is currently the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... Steny Hamilton Hoyer (born June 14, 1939) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the Marylands 5th congressional district since 1981. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Party leaders of the United States House of Representatives are elected by their respective parties in... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - District Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ... In the United States the term progressivism refers to two political movements: first, the original political progressive movement towards social and economic reform of the late 1800s and early 1900s; and second, the continuation of this movement/ideology in the form of modern progressivism which sees itself as a reform... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... In politics, the term centre-left is commonly used to describe and denote political parties or organisations that stretch from the centre to the left or are moderately left-wing, as opposed to extreme left wing beliefs such as communism. ... Map of results by state of the 2004 U.S. presidential election, representing states won by the Democrats as blue and those won by the Republican Party as red. ... The Great Seal of the United States, obverse side. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic...


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District Courts Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Party leaders of the United States House of Representatives are elected by their respective parties in... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... The United States federal courts are the system of courts organized under the Constitution and laws of the federal government of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... The United States courts of appeals (or circuit courts) are the mid-level appellate courts of the United States federal court system. ... Map of the boundaries of the United States Courts of Appeals and United States District Courts The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. ...

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Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties

The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countriesAtlas  Politics Portal      The United States has a federal government, with elected officials at federal (national), state and... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      United States presidential elections determine who serves as president and vice president of the United... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Midterm elections are elections in the United States in which members of Congress, state legislatures, and... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present political parties in the... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... A state government is the government of a subnational entity in nation-states with federal forms of government, which shares political power with the federal government or national government. ... Local governments are administrative offices that are smaller than a state or province. ... Current party control of Governors offices (2006). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      In the United States of America, a state legislature is a generic term referring to the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      All United States states are required to possess a legislative branch. ... In the U.S., a state court has jurisdiction over disputes which occur in a state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Local government in the United States (sometimes referred to as municipal government) is generally structured... Information on politics by country is available for every country, including both de jure and de facto independent states, inhabited dependent territories, as well as areas of special sovereignty. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic... Political parties Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A political party is a political organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...


Since the 2006 midterm elections the Democratic Party is the majority party for the 110th Congress; the party holds an outright majority in the House of Representatives and the Democratic caucus (including two independents) constitutes a majority in the United States Senate. Democrats also hold a majority of state governorships and control a plurality of state legislatures. It is currently the largest political party with 72 million registered members, 42.6% of the electorate.[1] The democratic base comprises two widely diverging demographics. On one hand, there are those in the working class, who are commonly conservative on social issues. On the other hand, it includes well-educated and relatively affluent liberals.[2] For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... A two-party system is a form of party system where two major political parties dominate the voting in nearly all elections. ... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... The Senate Democratic Caucus is the formal organization of the (currently) 44 Democratic Senators in the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Current party control of Governors offices (2006). ... A plurality, relative majority or simple majority is the largest share of something, which may or may not be considered a majority, i. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      All United States states are required to possess a legislative branch. ... The first U.S. census, in 1790, recorded under 4 million Americans. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... This graph shows the educational attainment since 1947. ... The percentage of households and individuals over the age of 25 with incomes exceeding $100,000 in the US.[1][2] Affluence in the United States refers to an individuals or households state of being in an economically favorable position in contrast to a given reference group. ... This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ...


The Democratic Party traces its origins to the Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and other influential opponents of the Federalists in 1792. Since the division of the Republican Party in the election of 1912, it has consistently positioned itself to the left of the Republican Party in economic as well as social matters. The economically left-leaning activist philosophy of Franklin D. Roosevelt, which has strongly influenced American liberalism, has shaped much of the party's economic agenda since 1932. Roosevelt's New Deal coalition usually controlled the national government until 1964. The civil rights movement of the 1960s, championed by the party despite opposition at the time from its Southern wing, has continued to inspire the party's liberal principles. Since the 1990s the party has pursued centrist economic policies combined with a liberal social agenda. The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817), was one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party during the First Party System, in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... “Leftism” redirects here. ... FDR redirects here. ... This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ... The New Deal coalition was the alignment of interest groups and voting blocks who supported the New Deal and voted for Democratic presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, which made the Democratic Party the majority party during the Fifth Party System. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...

Contents

Current structure and composition

Image:Party affiliation USA.jpg Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ...


The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is responsible for promoting Democratic campaign activities. While the DNC is responsible for overseeing the process of writing the Democratic Platform, the DNC is more focused on campaign and organizational strategy than public policy. In presidential elections it supervises the Democratic National Convention. The national convention is, subject to the charter of the party, the ultimate authority within the Democratic Party when it is in session, with the DNC running the party's organization at other times. The DNC is currently chaired by former Vermont Governor Howard Dean. Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ...


The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) assists party candidates in House races; its current chairman (selected by the party caucus) is Rep. Chris Van Hollen of Maryland. Similarly the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) raises large sums for Senate races. It is currently headed by Senator Charles E. Schumer of New York. The Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC), currently chaired by Mike Gronstal of Iowa, is a smaller organization with much less funding that focuses on state legislative races. The DNC sponsors the College Democrats of America (CDA), a student-outreach organization with the goal of training and engaging a new generation of Democratic activists. Democrats Abroad is the organization for Americans living outside the United States; they work to advance the goals of the party and encourage Americans living abroad to support the Democrats. The Young Democrats of America (YDA) is a youth-led organization that attempts to draw in and mobilize young people for Democratic candidates, but operates outside of the DNC. The Democratic Governors Association (DGA) is an organization supporting the candidacies of Democratic gubernatorial nominees and incumbents; it is currently chaired by Governor Kathleen Sebelius of Kansas. Categories: Politics stubs ... Christopher Chris Van Hollen, Jr. ... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is the senior Senator from the state of New York and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The College Democrats (officially named the College Democrats of America) are the official organization of the United States Democratic Party for college students. ... Democrats Abroad Democrats Abroad is the official organization of the Democratic Party of the United States for expatriates, representing Democrats that are citizens of the U.S. but live outside the United States. ... The Young Democrats of America (YDA), founded in 1932, is the official youth arm of the Democratic Party of the United States, although it severed official ties with the Democratic National Committee following passage of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 and became an independent 527 group. ... The Democratic Governors Association is a Washington, D.C.-based organization founded in 1983, consisting of U.S. state and territorial governors affiliated with the Democratic Party. ... Kathleen Gilligan Sebelius (born May 15, 1948 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American Democratic politician who currently serves as the 44th Governor of Kansas. ...


Each state also has a state committee, made up of elected committee members as well as ex-officio committee members (usually elected officials and representatives of major constituencies), which in turn elects a chair. County, town, city and ward committees generally are comprised of individuals elected at the local level. State and local committees often coordinate campaign activities within their jurisdiction, oversee local conventions and in some cases primaries or caucuses, and may have a role in nominating candidates for elected office under state law. Rarely do they have much funding, but in 2005 DNC Chairman Dean began a program (called the "50 State Strategy") of using DNC national funds to assist all state parties and paying for full time professional staffers.[3]


Ideology and voter base

Further information: Factions in the Democratic Party (United States) and Political ideologies in the United States
Composition of the Democratic base according to a 2005 Pew Research Center study.

Since the 1890s, the Democratic Party has favored "liberal" positions (the term "liberal" in this sense describes social liberalism, not classical liberalism). In recent exit polls, the Democratic Party has had broad appeal across all socio-ethno-economic demographics.[4][5][6] The Democratic base currently consists of a large number of well-educated and relatively affluent liberals as well as those in the socially more conservative working class.[2] The Democratic Party is currently the nation's largest party. In 2004, roughly 72 million (42.6%) Americans were registered Democrats, compared to 55 million (32.5%) Republicans and 42 million (24.8%) independents.[1] The Democratic Party of the United States is composed of various different factions, with some overlap and enough agreement between them to coexist with each other within the party. ... Political Compass. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... Classical liberalism (also known as traditional liberalism[1] and laissez-faire liberalism[2]) is a doctrine stressing the importance of human rationality, individual property rights, natural rights, the protection of civil liberties, constitutional limitations of government, free markets, and individual freedom from restraint as exemplified in the writings of Adam...


Historically, the party has favored farmers, laborers, labor unions, and religious and ethnic minorities; it has opposed unregulated business and finance, and favored progressive income taxes. In foreign policy, internationalism (including interventionism) was a dominant theme from 1913 to the mid 1960s. In the 1930s, the party began advocating welfare spending programs targeted at the poor. The party had a pro-business wing, typified by Al Smith, that shrank in the 1930s. The Southern conservative wing shrank in the 1980s. The major influences for liberalism were the labor unions (which peaked in the 1936-1952 era), and the African American wing, which has steadily grown since the 1960s. Since the 1970s, environmentalism has been a major new component. Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For the psychology topic, see Environmental psychology. ...


In recent decades, the party has adopted a centrists economic and more socially progressive agenda, with the voter base having shifted considerably. Once dominated by unionized labor and the working class, the Democratic base now consists of social liberals who tend to be well educated with above-average incomes as well as the socially more conservative working class. Today, Democrats advocate civil liberties, social freedoms, equal rights, affirmative action, fiscal responsibility, and a free enterprise system tempered by government intervention (mixed economy).The economic policy adopted by the modern Democratic Party, including the former Clinton administration, may also be referred to as the "Third Way".[7] The party believes that government should play a role in alleviating poverty and social injustice, even if such requires a larger role for government and progressive taxation. In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Social progressivism is the view that as time progresses, society should disgregard morality in place of political correctness. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... Affirmative action refers to policies intended to promote access to education or employment aimed at a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically, minorities or women). ... From a Keynesian point of view, a balanced budget in the public sector is achieved when the government has enough fiscal discipline to be able to equate the revenues with expenditure over the business cycles. ... Capitalism generally refers to an economic system in which the means of production are all or mostly privately[1][2] owned and operated for profit, and in which investments, distribution, income, production and pricing of goods and services are determined through the operation of a free market. ... A mixed economy is an economy that has a mix of economic systems. ... President Clintons Cabinet, circa 1993 Headed by President of the United States Bill Clinton, the Clinton Administation was the executive branch of the federal government of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... The Third Way, or Radical Middle, is a centrist philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... Social injustice is a concept relating to the perceived unfairness or injustice of a society in its divisions of rewards and burdens. ... A progressive tax is a tax imposed so that the tax rate increases as the amount to which the rate is applied increases. ...

Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, the old Democratic coalition of organized labor, white urban ethnics and Southern whites disappeared and was replaced by a coalition of suburban white liberals aligned with various racial, ethnic and ideological interests - Micheal Rust, Insight on News, 1995

The Democratic Party, once dominant in the Southeastern United States, is now strongest in the Northeast (Mid-Atlantic and New England), Upper Midwest and Great Lakes Region, as well as along the Pacific Coast (especially Coastal California), including Hawaii. The west coast may be referred to as Left Coast due to its geographic position relative to the rest of the continental U.S. and left-of-center political leaning. The Democrats are also strongest in major cities. Recently, Democratic candidates have been faring better in some southern states, such as Virginia, Arkansas, and Florida, and in the Rocky Mountain states, especially Colorado and Montana. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... It has been suggested that Middle Atlantic States be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Great Lakes states of the U.S. are colored red in this map. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Counties commonly seen as constituting coastal California. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ... Left Coast is a political expression with regards to the states of California, Oregon, and Washington on the West Coast. ... Ten most populous cities in the United States Los Angeles San Jose San Diego Phoenix Chicago New York City Houston San Antonio Dallas Philadelphia The following is a list of the most populous incorporated places in the United States. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked...


Social Liberals

Opinions of liberals in a 2005 Pew Research Center study.
Opinions of liberals in a 2005 Pew Research Center study.

Social liberals, a group that in American terms is almost synonimous with social progressives, constitute a large part, circa 45.6%, of the Democratic voter base. Liberals thereby form the largest united typological demographic within the Democratic base. Today, modern American liberalism, a variant of social liberalism is the party's main ideology. Social liberals, many of whom a are college-educated professionals tend to be centrist on economic issues, yet are quite left-leaning on social issues. According to the Pew Research Center liberals constitute roughly 19% of the electorate with 92% of American liberals favoring the Democratic Party.[2] While college-educated professionals were mostly Republican until the 1950, they now compromises the perhaps most vital component of the Democratic Party.[8] Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ... This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ... In the United States the term progressivism refers to two political movements: first, the original political progressive movement towards social and economic reform of the late 1800s and early 1900s; and second, the continuation of this movement/ideology in the form of modern progressivism which sees itself as a reform... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... Social progressivism is the view that as time progresses, society should disgregard morality in place of political correctness. ...


A majority of of liberals favor diplomacy over military action, stem-cell research, the legalization of same-sex marriage, secular government, stricter gun control and environmental protection laws as well as the preservation of abortion rights. They tend to be rather divided on free trade agreements and organizations such as NAFTA. Most liberals oppose increased military standing and the display of the ten commandments in public buildings. Immigration and cultural diversity is deemed positive. As a result liberals favor cultural pluralism, a system in which immigrants retain their native culture in addition to adopting their new culture.[2] This ideological group differs from the traditional organizaed labor base. According to the Pew Research Center, a plurality, 41% resided in mass affluent households and 49% were college graduates, the highest figure of any typographical group. It was also the fasest growing typological group between the late 1990s and early 2000s.[2] Liberals include most of academia[9] and large portion of the professional class.[4][5][6] Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... See also Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live together as a family. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... Nafta or NAFTA may refer to: an acronym for the North American Free Trade Agreement an acronym for the New Zealand Australia Free Trade Agreement the town/Tokyo of Nafta, Tunisia This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Main articles: Pluralism and Multiculturalism Cultural pluralism exists when all groups within a larger society maintain their unique cultural identities. ... Mass affluent is a marketing term used to refer to the growing high end of the mass market. ...

Professionals are college-educated workers who produce primarily ideas and services... In the 1950s, they were the most Republican of occupational groups, but over the last 30 years they have swung to the Democrats... Their political outlook is very different from the blue-collar or minority Democrats who entered the party earlier... These college-educated workers are... products of the social and cultural revolution that began in the colleges during the 1960s and has steadily swept through the country. They avidly support women's rights and civil rights and tolerance toward gays. They are fiscally moderate or conservative and socially liberal. - John B. Judis, Salon, July 2003

Many progressive Democrats are descendants of the New Left of Democratic Presidential candidate/Senator George McGovern of South Dakota; others were involved in the presidential candidacies of Vermont Governor Howard Dean and U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio; and still others are disaffected former members of the Green Party. The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) is a caucus of progressive Democrats, and is the single largest Democratic caucus in the House of Representatives. Its members have included Dennis Kucinich, John Conyers (Michigan), Jim McDermott (Washington), John Lewis (Georgia), the late Senator Paul Wellstone (Minnesota), Barbara Lee (California), Sherrod Brown (Ohio), and Bernie Sanders (I-VT). In the United States the term progressivism refers to two political movements: first, the original political progressive movement towards social and economic reform of the late 1800s and early 1900s; and second, the continuation of this movement/ideology in the form of modern progressivism which sees itself as a reform... The New Left is a term used in different countries to describe left-wing movements that occurred in the 1960s and 1970s. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Dennis John Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) the single largest caucus in the United States House of Representatives, and works together to advance progressive issues and causes. ... Dennis John Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... John Conyers, Jr. ... James Adelbert Jim McDermott (born December 28, 1936 in Chicago, Illinois) is the current U.S. Representative for Washingtons 7th congressional district. ... John Robert Lewis (born February 21, 1940) is an American politician and was an important leader in the American Civil Rights Movement. ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... Barbara Jean Lee (born July 16, 1946), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1998, representing Californias 9th congressional district (map) and is the first woman to represent that district. ... Sherrod Campbell Brown (born November 9, 1952) is the Democratic Junior United States Senator from the state of Ohio. ... Bernard Bernie Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is the current junior United States Senator from Vermont. ...


Academia

Percent of faculty members identifying as liberal and conservative by discipline.
Percent of faculty members identifying as liberal and conservative by discipline.

Academicians, Intellectuals and the highly educated overall constitute an important part of the Democratic voter base. Academia in particular tends to be liberal. In 2005, nearly three quarters, 72%, of full-time faculty members identified as liberal, while 15% identified as conservative. The social sciences and humanities were the most liberal disciplines while business was the most conservative. Percentages of professors who identified as liberal ranged from 49% in business to over 80% in political science and the humanities.[9] In a 2004 survey of 1,000 economists registered Democrats outnumbered registered Republicans by a 2.5 to 1 ratio. The majority of economists favored "safety regulations, gun control, redistribution, public schooling, and anti-discrimination laws," while opposing "tighter immigration controls, government ownership of enterprise and tariffs."[10] Among sociologists and anthropologists, Democrats outnumber Republicans 20 to 1.[11] The liberal inclination of American professors is largely attributed to the liberal outlook of the highly educated. The more educated a person is, the most likely he or she is to be liberal as the percentage of liberals increases along with educational attainment.[12] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Academia is a collective term for the scientific and cultural community engaged in higher education and research, taken as a whole. ... Social liberalism is either a synonym for new liberalism or a label used by progressive liberal parties in order to differentiate themselves from the more conservative liberal parties, especially when there are two or more liberal parties in a country. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... The humanities are those academic disciplines which study the human condition using methods that are largely analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military,[4] small government and promotion of states rights. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ...


Another recent survey by the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank, detailed the strong majority of Democrats among professors at some of the country's most prestigious universities. According to the study Democrats outnumber Republicans 18 to 1 at Brown University, 26 to 1 at Cornell University and 18 to 1 in the University of California system with 9 Democrats for each Republican at UC Berkley, the system's flagship school.[13] Among those with graduate degrees overall, the majority voted Democrat in the 1996,[14] 2000,[4] 2004[5] and 2006 elections.[6] Male professors at more advanced stages of their careers as well as those at elite institutions tend be the most liberal. At elite universities, 87% of faculty identified as liberal.[9] Social scientists, such as Brett O'Bannon of DePauw University, have pointed out that the liberal opinions of professors seem to have little if any effect on the political orientation of students.[12] The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research (AEI) is a conservative think tank, founded in 1943, whose stated mission is to defend the principles and improve the institutions of American freedom and democratic capitalism — limited government, private enterprise, individual liberty and responsibility, vigilant and effective defense and foreign policies... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military,[4] small government and promotion of states rights. ... This article is about the institution. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Cornell University is a university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... Articles with similar titles include DePaul University, a school with a similar spelling. ...


Labor

Since the 1930s, a critical component of the Democratic Party coalition has been organized labor. Labor unions supply a great deal of the money, grass roots political organization, and voting base of support for the party. The historic decline in union membership over the past half century has been accompanied by a growing disparity between public sector and private sector union membership percentages. The three most significant labor groupings in the Democratic coalition today are the AFL-CIO and Change to Win labor federations, as well as the National Education Association, a large, unaffiliated teachers' union. Both the AFL-CIO and Change to Win have identified their top legislative priority for 2007 as passage of the Employee Free Choice Act. Other important issues for labor unions include supporting industrial policy (including protectionism) that sustains unionized manufacturing jobs, raising the minimum wage and promoting broad social programs such as social security and universal health care. Labor unions in the United States today function as legally recognized representatives of workers in numerous industries, but are strongest among public sector employees such as teachers and police. ... American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, commonly AFL-CIO, is a national trade union center, the largest federation of unions in the United States, made up of 54 national and international unions (including Canadian), together representing more than 10 million workers. ... The Change to Win Federation is a coalition of American labor unions originally formed in 2005 as an alternative to the AFL-CIO. The coalition is associated with strong advocacy of the organising model. ... A national trade union center is a federation of trade unions in a single country. ... The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the United States, representing many of the countrys teachers along with other school personnel. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA) is proposed United States legislation which aims to amend the National Labor Relations Act to establish an efficient system to enable employees to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to provide for mandatory injunctions for unfair labor practices during organizing efforts, and for other... An industrial policy is any government regulation or law that encourages the ongoing operation of, or investment in, a particular industry. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... Manufacturing (from Latin manu factura, making by hand) is the use of tools and labor to make things for use or sale. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through dedicated payroll taxes called FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act). ... Universal health care is a state in which all residents of a geographic or political entity pay for and have access to some type of health care by means of provision of health insurance or direct provision of health care. ...


Working class

Further information: Social class in the United States
American social class model according to Dennis Gilbert.
American social class model according to Dennis Gilbert.[15]

While the American working class has lost much of its political strength with the decline of labor unions,[16] it remains a stronghold of the Democratic Party and continues as an essential part of the Democratic base. Today roughly a third of the American public is estimated to be working class with circa 52% being either members of the working or lower classes.[15][17] Yet, as those with lower socio-economic status are less likely to vote, the working and lower classes are underrepresented in the electorate. The working class is largely distinguished by highly routinized and closely supervised work. It consists mainly of clerical and blue collar workers.[15] Even though most in the working class are able afford an adequate standard of living, high economic insecurity and possible personal benefit from an extended social saftey net, make the majority of working class person left-of-center on economic issues. Most working class Democrats differ from most liberals, however, in their socially more conservative views. Working class tend to be more religious and likely to belong to an ethnic minority. Socially conservative and disadvantaged Democrats are among the least educated and lowest earning ideological demographics. In 2005, only 15% had a college degree, compared to 27% at the national average and 49% of liberals, respectively. Together socially conservative and the financially disadvantaged comprised roughly 54% of the Democratic base.[2] The continued importance of the working class votes manifests itself in recent CNN exit polls, which show the Democratic Party garner the majority of votes from those with low incomes and little education.[4][5][6] A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Dennis Gilbert is professor and chair of sociology at Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... The socio-economic stratification of American society as outlined by Dennis Gilbert. ... A monument to the working and supporting classes along Market Street in the heart of San Franciscos Financial District, home to tens of thousands of professional and managerial middle class workers each day. ... The word clerk, derived from the Latin clericus meaning cleric, i. ... A blue-collar worker is a working class employee who performs manual or technical labor, such as in a factory or in technical maintenance trades, in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ... The percentage of households and individuals in each income bracket. ...


Civil liberatrians

Civil libertarians also often support the Democratic Party because its positions on such issues as civil rights and separation of church and state are more closely aligned to their own than the positions of the Republican Party, and because the Democrats' economic agenda may be more appealing to them than that of the Libertarian Party. They oppose gun control, the "War on Drugs," protectionism, corporate welfare, governmental borrowing, and an interventionist foreign policy. The Democratic Freedom Caucus is an organized group of this faction. A civil libertarian is one who is actively concerned with the protection of individual civil liberties and civil rights. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Constantines Conversion, depicting the conversion of Emperor Constantine the Great to Christianity, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on Dec. ... For the general concept, see Prohibitionism. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... Corporate welfare is a pejorative term, first coined by Ralph Nader in 1956, describing a governments bestowal of grants and/or tax breaks on corporations or other special favorable treatment from the government. ... Interventionism is a term for a policy of non-defensive (proactive) activity undertaken by a nation-state, or other geo-political jurisdiction of a lesser or greater nature, to manipulate an economy or society. ...


Conservatives

In the House of Representatives, the Blue Dog Democrats, a caucus of fiscal and social conservatives and moderates, primarily southerners, forms part of the Democratic Party's current faction of Conservative Democrats. They have acted as a unified voting bloc in the past, giving its forty plus members some ability to change legislation and broker compromises with the Republican Party's leadership. Pro-life Democrats are sometimes classified as conservatives on the basis of social conservatism. The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Blue Dog Democrats are social and economic conservatives and moderates in the United States Democratic Party. ... In American politics, Conservative Democrat is a term referring to a member of the Democratic Party who holds some conservative political views. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Issues of discussion Pro-life is a term representing a variety of perspectives and activist movements in bioethics. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Centrists

Though centrist Democrats differ on a variety of issues, they typically foster a mix of political views and ideas. Compared to other Democratic factions, they are mostly more supportive of the use of military force, including the war in Iraq, and are more willing to reduce government welfare, as indicated by their support for welfare reform and tax cuts. One of the most influential factions is the Democratic Leadership Council (DLC), a non-profit organization that advocates centrist positions for the party. The DLC hails President Bill Clinton as proof of the viability of third way politicians and a DLC success story. Former Representative Harold Ford, Jr. of Tennessee is its current chairman. In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Welfare reform is the name for a policy change in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to reduce dependence on welfare, as demanded by political conservatives. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... The Democratic Leadership Council is a non-profit corporation[1] that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from traditionally populist positions. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Third Way, or Radical Middle, is a centrist philosophy of governance that embraces a mix of market and interventionist philosophies. ... Harold Eugene Ford, Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ...


Recent issue stances

Economic issues

Minimum wage

Democrats favor a higher minimum wage, and more regular increases, in order to assist the working poor. The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007 is an early component of the Democrats' agenda during the 110th Congress. In 2006, the Democrats supported six state ballot initiatives to increase the minimum wage; all six initiatives passed. The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007 was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on January 5, 2007 and passed on January 10. ... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ...


Renewable energy and oil

Democrats have opposed tax cuts and incentives to oil companies, favoring a policy of developing domestic renewable energy. Democratic governors have led the way in this issue, such as Montana's state-supported wind farm and "clean coal" programs. World renewable energy in 2005 (except 2004 data for items marked* or **). Enlarge image to read exclusions. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked...


Fiscal responsibility

Democrats are trying to position their party as the party of fiscal responsibility. Democrats increasingly call for responsible tax policies and government spending that keeps the budget deficit under control. The Democratic-led House of Representatives reinstated the PAYGO (pay-as-you-go) budget rule at the start of the 110th Congress.[18] DNC Chairman Howard Dean has cited Bill Clinton's presidency as a model for fiscal responsibility. From a Keynesian point of view, a balanced budget in the public sector is achieved when the government has enough fiscal discipline to be able to equate the revenues with expenditure over the business cycles. ... A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ... PAYGO (pay-as-you-go) is a term used to characterize a certain way of financing a system of social insurance. ... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


Health care and insurance coverage

Democrats call for "affordable and quality health care," and many advocate an expansion of government intervention in this area. Many Democrats favor a national health insurance system in a variety of forms to address the rising costs of modern health insurance. Some Democrats, such as Rep. John Dingell and Senator Edward Kennedy, have called for a program of "Medicare for All."[19] Rep. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... President Johnson signing the Medicare amendment. ...


Some Democratic governors have supported purchasing Canadian drugs, citing lower costs and budget restrictions as a primary incentive. Recognizing that unpaid insurance bills increase costs to the service provider, who passes the cost on to health-care consumers, many Democrats advocate expansion of health insurance coverage.


Environment

The Democratic Party generally sides with environmentalists and favors conservation of natural resources together with strong environmental laws against pollution. Democrats support preservation of endangered lands and species, clean land management and regulation on pollutants. For the psychology topic, see Environmental psychology. ...


The most contentious and concerning environmental issue championed by the party is global warming. Democrats, most notably former Vice President Al Gore, have pressed for stern regulation of greenhouse gases. Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Greenhouse gases are gaseous components of the atmosphere that contribute to the greenhouse effect. ...


College education

Most Democrats have the long term aim of having low-cost, publicly funded college education with low tuition fees (like in much of continental Europe) which should be available to every eligible American student, or alternatively, with increasing state funding for student financial aid such as the Pell grant or college tuition tax-deduction.[20][21] The Pell Grant program is a post-secondary education subsidy run by the Federal government of the United States, and is the largest need-based grant aid program in the country. ...


Trade agreements

The Democratic Party has a mixed record on international trade agreements that reflects a diversity of viewpoints in the party. Generally, more economically liberal Democrats favor free trade agreements while others are supporters of fair trade, populists, and unions often oppose them. In the 1990s, the Clinton administration and a number of prominent Democrats pushed through a number of agreements such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Since then, the party's shift away from free trade became evident in the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) vote, with 15 House Democrats voting for the agreement and 187 voting against.[22][23] International trade is the exchange of goods and services across international boundaries or territories. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... Certified Fair trade quinoa producers in Ecuador. ... Secretariats Mexico City, Ottawa and Washington, D.C. Official languages English, French and Spanish Membership Canada, Mexico and the United States Establishment  -  Formation 1 January 1994  Website http://www. ... Presidents Francisco Flores Pérez (former), Ricardo Maduro, George W. Bush, Abel Pacheco (former), Enrique Bolaños and Alfonso Portillo (former) The Dominican Republic–Central America Free Trade Agreement, commonly called DR-CAFTA (pronounced Doctor Cafta), is a free trade agreement (legally a treaty under international law, but not under...


Alternate Minimum Tax

While the Democratic Party is in support of a progressive tax structure, it has vowed to adjust the Alternate Minimum Tax (AMT). The tax was originally designed to tax the rich but now may affect many mass affluent households, especially those with incomes between $75,000 to $100,000. The party proposed to re-adjust the tax in such manner as to restore its initial intention. According to a 2007 Reuters News Report, "House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Charles Rangel has said he will push for permanent AMT relief for those taxpayers who were never meant to pay it."[24] The Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) system exists as a parallel United States. ... The percentage of households and individuals in each income bracket. ... Charles Bernard Rangel Charles Bernard Rangel (born June 11, American politician. ...


Social issues

Discrimination

The Democratic Party supports Equal Opportunity for all Americans regardless of sex, age, race, sexual orientation, religion, creed, or national origin. President Lyndon Baines Johnson The term Equal Opportunity Employment was created by President Lyndon Baines Johnson when he signed Executive Order 11246 which was created to prohibit federal contractors from discriminating against employees on the basis of age, race, sex, religion, color, or national origin. ...


The Democratic Party mostly supports affirmative action as a way to redress past discrimination and ensure equitable employment regardless of ethnicity or gender, but opposes the use of quotas in hiring. Democrats also strongly support the Americans with Disabilities Act to prohibit discrimination against people on the basis of physical or mental disability. Affirmative action refers to policies intended to promote access to education or employment aimed at a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically, minorities or women). ... The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 is the short title of United States Public Law 101-336, signed into law on July 26, 1990 by George H. W. Bush. ...


Same-sex marriage and LGBT rights

The Democratic Party is divided on the subject of same-sex marriage. Some members favor civil unions for same-sex couples, liberals commonly favor legalized marriage, and others are opposed to same-sex marriage on religious grounds. The 2004 Democratic National Platform stated that marriage should be defined at the state level and it repudiated the Federal Marriage Amendment. Almost all agree, however, that discrimination against persons because of their sexual orientation is wrong, support adoption rights for same sex couples, and also oppose the military's "Don't ask, don't tell" policy. The initialism LGBT is used to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... See also Civil union Registered partnership Domestic partnership Timeline of same-sex marriage Listings by country This box:      Same-sex marriage is a term for a governmentally, socially, or religiously recognized marriage in which two people of the same sex live together as a family. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... The United States Federal Marriage Amendment (FMA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would define marriage in the United States as a union of one man and one woman. ... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence This box:      Dont ask, dont tell is the common term for the U.S. military policy which implements Pub. ...


Reproductive rights

Most members of the Democratic Party believe that all women should have access to birth control, and supports public funding of contraception for poor women. The Democratic Party, in its national platforms since 1992, has called for abortion to be "safe, legal and rare"—namely, keeping it legal by rejecting laws that allow governmental interference in abortion decisions, and reducing the number of abortions by promoting both knowledge of reproduction and contraception, and incentives for adoption. When Congress voted on the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act in 2003, Congressional Democrats were split, with a minority—including current Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid—supporting the ban, and the majority of Democrats opposing the legislation. Birth control is a regimen of one or more actions, devices, or medications followed in order to deliberately prevent or reduce the likelihood of a woman becoming pregnant or giving birth. ... It has been suggested that Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 1995 be merged into this article or section. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The majority leader is a term used in congressional systems for the chamber leader of the party in control of a legislature. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


The Democratic Party opposes attempts to reverse the 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, which declared abortion to be a Constitutionally-protected right, and Planned Parenthood v. Casey which lays out the legal framework in which government action alleged to violate that right is assessed by courts. As a matter of the right to privacy and of gender equality, many Democrats believe all women should have the ability to choose to abort without governmental interference. They believe that each woman, conferring with her conscience, has the right to choose for herself whether abortion is morally correct. Many Democrats also believe that poor women should have a right to publicly funded abortions. Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ... Holding A Pennsylvania law that required spousal notification prior to obtaining an abortion was invalid under the Fourteenth Amendment because it created an undue burden on married women seeking an abortion. ... Privacy has no definite boundaries and it has different meanings for different people. ... Feminism comprises a number of social, cultural and political movements, theories and moral philosophies that are concerned with cultural, political and economic practices and inequalities that discriminate against women. ...


Stem cell research

The Democratic Party has voiced overwhelming support for all stem cell research with federal funding. In his 2004 platform, John Kerry affirmed his support of federally funded stem-cell research "under the strictest ethical guidelines." He explained, "We will not walk away from the chance to save lives and reduce human suffering." Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


Foreign policy issues

Invasion of Afghanistan

Democrats in the House of Representatives and United States Senate near-unanimously voted for the authorization of military force against "those responsible for the recent attacks launched against the United States" in Afghanistan in 2001, supporting the NATO coalition invasion of the nation. Most elected Democrats continue in their support of the Afghanistan conflict, and some have voiced concerns that the Iraq War is shifting too many resources away from the presence in Afghanistan. The Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public law 107-40) was a joint resolution passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 2001, authorizing the use of United States Armed Forces against those responsible for the attacks on September 11, 2001. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague. ...


Iraq war

In 2002, Democrats were divided as most in the Senate voted for the authorization of the use of force against Iraq while a majority of Democrats in the House (81 for, 126 against) voted against it. Since then, many prominent Democrats have expressed regret about this decision, such as former Senator John Edwards, and have called it a mistake, while others, such as Senator Hillary Clinton have criticized the conduct of the war but not repudiated their initial vote for it. Amongst lawmakers, Democrats are the most vocal critics of the Iraq War and the President's management of the war. Democrats in the House of Representatives near-unanimously supported a non-binding resolution disapproving of President Bush's decision to send additional troops into Iraq in 2007. Congressional Democrats overwhelmingly supported military funding legislation which included a provision that set "a timeline for the withdrawal of all US combat troops from Iraq" by March 31, 2008, but also would leave combat forces in Iraq for purposes such as targeted counter-terrorism operations.[25][26] After a veto from the president, and a failed attempt in Congress to override the veto,[27] the U.S. Troop Readiness, Veterans' Care, Katrina Recovery, and Iraq Accountability Appropriations Act, 2007 was passed by Congress and signed by the president after the timetable was dropped. Iraq Resolution and Iraq War Resolution are popular names for the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public law 107-243, 116 Stat. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards [1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... A non-binding resolution is a written motion adopted by a deliberative body that can not progress in to a law. ... “The New Way Forward” redirects here. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... H.R. 1591 of 2007 was a proposed law for Making emergency supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2007, and for other purposes. The bill was vetoed by president George W. Bush. ...


Unilateralism

Democrats usually oppose the doctrine of unilateralism, which dictates that the United States should use military force without any assistance from other nations whenever it believes there is a threat to its security or welfare. They believe the United States should act in the international arena in concert with strong alliances and broad international support. This was a major foreign policy issue of John Kerry's 2004 presidential campaign; his platform attributed rifts with international allies to unilateralism. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


In a general sense, the modern Democratic Party is more closely aligned with the international relations theories of liberalism, neoliberalism, and functionalism than realism and neorealism, though realism has some influence on the party. Main International Relations Theories and derivates Realism & Neorealism Idealism, Liberalism & Neoliberalism Marxism & Dependency theory Functionalism & Neofunctionalism Critical theory & Constructivism International relations theory attempts to provide a conceptual model upon which international relations can be analyzed. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Liberal institutionalism. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... International Relations Theory Realism Liberalism Idealism Neoconservatism Institutionalism Functionalism Marxism Critical theory Isolationism Functionalism is a theory of international relations that arose principally from the experience of European integration. ... It has been suggested that Defensive realism be merged into this article or section. ... Main International Relations Theories and derivates Realism & Neorealism Idealism, Liberalism & Neoliberalism Marxism & Dependency theory Functionalism & Neofunctionalism Critical theory & Constructivism Neorealism or structural realism is a theory of international relations, outlined by Kenneth Waltz in his 1979 book, Theory of International Politics. ...


Legal issues

Torture

Democrats are opposed to use of torture against individuals apprehended and held prisoner by the military of the United States, and deny that categorizing military prisoners as unlawful combatants excludes them from the rights granted under the Geneva Conventions. Democrats contend that torture is inhumane, decreases the United States' moral standing in the world, and produces questionable results. Torture is defined by the United Nations Convention Against Torture as any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he... Unlawful combatant (also illegal combatant or unprivileged combatant) describes a person who engages in combat without meeting the requirements for a lawful combatant according to the laws of war as specified in the Third Geneva Convention. ... Development of the Geneva Conventions from 1864 to 1949. ...


USA PATRIOT Act

All Democrats in the U.S. Senate except for Wisconsin Senator Russ Feingold voted for the original USA PATRIOT Act legislation. After voicing concerns over the "invasion of privacy" and other civil liberty restrictions of the Act, the Democrats split on the renewal in 2006. Most Democratic Senators voted to renew it, while most Democratic Representatives voted against renewal. It should be noted renewal was only allowed after many of the most invasive clauses in the Act were removed or curbed. Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked... Russell Dana Russ Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an American act which President George W. Bush signed into law on October 26, 2001. ... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ...


Right to privacy

The Democratic Party believes that individuals should have a right to privacy, and generally supports laws which place restrictions on law-enforcement and intelligence agency monitoring of U.S. citizens. Some Democratic Party officeholders have championed consumer-protection laws that limit the sharing of consumer data between corporations. Most Democrats believe that government should not regulate consensual non-commercial sexual conduct (among adults), as a matter of personal privacy. The right to privacy is a purported human right and an element of various legal traditions which may restrain both government and private party action. ...


Crime and gun control

Democrats often focus on methods of crime prevention, believing that preventive measures save taxpayers' money in prison, policing and medical costs, and prevent crime and murder. They emphasize improved community policing and more on-duty police officers in order to help accomplish this goal. The party's platform in 2000 and 2004 cited crackdowns on gangs and drug trafficking as preventive methods. The party's platforms have also addressed the issue of domestic violence, calling for strict penalties for offenders and protection for victims. For other uses, see Gang (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


With a stated goal of reducing crime and homicide, the Democratic Party has introduced various gun control measures, most notably the Gun Control Act of 1968, the Brady Bill of 1993 and Crime Control Act of 1994. However, many Democrats, especially rural, Southern, and Western Democrats, favor fewer restrictions on firearm possession and warned the party was defeated in the 2000 presidential election in rural areas because of the issue.[28] In the national platform for 2004, the only statement explicitly favoring gun control was a plan calling for renewal of the 1994 Assault Weapons Ban. Gun politics fundamentally involves the politics of two related questions: Does a government have valid authority to impose regulations on guns? And, assuming such authority, should a government regulate guns and to what extent?[1] The answer to these questions and the nature of the politics varies and depends on... The Gun Control Act of 1968, Pub. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by the United States Congress, signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993, and went into effect on February 28, 1994. ... The Federal Assault Weapons Ban (AWB) was a provision of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that included a prohibition on the sale of semi-automatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans enactment. ...


History

The Democratic Party evolved from the Anti-federalist factions that opposed the fiscal policies of Alexander Hamilton in the early 1790s. Thomas Jefferson and James Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party and the party's key issues included support of states' rights, strict construction of the Constitution, opposition to a national bank, and opposition to elites and aristocrats (and distrustful of moneyed interests), known as Jeffersonian democracy. It won an ascendancy to power in the election of 1800. After the War of 1812, the party was divided on the issues that once contrasted it from its then-moribund rival, the Federalist Party. The party faction that supported many of the old Jeffersonian principles was later led by Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren, and became the Democratic Party, imbued with political philosophy known as Jacksonian democracy. The Democratic Party competed with its main rival, the Whig Party, from the 1830s until the 1850s. As the Democrats became increasingly associated with "The Slave Power," and the Whigs splintered over the issue of slavery and faded away, the Republican Party emerged in the 1850s in opposition to the expansion of slavery and in support of modernization. The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. ... The Anti-Federalist Party, though not a true political party, but a faction, left a major legacy on the country by initiating the Bill of Rights. ... The Hamiltonian economic program is one of many names given by historians to the set of measures that were proposed by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton and implemented by Congress during George Washingtons first administration. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757–July 12, 1804) was an Army officer, lawyer, Founding Father, American politician, leading statesman, financier and political theorist. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836), an American politician and fourth President of the United States of America (1809–1817), was one of the most influential Founders of the United States. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale in 1800. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Combatants United States Great Britain Canada Bermuda Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •United States Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party during the First Party System, in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the 8th President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Jacksonian democracy refers to the political philosophy of United States President Andrew Jackson and his followers in the new Democratic Party. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... The Slave Power (sometimes referred to as the Slaveocracy) was a term used in the Northern United States in the period 1840-1865 to characterize the political power of the slaveholding class in the South. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...


The Democrats split over the choice of a successor to President James Buchanan along Northern and Southern lines, while the Republican Party gained an ascendancy in the election of 1860. As the American Civil War broke out, Northern Democrats were divided into War Democrats and Peace Democrats. Most War Democrats rallied to President Abraham Lincoln and the Republicans' National Union Party. The Democrats benefited from white Southerners' resentment of Reconstruction after the war and consequent hostility to the Republican Party. After Redeemers ended Reconstruction in the 1870s, and the disenfranchisement of African Americans took place in the 1890s, the South, voting Democratic, became known as the "Solid South." Though Republicans continued to control the White House until 1884, the Democrats remained competitive. The party was dominated by pro-business Bourbon Democrats led by Samuel J. Tilden and Grover Cleveland, who represented mercantile, banking and railroad interests, opposed imperialism and overseas expansion, fought for the gold standard, opposed bimetallism, and crusaded against corruption, high taxes, and tariffs. Cleveland was elected to non-consecutive presidential terms in 1884 and 1892. James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... War Democrats were those who broke with the majority of the Democratic Party and supported the military policies of President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War of 1861-1865. ... Warning: there is some racist language (such as the N-word) in this article. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... 1864 National Union Party candidate and U.S. President-elect Abraham Lincoln 1864 National Union Party candidate and U.S. Vice President-elect Andrew Johnson U.S. Postmaster General, Montgomery Blair. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... We dont have an article called Redeemers Start this article Search for Redeemers in. ... The phrase Solid South describes the electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ... Bourbon Democrats was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to conservative or reactionary members of the Democratic Party, especially those who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884-1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ...


Agrarian Democrats demanding free silver overthrew the Bourbon Democrats in 1896 and nominated William Jennings Bryan for the presidency (a nomination repeated by Democrats in 1900 and 1908). Bryan waged a vigorous campaign attacking Eastern moneyed interests, but he lost to Republican William McKinley. The Democrats took control of the House in 1910 and elected Woodrow Wilson as president in 1912 and 1916. Wilson led Congress to, in effect, put to rest the issues of tariffs, money, and antitrust that had dominated politics for 40 years with new progressive laws. The Great Depression in 1929 that occurred under Republican President Herbert Hoover and the Republican Congress set the stage for a more liberal government; the Democrats controlled the House of Representatives nearly uninterrupted from 1931 until 1995 and won most presidential elections until 1968. Franklin Delano Roosevelt, elected to presidency in 1932, came forth with government programs called the New Deal. New Deal liberalism meant the promotion of social welfare, labor unions, civil rights, and regulation of business. The opponents, who stressed long-term growth, support for business, and low taxes, started calling themselves "conservatives." This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... For the mountain, see Mount McKinley. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924), was the 28th President of the United States. ... The Great Depression started after October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the thirty-first President of the United States (1929–1933), was a world-famous mining engineer and humanitarian administrator. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The New Deal was the title President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave to the series of programs he initiated between 1933 and 1938 with the goal of providing relief, recovery, and reform (3 Rs) to the people and economy of the United States during the Great Depression. ...


Issues facing parties and the United States after the Second World War included the Cold War and the Civil Rights Movement. Republicans peeled off conservatives and white Southerners from the Democratic coalition with their resistance to New Deal and Great Society liberalism and the Republicans' use of the Southern Strategy. African Americans traditionally supported the Republican Party and began supporting Democrats following the ascent of the Franklin Roosevelt administration, the New Deal, and the Civil Rights movement. The Democratic Party's main base of support shifted to the Northeast, marking a dramatic reversal of history. Bill Clinton was elected to the presidency in 1992 and 1996 and governed as a New Democrat while the Democratic Party lost control of Congress in the election of 1994 to the Republican Party; the Democratic Party regained majority control of Congress in 2006. Some of the party's key issues in the early 21st century have included the methods of how to combat terrorism, homeland security, labor rights, environmentalism, and the preservation of liberal government programs. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The Great Society was a set of domestic programs proposed or enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-1969). ... In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For the Canadian New Democratic Party, see New Democratic Party. ...


Presidential tickets

See also: Democratic-Republican Party
Election year Result Nominees
President Vice President
1828 won Andrew Jackson John Caldwell Calhoun[1]
1832 won Martin Van Buren
1836 won Martin Van Buren Richard Mentor Johnson
1840 lost
1844 won James Knox Polk George Mifflin Dallas
1848 lost Lewis Cass William Orlando Butler
1852 won Franklin Pierce William Rufus de Vane King[2]
1856 won James Buchanan John Cabell Breckinridge
1860 lost Stephen Arnold Douglas (Northern) Herschel Vespasian Johnson
lost John Cabell Breckinridge (Southern) Joseph Lane
1864 lost George Brinton McClellan George Hunt Pendleton
1868 lost Horatio Seymour Francis Preston Blair, Jr.
1872 lost Horace Greeley[3] Benjamin Gratz Brown
1876 lost Samuel Jones Tilden Thomas Andrews Hendricks
1880 lost Winfield Scott Hancock William Hayden English
1884 won Stephen Grover Cleveland Thomas Andrews Hendricks[2]
1888 lost Allen Granberry Thurman
1892 won Adlai Ewing Stevenson
1896 lost William Jennings Bryan Arthur Sewall
1900 lost Adlai Ewing Stevenson
1904 lost Alton Brooks Parker Henry Gassaway Davis
1908 lost William Jennings Bryan John Worth Kern
1912 won Thomas Woodrow Wilson Thomas Riley Marshall
1916 won
1920 lost James Middleton Cox Franklin Delano Roosevelt
1924 lost John William Davis Charles Wayland Bryan
1928 lost Alfred Emmanuel Smith Joseph Taylor Robinson
1932 won Franklin Delano Roosevelt[2] John Nance Garner
1936 won
1940 won Henry Agard Wallace
1944 won Harry S. Truman
1948 won Harry S. Truman Alben William Barkley
1952 lost Adlai Ewing Stevenson II John Jackson Sparkman
1956 lost Carey Estes Kefauver
1960 won John Fitzgerald Kennedy[2] Lyndon Baines Johnson
1964 won Lyndon Baines Johnson Hubert Horatio Humphrey
1968 lost Hubert Horatio Humphrey Edmund Sixtus Muskie
1972 lost George Stanley McGovern Thomas Francis Eagleton
Robert Sargent Shriver[4]
1976 won James Earl Carter, Jr. Walter Frederick Mondale
1980 lost
1984 lost Walter Frederick Mondale Geraldine Anne Ferraro
1988 lost Michael Stanley Dukakis Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr.
1992 won William Jefferson Clinton Albert Arnold Gore, Jr.
1996 won
2000 lost Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. Joseph Isadore Lieberman
2004 lost John Forbes Kerry John Reid Edwards

[1] Resigned from office.
[2] Died in office.
[3] Died before the electoral votes were cast.
[4] Thomas Eagleton was the original vice presidential nominee, but withdrew his nomination less than a month after receiving it.
The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican Party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782–March 31, 1850), was a prominent United States politician in the first half of the 19th century. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the 8th President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the 8th President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... George Mifflin Dallas (July 10, 1792—December 31, 1864) was a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania and the eleventh Vice President, serving under James K. Polk. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Birthplace of Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 — October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant Because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for president in 1860. ... Herschel Vespasian Johnson (September 18, 1812 - August 16, 1880) was an American politician. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Joseph Lane (1801-1881) was an American general during the Mexican War. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For the 1960s commissioner of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, see George McClellan (police commissioner). ... George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825–November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 - December 13, 1885) was a Liberal Republican Senator, Governor of Missouri, and the Vice presidential candidate in the election of 1872. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. ... Portrait of Winfield S. Hancock during the Civil War Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer who served with distinction as a general in the American Civil War and ran unsuccessfully for President of the United States in 1880. ... William Hayden English (August 27, 1822–February 7, 1896) was an American politician. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Congressman from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... Arthur Sewall (November 25, 1835 _ September 5, 1900 was a U.S. Democratic politician from Maine most notable as William Jennings Bryans first running mate in 1896. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Congressman from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Alton Brooks Parker (May 14, 1852 – May 10, 1926) was an American lawyer and judge and a U.S. presidential candidate in the 1904 elections. ... Henry Gassaway Davis (16 November 1823 - March 11, 1916) was a U.S. Democratic politician from West Virginia. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... John Worth Kern (December 20, 1849 - August 17, 1917) was a U.S. Democratic politician from Indiana. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924), was the 28th President of the United States. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 – July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ... FDR redirects here. ... Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. ... John W. Davis John William Davis (April 13, 1873 — March 24, 1955) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Charles Wayland Bryan (February 10, 1867 - March 4, 1945), was the younger brother of perennial U.S. Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Joseph Taylor Robinson Joseph Taylor Robinson (August 26, 1872 - July 14, 1937) was a Democratic United States Senator, Senate Majority Leader, member of the United States House of Representatives, Governor of Arkansas, and U.S. Vice Presidential candidate. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... FDR redirects here. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office John Jackson Sparkman (December 20, 1899 – November 16, 1985) was a United States politician from Alabama. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, or JFK, was the thirty-fifth President of the United States. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey, Jr. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ... Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is best known as the first and, so far, only woman to be a candidate for Vice President of the United States on a major party ticket (although women on third-party tickets continue to run for the position). ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... Presidential election results map. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards [1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ...


2008 nomination

2004 Democratic Vice Presidential nominee John Edwards, former Alaska Senator Mike Gravel, Connecticut Senator Christopher Dodd, Delaware Senator Joe Biden, Illinois Senator Barack Obama, and Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio have declared their candidacies for the Democratic presidential nomination. New York Senator Hillary Clinton has declared being in the race, and has formed a presidential exploratory committee. New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson has also formed an exploratory committee. Other possible candidates include 2000 Democratic Presidential nominee Al Gore as well as retired General Wesley Clark. Former Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack became a candidate and later withdrew his candidacy. 2004 Democratic Presidential nominee John Kerry, former Virginia Governor Mark Warner, Wisconsin Senator Russ Feingold, and Indiana Senator Evan Bayh, once considered possible candidates, have announced that they will not be seeking the party's presidential nomination in 2008. Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 This article lists official and potential Democratic candidates for the President of the United States in the election of 2008. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The United States presidential election of 2008 will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial election for President and Vice President of the United States, and is scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards [1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (IPA: ) (born May 13, 1930), is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska for two terms, from 1969 to 1981. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Joseph Robinette Joe Biden, Jr. ... Barack Hussein Obama (born August 4, 1961) is the junior United States Senator from Illinois and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Dennis John Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... William Blaine Bill Richardson (born November 15, 1947) is an American politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ... Thomas James Vilsack (born December 13, 1950 in Pittsburgh) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and served as the 40th Governor of the state of Iowa. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Russell Dana Russ Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... Birch Evans Evan Bayh III (last name pronounced buy) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ...


Senator Clinton has taken an early lead in national opinion polls for the 2008 Democratic nomination. Many early polls have put Senator Obama, and former Senator Edwards closely behind Clinton. Clinton leads many early opinion polls of 2008 Democratic primaries; Edwards often leads opinion polls in the first primary caucus state of Iowa. The Clinton campaign very narrowly led fundraising over Obama in the first quarter of 2007, although twice as many donors gave to Obama as any of his nearest competitors.[29] Main article: Opinion polling for the United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the 2008 Democratic presidential candidates. ... This is a collection of scientific, state-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the Democratic presidential primaries, 2008. ...


Symbols and name

"A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" by Thomas Nast. Harper's Weekly, January 19, 1870.
"A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" by Thomas Nast. Harper's Weekly, January 19, 1870.

In the 1790s, the Federalists deliberately used the terms "Democrat" and "Democratic Party" as insults against Jeffersonians. For example, in 1798, George Washington wrote that "you could as soon scrub the blackamore white, as to change the principles of a profest Democrat; and that he will leave nothing unattempted to overturn the Government of this Country."[30] By the 1830s, however, the term that had once been considered an insult became the party's name. In the late 19th century, the term "The Democracy" was in common use for the party. Download high resolution version (694x750, 126 KB)nast sketch of demo donkey This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Download high resolution version (694x750, 126 KB)nast sketch of demo donkey This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly general-interest magazine covering literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts from a progressive, moderate left perspective in a fashion often not found in the ordinary news... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party during the First Party System, in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ...


The most common symbol for the party is the donkey, although the party itself never officially adopted this symbol.[31] The origins of this symbol are unknown, but several theories have been proposed. According to one theory, in its original form, the jackass was born in the intense mudslinging that occurred during the presidential race of 1828 in which Andrew Jackson was sometimes called a jackass by his opponents. A political cartoon depicting Jackson riding and directing a donkey (representing the Democratic Party) was published in 1837. A political cartoon by Thomas Nast in an 1870 edition of Harper's Weekly revived the donkey as a symbol for the Democratic Party. Cartoonists followed Nast and used the donkey to represent the Democrats, and the elephant to represent the Republicans. Binomial name Equus asinus Linnaeus, 1758 For other uses, see Donkey (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a famous German-American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly general-interest magazine covering literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts from a progressive, moderate left perspective in a fashion often not found in the ordinary news...


In the early 20th century, the traditional symbol of the Democratic Party in Midwestern states such as Indiana, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Ohio was the rooster, as opposed to the Republican eagle. This symbol still appears on Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Indiana ballots. For the majority of the 20th century, Missouri Democrats used the Statue of Liberty as their ballot emblem. This meant that when Libertarian candidates received ballot access in Missouri in 1976, they could not use the Statue of Liberty, their national symbol, as the ballot emblem. Missouri Libertarians instead used the Liberty Bell until 1995, when the mule became Missouri's state animal. From 1995 to 2004, there was some confusion among voters, as the Democratic ticket was marked with the Statue of Liberty, and it seemed that the Libertarians were using a donkey. The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Rooster crowing during daylight A Rhode Island Red. ... Genera Several, see below. ... For the town in France, see Ballots, Mayenne. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis Metro[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Liberty Enlightening the World (French: La liberté éclairant le monde), known more commonly as the Statue of Liberty (Statue de la Liberté), is a large statue of a prostitute that was presented to the United States by France in 1886, standing at Liberty Island, New York in the mouth of... An emblem consists of a pictorial image, abstract or representational, that epitomizes a concept - often a concept of a moral truth or an allegory. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... Ballot access rules regulate the conditions under which a candidate or political party is entitled to appear on voters ballots. ... The Liberty Bell. ... A barren of mules. ...


Although both major political parties (and many minor ones) use the traditional American red, white, and blue colors in their marketing and representations, since election night 2000 the color blue has become the identified color of the Democratic Party, while the color red has become the identified color of the opposition Republican Party. That night, for the first time, all major broadcast television networks used the same color scheme for the electoral map: blue states for Al Gore (Democratic nominee) and red states for George W. Bush (Republican nominee). Since then, the color blue has been widely used by the media to represent the party, much to the confusion of non-American observers, as blue is the traditional color of the right and red the color of the left outside of the United States (c.f. red for the Liberals and blue for the Conservatives in Canada, or red for Labour and blue for Conservative in the United Kingdom). Blue has also been used by party supporters for promotional efforts (e.g BuyBlue, BlueFund) and by the party itself, which in 2006 unveiled the "Red to Blue Program" to support Democratic candidates running against Republican incumbents in the 2006 midterm elections. Presidential electoral votes. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Left-Right politics. ... “Leftism” redirects here. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ...


Jefferson-Jackson Day is the most common name given to the annual fundraising celebration held by local chapters of the Democratic Party. It is named after Presidents Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson, whom the party regards as its distinguished early leaders. Jefferson-Jackson Day is the most common name given to the annual fundraising celebration held by local chapters of the Democratic Party in the United States. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


The song "Happy Days Are Here Again" is the unofficial song of the Democratic Party. It was used prominently when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was nominated for president at the 1932 Democratic National Convention and remains a sentimental favorite for Democrats today. More recently, the emotionally similar song "Beautiful Day" by the band U2 has become a favorite theme song for Democratic candidates. John Kerry used the song during his 2004 presidential campaign, and it was used as a celebratory tune by several Democratic Congressional candidates in 2006.[32][33] Wochenend und Sonnenschein (literally, Weekend and Sunshine) is a song first performed by the German sestet, the Comedian Harmonists. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The 1932 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois from June 27 - July 2, 1932. ... Beautiful Day is the lead single from U2s 2000 album, All That You Cant Leave Behind. ... U2 are a rock band from Dublin, Ireland. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ...


State parties

The Alabama Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Alabama. ... The Alaska Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Alaska. ... The Arizona Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Arizona. ... The Democratic Party of Arkansas is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Arkansas. ... The California Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of California. ... The Colorado Democratic Party is the state affiliate of the United States Democratic Party in the U.S. state of Colorado. ... The Democratic State Central Committee of Connecticut is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Connecticut. ... The Delaware Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Delaware. ... The Florida Democratic Party is the official organization for Democrats in the state of Florida. ... The Democratic Party of Georgia is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Georgia. ... Governor John A. Burns is often called the Father of the State of Hawaii, having overseen its modern development and setting precedents still honored today. ... The Idaho Democratic Party is an Idaho political party affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Party of Illinois is a political party and affiliate of the United States Democratic Party in Illinois. ... The Indiana Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Indiana. ... The Iowa Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Iowa. ... The Kansas Democratic Party is the state affiliate political party of the national Democratic Party in Kansas. ... The Kentucky Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Kentucky. ... The Louisiana Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Louisiana. ... The Maine Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Maine. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Massachusetts Democratic Party is the state affiliate of the United States Democratic Party in the U.S. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... The Michigan Democratic Party is the state-level party of the United States Democratic Party in Michigan. ... The Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) is a major political party in the US state of Minnesota. ... The Democratic Party of the State of Mississippi is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Mississippi. ... The Missouri Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Missouri. ... The Montana Democratic Party (abbreviated MDP) is a Montana political party affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... The Nebraska Democratic Party is the official arm of the Democratic Party in the U.S. State of Nebraska. ... The Nevada Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Nevada. ... The New Hampshire Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of New Hampshire. ... The New Jersey Democratic State Committee or the NJDSC is the New Jersey state affiliate of the United States Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Party of New Mexico is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of New Mexico. ... The New York State Democratic Committee is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of New York. ... The North Carolina Democratic Party is the North Carolina affiliate of the national Democratic Party. ... The North Dakota Democratic-NPL Party (abbreviated Democratic-NPL or Dem-NPL) is a North Dakota political party affiliated with the Democratic Party of the United States. ... The Ohio Democratic Party is the Ohio affiliate to the national Democratic Party. ... The Oklahoma Democratic Party is an Oklahoma political party affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... The Pennsylvania Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Pennsylvania. ... The Rhode Island Democratic Committee is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Rhode Island. ... The South Carolina Democratic Party is the South Carolina affiliate of the national Democratic Party. ... The South Dakota Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of South Dakota. ... The Tennessee Democratic Party is the organized coalition of Democrats in Tennessee, tracing its philosophical roots to President Andrew Jackson. ... The Texas Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Texas. ... The Utah State Democratic Party works to elect Democrats to office in the state of Utah. ... The Vermont Democratic Party is the affiliate branch of the Democratic Party in the U.S. state of Vermont. ... The Democratic Party of Virginia is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Virginia. ... The Washington State Democratic Party works to elect Democrats to office in Washington State. ... The West Virginia Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of West Virginia. ... The Democratic Party of Wisconsin is the affiliate of the Democratic Party in Wisconsin. ... The Wyoming Democratic Party is the local branch of the Democratic Party in the state of Wyoming. ...

See also

Democratic Organizations Blue Dog Democrats Democratic Freedom Caucus Democrats Abroad Democratic Leadership Council College Democrats Democrats for Life National Democratic Institute for International Affairs Unofficial organizations for Democrats Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Progressive Democrats of America Stonewall Democrats Young Democrats of America National Federation of Democratic... Prominent figures of the Democratic Party Currently notable Democrats Evan Bayh (1955), U.S. senator from Indiana Joseph Biden (1942), U.S. senator from Delaware, candidate for the Democratic nomination for president Kathleen Blanco (1942), Governor of Louisiana Barbara Boxer (1940), U.S. senator from California Jerry Brown (1938), mayor... This is a list of state Democratic Parties in the United States. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Political party strength in U.S. states. ... The following is a list of fictional characters who have associated with the Democratic Party of the United States. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Neuhart, P. (22 January, 2004). Why politics is fun from catbirds' seats. USA Today'.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Pew Reasearch Center. (10 May, 2005). Beyond Red vs. Blue.. Retrieved on 2007-07-12.
  3. ^ Gilgoff, Dan. "Dean's List", U.S. News & World Report, 2006-07-16. Retrieved on 2007-04-26. 
  4. ^ a b c d CNN. (2000). Exit Poll.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  5. ^ a b c d CNN. (2004). Exit Poll.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  6. ^ a b c d CNN. (2006). Exit Poll.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  7. ^ Democratic Leadership Council. (1 June, 1998). About the Third Way.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  8. ^ Judis, B. J. (11 July, 2003). The trouble with Howard Dean. Salon.com.. Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  9. ^ a b c Kurtz, H. (29 March, 2005). College Faculties A Most Liberal Lot, Study Finds. The Washington Post.. Retrieved on 2007-07-02.
  10. ^ Klein, D. B. & Stern, C. (6 December, 2004) Economists' policy views and voting. Public Choice Journal.. Retrieved on 2007-07-02.
  11. ^ Stannard, M. B. (29 April, 2007). Montgomery McFate's Mission Can one anthropologist possibly steer the course in Iraq?. San Francisco Chronicle.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  12. ^ a b O'Bannon, B. R. (27 August, 2003). In Defense of the 'Liberal' Professor. Indianapolis Star.. Retrieved on 2007-07-02.
  13. ^ Chow, C. (October, 2002) New Study Reveals Extreme Partisan Bias Among Faculty. Accuracy in Academia.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  14. ^ CNN. (1996). Exit Poll.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  15. ^ a b c Gilbert, Dennis (1998). The American Class Structure. New York: Wadsworth Publishing. 0-534-50520-1. 
  16. ^ Zweig, Michael (2004). What's Class Got To Do With It, American Society in the Twenty-First Century. New York, NY: Cornell University Press. 0-8014-8899-0. 
  17. ^ Thompson, William; Joseph Hickey (2005). Society in Focus. Boston, MA: Pearson. 0-205-41365-X. 
  18. ^ "Day Two: House passes new budget rules", Associated Press, 2007-01-05. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 
  19. ^ Medicare for All (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-01-25.
  20. ^ Clinton Joins Key Senate Democrats to Release Report on "The College Cost Crunch". clinton.senate.gov (2006-06-28). Retrieved on 2006-11-25.
  21. ^ Economic Prosperity and Educational Excellence. Retrieved on 2006-11-25.
  22. ^ Weisman, Jonathan. "CAFTA Reflects Democrats' Shift From Trade Bills", The Washington Post, 2005-07-06. Retrieved on 2006-12-10. 
  23. ^ Nichols, John. "CAFTA Vote Outs "Bush Democrats"", The Nation, 2005-07-28. Retrieved on 2006-12-15. 
  24. ^ Smith, D. (14 April, 2007). Democrat says middle class tax relief a priority. Reuters.. Retrieved on 2007-07-11.
  25. ^ Flaherty, Anne. "Congress passes Iraq bill, veto awaits", 2007-04-26. .
  26. ^ "US Democrats push for 2008 Iraq exit", Reuters, 2007-04-26. Retrieved on 2007-04-26. 
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  28. ^ Abramsky, Sasha. "Democrat Killer?", The Nation, 2005-04-18. Retrieved on 2006-10-10. 
  29. ^ Barabak, Mark Z.. "Clinton, McCain lose front-runner label", Los Angeles Times, 2007-04-09. Retrieved on 2007-04-09. 
  30. ^ George Washington to James McHenry, September 30, 1798. Retrieved on 2006-10-12. Transcript.
  31. ^ History of the Democratic Donkey. Retrieved on 2006-11-15.
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  33. ^ Scherer, Michael. "'The Democrats are ready to lead'", Salon.com, 2006-11-08. Retrieved on 2007-03-18. 

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 5 is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. [2] Founded on July 6, 1865 as an Abolitionist publication, it is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 192nd day of the year (193rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pron. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Herald Tribune is a widely read English language international newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. [2] Founded on July 6, 1865 as an Abolitionist publication, it is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Virginian-Pilot is a daily newspaper, serving the area around Norfolk, Virginia. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Salon. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

Surveys

  • Finkelman, Paul and Peter Wallenstein, eds. Encyclopedia of American Political History (2001)
  • Jensen, Richard. Grass Roots Politics: Parties, Issues, and Voters, 1854-1983 (1983)
  • Kleppner, Paul et al. The Evolution of American Electoral Systems (1983), advanced scholarly essays.
  • Rutland, Robert Allen. The Democrats: From Jefferson to Clinton (1995). short popular history
  • Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, Jr. ed. History of American Presidential Elections, 1789-2000 (various multivolume editions, latest is 2001). For each election includes good scholarly history and selection of primary document. Essays on the most important election are reprinted in Schlesinger, The Coming to Power: Critical Presidential Elections in American History (1972)
  • Schlisinger, Galbraith. Of the People: The 200 Year History of the Democratic Party (1992) popular essays by scholars.
  • Taylor, Jeff. Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy (2006), for history and ideology of the party.
  • Witcover, Jules. Party of the People: A History of the Democrats (2003), 900 page popular history

Arthur Meier Schlesinger, Jr. ...

Since 1992

  • Barone, Michael, and Grant Ujifusa, The Almanac of American Politics 2006: The Senators, the Representatives and the Governors: Their Records and Election Results, Their States and Districts (2005) covers all the live politicians with amazing detail.
  • Dark, Taylor, The Unions and the Democrats: An Enduring Alliance (2001)
  • Judis, John B. and Ruy Teixeira. The Emerging Democratic Majority (2004) demography is destiny
  • Patterson, James T. Restless Giant: The United States from Watergate to Bush vs. Gore (2005) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Sabato, Larry J. Divided States of America: The Slash and Burn Politics of the 2004 Presidential Election (2005), scholarly study.
  • Sabato, Larry J. and Bruce Larson. The Party's Just Begun: Shaping Political Parties for America's Future (2001) scholarly textbook.

Michael Barone Michael Barone is a political expert and commentator. ... John Judis is an American author and journalist. ... Ruy Teixeira is a political consultant and commentator. ... Larry J. Sabato is the Robert Kent Gooch Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia and is director of their Center for Politics. ... Larry J. Sabato is the Robert Kent Gooch Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia and is director of their Center for Politics. ...

Before 1992

  • Blum, John Morton. The Progressive Presidents: Roosevelt, Wilson, Roosevelt, Johnson (1980)
  • Fraser, Steve and Gary Gerstle, eds. The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930-1980 (1990)
  • Kleppner, Paul. The Third Electoral System 1853-1892: Parties, Voters, and Political Cultures (1979), major study of voting patterns in every state
  • Ladd Jr., Everett Carll with Charles D. Hadley. Transformations of the American Party System: Political Coalitions from the New Deal to the 1970s 2nd ed. (1978).
  • Lawrence, David G. The Collapse of the Democratic Presidential Majority: Realignment, Dealignment, and Electoral Change from Franklin Roosevelt to Bill Clinton (1996)
  • Milkis, Sidney M. and Jerome M. Mileur, eds. The New Deal and the Triumph of Liberalism (2002)
  • Milkis, Sidney M. The President and the Parties: The Transformation of the American Party System Since the New Deal (1993)
  • Nichols, Roy Franklin. The Democratic Machine, 1850-1854 (1923)
  • Patterson, James T. Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974 (1997) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Rae, Nicol C. Southern Democrats Oxford University Press. 1994. focus on 1964 to 1992.
  • Remini, Robert V. Martin Van Buren and the Making of the Democratic Party (1959)
  • Silbey, Joel H. The American Political Nation, 1838-1893 (1991)
  • Sundquist, James L. Dynamics of the Party System: Alignment and Realignment of Political Parties in the United States (1983)

John Morton Blum was one of the dominating writers of United States political history from the 1940s to the early 1990s. ... Robert V. Remini (b. ...

External links

  • Democratic National Committee
  • Democratic Senate Caucus
  • Democratic House Caucus
  • Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee
  • Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee
  • Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee
  • Democratic Governors Association
  • Democratic Attorneys General Association
  • College Democrats of America
  • Young Democrats of America
  • Democrats Abroad
  • 2004 National Platform (PDF), HTML version
  • Charter & Bylaws (PDF)
  • Democratic Party at the Open Directory Project

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present political parties in the... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on Dec. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... United States Peace and Freedom Party logo The Peace and Freedom Party (PFP) is a ballot-listed minor political party in California. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... The Socialist Party USA (SP USA) is one of the heirs to the Socialist Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas. ... The Socialist Workers Party is a communist political party in the United States. ... The Vermont Progressive Party is perhaps the United States most consistently successful current third party, although it is active in only one state. ... The Anti-Masonic Party (also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement) was a 19th century minor political party in the United States. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... The Dixiecrats were a segregationist splinter-party of the Democratic Party in the mid-20th century who were determined to protect what they saw as the southern way of life against an oppressive United States federal government. ... Farmer-Labor Party was a political party of Minnesota. ... The Federalist Party (or Federal Party) was an American political party during the First Party System, in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States active in the 1848 and 1852 presidential elections, and in some state elections. ... -1... 1864 National Union Party candidate and U.S. President-elect Abraham Lincoln 1864 National Union Party candidate and U.S. Vice President-elect Andrew Johnson U.S. Postmaster General, Montgomery Blair. ... The Non-Partisan League was a political organization that was founded in 1915 in the United States by socialist A. C. Townley. ... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1912 was a political party created by a split in the Republican Party in the presidential election 1912. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1924 was a national ticket created by Robert M. La Follette, Sr. ... The United States Progressive Party of 1948 was a political party that ran former Vice President Henry A. Wallace of Iowa for president and U.S. Senator Glen H. Taylor of Idaho for vice president in 1948. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Ultimate Democratic Party (United States) - American History Information Guide and Reference (4001 words)
The Party is currently (as of 2005) the minority party in both the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, as well as in governorships and state legislative seats.
Of the two major U.S. parties, the Democratic Party is to the left of the Republican Party, though its politics are not as consistently leftist as the traditional social democratic and labor parties in much of the rest of the world.
In the early 20th century, the traditional symbol of the Democratic Party in Midwestern states such as Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio was the rooster, as opposed to the Republican eagle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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