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Encyclopedia > Democratic Party (U.S.)
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Democratic Party
Democratic Party logo
Party Chairman Howard Dean
Senate Leader Harry Reid
House Leader Nancy Pelosi
Founded 1820s (modern)
1792 (historical)
Headquarters 430 South Capitol Street SE
Washington, D.C.
20003
Political ideology American Liberalism
Progressivism
Center-left
International affiliation None
Color(s) Blue1
Website www.democrats.org

1 Blue has been used by most media and commentators since 2000; it is official since 2006; see red state vs. blue state divide.

The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. Currently, during the 109th Congress, the Democratic Party is the minority party in the United States Senate and the House of Representatives. Democrats control 22 governorships and 19 state legislatures. Ten state legislatures are split between the two parties. In the 2006 midterm elections, the Democratic Party gained outright majority control in the House of Representatives and effective majority status in the United States Senate, and appears to be set to assume the role of the majority party when the 110th Congress convenes in 2007;[1] the Democrats will control 28 governorships and a plurality of state legislatures.[2] Image File history File links Padlock. ... Image File history File links Democratslogo. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party, for which he serves as Senate Minority Leader. ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is the House Minority Leader of the 109th Congress of the United States and is expected to be the Speaker of the House for the 110th Congress. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia. ... American liberalism—that is, liberalism in the United States of America—is a broad political and philosophical mindset, favoring individual liberty, and opposing restrictions on liberty, whether they come from established religion, from government regulation, from the existing class structure, or from multi-national corporations. ... In the United States the term Progressivism refers to two political movements: first, political progressivism rooted in optimistic social and economic reform movements of the late 1800s and early 1900s; and second, ideological or modern left-wing progressivism which sees itself as a reform movement to the left of Democratic... The term center-left has two distinct meanings in politics: Center-left can be used to describe a moderately left-wing political party. ... The term Blue may refer any of a number of similar colors. ... Blue States redirects here. ... A political party is an organization that seeks to attain political power within a government, usually by participating in electoral campaigns. ... GOP redirects here. ... The 109th United States Congress meets from January 4, 2005, to January 1, 2007. ... A two-party system is a form of party system where two major political parties dominate the voting in nearly all elections. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Current party control of Governors offices (2006). ... State legislatures are the lawmaking bodies of the 50 states in the United States of America. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A plurality (or relative majority) is the largest share of something, which may or may not be a majority. ...


Although the name "Democratic party" was adopted during the presidency of Andrew Jackson (1829-1837), Democrats trace their origins to the Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1792,[3] making it the oldest political party in the world.[4] Since William Jennings Bryan's takeover of the party in 1896, it has positioned itself to the left of the Republican Party in economic matters. The pro-working class, activist philosophy of Franklin D. Roosevelt, called "liberalism" in the U.S., has shaped much of the party's agenda since 1932. During the Fifth Party System Roosevelt's New Deal coalition usually controlled the national government through 1964. The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, championed by the party despite opposition at the time from its conservative Southern wing, has continued to inspire the party's liberal principles. The Vietnam War in the 1960s opened a split on foreign military intervention that persists into the 21st century. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the republican party in 1793, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until it broke up in the 1820s. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Left-Right politics. ... FDR redirects here. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Fifth Party System, also called the New Deal Party System, refers to the era of United States national politics that began with the New Deal in 1933. ... The New Deal coalition was the poop alignment of interest groups and voting blocs who supported the New Deal and voted for United States Democratic Party presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, and which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that time. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1954-1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Since the 1990s and the shift towards the political strategy of triangulation employed by Democratic President Bill Clinton, the Democratic Party has become less ideologically uniform and more centrist in the American political spectrum as it attempts to expand its appeal to Republican electorates. Triangulation is the act of a candidate presenting his or her ideology as being above or between the left and right sides of the political spectrum. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... GOP redirects here. ...

Contents

Ideological base

Since the 1890s, the Democratic party has favored "liberal" positions. (The term "liberal" in this sense dates from the New Deal era.) The party has favored farmers, laborers, labor unions, and religious and ethnic minorities; it has opposed unregulated business and finance, and favored progressive income taxes. In foreign policy, internationalism (including interventionism) was a dominant theme from 1913 to the mid 1960s. In the 1930s, the party began advocating welfare spending programs targeted at the poor. The party had a pro-business wing, typified by Al Smith, that shrank in the 1930s. The Southern conservative wing shrank in the 1980s. The major influences for liberalism were the labor unions (which peaked in the 1936-1952 era), and the African American wing, which has steadily grown since the 1960s.[5] Since the 1970s, environmentalism has been a major new component. Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


In recent decades, the party advocates civil liberties, social freedoms, equal rights, equal opportunity, and a free enterprise system tempered by government intervention (what economists call a mixed-economy). The party believes that government should play a role in alleviating poverty and social injustice, even if that means a larger role for government and progressive taxation to pay for social services. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Equal opportunity is a descriptive term for an approach intended to give equal access to a certain social environment, or to ensure people are not specifically excluded from participating in activities such as education, employment, or health care on the basis of immutable traits. ... Capitalism is an economic system in which the means of production are mostly privately owned and in which prices of capital and commodities are determined in a largely free market which operates in the pursuit of profit, with investments being determined by private decision. ... Headline text Social injustice is a concept relating to the perceived unfairness of a society in its divisions of rewards and burdens. ... A progressive tax is a tax imposed so that the tax rate increases as the amount to which the rate is applied increases. ...


Recent issue stances

Economic issues

Minimum wage

Democrats favor a higher minimum wage, and more regular increases, in order to assist the working poor. Party leaders, like Nancy Pelosi, have said increasing the minimum wage is one of the top priorities of the 110th Congress when it convenes under Democratic control. Various state ballot initiatives in 2006 to increase the minimum wage were supported by the Democrats, and all six such initiatives passed. The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is the House Minority Leader of the 109th Congress of the United States and is expected to be the Speaker of the House for the 110th Congress. ... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ...

Renewable energy and oil

Democrats have opposed tax cuts and incentives to oil companies, favoring a policy of developing domestic renewable energy. Democratic governors have led the way in this issue, such as Montana's state-supported wind farm and "clean coal" programs. Renewable energy is energy which can be replenished at the same rate it is used. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Health care and insurance coverage

Democrats call for "affordable and quality health care," and many advocate an expansion of government intervention in this area. Many Democrats favor a national health insurance system in a variety of forms to address the rising costs of modern health insurance. In 1951, President Harry S. Truman proposed national health insurance as a part of his Fair Deal program, although his proposal was defeated by the American Medical Association. More recently, some Democrats, such as Senator Edward Kennedy, have called for a program of "Medicare for All."[6] Harry S Truman (May 8, 1884–December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... In United States history, the Fair Deal was U.S. President Harry S. Trumans policy of social improvement, outlined in his 1949 State of the Union Address to Congress on January 5, 1949. ... The American Medical Association (AMA) is the largest association of medical doctors in the United States. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... President Johnson signing the Medicare amendment. ...


Some Democratic governors have supported purchasing Canadian drugs, citing lower costs and budget restrictions as a primary incentive. Recognizing that unpaid insurance bills increase costs to the service provider, who passes the cost on to health-care consumers, many Democrats advocate expansion of health insurance coverage.

Environment

The Democratic Party generally sides with environmentalists and favors conservation of natural resources together with strong environmental laws against pollution. Democrats support preservation of endangered lands and species, clean land management and regulation on pollutants. The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ...


The most contentious and concerning environmental issue championed by the party is global warming. Democrats, most notably former Vice President Al Gore, have pressed for stern regulation of greenhouse gases, while Republicans have expressed concern over the effect of such regulation on industry and doubt that global warming exists and requires such drastic measures to diminish. Global mean surface temperatures 1856 to 2005 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades. ... This article is about the former United States Vice President. ... Greenhouse gases are gaseous components of the atmosphere that contribute to the greenhouse effect. ...

College education

Most Democrats have the long term aim of having low-cost, publicly funded college education with low tuition fees (like in much of continental Europe) which should be available to every eligible American student, or alternatively, with increasing state funding for student financial aid such as the Pell grant or college tuition tax-deduction.[7][8] The Pell Grant program is a post-secondary education subsidy run by the Federal government of the United States. ...


Social issues

Discrimination

Democrats support Equal Opportunity for all Americans regardless of sex, age, race, sexual orientation, religion, creed, or national origin. President Lyndon Baines Johnson The term Equal Opportunity Employment was created by President Lyndon Baines Johnson when he signed Executive Order 11246 which was created to prohibit federal contractors from discriminating against employees on the basis of age, race, sex, religion, color, or national origin. ...


The Democratic party mostly supports affirmative action as a way to redress past discrimination and ensure equitable employment regardless of ethnicity or gender, but opposes the use of quotas in hiring. Democrats also strongly support the Americans with Disabilities Act to prohibit discrimination against people on the basis of physical or mental disability. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 is the short title of United States Public Law 101-336, signed into law on July 26, 1990 by George H. W. Bush. ...

Same-sex marriage and LGBT rights

The Democratic Party is divided on the subject of same-sex marriage. Some members favor civil unions for same-sex couples, others favor legalized marriage, and others are opposed to same-sex marriage on religious grounds. Almost all agree, however, that discrimination against persons because of their sexual orientation is wrong. DNC Chairman Dean has unofficially endorsed a move by gay Democrats to require the party to guarantee that 5 to 10 percent of the DNC's 2008 convention delegates are gay or lesbian.[9] LGBT (or GLBT) is an abbreviation used as a collective term to refer to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... Same-sex marriage is the union of two people who are of the same biological sex or gender. ... A civil union is a legal partnership agreement between two persons. ...

Reproductive rights

The Democratic Party believes that all women should have access to birth control, and supports public funding of contraception for poor women. The Democratic Party, in its platform in 2000 and 2004, called for abortion to be "safe, legal and rare"—namely, keeping it legal by rejecting laws that allow governmental interference in abortion decisions, and reducing the number of abortions by promoting both knowledge of reproduction and contraception, and incentives for adoption. Birth control is a regimen of one or more actions, devices, or medications followed in order to deliberately prevent or reduce the likelihood of a woman becoming pregnant or giving birth. ...


The Democratic Party opposes attempts to reverse the 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade which recognized abortion as a right. As a matter of the right to privacy and of gender equality, many Democrats believe all women should have the ability to choose without governmental interference. They believe that each woman, conferring with her conscience, has the right to choose for herself whether abortion is morally correct. Many Democrats also believe that poor women should have a right to publicly funded abortions. Holding Texas laws criminalizing abortion violated womens Fourteenth Amendment right to choose whether to continue a pregnancy. ... Privacy is the ability of an individual or group to keep their lives and personal affairs out of public view, or to control the flow of information about themselves. ... Feminism is a collection of social theories, political movements and moral philosophies, largely motivated by or concerned with the liberation of women. ...


The largest national pro-life group within the party is the Democrats for Life. A substantial number of other party members have been shifting to the center on this issue. Some believe in programs to make abortions less frequent as well as making sure the procedure is legal and available. Senator Hillary Clinton of New York said in early 2005 that the opposing sides should find "common ground" to prevent unwanted pregnancies and ultimately reduce abortions, which she called a "sad, even tragic choice to many, many women."[10] This article is about the political organization. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ...

Stem cell research

The Democratic Party has voiced overwhelming support for all stem cell research with federal funding. In his 2004 platform, John Kerry affirmed his support of federally funded stem-cell research "under the strictest ethical guidelines." He explained, "We will not walk away from the chance to save lives and reduce human suffering."[11] Mouse embryonic stem cells. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ...


Foreign policy issues

Invasion of Afghanistan

Democrats in the House of Representatives and United States Senate near-unanimously voted for the authorization of military force against "those responsible for the recent attacks launched against the United States" in Afghanistan in 2001, supporting the NATO coalition invasion of the nation. The Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public law 107-40) was a joint resolution passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 2001, authorizing the use of United States Armed Forces against those responsible for the attacks on September 11, 2001. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation[1] (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ...

Iraq War

In 2002, Democrats were divided as most in the Senate voted for the authorization of the use of force against Iraq while most Democrats in the House voted against it. Since then, many prominent Democrats have expressed regret about this decision, such as Senator John Edwards, and have called it a mistake. Amongst lawmakers, Democrats constitute some of the most vocal critics of the Iraq War and the President's management of the war. Iraq Resolution and Iraq War Resolution are popular names for the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public law 107-243, 116 Stat. ... John Reid Edwards (born June 10, 1953), was the Democratic 2004 nominee for Vice President, and a one-term former Democratic Senator from North Carolina who is considered a potentially strong Democratic candidate for the 2008 Presidential election. ...

Unilateralism

Democrats mostly oppose the doctrine of unilateralism, which dictates that the United States should use military force without any assistance from other nations whenever it believes there is a threat to its security or welfare. They believe the United States should act in the international arena in concert with strong alliances and broad international support. This was a major foreign policy issue of John Kerry's 2004 presidential campaign, and unilateralism has been blamed for the failures in Iraq. Unilateralism, (one+side-ism) is any doctrine or agenda that supports one-sided action. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ...


In a general sense, the modern Democratic Party is more closely aligned with the international relations theories of liberalism and neoliberalism than realism and neorealism, though realism has some influence on the party. International relations theory attempts to provide a conceptual model upon which international relations can be analyzed. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Liberal institutionalism. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that Defensive realism be merged into this article or section. ... Main International Relations Theories and derivates Realism & Neorealism Idealism, Liberalism & Neoliberalism Marxism & Dependency theory Functionalism & Neofunctionalism Critical theory & Constructivism Neorealism or structural realism is a theory of international relations, outlined by Kenneth Waltz in his 1979 book, Theory of International Politics. ...


Legal issues

Torture

Democrats are opposed to use of torture against individuals apprehended and held prisoner by the military of the United States, and deny that categorizing military prisoners as unlawful combatants excludes them from the rights granted under the Geneva Conventions. Democrats contend that torture is inhumane, decreases the United States' moral standing in the world, and produces questionable results. For other uses, see Torture (disambiguation). ... Unlawful combatant (also illegal combatant or unprivileged combatant) describes a person who engages in combat without meeting the requirements for a lawful combatant according to the laws of war as specified in the Third Geneva Convention. ... Development of the Geneva Conventions from 1864 to 1949. ...

USA PATRIOT Act

All Democrats in the U.S. Senate except for Wisconsin Senator Russ Feingold voted for the original USA PATRIOT Act legislation. After voicing concerns over the "invasion of privacy" and other civil liberty restrictions of the Act, the Democrats split on the renewal in 2006. Most Democratic Senators voted to renew it, while most Democratic Representatives voted against renewal. It should be noted renewal was only allowed after many of the most invasive clauses in the Act were removed or curbed. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Russell Dana Russ Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Right to privacy

The Democratic Party believes that individuals should have a right to privacy, and generally supports laws which place restrictions on law-enforcement and intelligence agency monitoring of U.S. citizens. Some Democratic Party officeholders have championed consumer-protection laws that limit the sharing of consumer data between corporations. The right to privacy is a purported human right and an element of various legal traditions which may restrain both government and private party action. ...


Most Democrats believe that government should not regulate consensual non-commercial sexual conduct (among adults), as a matter of personal privacy.

Crime and gun control

Democrats often focus on methods of crime prevention, believing that preventive measures save taxpayers' money in prison, policing and medical costs, and prevent crime and murder. They emphasize improved community policing and more on-duty police officers in order to help accomplish this goal. The party's platform in 2000 and 2004 cited crackdowns on gangs and drug trafficking as preventive methods. The party's platforms have also addressed the issue of domestic violence, calling for strict penalties for offenders and protection for victims. This does not cite its references or sources. ... These lollipops were found to contain heroin when inspected by the US DEA The illegal drug trade is a global black market activity consisting of production, distribution, packaging and sale of illegal psychoactive substances. ...


With a stated goal of reducing crime and homicide, the Democratic Party has introduced various gun control measures, most notably the Gun Control Act of 1968, the Brady Bill of 1993 and Crime Control Act of 1994. However, many Democrats, especially rural, Southern, and Western Democrats, favor fewer restrictions on firearm possession and warned the party was defeated in the 2000 presidential election in rural areas because of the issue.[12] In the national platform for 2004, the only statement explicitly favoring gun control was a plan calling for renewal of the 1994 Assault Weapons Ban. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Gun Control Act of 1968, Pub. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by the United States Congress, signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993, and went into effect on February 28, 1994. ... The Federal Assault Weapons Ban (AWB) was a provision of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that included a prohibition on the sale of semiautomatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans enactment. ...


History

Origins: 1792-1828

The Democrats trace their roots to the Democratic-Republican Party, established by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party in the 1790s. It was so named to emphasize devotion to the principles of republicanism. The party was a central part of the First Party System. It arose from opposition to the policies of the ruling Federalist party, dominated by Alexander Hamilton, which advocated a strong central government, a loose interpretation of the Constitution, and a republic governed by elites. The Jeffersonians (before 1801) favored France in the raging wars between Britain and France, and opposed the Jay Treaty which restored peace with Britain because it might help the monarchist elements inside the United States. Republicans idealized the independent ("yeoman") farmer as the exemplar of republican virtue, and distrusted cities, banks, and factories. Jefferson and his close collaborator Madison made States rights a keystone of the party in 1798. The party was strongest in the South and West, and weakest in New England. The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the republican party in 1793, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until it broke up in the 1820s. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was an American politician and fourth President of the United States (1809–1817). ... The First Party System is the term historians give to the political system existing in the United States from about 1792 to 1820. ... The Federalist Party was a United States political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s; this is sometimes called the First Party System. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 — July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier, intellectual, military officer, and founder of the Federalist party. ... The Treaty The Jay Treaty between the United States and Great Britain averted war, solved many issues left over from the Revolution, and opened ten years of peaceful trade in the midst of a large war. ... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, (i. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


The Republican party won control of the Presidency and Congress in 1800, and later elected Henry Clay as the powerful Speaker of the House in the 1810s. The Federalists collapsed as serious rivals by the end of the War of 1812. After 1816, the only national mechanism, the Congressional nominating caucus, fell into disuse and the remnants of the party split into factions. War hero General Andrew Jackson of Tennessee emerged as the leader of the faction that, after he was elected president in 1828, became the Democratic Party. Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was a leading American statesman and orator who represented Kentucky in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the lower... Combatants United States Native Americans United Kingdom, Canadian colonial forces Native Americans First Nations Peoples Commanders James Madison Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson Isaac Brock† George Prevost Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6... The Congressional nominating caucus is the name for informal meetings in which American congressmen would agree on who to nominate for the Presidency and Vice Presidency from their political party. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Jacksonian democracy: 1828-1854

Andrew Jackson, the first Democratic President of the United States (1829-1837).
Andrew Jackson, the first Democratic President of the United States (1829-1837).

The Second Party System was a confrontation between the Democrats and their main opponent, the Whig Party. The Democrats usually won by building a nationwide coalition that was strongest in New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and the frontier; it was weakest in New England). Like the Jeffersonians the Democrats voiced strong anti-elite opposition to "aristocracy" and banks, and put their faith in "the people." By the 1820s universal suffrage, with no property restrictions, was the norm for all white American men nearly everywhere. Andrew Jackson File links The following pages link to this file: Andrew Jackson ... Andrew Jackson File links The following pages link to this file: Andrew Jackson ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Second Party System is the term historians give to the political system existing in the United States from about 1824 to 1854. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width {{{WidthUS}}} miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... Official language(s) None Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 160 miles (255 km)  - Length 280 miles (455 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... The states marked in red show New England. ...


The Democratic Party was a complex coalition that included farmers in all parts of the country and workingmen's groups in the cities. The key issues in the 1830s were use of patronage to build a strong party machine, opposition to state and national banks, and opposition to modernizing programs that would build up industry at the expense of the taxpayer. Instead of vertical specialization the Democrats strongly favored horizontal expansion to new farm lands, as typified by their expulsion of eastern Indians and acquisition of vast new lands in the West after 1846.


Martin Van Buren won the presidency in 1836 but the economic depression of 1837 caused his defeat for reelection. James K. Polk won in the 1844 election, directed the Mexican-American War, lowered the tariff, set up a subtreasury system, acquired modern-day Washington, Oregon and the Southwest, and then retired. In the 1848 election, the new Free Soil Party, opposing slavery expansion, split the Democratic Party. The Democrats in Congress passed the Compromise of 1850. As the Whigs splintered over slavery and nativism, the Democrats easily elected Franklin Pierce in 1852 and James Buchanan in 1856. Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... 1840 Whig campaign poster blames Van Buren for hard times The Panic of 1837 was an economic depression, one of the most severe financial crises in the history of the United States. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 7,000 - 43,000 18,000 - 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1840 that faded out by about 1856. ... Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Franklin Pierce, Sr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is about the United States President. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Civil War and Reconstruction: 1854-1877

The main Democratic leader in the Senate, Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois, pushed through the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854 amidst strong protest. A major realignment took place among voters and politicians, with new issues, new parties, and new rules, which marked the beginning of the Third Party System. The Whig Party entirely dissolved. While the Democrats survived, many northern Democrats (especially Free Soilers from 1848) joined the newly established Republican Party. Buchanan split the party on the issue of slavery in Kansas; most Democrats in the North rallied to Stephen Douglas. Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861), known as the Little Giant, was an American politician from the frontier state of Illinois, and was one of two Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860, along with John C. Breckenridge. ... This 1854 map shows slave states (grey), free states (red), and US territories (green) with Kansas in center (white). ... The Third Party System, which began in 1854 and changed over to the Fourth Party System in the mid-1890s revolved around the issues of nationalism, modernization, and race. ... GOP redirects here. ... Stephen A. Douglas Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 - June 3, 1861), American politician from Illinois, was one of the Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860 (the other being John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky). ...


In 1860, Douglas was unable to gain the two-thirds vote needed for the nomination. The party nominated Douglas in the North, and John C. Breckinridge in the South. During the Civil War no party politics were allowed in the Confederacy, but partisanship flourished in the North. After the attack on Ft. Sumter, Douglas rallied northern Democrats behind the Union. But Douglas died and the party lacked an outstanding national figure. There was a deep split between the anti-war Copperheads and the War Democrats. The party did well in the 1862 congressional elections, but in 1864 it nominated General George McClellan, a War Democrat, on a peace platform, and lost badly as many War Democrats bolted to support Lincoln. In the 1866 elections, the Radical Republicans won two-thirds majorities in Congress and took control of national affairs. Ulysses S. Grant led the Republicans to landslides in 1868 and 1872. John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Lincoln, President Ulysses S. Grant, General Jefferson Davis, President Robert E. Lee, General Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery (until 29 May 1861) Richmond (29 May 1861–2 April 1865) Danville (from 3 April 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government Confederate Republic President Jefferson... The Copperheads were a group of Northern Democrats who opposed the American Civil War, wanting an immediate peace settlement with the Confederates. ... War Democrats were those who broke with the majority of the Democratic Party and supported the military policies of President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War of 1861-1865. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 - October 29, 1885) was a Major General of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... The U.S. House election, 1866 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1866 which occurred during President Andrew Johnsons term. ... Radical Republicans were certain Republicans in Congress and other federal and state leaders during the American Civil War and Reconstruction eras in U.S. history. ... Ulysses S. Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and politician who was elected as the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant was easily elected to a second term in office despite a split within the Republican Party that resulted in a defection of many key Republicans to opponent Horace Greeley. ...


The nationwide depression of 1873 allowed the Democrats to retake control of the House in the 1874 Democratic landslide. The Democrats benefited from white Southerners' resentment of Reconstruction and consequent hostility to the Republican Party. Once Redeemers ended Reconstruction, and the disenfranchisement of African Americans took place in the 1890s, the South became the "Solid South" for nearly a century because it reliably voted Democratic. In most of the South, there was effectively only one party, and victory in the Democratic primary was tantamount to election. Run on the Fourth National Bank, No. ... The U.S. House election, 1874 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1874 which occurred in the middle of President Ulysses S. Grants second term. ... // Reconstruction was a period in United States history, 1862–1877, that resolved the issues of the American Civil War when both the Confederacy and its system of slavery were destroyed. ... We dont have an article called Redeemers Start this article Search for Redeemers in. ... // Reconstruction was a period in United States history, 1862–1877, that resolved the issues of the American Civil War when both the Confederacy and its system of slavery were destroyed. ... Suffrage (from the Latin suffragium, meaning vote) is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. ... The phrase Solid South describes the electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ...

President Grover Cleveland (1885-1889 and 1893-1897), the only Democrat elected president between 1860 and 1912
President Grover Cleveland (1885-1889 and 1893-1897), the only Democrat elected president between 1860 and 1912

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1732x2572, 411 KB) U.S. President Grover Cleveland. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1732x2572, 411 KB) U.S. President Grover Cleveland. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ...

The Gilded Age: 1877-1896

The national vote was very evenly balanced in the 1880s. Though Republicans continued to control the White House until 1884, the Democrats remained competitive. Dominated by conservative pro-business Bourbon Democrats led by Samuel J. Tilden and Grover Cleveland, they had a solid base in the South and great strength in the rural lower Midwestern United States, and in ethnic German American and Irish American enclaves in large cities, mill towns and mining camps. They controlled the House of Representatives for most of that period. In the election of 1884, Grover Cleveland, the reforming Democratic Governor of New York, won the Presidency. He was defeated in the election of 1888 but was re-elected in 1892. Cleveland was the leader of the conservative Bourbon Democrats who represented mercantile, banking and railroad interests, opposed imperialism and overseas expansion, fought for the gold standard, opposed Bimetallism, and crusaded against corruption and high taxes and tariffs. The Bourbon Democrats were overthrown by William Jennings Bryan in 1896. Bourbon Democrats was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to conservative or reactionary members of the Democratic Party, especially those who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884-1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... German Americans are citizens of the United States of German ancestry. ... Irish population density in the United States, 1872. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Bourbon Democrats was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to conservative or reactionary members of the Democratic Party, especially those who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884-1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... In economics, bimetallism is a monetary standard in which the value of the monetary unit can be expressed either with a certain amount of gold or with a certain amount of silver: the ratio between the two metals is fixed by law. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ...


Bryan, Wilson, and the Progressive Era: 1896-1932

President Woodrow Wilson (1913-1921), the only Democrat elected president between 1896 and 1932
President Woodrow Wilson (1913-1921), the only Democrat elected president between 1896 and 1932

In the presidential election of 1896, widely regarded as a political realignment and beginning of the Fourth Party System, agrarian Democrats demanding free silver defeated the Bourbons and nominated William Jennings Bryan (the Populist Party then followed suit). Bryan, having gained the nomination after his stirring "Cross of Gold" speech delivered at the 1896 convention, waged a vigorous campaign attacking Eastern moneyed interests, but he lost to Republican William McKinley in an election which was to prove decisive. Portrait of Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Realigning election or critical election or realignment are terms from political history and political science. ... The Fourth Party System is a term generally used by historians and political scientists to cover a period in American political history from about 1896 to 1932 (see Third Party System). ... Free Silver was an important political issue in the late 19th century United States. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ... The Cross of Gold speech was delivered by William Jennings Bryan at the 1896 Democratic National Convention on July 9, 1896 at the Chicago Coliseum in Chicago, Illinois. ... The 1896 Democratic National Convention, held at the Chicago Coliseum from July 7 to July 11, was the scene of William Jennings Bryans nomination as Democratic presidential candidate for the 1896 U.S. presidential election, the youngest ever nominee. ... William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was the 25th President of the United States. ...


The Republicans controlled the presidency for 28 of the following 36 years, dominating most of the Northeast, the Midwest, and half of the West. Bryan, with a base in the South and the Great Plains, was strong enough to get the nomination in the elections of 1900, again losing to McKinley, and 1908, losing to William Howard Taft. Bourbon conservatives controlled the convention in 1904, but they faced a Theodore Roosevelt landslide. By 1908, Bryan had dropped his free silver and anti-imperialism rhetoric and supported mainstream progressive issues, especially "anti-trust" or opposition to the big trusts. Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... If you have been redirected here after viewing any statistical information, note that as defined by the Census Bureau, the western United States includes 13 states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. ... Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text here Southern United States The states shown in dark red are usually included in the South, while all or portions of the striped states may or may not be considered part of the Southern United States. ... The Great Plains is the broad expanse of prairie which lies east of the Rocky Mountains in the United States and Canada. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States, a leader of the progressive conservative wing of the Republican Party in the early twentieth century, a chaired professor at Yale Law... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Progressivism is a term that refers to a broad school of contemporary international social and political philosophies. ...

James "Champ" Clark of Missouri was Speaker of the House from 1911-1919.
James "Champ" Clark of Missouri was Speaker of the House from 1911-1919.

Taking advantage of a deep split in the GOP, the Democrats took control of the House in 1910 and elected intellectual reformer Woodrow Wilson in 1912 and 1916. Wilson successfully led Congress to a series of progressive laws, including the Underwood Tariff that reduced tariffs; the Clayton Antitrust Act that systematized the antitrust system; the income tax on individuals; new programs for farmers; and the 8-hour day for railroad workers. His most important innovation was the Federal Reserve System that created a strong central bank. A law to outlaw child labor was reversed by the Supreme Court. Wilson ordered the segregation of the federal Civil Service.[13] The Eighteenth Amendment establishing Prohibition and the Nineteenth Amendment establishing Women's suffrage were passed in Wilson's second term, but they were bipartisan efforts. In effect, Wilson laid to rest the issues of tariffs, money and antitrust that had dominated politics for 40 years. Image File history File links JamesBeauchampClark. ... Image File history File links JamesBeauchampClark. ... James Beauchamp Clark James Beauchamp Clark, known as Champ Clark (March 7, 1850 - March 2, 1921), was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party from the 1890s until his death, and was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination for President in 1912. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the lower... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Underwood Tariff, or the Tariff Act of 1913 reduced the basic United States tariff rates from 41% to 27%, well below the Payne-Aldrich Tariff Act of 1909. ... In the United States, the Clayton Anti-trust Act of 1914 (codified as 15 U.S.C. §§ 12-27) was enacted to remedy deficiencies in antitrust law created under the Sherman Anti-trust Act(1890) that allowed corporations to dissolve labor unions. ... Antitrust laws, or competition laws, are laws which prohibit anti-competitive behavior and unfair business practices. ... Headquarters Washington, DC, USA Central Bank of United States Currency US dollar -ISO 4217 Code USD Base borrowing rate 5. ... A civil servant or public servant is a civilian career public sector employee working for a government department or agency. ... Amendment XVIII (the Eighteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, along with the Volstead Act (which defined intoxicating liquors excluding those used for religious purposes), established Prohibition in the United States. ... Prohibition is any of several periods during which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Amendment XIX (the Nineteenth Amendment) to the United States Constitution grants voting rights regardless of the voters sex: The amendment prohibits both the federal government and the states from using a persons sex as a qualification to vote; it was specifically intended to extend suffrage to women. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Wilson led the U.S. to victory in World War I and helped write the Versailles Treaty, which included his goal of a League of Nations. But in 1919 Wilson's political skills faltered, as did his health; suddenly everything turned sour. The Senate rejected the Versailles Treaty and the League, and a nationwide wave of strikes and violence caused unrest. Prohibition opened a bitter split in the party between the Catholic and ethnic Northern "wets" and the Southern "dries." The deeply divided party was hit by Republican landslides in the presidential elections of 1920, 1924, and 1928. However, Al Smith helped build a strong Catholic base in the big Eastern cities in 1928, and Franklin D. Roosevelt's election as governor of New York that year brought a new leader to center stage. Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Commanders Ferdinand Foch Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Wilhelm II Paul... Woodrow Wilson with the American Peace Commissioners The Treaty of Versailles of 1919 is the peace treaty created as a result of six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 which put an official end to World War I between the Allies and Central Powers. ... The League of Nations was a international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR redirects here. ...


The New Deal and World War II: 1933-1945

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1933-1945), the only person elected four times to the presidency.
President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1933-1945), the only person elected four times to the presidency.

The Great Depression set the stage for a more liberal government, and Franklin D. Roosevelt won a landslide victory in the presidential election of 1932, campaigning on a vague platform that promised repeal of Prohibition and criticizing Herbert Hoover's presidential failures. Within 100 days of taking office on March 4, 1933, Roosevelt came forth with a massive array of programs, the New Deal. These focused on Relief, Recovery, and Reform; that is, relief of unemployment and rural distress, recovery of the economy back to normal, and long-term structural reforms to prevent any repetition. Image File history File linksMetadata FDR_in_1933. ... Image File history File linksMetadata FDR_in_1933. ... FDR redirects here. ... The Great Depression an economic downturn which started in 1929 (although its effects were not fully felt until late 1930) and lasted through most of the 1930s. ... FDR redirects here. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Prohibition is any of several periods during which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Herbert Clark Hoover (August 10, 1874 – October 20, 1964), the 31st President of the United States (1929-1933), was a successful mining engineer, and administrator. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal For other uses of New Deal and The New Deal, see New Deal (disambiguation). ...


The 1932 election brought Democrats large majorities in both houses of Congress, and among state governors; the 1934 election increased those margins. The 1933 programs, called "the First New Deal" by historians, represented a broad consensus; Roosevelt tried to reach out to business and labor, farmers and consumers, cities and countryside. By 1934, however, he was moving toward a more confrontational policy. Roosevelt sought to move the party away from its business base toward a new base in farmers and workers. The New Deal was a program of economic regulation and insurance against hardship. Two old words took new meanings. "Liberal" now meant a supporter of the New Deal; "conservative" meant an opponent. Conservative Democrats were outraged; led by Al Smith, they formed the American Liberty League in 1934 and counterattacked, but were ineffective. Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... The American Liberty League was a U.S. organization formed in 1934 by conservative Democrats such as Al Smith (the 1928 Democratic nominee), Jouett Shouse (former high party official and U.S. Representative), and John Jacob Raskob (former Democratic national chairman and the foremost opponent of prohibition), Dean Acheson (future...

Sam Rayburn of Texas was Speaker of the House from 1940-1947, 1949-1953, and 1955-1961.
Sam Rayburn of Texas was Speaker of the House from 1940-1947, 1949-1953, and 1955-1961.

After making gains in Congress in 1934 Roosevelt embarked on an ambitious legislative program that came to be called "The Second New Deal." It was characterized by building up labor unions, nationalizing welfare by the Works Progress Administration, setting up Social Security, imposing more regulations on business (especially transportation and communications), and raising taxes on business profits. He built a new, diverse majority coalition called the New Deal Coalition, which included labor unions, minorities (most significantly, Catholics, Jews, and for the first time, Blacks). The New Deal coalition won all but two presidential elections (1952 and 1956) until it came apart in 1968. Sam Rayburn, portrait Source: http://teachpol. ... Sam Rayburn, portrait Source: http://teachpol. ... Portrait of Sam Rayburn Samuel Taliaferro Rayburn (January 6, 1882 – November 16, 1961) was a United States politician from Texas. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the lower... WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Works Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created in May 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ... Social Security, in the United States, refers to the Federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ... The New Deal coalition was the poop alignment of interest groups and voting blocs who supported the New Deal and voted for United States Democratic Party presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, and which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that time. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ...


After a triumphant landslide reelection in 1936, Roosevelt announced plans to enlarge the Supreme Court, which tended to oppose his New Deal. A firestorm of opposition erupted, led by his own vice president, John Nance Garner. Roosevelt was defeated by an alliance of Republicans and conservative Democrats, who formed a new Conservative coalition that managed to block nearly all liberal legislation and dominate Congress for the remainder of FDR's presidency. Threatened by the conservative wing of his party, Roosevelt made an attempt to purge it; in 1938, he actively campaigned against five conservative Democratic senators. They denounced national interference in state affairs, and all five senators won re-election. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Nance Cactus Jack Garner (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ...


New Deal liberalism meant the promotion of social welfare, labor unions, civil rights, and regulation of business. The opponents, who stressed long-term growth, support for entrepreneurship and low taxes, now started calling themselves "conservatives." ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ...


Truman to Kennedy: 1945-1963

President Harry S. Truman (1945-1953)
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President Harry S. Truman (1945-1953)

Roosevelt died in office on April 12, 1945, and Harry S. Truman took over. The rifts inside the party that FDR had papered over began to emerge. Former Vice President Henry A. Wallace denounced Truman as a war-monger for his anti-Soviet programs, the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, and NATO. However the Wallace supporters and far left were pushed out of the party and the CIO in 1946-48 by young anti-Communists like Hubert H. Humphrey, Walter Reuther, and Arthur Schlesinger Jr.. On the right the Republicans blasted Truman’s domestic policies. "Had Enough?" and "To err is Truman" were winning slogans for Republicans, who recaptured Congress in 1946 for the first time since 1928. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (512x641, 94 KB) This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the persons official duties. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (512x641, 94 KB) This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made during the course of the persons official duties. ... Harry S Truman (May 8, 1884–December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Harry S Truman (May 8, 1884–December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... Truman delivering the Truman Doctrine on March 12, 1947. ... Map of Cold-War era Europe showing countries that received Marshall Plan aid. ... NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation[1] (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance, the Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for collective security established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, DC, on 4 April 1949. ... CIO may mean: Central Intelligence Organization, secret police in Zimbabwe Chief Information Officer, a corporate title Congress of Industrial Organizations, a United States trade union confederation. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Walter Philip Reuther (September 1, 1907 – May 10, 1970) was an American labor union leader, who made the United Automobile Workers a major force not only in the auto industry but also in the Democratic party]] in the mid 20th century. ... Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. ...


Many party leaders were ready to dump Truman, but they lacked an alternative. Truman counterattacked, pushing out Strom Thurmond and his Dixiecrats and, as an audacious and inspired strategic move, calling the GOP-controlled Congress into special session in July, sending them legislation he knew was anathema to the congressional Republicans, and then, upon the end of the predictably deadlocked and unproductive session, blasting them as the "Do-Nothing" 80th Congress in a relentless whistle-stopping campaign across the country. In perhaps the most stunning presidential election result of the 20th century, Truman won re-election over Thomas Dewey in 1948, and the Democrats regained control of Congress. However, Truman’s Fair Deal proposals, such as universal health care, were defeated by the conservative coalition in Congress. James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... In United States history, the Fair Deal was U.S. President Harry S. Trumans policy of social improvement, outlined in his 1949 State of the Union Address to Congress on January 5, 1949. ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ...


In 1952, Dwight D. Eisenhower recaptured the White House for the Republicans, defeating Illinois governor Adlai Stevenson. Four years later, Eisenhower repeated his success against Stevenson. In Congress the powerful Texas duo of House Speaker Sam Rayburn and Senate Majority Leader Lyndon B. Johnson held the party together in the shadow of the war hero, often by compromising with Eisenhower. In 1958, thanks largely to organized labor, the party made dramatic gains in the off-year congressional elections. Dwight David Eisenhower (also known as Ike) (born David Dwight Eisenhower on October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... Portrait of Sam Rayburn Samuel Taliaferro Rayburn (January 6, 1882 – November 16, 1961) was a United States politician from Texas. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ...

President John F. Kennedy (1961-1963)

Senator John F. Kennedy won the presidential election of 1960, defeating then-Vice President Richard Nixon. Though Kennedy's term in office lasted only about a thousand days, he tried to hold back Communist gains after the failed Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba and the construction of the Berlin Wall, and sent 16,000 soldiers to Vietnam to advise the hard-pressed South Vietnamese army. He challenged America in the Space Race to land an American man on the moon by 1969. After the Cuban Missile Crisis he moved to de-escalate tensions with the Soviet Union. Kennedy also pushed for civil rights and racial integration, one example being Kennedy assigning federal marshals to protect the Freedom Riders in the south. President Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas. Soon after then-Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in as the 36th President of the United States. Johnson, heir to the New Deal broke the Conservative Coalition in Congress and passed a remarkable number of liberal laws, known as the Great Society. Johnson succeeded in passing major civil rights laws that started the racial integration in the south. At the same time, Johnson escalated the Vietnam War, leading to an inner conflict inside the Democratic party that shattered the party in the elections of 1968. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (760x963, 187 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): History of the United States Democratic Party (United States) List of United States Presidents by longevity ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (760x963, 187 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): History of the United States Democratic Party (United States) List of United States Presidents by longevity ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917–November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917–November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Combatants Cuba Cuban exiles trained by the United States Commanders Fidel Castro Arnaldo Ochoa Sanchez Ernesto Guevara de la Serna Grayston Lynch Pepe San Roman Erneido Oliva Strength 51,000 1,500 Casualties 2,200; estimated 115 dead 1,189 captured Cuban poster warning before invasion showing a soldier armed... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Titan II rockets launched 12 U.S. Gemini spacecraft in the 1960s. ... USAF spy photo of one of the suspected launch sites The Cuban Missile Crisis was a confrontation during the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States regarding the Soviet deployment of nuclear missiles in Cuba. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Freedom rides. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ...      Nickname: Big D Location in the state of Texas Country United States State Texas Counties Dallas, Collin, Denton, Kaufman, and Rockwall Mayor Laura Miller Area    - City 997. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908 – January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States (1963–1969). ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal For other uses of New Deal and The New Deal, see New Deal (disambiguation). ... The Conservative coalition was a coalition in American politics bringing together Republicans (most of whom were conservatives) and the minority of conservative Democrats, most of them from the South. ... The Great Society was a set of domestic programs proposed or enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson (1963-1969). ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


The Civil Rights Movement: 1963-1968

African-Americans, who had traditionally given strong support to the Republican Party since the American Civil War, shifted to the Democratic Party in the 1930s, largely due to New Deal relief programs, patronage offers, and the advocacy of civil rights by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt. In many cities, such as Chicago, entire ward-based Republican apparatuses in black neighborhoods switched parties virtually overnight. However, in the late 1960s, the New Deal Coalition began to fracture, as more Democratic leaders voiced support for civil rights, upsetting the party's traditional base of conservative Southern Democrats and ethnic Catholics in Northern cities. After Harry Truman's platform showed support for civil rights and desegregation laws during the 1948 Democratic National Convention, some Southern Democrats, called "Dixiecrats," temporarily abandoned the national party and voted for South Carolina governor Strom Thurmond. They voted for his electors on the regular state Democratic ticket. Although Republican Dwight D. Eisenhower carried half the South in 1952 and 1956, and Senator Barry Goldwater also carried five Southern states in 1964, Democrat Jimmy Carter carried all of the South except Virginia, and there was no long-term realignment until Ronald Reagan's sweeping victories in the South in 1980 and 1984. Download high resolution version (407x619, 70 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (407x619, 70 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Lincoln, President Ulysses S. Grant, General Jefferson Davis, President Robert E. Lee, General Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American political leader who used her stature as First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945 to promote her husbands (Franklin D. Roosevelts) New Deal, as well as Civil Rights. ... The New Deal coalition was the poop alignment of interest groups and voting blocs who supported the New Deal and voted for United States Democratic Party presidential candidates from 1932 until approximately 1966, and which made the Democratic Party the majority party during that time. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Desegregation is the process of ending racial segregation, most commonly used in reference to the United States. ... The 1948 Democratic National Convention was held in Philadelphia from July 12 to July 14, and resulted in the nomination of President Harry Truman for President and of Alben Barkley for Vice President. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... Dwight David Eisenhower (also known as Ike) (born David Dwight Eisenhower on October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician. ... Barry Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for President in the 1964 election. ... James Earl Carter, Jr. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


The national party's dramatic reversal on civil rights issues culminated when Johnson signed into law the Civil Rights Act of 1964. On doing so he commented, "We [the Democrats] have lost the South for a generation." Meanwhile, the Republicans, led again by Richard Nixon, were beginning to implement their Southern strategy, which aimed to resist federal encroachment on the states, while appealing to conservative and moderate white Southerners in the rapidly growing cities and suburbs of the South. President Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ... In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states through its racial appeals to white southerners. ...


The year 1968 was a trying one for the party as well as the United States. In January, even though it was a military defeat for the Viet Cong, the Tet Offensive began to turn American public opinion against the Vietnam War. Senator Eugene McCarthy rallied anti-war forces on college campuses and won the New Hampshire primary. In a stunning move, Johnson withdrew from the election on March 31, and shortly afterward, Senator Robert Kennedy, brother of the former president, entered the race. He won the California primary on June 4 and seemed well on his way to capturing the nomination, but he was assassinated in Los Angeles. During the Democratic National Convention, while Chicago police violently confronted anti-war protesters outside the convention hall, the Democrats nominated Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, a stalwart New Dealer from Minnesota. Meanwhile Alabama's Democratic governor George C. Wallace launched a third-party campaign and at one point was running second to the Republican candidate Richard M. Nixon. Nixon barely won, with the Democrats retaining control of Congress. A Viet Cong soldier, heavily guarded, awaits interrogation following capture in the attacks on Saigon during the festive Tet holiday period of 1968. ... Combatants South Vietnam United States South Korea New Zealand Australia National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam (Viet Cong) North Vietnam Commanders William Westmoreland Võ Nguyên Giáp Strength 50,000+ (estimate) 85,000+ (estimate) Casualties ~2,300 dead ~1,100 dead Total: ~3,400 dead 25,000... Eugene Joseph Gene McCarthy (March 29, 1916 – December 10, 2005) was an American politician and a longtime member of the U.S. Congress. ... The New Hampshire primary is the opening gun of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ... Robert Kennedy Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925–June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... George Corley Wallace (August 25, 1919–September 13, 1998) was an American politician who was elected Governor of Alabama (as a Democrat) four times (1962, 1970, 1974 and 1982) and ran for U.S. President (in 1964, 1968, 1972 and 1976). ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


The degree to which white and black Southerners had reversed their historic parties became evident in the 1968 election, when every Southern state except Texas deserted Humphrey and voted for either Republican Nixon or former Democrat Wallace. The party's main electoral base thus shifted to the Northeast, marking a dramatic reversal from tradition. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Regional definitions vary The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. ...


Transformation years: 1969-1992

President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981)
President Jimmy Carter (1977-1981)

In the presidential election of 1972, the Democrats nominated South Dakota Senator George McGovern with his anti-war slogan "Come Home, America!" McGovern's platform advocated immediate withdrawal from Vietnam and a guaranteed minimum income for all Americans. McGovern tried to crusade against the policies of Nixon, but disclosures about his running-mate Thomas Eagleton (who had undergone secret electroshock therapy) proved disastrous to McGovern's public image. Sargent Shriver, an ally of Daley's, finally accepted the vice presidential candidacy. The general election was a landslide for Nixon, as McGovern carried only Massachusetts. However, Democrats retained their large majorities in Congress and most state houses. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (910x1201, 108 KB)Official White House Portrait of U.S. President Ronald Reagan. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (910x1201, 108 KB)Official White House Portrait of U.S. President Ronald Reagan. ... James Earl Carter, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee, who lost the 1972 presidential election in a landslide to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Thomas Eagleton Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former United States Senator from Missouri. ... Electroconvulsive therapy, also known as electroshock or ECT, is a controversial type of psychiatric shock therapy involving the induction of an artificial seizure in a patient by passing electricity through the brain. ... Sargent Shriver and George McGovern on Aug. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the remainder of this article may require cleanup. ...


The sordid Watergate scandal soon destroyed the Nixon presidency, giving the Democrats a flicker of hope. With Gerald Ford's pardon of Nixon soon after his resignation in 1974, the Democrats were given a "corruption" issue they used to make major gains in the off-year elections. In the 1976 election the surprise winner was Georgia governor Jimmy Carter, a little-known outsider who promised honesty in Washington. The Watergate building. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Earl Carter, Jr. ...


Some of President Carter's major accomplishments consisted of the creation of a national energy policy and the consolidation of governmental agencies, resulting in two new cabinet departments, the Department of Energy and the Department of Education. Carter led the bipartisan effort to deregulate the trucking, airline, rail, finance, communications, and oil industries, thus eliminating the New Deal approach to regulation of the economy. He bolstered the Social Security system, and appointed record numbers of women and minorities to significant government and judicial posts. He helped enact strong legislation on environmental protection, through the expansion of the National Park Service in Alaska, creating 103 million new acres of federally administered land. In foreign affairs, Carter's accomplishments consisted of the Camp David Accords, the Panama Canal Treaties, the creation of full diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China, and the negotiation of the SALT II Treaty with the Soviet Union. In addition, he championed human rights throughout the world and used human rights as the center of his administration's foreign policy. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... The United States Department of Education (also known as ED) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal For other uses of New Deal and The New Deal, see New Deal (disambiguation). ... Social Security, in the United States, refers to the Federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,855 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ... It has been suggested that Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty be merged into this article or section. ... Map of Panama, with Panama canal The Torrijos-Carter Treaties (sometimes referred to in the singular as the Torrijos-Carter Treaty), are a pair of treaties signed by the United States and Panama in Washington, D. C. on September 7, 1977, abrogating the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty signed in 1903. ... nSALT II was a second round of the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks from 1972-1979 between the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, which sought to curtail the manufacture of strategic nuclear weapons. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


Despite all of these successes, Carter failed to implement a national health plan or to reform the tax system, as he had promised in his campaign. Inflation was also on the rise. Abroad, the Iran hostage crisis (November 4, 1979 - January 20, 1981) involved 52 Americans held hostage for 444 days, and Carter's diplomatic and military rescue attempts failed. The Soviet war in Afghanistan starting in December 1979 helped weaken the perception Americans had of Carter. In the presidential election of 1980, Carter defeated Ted Kennedy to regain the party's nomination, but lost to Ronald Reagan in November. The Democrats lost 12 Senate seats, and, for the first time since 1954, the Republicans controlled the Senate. The House, however, remained in Democratic hands. A blindfolded American hostage is paraded by members of the Muslim Student Followers of the Imams Line. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Soviet Union Democratic Republic of Afghanistan Afghan Mujahideen rebels supported by nations such as: United States, Pakistan, Iran, China, Saudi Arabia, United Kingdom Commanders Soviet forces only Boris Gromov Pavel Grachev Valentin Varennikov Jalaluddin Haqqani Abdul Haq Gulbuddin Hekmatyar Mohammed Younas Khalis Ismail Khan Ahmed Shah Massoud Sibghatullah Mojadeddi... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... == == ! ...

Thomas "Tip" O'Neill of Massachusetts was Speaker of the House from 1977-1987.

Instrumental in the election of Republican President Ronald Reagan in the 1980 election were Democrats who supported many conservative policies. These "Reagan Democrats" were Democrats before and after the Reagan years. They were mostly white ethnics in the Northeast and Midwest who were attracted to Reagan's social conservatism and his hawkish foreign policy. Reagan carried 49 states against former Vice President Walter Mondale, a New Deal stalwart, in the 1984 election. Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis, running not as a New Dealer but as an efficiency expert in public administration, lost by a landslide in the 1988 election to Vice President George H. W. Bush. Image File history File links This is the official government photo of Tip ONeill. ... Image File history File links This is the official government photo of Tip ONeill. ... Thomas Phillip ONeill, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the lower... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... President Ronald Reagan. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the remainder of this article may require cleanup. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and a former presidential candidate, being the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Herbert Walker Bush GCB (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America serving from 1989 to 1993. ...


The Democrats remained in control of Congress, although conservative "Blue Dog Democrats" often voted with Reagan and the GOP controlled the Senate 1980-86. The Democrats clashed frequently with Reagan on numerous issues. In foreign policy, they disagreed with the president on the nuclear freeze and the Boland Amendment, which tried to restrict funding of the Contras who were challenging the left-wing government of Nicaragua. Democrats failed to block Reagan's income tax cuts. They supported his increases in military spending, but they did keep funding for social programs that he tried to cut or eliminate, but did not veto. Congress voted for most of the spending increases and tax cuts that Reagan proposed, but not his spending cuts. Annual federal budget deficits, and the national debt, rose to record heights under Reagan. Blue Dog Democrats are social and economic conservatives and moderates in the United States Democratic Party. ... The nuclear freeze was a proposed agreement between the worlds nuclear powers, primarily the United States and the then-Soviet Union, to freeze all production of new nuclear arms and to leave levels of nuclear armanent where they currently were. ... The Boland Amendment was an amendment to the House Appropriations Bill of 1982, which was attached as something known as a Barnacle Bill, or provision that would not be expected to pass on its own merit, to the Defense Appropriations Act of 1983. ... The Contras (from the Spanish term La Contra, short for movement of the contrarrevolucionarios) were the armed opponents of Nicaraguas Sandinista Junta of National Reconstruction following the July 1979 overthrow of Anastasio Somoza Debayle (which ended the Somoza dynasty), and continuing throughout the following decade. ...


In response to three landslide defeats in a row (1980, 1984, 1988), the Democratic Leadership Council was created to move the party to the ideological center. With the party retaining left-of-center supporters as well as supporters holding moderate or conservative views on some issues, the Democrats, more so than ever, became a big tent party with widespread appeal to most opponents of the Republicans. The Democratic Leadership Council is a non-profit corporation[1] that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from traditionally populist positions. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Catch-all party. ...


The Clinton era: 1993-2001

It was during Bill Clinton's presidency (1993-2001) that the Democratic Party's campaigning ideology moved towards the center.
It was during Bill Clinton's presidency (1993-2001) that the Democratic Party's campaigning ideology moved towards the center.

In 1992, for the first time in 12 years, the United States elected a Democrat to the White House. President Bill Clinton balanced the federal budget for the first time since the Kennedy presidency and presided over a robust American economy that saw incomes grow across the board. In 1994, the economy had the lowest combination of unemployment and inflation in 25 years. President Clinton signed into law the Brady Bill, which imposed a five-day waiting period on handgun purchases; he also signed into legislation a ban on many types of semi-automatic firearms (which expired in 2004). His Family and Medical Leave Act, covering some 40 million Americans, offered workers up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-guaranteed leave for childbirth or a personal or family illness. He helped temporarily restore democracy to Haiti, took a strong (if ultimately unsuccessful) hand in Palestinian-Israeli peace negotiations, brokered a historic cease-fire in Northern Ireland, and negotiated the Dayton accords, which helped bring an end to nearly four years of terror and killing in the former Yugoslavia. Clinton was re-elected in 1996, the first time since Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1944 that a Democratic president had been elected two consecutive terms. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Budget generally refers to a list of all planned expenses and revenues. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993. ... A semi-automatic firearm is a gun that requires only a trigger pull for each round that is fired, unlike a single-action revolver, a pump-action firearm, a bolt-action firearm, or a lever-action firearm, which require the shooter to manually chamber each successive round. ... The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (Public Law 103-3, enacted February 5, 1993) was one of the first major new laws enacted by United States President Bill Clinton in his first term, fulfilling a campaign promise. ... Motto: [citation needed] (French for God and my right)2 Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official language(s) English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, NI Sign Language Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair... The Dayton Agreement or Dayton Accords is the name given to the agreement at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio to end the war in the former Yugoslavia that had gone on for the previous three years, in particular the future of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in South Slavic languages, Југославија (Serbian, Macedonian Cyrillic): Land of the South Slavs) describes three separate political entities that existed on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... FDR redirects here. ...


However, the Democrats lost their majority in both houses of Congress in 1994. Clinton vetoed two Republican-backed welfare reform bills before signing the third, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996. The tort reform Private Securities Litigation Reform Act passed over his veto. Labor unions, which had been steadily losing membership since the 1960s, found they had also lost political clout inside the Democratic Party; Clinton enacted the North American Free Trade Agreement with Canada and Mexico over their strong objections.[14] Welfare reform is the name for a political movement in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to institute changes in that system, generally in a more conservative direction. ... The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996, passed under the Clinton administration, was a fundamental shift in both the method and goal of cash assistance to the poor. ... Tort reform is the phrase used by its advocates who claim it is a change in the legal system to reduce litigations alleged adverse effects on the economy. ... The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (PSLRA) implemented several significant substantive changes affecting certain cases brought under the federal securities laws, including changes related to pleading, discovery, liability, and awards fees and expenses. ... Map of NAFTA President Clinton signs the agreement. ...


When the Democratic Leadership Council attempted to move the Democratic agenda in favor of more centrist positions, prominent Democrats from both the centrist and conservative factions (such as Terry McAuliffe) assumed leadership of the party and its direction. Some liberals and progressives felt alienated by the Democratic Party, which they felt had become unconcerned with the interests of the common people and left-wing issues in general.[15] The Democratic Leadership Council is a non-profit corporation[1] that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from traditionally populist positions. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Terry McAuliffe opening the 2004 Democratic National Convention Terrence Richard Terry McAuliffe (born 1957) is an American political leader from the Democratic Party; he served as Chairman of the Democratic National Committee from February 2001 to February 2005. ...


The 21st century: 2000-present

Presidential election of 2000

During the presidential election of 2000, the Democrats chose Vice President Al Gore to be the party's candidate for the presidency. Gore and his Republican opponent, George W. Bush, disagreed on a number of issues, but Gore's affiliation with Clinton and the DLC caused critics—Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader in particular—to assert that Bush and Gore were too similar. Gore won a half-million popular vote plurality over Bush, but lost in the Electoral College by four votes. Many Democrats blamed Nader's third-party spoiler role for Gore's defeat. Presidential election results map. ... This article is about the former United States Vice President. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... Ralph Nader Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... The spoiler effect is a term to describe the effect a candidate can have on a close election, in which their candidacy results in the election being won by a candidate dissimilar to them, rather than a candidate similar to them. ...


Despite Gore's close defeat, the Democrats gained five seats in the Senate, to turn a 55-45 Republican edge into a 50-50 split (with a Republican Vice President breaking a tie). However, when Republican Senator Jim Jeffords of Vermont decided in 2001 to become an independent and vote with the Democratic Caucus, the majority status shifted to the Democrats. It was temporary, as the Republicans regained their Senate majority with gains in 2002 and 2004, leaving the Democrats with only 44 seats, the fewest since the 1920s. James Merrill Jim Jeffords (born May 11, 1934 in Rutland, Vermont) is currently the junior U.S. Senator from Vermont and the only Independent in the United States Senate. ...


In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks, the nation's focus was changed to issues of national security. All but one Democrat voted with their Republican counterparts to authorize President Bush's 2001 invasion of Afghanistan. House and Senate Democratic leaders pushed Democrats to vote for the USA PATRIOT Act and the invasion of Iraq. The Democrats were split over entering Iraq in 2003 and increasingly expressed concerns about both the justification and progress of the War on Terrorism, as well as the domestic effects, including threats to civil rights and civil liberties, from the USA PATRIOT Act. A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Security measures taken to protect the Houses of Parliament in London, England. ... Combatants al-Qaeda, Taliban Northern Alliance, United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, France, New Zealand, Italy, Germany Commanders Mohammed Omar Osama bin Laden Tommy Franks Mohammed Fahim Strength Casualties {{{notes}}} The United States invasion of Afghanistan occurred in October 2001, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks on... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article regards the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Combatants Participants in Operations: United States United Kingdom Turkey South Korea Canada Israel Spain Portugal Pakistan Afghanistan Australia New Zealand Italy Netherlands Denmark France Germany Norway Romania Philippines Poland Ukraine Georgia Jordan Saudi Arabia NATO New Iraqi Army and others Targets of Operations: Taliban Baathist Iraq Baath Loyalists... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


In the wake of the financial fraud scandal of the Enron Corporation and other corporations, Congressional Democrats pushed for a legal overhaul of business accounting with the intention of preventing further accounting fraud. This led to the bipartisan Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002. The Democrats generally campaigned on the issue of economic recovery for the 2002 midterm elections. Enron Corporation was an energy company based in Houston, Texas. ... Before the signing ceremony of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, President George W. Bush meets with Senator Paul Sarbanes, Secretary of Labor Elaine Chao and other dignitaries in the Blue Room at the White House on July 30, 2002. ...


Presidential election of 2004

Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts was the Democratic Party's 2004 candidate for President.
Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts was the Democratic Party's 2004 candidate for President.

The 2004 campaign started as early as December 2002, when Gore announced he would not seek the party's nomination for president. Howard Dean, an opponent of the war and a critic of the Democratic establishment, was the early front-runner leading into the Democratic primaries. Massachusetts Senator John Kerry was nominated because he was seen as more "electable" than Dean.[16] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... John Kerry arrives at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, where he was officially designated as the Democratic Party nominee. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (999x1546, 291 KB) Description Promotional photograph of John Kerry with the U.S. flag in the background. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (999x1546, 291 KB) Description Promotional photograph of John Kerry with the U.S. flag in the background. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... A primary election is an election in which registered voters in a jurisdiction select a political partys candidate for a later election (nominating primary). ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Anybody but Bush was an informal political movement during the 2004 US Presidential election. ...


As layoffs of American workers occurred in various industries due to outsourcing, some Democrats such as Howard Dean and Erskine Bowles began to refine their positions on free trade. By 2004, the failure of George W. Bush's administration to find weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, mounting combat casualties and fatalities in that country, and the lack of any end point for the War on Terror were frequently debated issues in the election. That year, Democrats generally campaigned on surmounting the jobless recovery, solving the Iraq crisis, and fighting terrorism more efficiently. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Erskine Boyce Bowles is an American businessman and political figure from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Weapon of mass destruction (WMD) is a term used to describe a munition with the capacity to indiscriminately kill large numbers of human beings. ... A jobless recovery is a phrase used by economists to describe the recovery from a recession which does not produce strong growth in employment. ...


In the election, Kerry lost both the popular vote by 3 million votes and the Electoral College. Republicans also gained four seats in the Senate and three seats in the House of Representatives. For the first time since 1952, the Democratic leader of the Senate lost re-election. Democrats gained governorships in Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Montana while losing the governorship of Missouri and a legislative majority in Georgia—which had long been a Democratic stronghold. An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ...


After the election most analysts concluded that Kerry was a poor campaigner.[17][18] The Swift Boat Veterans for Truth, ballot initiatives banning same-sex marriage, Kerry's inability to reconcile his vote to authorize the war in Iraq with his opposition to it, all played various parts in his defeat. Other factors included a healthy job market, a rising stock market, strong home sales, and low unemployment. Swift Vets and POWs for Truth, formerly known as the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT), is an organization of American Swift boat veterans and former prisoners of war of the Vietnam War, formed during the 2004 presidential election campaign for the purpose of opposing John Kerrys candidacy for... Same-sex marriage is the union of two people who are of the same biological sex or gender. ...


The party today

Senator Barack Obama of Illinois is the only African-American currently serving in the United States Senate.
Senator Barack Obama of Illinois is the only African-American currently serving in the United States Senate.

After the 2004 election, prominent Democrats began to rethink the party's direction, and a variety of strategies for moving forward were voiced. Some Democrats proposed moving towards the right to regain seats in the House and Senate and possibly win the presidency in the election of 2008; others demanded that the party move more to the left and become a stronger opposition party. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2800x4073, 1245 KB) http://obama. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2800x4073, 1245 KB) http://obama. ... Barack Hussein Obama (born August 4, 1961) is the junior U.S. Senator from Illinois. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The United States Presidential election of 2008 will be held on November 4, 2008. ...


These debates were reflected in the 2005 campaign for Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, which Howard Dean won over the objections of many party insiders. Dean sought to move the Democratic strategy away from the establishment, and bolster support for the party's state organizations, even in Red states.[19] Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ...


When the 109th Congress convened, Democratic Senators chose Harry Reid of Nevada as their Minority Leader and Richard Durbin of Illinois to replace Reid as their Assistant Minority Leader. Reid tried to convince the Democratic Senators to vote more as a bloc on important issues; he forced the Republicans to abandon their push for privatization of Social Security. In 2005, the Democrats retained their governorships in Virginia and New Jersey, electing Tim Kaine and Jon Corzine, respectively. However, the party lost the mayoral race in New York City, a Democratic stronghold, for the fourth straight time. The 109th United States Congress meets from January 4, 2005, to January 1, 2007. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party, for which he serves as Senate Minority Leader. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... Richard Joseph Durbin, usually called Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ... Traditionally the second ranking position in the minority party in the United States Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Timothy Michael Kaine (born February 26, 1958 in St. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the current Democratic Governor of the state of New Jersey. ... Nickname: Big Apple; City that never Sleeps; Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ...


Scandals involving lobbyist Jack Abramoff, former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, the House GOP leadership's purported cover-up of the Mark Foley scandal, and Ohio governor Bob Taft gave the Democrats the opportunity of using corruption as an issue for the 2006 campaign. President Bush's slow response to the Hurricane Katrina disaster seemed to be an issue that highlighted conflicts in the emergency response system in many areas, including the local agencies. Public opinion on the war in Iraq continued its steady negative trend, and this, along with widespread sentiment among conservatives that the government had let spending get out of control, continued to drag President Bush's job approval ratings down to the lowest levels of his presidency. The main hurdle for Democratic victory in the House was the districting system (see Gerrymandering) that made over 90% of the seats "safe" for one party or the other. To regain a majority, the Democrats needed to take nearly all the rest. ÷ It has been suggested that Category:Jack Abramoff scandals be merged into this article or section. ... Thomas Dale Tom DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Sugar Land, Texas. ... Mark Foley The Mark Foley scandal, which broke in late September 2006, centers on sexually explicit and solicitative e-mails and instant messages sent by Mark Foley, a Republican Congressman from Florida, to congressional pages and former pages. ... Robert Alphonso Taft II (born January 8, 1942) has been the Republican governor of the U.S. state of Ohio since 1999. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Gerrymandering is a controversial form of redistricting in which electoral district or constituency boundaries are manipulated for an electoral advantage. ...

In late 2006, Democrats chose Representative Nancy Pelosi of California to be their nominee for the next Speaker of the House.
In late 2006, Democrats chose Representative Nancy Pelosi of California to be their nominee for the next Speaker of the House.

As a result of the 2006 midterm elections, the Democratic Party is set to become the majority party in the House of Representatives as well as the effective majority party in the United States Senate when the 110th Congress convenes in 2007 (The Senate will consist of 49 Democrats, 49 Republicans and two Independents who will caucus with the Democratic party). The Democrats had spent twelve successive years as the minority party in the House before the watershed 2006 mid-term elections. Part of the Democratic Party's electoral success can be attributed to running mostly conservative-leaning Democrats against at-risk Republican incumbents.[20] The Democrats also went from controlling a minority of governorships to an expected majority. The number of seats held by party members likewise increased in various state legislatures, giving the Democrats control of a plurality of them nationwide. No opposition party challenger defeated any incumbent Democratic Governor, U.S. Senator, or U.S. Representative in the election. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1768x2400, 161 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nancy Pelosi Democratic Party (United States) ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1768x2400, 161 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Nancy Pelosi Democratic Party (United States) ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is the House Minority Leader of the 109th Congress of the United States and is expected to be the Speaker of the House for the 110th Congress. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the lower... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ...


In the 2006 Democratic caucus leadership elections, Democrats chose Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland for House Majority Leader and nominated Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California for Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. If elected by the House of Representatives, she would become the first female House Speaker as well as second in the line of succession to the presidency. Senate Democrats chose Harry Reid of Nevada for United States Senate Majority Leader. Those elected would assume these roles in the 110th Congress. Steny Hamilton Hoyer (born June 14, 1939) is a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, representing the Marylands 5th congressional district since 1981. ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is the House Minority Leader of the 109th Congress of the United States and is expected to be the Speaker of the House for the 110th Congress. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the lower... The presidential line of succession defines who may become or act as President of the United States upon the incapacity, death, resignation, or removal from office (by impeachment and subsequent conviction) of a sitting President or a President-elect. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party, for which he serves as Senate Minority Leader. ... The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by the party conference which holds the majority in the Senate to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the...


The Democratic Party, once dominant in the Southern states of the former Confederacy, is now strongest in the Northeast (Mid-Atlantic and New England), Upper Midwest and Great Lakes Region and along the Pacific Coast, including California and in Hawaii. The Democrats are also strongest in the major cities, such as New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, Detroit, San Francisco, Dallas and Washington D.C.. Recently, Democrats have been faring better in some southern states, such as Virginia and Florida, and in the Rocky Mountain states. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The states marked in red show New England. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: Big Apple; City that never Sleeps; Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... Nickname: The Windy City, The Second City, Chi Town, The City of Big Shoulders Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook Incorporated March 4, 1837 Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area    - City 606. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the City That Loves You Back, the Quaker City, The Birthplace of America Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D... Boston is a town and small port c. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Dallas redirects here. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


2008 outlook

Senator Hillary Clinton of New York has led the opinion polls in the race for the party's 2008 presidential nomination.
Senator Hillary Clinton of New York has led the opinion polls in the race for the party's 2008 presidential nomination.

Senator Hillary Clinton has taken an early lead as the most likely 2008 Democratic Party presidential nominee although she has not formally announced her candidacy. Delaware Senator Joe Biden, Connecticut Senator Christopher Dodd, former Alaska Senator Mike Gravel, and Iowa Governor Tom Vilsack have announced their intentions to seek the nomination. Other possible candidates include former national nominees John Kerry, John Edwards, and Al Gore, as well as retired General Wesley Clark, Indiana Senator Evan Bayh, Illinois Senator Barack Obama (who could become the first African-American on a major party ticket), and New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson (who could become the first Hispanic on a major party ticket). Based on past election cycles, analysts expect serious candidates will have to announce their intentions by the end of 2006 in order to secure pledges of funding and recruit high visibility supporters. Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1500, 200 KB) Official Senate portrait of Hillary Rodham Clinton Source: http://clinton. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1500, 200 KB) Official Senate portrait of Hillary Rodham Clinton Source: http://clinton. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide polls that have been conducted relating to the U.S. presidential election, 2008. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... Joseph Robinette Joe Biden, Jr. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944), is an American politician. ... Maurice Robert Gravel (born May 13, 1930) better known as Mike Gravel, was a Democratic U.S. Senator from Alaska for two terms, from 1969 to 1981. ... Thomas James Vilsack (born December 13, 1950) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and is currently serving as the 40th Governor of the state of Iowa. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... John Reid Edwards (born June 10, 1953), was the Democratic 2004 nominee for Vice President, and a one-term former Democratic Senator from North Carolina who is considered a potentially strong Democratic candidate for the 2008 Presidential election. ... This article is about the former United States Vice President. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general in the U.S. Army. ... Birch Evans Evan Bayh III (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as a U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Barack Hussein Obama (born August 4, 1961) is the junior U.S. Senator from Illinois. ... William Blaine Bill Richardson (born November 15, 1947) is an American politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


Presidential tickets

Election year Result Nominees
President Vice President
1828 won Andrew Jackson John Caldwell Calhoun[1]
1832 won Martin Van Buren
1836 won Martin Van Buren Richard Mentor Johnson
1840 lost
1844 won James Knox Polk George Mifflin Dallas
1848 lost Lewis Cass William Orlando Butler
1852 won Franklin Pierce William Rufus de Vane King[2]
1856 won James Buchanan John Cabell Breckinridge
1860 lost Stephen Arnold Douglas (Northern) Herschel Vespasian Johnson
lost John Cabell Breckinridge (Southern) Joseph Lane
1864 lost George Brinton McClellan George Hunt Pendleton
1868 lost Horatio Seymour Francis Preston Blair, Jr.
1872 lost Horace Greeley[3] Benjamin Gratz Brown
1876 lost Samuel Jones Tilden Thomas Andrews Hendricks
1880 lost Winfield Scott Hancock William Hayden English
1884 won Stephen Grover Cleveland Thomas Andrews Hendricks[2]
1888 lost Allen Granberry Thurman
1892 won Adlai Ewing Stevenson
1896 lost William Jennings Bryan Arthur Sewall
1900 lost Adlai Ewing Stevenson
1904 lost Alton Brooks Parker Henry Gassaway Davis
1908 lost William Jennings Bryan John Worth Kern
1912 won Thomas Woodrow Wilson Thomas Riley Marshall
1916 won
1920 lost James Middleton Cox Franklin Delano Roosevelt
1924 lost John William Davis Charles Wayland Bryan
1928 lost Alfred Emmanuel Smith Joseph Taylor Robinson
1932 won Franklin Delano Roosevelt[2] John Nance Garner
1936 won
1940 won Henry Agard Wallace
1944 won Harry S. Truman
1948 won Harry S. Truman Alben William Barkley
1952 lost Adlai Ewing Stevenson II John Jackson Sparkman
1956 lost Estes Kefauver
1960 won John Fitzgerald Kennedy[2] Lyndon Baines Johnson
1964 won Lyndon Baines Johnson Hubert Horatio Humphrey
1968 lost Hubert Horatio Humphrey Edmund Sixtus Muskie
1972 lost George Stanley McGovern Robert Sargent Shriver[4]
1976 won James Earl Carter, Jr. Walter Frederick Mondale
1980 lost
1984 lost Walter Frederick Mondale Geraldine Anne Ferraro
1988 lost Michael Stanley Dukakis Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr.
1992 won William Jefferson Clinton Albert Arnold Gore, Jr.
1996 won
2000 lost Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. Joseph Isadore Lieberman
2004 lost John Forbes Kerry John Reid Edwards

[1] Resigned.
[2] Died in office.
[3] The Greeley/Brown ticket was first nominated by the Liberal Republican Party. Greeley died before the electoral votes were cast.
[4] Thomas Eagleton was the original vice presidential nominee, but was forced to withdraw his nomination.
Presidential electoral votes by state. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782–March 31, 1850), was a prominent United States politician in the first half of the 19th century. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795–June 15, 1849) was the eleventh President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1845 to March 4, 1849. ... George Mifflin Dallas (July 10, 1792—December 31, 1864) was a U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania and the eleventh Vice President, serving under James K. Polk. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Campaign poster for 12th United States Presidential campaign, 1848. ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Franklin Pierce, Sr. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is about the United States President. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (April 23, 1813 – June 3, 1861), known as the Little Giant, was an American politician from the frontier state of Illinois, and was one of two Democratic Party nominees for President in 1860, along with John C. Breckenridge. ... Herschel Vespasian Johnson (September 18, 1812 - August 16, 1880) was an American politician. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Joseph Lane (1801-1881) was an American general during the Mexican War. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Brinton McClellan (December 3, 1826 - October 29, 1885) was a Major General of the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825–November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Horatio Seymour (May 31, 1810 - February 12, 1886) was an American politician. ... Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Photographic portrait of Greeley Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811–November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 - December 13, 1885) was a Liberal Republican Senator, Governor of Missouri, and the Vice presidential candidate in the election of 1872. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. ... Portrait of Winfield S. Hancock during the Civil War Winfield Scott Hancock (February 14, 1824 – February 9, 1886) was a career U.S. Army officer who served with distinction as a general in the American Civil War and ran unsuccessfully for President of the United States in 1880. ... William Hayden English (August 27, 1822–February 7, 1896) was an American politician. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Congressman from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... Arthur Sewall (November 25, 1835 _ September 5, 1900 was a U.S. Democratic politician from Maine most notable as William Jennings Bryans first running mate in 1896. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Congressman from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Alton Brooks Parker (May 14, 1852 – May 10, 1926) was an American lawyer and judge and a U.S. presidential candidate in the 1904 elections. ... Henry Gassaway Davis (16 November 1823 - March 11, 1916) was a U.S. Democratic politician from West Virginia. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ... John Worth Kern (December 20, 1849 - August 17, 1917) was a U.S. Democratic politician from Indiana. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Middleton Cox (March 31, 1870 – July 15, 1957) was a Governor of Ohio, U.S. Representative from Ohio and Democratic candidate for President of the United States in the election of 1920. ... FDR redirects here. ... Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. ... John William Davis John William Davis (April 13, 1873 — March 24, 1955) was an American politician and lawyer. ... Charles Wayland Bryan (February 10, 1867 - March 4, 1945), was the younger brother of perennial U.S. Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Al Smith waves to crowds, 1928 Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... Joseph Taylor Robinson Joseph Taylor Robinson (August 26, 1872 - July 14, 1937) was a Democratic United States Senator, Senate Majority Leader, member of the United States House of Representatives, Governor of Arkansas, and U.S. Vice Presidential candidate. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... FDR redirects here. ... John Nance Cactus Jack Garner (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Harry S Truman (May 8, 1884–December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Harry S Truman (May 8, 1884–December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office John Jackson Sparkman (December 20, 1899 – November 16, 1985) was a United States politician from Alabama. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917–November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee, who lost the 1972 presidential election in a landslide to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... James Earl Carter, Jr. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) has been a two-term U.S. Senator, the forty-second vice president of the United States (1977-1981), and the wildly unsuccessful Democratic Party nominee for president in 1984 against the incumbent, Republican Ronald W. Reagan. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) has been a two-term U.S. Senator, the forty-second vice president of the United States (1977-1981), and the wildly unsuccessful Democratic Party nominee for president in 1984 against the incumbent, Republican Ronald W. Reagan. ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is best known as the first and, so far, only woman to be a candidate for Vice President of the United States on a major party ticket (although women on third-party tickets continue to run for the position). ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and a former presidential candidate, being the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... This article is about the former United States Vice President. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This article is about the former United States Vice President. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a Jewish American politician from Connecticut and a leading member of the anti-Palestinian lobby. ... Presidential election results map. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... John Reid Edwards (born June 10, 1953), was the Democratic 2004 nominee for Vice President, and a one-term former Democratic Senator from North Carolina who is considered a potentially strong Democratic candidate for the 2008 Presidential election. ... The Liberal Republican Party of the United States was a political party formed in 1872 to oppose the administration of then-President Ulysses S. Grant. ... Thomas Eagleton Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former United States Senator from Missouri. ...


Current factions

New Democrats, Centrists and the DLC

Though centrist Democrats differ on a variety of issues, they typically foster a mix of political views and ideas. Compared to other Democratic factions, they are mostly more supportive of the use of military force, including the war in Iraq, and are more willing to reduce government welfare, as indicated by their support for welfare reform and tax cuts. Centrists argue that their ideas are more in line with the majority of Americans. Progressive Democrats such as Governor Howard Dean classify "new democrats" as "Republican Lite" due to their willingness to promote and vote for a Republican agenda and their willingness to accept corporate fundraising. Welfare reform is the name for a political movement in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to institute changes in that system, generally in a more conservative direction. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ...


One of the most influential factions is the Democratic Leadership Council (DLC), an influential non-profit organization that advocates centrist positions for the party. Members often self-identify under the title "New Democrat." Selected former party leaders of the 1980s founded the DLC in response to the landslide victory of Ronald Reagan over Walter Mondale in 1984, believing the Democratic Party needed to reform its political philosophy if it was to ever retake the White House. The DLC hails President Bill Clinton as proof of the viability of third way politicians and a DLC success story. The DLC has no official allegiance with or control over the Democratic National Committee. Many Progressive Democrats believe the DLC to be partially responsible for the Republican takeover of Congress in 1994 and their taking back of the Senate in 2002. Chairman Howard Dean is the first DNC Chair since 1992 to not be aligned or involved with the DLC. However, critics contend that the DLC is effectively a powerful, corporate-financed influence within the Democratic Party that acts to keep Democratic Party candidates and platforms sympathetic to corporate interests. The Democratic Leadership Council is a non-profit corporation[1] that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from traditionally populist positions. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... For the Canadian New Democratic Party, see New Democratic Party. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Third Way is a centrist philosophy of governance that, at least from a traditional social democratic perspective, usually stands for deregulation, decentralization and lower taxes. ...


Prominent politicians associated with the DLC include its former chairman President Bill Clinton, former chairman Connecticut Senator Joseph Lieberman (elected over the Democratic nominee for Senate in 2006), New York Senator Hillary Clinton, former Vice President Al Gore (up to 2000, but not since), and former Virginia Governor Mark Warner. The DLC was founded and continues to be led by Al From. Governor Tom Vilsack of Iowa is the current chairman. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a Jewish-American Democratic politician and a current U.S. senator from Connecticut. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... This article is about the former United States Vice President. ... Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Al From is the primary founder and current CEO of the Democratic Leadership Council. ... Thomas James Vilsack (born December 13, 1950) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and is currently serving as the 40th Governor of the state of Iowa. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Libertarian Democrats

Civil libertarians also often support the Democratic Party because its positions on such issues as civil rights and separation of church and state are more closely aligned to their own than the positions of the Republican Party, and because the Democrats' economic agenda may be more appealing to them than that of the Libertarian Party. They oppose gun control, the "War on Drugs," protectionism, corporate welfare, governmental borrowing, and an interventionist foreign policy. The Democratic Freedom Caucus is an organized group of this faction. Libertarian socialists (also called "left libertarians") are divided over the issue of voting, but may individually choose to support progressive Democratic political candidates. A civil libertarian is one who is actively concerned with the protection of individual civil liberties and civil rights. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The separation of church and state is a political doctrine which states that the institutions of the state or national government should be kept separate from those of religious institutions. ... GOP redirects here. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded in 1971. ... The prohibition of drugs through legislation or religious law is a common means of controlling the perceived negative consequences of recreational drug use at a society- or world-wide level. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over... Corporate welfare is a pejorative term, first coined by Ralph Nader in 1956, describing a governments bestowal of grants and/or tax breaks on corporations or other special favorable treatment from the government. ... Interventionism is a term for a policy of non-defensive (proactive) activity undertaken by a nation-state, or other geo-political jurisdiction of a lesser or greater nature, to manipulate an economy or society. ... Libertarian socialism includes a group of political philosophies that aims to create a society without political, economic or social hierarchies - a society within which individuals freely co-operate together as equals. ...


Progressive Democrats

Many Progressive Democrats are descendants of the New Left of Democratic Presidential candidate/Senator George McGovern of South Dakota; others were involved in the presidential candidacies of Vermont Governor Howard Dean and U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich of Ohio; and still others are disaffected former members of the Green Party. Progressive Democratic candidates for public office have had popular support as candidates in metropolitan areas outside the South, and among African-Americans nationwide. Unifying issues among progressive Democrats have been opposition to the War in Iraq, opposition to economic and social conservatism, opposition to heavy corporate influence in government, support for universal health care, revitalization of the national infrastructure and steering the Democratic Party in the direction of being a more forceful opposition party. Compared to other factions of the party, they've been most critical of the Republican Party, and most supportive of social and economic equality. The 21st Century Democrats is a political organization active since 2000 in assisting candidates it describes as "progressive" or "populist" in winning elections. Its strategy puts emphasis on training large numbers of organizers to work at the grassroots level and targeting specific campaigns it sees as important. It has strong ties to veterans of campaigns for the late Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone. The New Left is a term used in political discourse to refer to radical left-wing movements from the 1960s onwards. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine Dr. George Stanley McGovern (born July 19, 1922) was a United States Congressman, Senator, and Democratic presidential nominee, who lost the 1972 presidential election in a landslide to incumbent Richard Nixon. ... Official language(s) None[1] Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... Dennis John Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... This article regards the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Universal health care is a health care system in which all residents of a geographic or political entity have their health care paid for, regardless of medical condition or financial status. ... 21st Century Democrats is a political organization founded by Senator Tom Harkin, commentator Jim Hightower and Congressman Lane Evans to help elect progressive or populist candidates in winning elections. ... Progressivism is a term that refers to a broad school of contemporary international social and political philosophies. ... Populism is a political philosophy or rhetorical style that holds that the common persons interests are oppressed or hindered by the elite in society, and that the instruments of the state need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and used for the benefit and advancement of the... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ...


The Congressional Progressive Caucus or CPC is a caucus of progressive Democrats, along with one independent, in the U.S. Congress. It is the single largest Democratic caucus in the House of Representatives, although it currently has no members from the Senate. Well-known members include Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA), and Rep. Bernie Sanders (I-VT). The CPC advocates universal health care, fair trade agreements, living wage laws, the right of all workers to organize into trade unions and engage in strikes and collective bargaining, the repeal of significant portions of the USA PATRIOT Act, the formation of a Department of Peace, the legalization of gay marriage, strict campaign finance reform laws, a complete pullout from Iraq, a crackdown on corporate crime and corporate welfare, an increase in income tax on whom they consider "wealthy," tax cuts for those they consider "poor," and an increase in welfare spending by the federal government. The Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) the single largest caucus in the United States House of Representatives, and works together to advance progressive issues and causes. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... Dennis John Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... John Lewis John Robert Lewis (born February 21, 1940) is an American politician and was an important leader in the American Civil Rights Movement as president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). ... Barbara Lee Barbara Lee (born July 16, 1946), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1998, representing the 9th District of California (map). ... Bernard Bernie Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is a United States Representative and current Senator-elect from Vermont. ... Italic textsilly website ... Living wage refers to the minimum hourly wage necessary for a person to achieve a basic standard of living. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Logo of U.S. Department of Peace Movement The United States Department of Peace (or DoP) is a proposed cabinet-level department of the executive branch of the U.S. government. ... Same-sex marriage is the union of two people who are of the same biological sex or gender. ... Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... ...


Progressive Democrats have included Congressmen Kucinich, Congressman John Conyers (Michigan), Jim McDermott (Washington), John Lewis (Georgia), the late Senator Paul Wellstone (Minnesota). The Democracy for America (DFA) political action committee generally supports fiscally responsible and socially progressive candidates at all levels of government. It was founded by ex-Vermont Governor and current Democratic Party Chairman Howard Dean during his presidential campaign; its current Chairman is James H. Dean, Howard Dean's brother. DFA fights against the influence of the far-right on American politics and works to rebuild the Democratic Party "from the bottom up." John Conyers John Conyers, Jr. ... Rep. ... John Lewis John Robert Lewis (born February 21, 1940) is an American politician and was an important leader in the American Civil Rights Movement as president of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... Democracy for America (DFA) is a political action committee dedicated to supporting fiscally responsible, socially progressive candidates at all levels of government—from school board to the presidency. ... Progressivism is a term that refers to a broad school of contemporary international social and political philosophies. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... Jim Dean Speaks at a Democracy for New Hampshire fundraiser in Concord, New Hampshire James H. Dean is a U.S. politician. ...


The Progressive Democrats of America lends itself to the progressive ideology within the party. Founded by members of Dennis Kucinich's 2004 presidential campaign, it does not hold much sway in the Democratic Party, being considered more liberal than other factions. The Progressive Democrats of America is a progressive organization that formed out of the members of Dennis Kucinichs Presidential Campaign as well as Democracy for America, an organization that itself grew out of Howard Deans presidential campaign. ... Dennis John Kucinich (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ...


Unions

Since the 1930s, a critical element in the Democratic Party coalition are labor unions. Unions supply a great deal of the money, grass roots political organization, and voting base of support for the party. Union membership in the private sector of the economy has fallen to 8 from 35 percent in the past 50 years, but is still important in some industrial states and in the national capital. The most important unions in the 21st century represent government employees, such as teachers, policemen, nurses, and prison guards, as well as service-sector workers, such as hotel workers and janitors.


The old industrial unions are more protectionist and are concerned with preservation of pensions, collective bargaining, and access to health insurance. Important union organizations in the Democratic coalition include SEIU, UNITE HERE, AFSCME, UAW, and the Change to Win and AFL-CIO Labor Federations. Prominent politicians associated with the labor wing include Ohio congressman and Senator-elect Sherrod Brown and Byron Dorgan, the populist senator from North Dakota, as well as prospective 2008 Presidential candidate John Edwards. Most of the members in this faction identify with the progressive faction of the party. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is the largest and fastest growing labor union in the United States and Canada, representing 1. ... UNITE HERE is a result of a 2004 merger of two North American labor unions: the Union of Needletrades, Industrial, and Textile Employees (UNITE) and the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees Union (HERE). ... The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) is the second- or third-largest labor union in the United States and one of the fastest-growing, representing over 1. ... The United Auto Workers (UAW), officially the United Automobile, Aerospace & Agricultural Implement Workers of America International Union, is one of the largest labor unions in North America, with more than 700,000 members in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico organized into approximately 950 union locals. ... The Change to Win Federation is a coalition of American labor unions originally formed in 2005 as an alternative to the AFL-CIO. The coalition is associated with strong advocacy of the organising model. ... American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, commonly AFL-CIO, is Americas largest federation of unions, made up of 53 national and international (including Canadian) unions, together representing over 9 million workers. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Sherrod Brown (born November 9, 1952), of Avon, Ohio is an American politician who serves as a U.S. representative from the Democratic Party, representing the 13th congressional district of Ohio. ... Byron Leslie Dorgan (born May 14, 1942) is the junior United States Senator from North Dakota. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... John Reid Edwards (born June 10, 1953), was the Democratic 2004 nominee for Vice President, and a one-term former Democratic Senator from North Carolina who is considered a potentially strong Democratic candidate for the 2008 Presidential election. ...


Liberal Democrats

Liberal Democrats are to the left of centrist Democrats. The liberal faction was dominant in the party for several decades, although they have been hurt by the rise of centrist forces such as President Bill Clinton. Compared to conservatives and moderates, liberal Democrats generally have advocated fair trade and other less conservative economic policies, and a less militaristic foreign policy, and have a reputation of being more forceful in pushing for civil liberties. Liberals are increasingly identified as being part of the larger progressive wing of the party. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Italic textsilly website ... Civil liberties are protections from the power of governments. ...


Prominent liberal Democrats include U.S. Senators Barbara Boxer (California), Russ Feingold (Wisconsin), Ted Kennedy (Massachusetts), Tom Harkin (Iowa), and House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi (California). Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... Russell Dana Russ Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ... == == ! ... Thomas Richard Tom Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is the junior United States Senator from Iowa. ... Nancy Patricia DAlesandro Pelosi (born March 26, 1940) is the House Minority Leader of the 109th Congress of the United States and is expected to be the Speaker of the House for the 110th Congress. ...


Conservative Democrats

Also see: Bourbon Democrat, a forerunner of Conservative Democrats.

The Democratic Party had a conservative element, mostly from the South and Border regions, into the 1980s. Their numbers declined sharply as the GOP built up its Southern base. They were sometimes humorously called "Yellow dog Democrats," or "boll weevils," "Dixiecrats." In the House, they form the Blue Dog Democrats caucus of fiscal and social conservatives and moderates, primarily southerners, willing to broker compromises with the Republican leadership. They have acted as a unified voting bloc in the past, giving its forty plus members some ability to change legislation. The Blue Dogs added nine new members as a result of the 2006 midterm elections.[21] Bourbon Democrat was a term used in the United States from 1876 to 1904 to refer to a conservative or reactionary member of the Democratic Party, especially one who supported President Grover Cleveland in 1884–1896 and Alton B. Parker in 1904. ... Yellow Dog Democrats are voters in the southern region of the United States who consistently vote for Democratic candidates in the late 19th and early 21st centuries because of lingering resentment against the Republicans dating back to the Civil War and Reconstruction period. ... Boll weevils was an American political term used in the mid- and late-20th century to describe conservative Southern Democrats. ... The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... Blue Dog Democrats are social and economic conservatives and moderates in the United States Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal • • The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ...


Prominent conservative Democrats of recent time include Senators Ben Nelson (Nebraska), Ken Salazar (Colorado) and Mary Landrieu (Louisiana); as well as Congressmen Ike Skelton (Missouri), Gene Taylor (Mississippi), Henry Cuellar (Texas), Collin Peterson (Minnesota), and Jim Marshall (Georgia). Moderate Blue Dogs include Harold Ford, Jr. (Tennessee). Joe Lieberman (Connecticut) has sided with conservatives on some foreign policy issues (especially his support for the Iraq war), but is considered liberal on many social and economic issues. Earl Benjamin Ben Nelson (born May 17, 1941 in McCook, Nebraska) is an American politician from Nebraska, where he was born and has lived for most of his life. ... Kenneth Lee Salazar (born March 2, 1955) is an American politician, rancher, and environmentalist from the U.S. state of Colorado. ... Mary Loretta Landrieu (born November 23, 1955) is the senior Democratic United States Senator for the state of Louisiana. ... Isaac Newton Skelton IV (born December 20, 1931), an American politician, has been a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1977. ... Gary Eugene Gene Taylor (born September 17, 1953) is an American politician of the Democratic Party and a U.S. Representative from the 4th District of Mississippi (map). ... Rep. ... Collin Clark Peterson (born June 29, 1944), is an American politician. ... James Creel Jim Marshall (born March 31, 1948) is an American politician, and has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 2003, representing the 3rd District of Georgia (map). ... Harold Ford redirects here. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a Jewish American politician from Connecticut and a leading member of the anti-Palestinian lobby. ...


A newly emerging trend is the return of active pro-life Democratic groups and candidates. Some of these candidates have won office or are being backed by the party establishment in their state. While some of these pro-life Democrats are more conservative than most Democrats in general, most are centrists or liberals {cite} in keeping with the majority of the Democratic Party on other issues. The largest national pro-life group within the party is the Democrats for Life. Pro-life candidate Bob Casey, Jr. (Pennsylvania) was elected as a U.S. Senator in the 2006 midterm elections. This article is about the political organization. ... Robert Patrick Casey, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ...


The 2006 congressional elections brought to Congress a significant bloc of conservative Democrats who are likely to support protectionist policies.[1][2]


Current structure and composition

Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is responsible for promoting Democratic campaign activities. While the DNC is responsible for overseeing the process of writing the Democratic Platform, the DNC is more focused on campaign and organizational strategy than public policy. In presidential elections it supervises the national convention and, during the primary season, raises funds, commissions polls, and coordinates campaign strategy. Following the selection of a Party nominee, the public funding laws permit the National party to coordinate certain expenditures with the Nominee, but additional funds are spent on general, party-building activities.[22] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ...


The chairman of the DNC (currently Howard Dean) is elected by vote of the Democratic National Committee Members for a four year term.[23] When there is a sitting President who is a Democrat, the Members generally elect the President's candidate for DNC Chair. Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ...


Dean ran against numerous candidates to win his position in early 2005. Rather than focusing just on close "swing states," Dean proposed the "50 State Strategy." His goal is for the Democratic Party to be committed to winning elections at every level in every region of the country, with Democrats organized in every single voting precinct in the country.[24]


According to the Charter of the Democratic Party, the National Convention is, subject to the Charter, the ultimate authority within the Democratic Party when it is in session, with the DNC running the party's organization at other times.[23] The DNC is composed of the Chairs and Vice-Chairs of each state Democratic Party Committee, two hundred members apportioned among the states based on population and generally elected either on the ballot by primary voters or by the State Democratic Party Committee, a number of elected officials serving in an ex-officio capacity, and a variety of representatives of major Democratic Party constituencies.


The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (or DCCC) assists party candidates in House races, It has raised over $70 million through the first eighteen months of the 2005-2006 election cycle; its current head (selected by the party caucus) is Rep. Rahm Emanuel of Illinois. Similarly the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee raises large sums for Senate races. It is currently headed by Senator Charles E. Schumer of New York. Categories: Politics stubs ... Categories: Politics stubs ... Rahm Emanuel (born November 29, 1959), an American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 2003, representing the 5th Congressional District of Illinois, which covers the northside of Chicago and parts of Cook County. ... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is the senior Senator from the state of New York and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


Smaller groups with much less funding include a group focused on state legislative races, the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee. The DNC sponsors two youth-oriented organizations: the Young Democrats of America (YDA) and the College Democrats. The Young Democrats of America, founded in 1932, is the official youth arm of the Democratic party of the United States, although it severed official ties with the Democratic National Committee following passage of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 and became an independent 527 group. ... The College Democrats (officially named the College Democrats of America) is the official organization of the Democratic Party of the United States for college and university students. ...


Each state also has a State Committee, made up of elected committee members as well as ex-officio committee members (usually elected officials and representatives of major constituencies), which in turn elects a Chair. County, Town, City and Ward committees generally are comprised of individuals elected at the local level. State and local committees often coordinate campaign activities within their jurisdiction, oversee local conventions and in some cases primaries or caucuses, and may have a role in nominating candidates for elected office under state law. Rarely do they have much funding, but in 2005 Chairman Dean began a program of using DNC national funds to assist the state parties, and paying for full time professional staffers. Dean's policy of spreading national funds evenly across the red and blue states angered the Senate and House campaign chairmen who wanted the DNC funds concentrated in states and districts that were closely contested, thereby increasing the chances the party could win control of Congress in 2006.[25]


Symbols and name

"A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" by Thomas Nast
"A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" by Thomas Nast

In the 1790s, the Federalists deliberately used the terms "Democratic Party" and "Democrat" as insults against Jeffersonians. For example, in 1798, George Washington wrote, "…you could as soon scrub the blackamore white, as to change the principles of a profest Democrat."[26] By the 1830s, however, the term that had once been considered an insult became the party's name, and the party called itself "The Democratic Party of the United States of America." In the late 19th century, the term "The Democracy" was in common use for the party. Download high resolution version (694x750, 126 KB)nast sketch of demo donkey This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Download high resolution version (694x750, 126 KB)nast sketch of demo donkey This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... The Federalist Party was a United States political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s; this is sometimes called the First Party System. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ...


The most common symbol for the party is the donkey, although the party itself never officially adopted it.[27] The origins of this symbol are unknown, but several theories have been proposed. According to one theory, in its original form, the jackass was born in the intense mudslinging that occurred during the presidential race of 1828 as a play on the name of Andrew Jackson, the Democratic candidate. Jackson had been called "Andrew Jackass," and the defiant Jackson adopted the nickname. Binomial name Equus asinus Linnaeus, 1758 For other uses, see Donkey (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


On January 19, 1870, a political cartoon by Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly titled "A Live Jackass Kicking a Dead Lion" revived the donkey as a symbol for the Democratic Party (the symbol had also been used in the 1830s). Cartoonists followed Nast and used the donkey to represent the Democrats, and the elephant to represent the Republicans. January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a famous caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly general-interest magazine covering literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts from a progressive, moderate left perspective in a fashion often not found in the ordinary news...


The song "Happy Days Are Here Again" is the unofficial song of the Democratic Party. It was used prominently when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was nominated for president at the 1932 Democratic National Convention and remains a sentimental favorite for Democrats today. Wochenend und Sonnenschein (literally, Weekend and Sunshine) is a song first performed by the German sestet, the Comedian Harmonists. ...


Jefferson-Jackson Day is the most common name given to the annual fundraising celebration held by local chapters of the Democratic Party. It is named after Presidents Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson, whom the party regards as its distinguished early leaders. Jefferson-Jackson Day is the most common name given to the annual fundraising celebration held by local chapters of the Democratic Party in the United States. ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13, 1743 N.S. – July 4, 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–1809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ...


Although both major political parties (and many minor ones) use the traditional American red, white, and blue colors in their marketing and representations, since election night 2000 the color blue has become the identified color of the Democratic Party, while the color red has become the identified color of the opposition Republican Party. It was on election night 2000 that, for the first time ever, all major broadcast television networks used the same color scheme for the electoral map: red for Republicans and blue for Democrats. Since then, the color blue has been widely used by the media to represent the party. It has also been used by party supporters for promotional efforts (e.g BuyBlue, BlueFund) and by the party itself, which in 2006 unveiled the "Red to Blue Program" to support Democratic candidates running against Republican incumbents in the 2006 midterm election. GOP redirects here. ...


It is appropriate to refer to candidates and the party using the adjective "Democratic" as opposed to the noun "Democrat," (i.e. "Democratic" Party, the "Democratic" candidate). Some Democrats consider the use of the term "Democrat Party" as a political epithet. Democrat Party is a political epithet[1] used by some leaders and supporters of the U.S. Republican Party to refer to the opposition Democratic Party. ... See also Alternative political spellings and the list of pejorative political puns. ...


See also

DINO stands for Democrat In Name Only, a disparaging term for a member of the modern-day United States Democratic Party whose words and actions are thought to be too fiscally or socially conservative. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... Democratic Organizations Blue Dog Democrats Democratic Freedom Caucus Democrats Abroad Democratic Leadership Council College Democrats Democrats for Life National Democratic Institute for International Affairs Unofficial organizations for Democrats Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Progressive Democrats of America Stonewall Democrats Young Democrats of America National Federation of Democratic... Democrat Party is a political epithet[1] used by some leaders and supporters of the U.S. Republican Party to refer to the opposition Democratic Party. ... The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. ... Prominent figures of the Democratic Party Currently notable Democrats Evan Bayh (1955), U.S. senator from Indiana Joseph Biden (1942), U.S. senator from Delaware, candidate for the Democratic nomination for president Kathleen Blanco (1942), Governor of Louisiana Barbara Boxer (1940), U.S. senator from California Jerry Brown (1938), mayor... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present political parties in... This is a list of state Democratic Parties in the United States. ... Blue States redirects here. ... GOP redirects here. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Broder, John M., Hauser, Christine. "Allen concedes race in Virginia", The New York Times, 2006-11-09. Retrieved on 2006-11-09. Although 49 Senators were elected as nominees of the Democratic Party and 49 Senators were elected as nominees of the Republican Party, it is presumed that Joe Lieberman (CT) and Bernie Sanders (VT) will caucus with Democrats in the Senate, giving them a slim majority of seats.
  2. ^ Democrats Make Major Gains in Nation's State Legislatures. National Conference of State Legislatures (2006-11-08). Retrieved on 2006-11-09.
  3. ^ By the 1820s, the old Democratic-Republican party was nearly moribund, with few activities; its name lingered on. Martin Van Buren organized a multi-state coalition that elected Jackson in 1828. Remini (1959). That coalition held its first national convention in 1832. Summary Of The Proceedings Of A Convention Of Republican Delegates, From The Several States In The Union, For The Purpose of Nominating A Candidate For The Office Of Vice-President Of The United States; Held At Baltimore, In The State Of Maryland, May, 1832. Albany: Packard and Van Benthuysen.
  4. ^ The British Parliamentary parties were not based on the voters until the mid 19th century.
  5. ^ Membership of the 109th Congress: A Profile. Congressional Research Service (2006-06-13). Retrieved on 2006-10-25. "A record number (43) of black Members are serving, 42 in the House, one in the Senate. All are Democrats, including two Delegates."
  6. ^ Medicare for All. Retrieved on 2006-10-29. See also: TedKennedy.com
  7. ^ Clinton Joins Key Senate Democrats to Release Report on "The College Cost Crunch". clinton.senate.gov (2006-06-28). Retrieved on 2006-11-25.
  8. ^ Economic Prosperity and Educational Excellence. Retrieved on 2006-11-25.
  9. ^ Mercurio, John. "Dean's Meeting With Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Caucus", National Journal, 2005-12-03.
  10. ^ Healy, Patrick D.. "Clinton Seeking Shared Ground Over Abortions", The New York Times, 2005-01-25. Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  11. ^ The 2004 Democratic National Platform for America. Retrieved on 2006-10-12. HTML format.
  12. ^ Abramsky, Sasha. "Democrat Killer?", The Nation, 2005-04-18. Retrieved on 2006-10-10.
  13. ^ Du Bois, William Edward Burghardt (1913-09). Another Open Letter to Woodrow Wilson. Retrieved on 2006-10-16.
  14. ^ Kilborn, Peter T.. "THE FREE TRADE ACCORD: Labor; Unions Vow to Punish Pact's Backers", The New York Times, 1993-11-19. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
  15. ^ Moore, Michael (2002). Stupid White Men ...and Other Sorry Excuses for the State of the Nation!. Chapter 10. Regan Books. ISBN 0-06-039245-2.
  16. ^ Mahajan, Rahul (2004-01-28). Kerry vs. Dean; New Hampshire vs. Iraq. Common Dreams NewsCenter. Retrieved on 2006-10-12.
  17. ^ Thomas, Evan, Clift, Eleanor, and Staff of Newsweek (2005).Election 2004: How Bush Won and What You Can Expect in the Future. PublicAffairs. ISBN 1-58648-293-9.
  18. ^ Kelly, Jack. "Kerry's Fall From Grace", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 2004-09-05. Retrieved on 2006-10-10. See also: Last, Jonathan V.. "Saving John Kerry", The Weekly Standard, 2004-11-12. Retrieved on 2006-10-10.
  19. ^ Interview with Howard Dean, This Week, 2005-01-23. American Broadcasting Company (ABC). Retrieved on 2006-10-11.
  20. ^ Hook, Janet. "A right kind of Democrat", Los Angeles Times, 2006-10-26. Retrieved on 2006-11-10. See also: Dewan, Shaila, Kornblut, Anne E.. "In Key House Races, Democrats Run to the Right", The New York Times, 2006-10-30. Retrieved on 2006-11-10.
  21. ^ Reiss, Cory. "House Blue Dogs ready to hunt", The Star-News, 2006-11-16. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  22. ^ Public Funding of Presidential Elections. Federal Election Commission (2005-02). Retrieved on 2006-10-29.
  23. ^ a b The Charter & Bylaws of the Democratic Party of the United States. Retrieved on 2006-10-10.
  24. ^ O'Donell, Shawn M., Badurina, Drucilla (2005). Rebuilding The Democratic Party From The Grassroots: The Ultimate Guidebook For Democrats. iUniverse, Inc.. ISBN 0-595-35620-6. See also: Mann, Thomas E., Ortiz, Daniel R., Potter, Trevor, Corrado, Anthony (2005). The New Campaign Finance Sourcebook. Brookings Institution Press. ISBN 0-8157-0005-9.
  25. ^ Edsall, Thomas B.. "Democrats Are Fractured Over Strategy, Funds", The Washington Post, 2006-05-11. Retrieved on 2006-10-10.
  26. ^ George Washington to James McHenry, September 30, 1798. Retrieved on 2006-10-12. Transcript.
  27. ^ History of the Democratic Donkey. Retrieved on 2006-11-15.

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Bibliography

Surveys

  • Finkelman, Paul and Peter Wallenstein, eds. Encyclopedia of American Political History (2001)
  • Jensen, Richard. Grass Roots Politics: Parties, Issues, and Voters, 1854-1983 (1983)
  • Kleppner, Paul et al. The Evolution of American Electoral Systems (1983), advanced scholarly essays.
  • Rutland, Robert Allen. The Democrats: From Jefferson to Clinton (1995). short popular history
  • Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, Jr. ed. History of American Presidential Elections, 1789-2000 (various multivolume editions, latest is 2001). For each election includes good scholarly history and selection of primary document. Essays on the most important election are reprinted in Schlesinger, The Coming to Power: Critical Presidential Elections in American History (1972)
  • Schlisinger, Galbraith. Of the People: The 200 Year History of the Democratic Party (1992) popular essays by scholars.
  • Taylor, Jeff. Where Did the Party Go?: William Jennings Bryan, Hubert Humphrey, and the Jeffersonian Legacy (2006), for history and ideology of the party.
  • Witcover, Jules. Party of the People: A History of the Democrats (2003), 900 page popular history

Arthur Meier Schlesinger, Jr. ...

Since 1992

  • Barone, Michael, and Grant Ujifusa, The Almanac of American Politics 2006: The Senators, the Representatives and the Governors: Their Records and Election Results, Their States and Districts (2005) covers all the live politicians with amazing detail.
  • Dark, Taylor, The Unions and the Democrats: An Enduring Alliance (2001)
  • Judis, John B. and Ruy Teixeira. The Emerging Democratic Majority (2004) demography is destiny
  • Patterson, James T. Restless Giant: The United States from Watergate to Bush vs. Gore (2005) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Sabato, Larry J. Divided States of America: The Slash and Burn Politics of the 2004 Presidential Election (2005), scholarly study.
  • Sabato, Larry J. and Bruce Larson. The Party's Just Begun: Shaping Political Parties for America's Future (2001) scholarly textbook.

Michael Barone Michael Barone is a political expert and commentator. ... Ruy Teixeira is a political consultant and commentator. ... Larry J. Sabato is the Robert Kent Gooch Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia. ... Larry J. Sabato is the Robert Kent Gooch Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia. ...

Before 1992

  • Blum, John Morton. The Progressive Presidents: Roosevelt, Wilson, Roosevelt, Johnson (1980)
  • Fraser, Steve and Gary Gerstle, eds. The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930-1980 (1990)
  • Kleppner, Paul. The Third Electoral System 1853-1892: Parties, Voters, and Political Cultures (1979), major study of voting patterns in every state
  • Ladd Jr., Everett Carll with Charles D. Hadley. Transformations of the American Party System: Political Coalitions from the New Deal to the 1970s 2nd ed. (1978).
  • Lawrence, David G. The Collapse of the Democratic Presidential Majority: Realignment, Dealignment, and Electoral Change from Franklin Roosevelt to Bill Clinton (1996)
  • Milkis, Sidney M. and Jerome M. Mileur, eds. The New Deal and the Triumph of Liberalism (2002)
  • Milkis, Sidney M. The President and the Parties: The Transformation of the American Party System Since the New Deal (1993)
  • Nichols, Roy Franklin. The Democratic Machine, 1850-1854 (1923)
  • Patterson, James T. Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974 (1997) well balanced scholarly synthesis.
  • Rae, Nicol C. Southern Democrats Oxford University Press. 1994. focus on 1964 to 1992.
  • Remini, Robert V. Martin Van Buren and the Making of the Democratic Party (1959)
  • Silbey, Joel H. The American Political Nation, 1838-1893 (1991)
  • Sundquist, James L. Dynamics of the Party System: Alignment and Realignment of Political Parties in the United States (1983)

John Morton Blum was one of the dominating writers of United States political history from the 1940s to the early 1990s. ... Robert V. Remini (b. ...

External links

Official

  • Democratic National Committee
  • Democratic Senate Caucus
  • Democratic House Caucus
  • Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee
  • Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee
  • Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee
  • Democratic Governors Association
  • Democratic Attorneys General Association
  • Kicking Ass: The Democratic Party's Blog
  • College Democrats of America
  • Young Democrats of America
  • Democrats Abroad
  • 2004 National Platform (HTML format)

Unofficial

  • Democracy For America
  • Democratic Leadership Council
  • Democrats For Life of America
  • Woman's National Democratic Club
  • 2020 Democrats
  • Music Row Democrats
  • Democrats.US: Online Think Tank For Democrats
Political Parties of the United States
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Smaller Parties  Peace and Freedom    Reform    Socialist    Socialist Workers    VT Progressive
Historical Parties  Anti-Masonic  Democratic-Republican  Federalist  National Republican  Populist (People's) Party  Progressive  Whig
See List of political parties in the United States for a complete list.

GOP redirects here. ... In United States politics, the Green Party has been active as a third party since the 1980s. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded in 1971. ... United States Peace and Freedom Party logo The Peace and Freedom Party (PFP) is a United States political party founded in 1967 as a leftist organization opposed to the Vietnam War. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 who said Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics – as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital issues – and... The Socialist Party USA (SPUSA) is one of the heirs to the Socialist Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas. ... The Socialist Workers Party is a communist political party in the United States. ... The Vermont Progressive Party is perhaps the United States most consistently successful current third party, although it is active in only one state. ... The Anti-Masonic Party (also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement) was a 19th century minor political party in the United States. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the republican party in 1793, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until it broke up in the 1820s. ... The Federalist Party was a United States political party in the period 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s; this is sometimes called the First Party System. ... -1... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ... The name Progressive Party has been assigned to a collection of parties in the United States over the past century or so. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      This list of political parties in the United States contains past and present political parties in...


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The Democratic Party (1337 words)
Thomas Jefferson founded the Democratic Party in 1792 as a congressional caucus to fight for the Bill of Rights and against the elitist Federalist Party.
In 1798, the "party of the common man" was officially named the Democratic-Republican Party and in 1800 elected Jefferson as the first Democratic President of the United States.
Democratic Party leader William Jennings Bryan led a movement of agrarian reformers and supported the right of women's suffrage, the progressive graduated income tax and the direct election of Senators.
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