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Encyclopedia > Democratic National Committee

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal organization governing the United States Democratic Party on a day to day basis. While it is responsible for overseeing the process of writing a platform every four years, the DNC's central focus is on campaign and political activity in support of Democratic Party candidates, and not on public policy. The DNC was established at the 1848 Democratic National Convention.[1] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ...


The Democratic National Committee provides national leadership for the Democratic Party of the United States. It is responsible for promoting the Democratic political platform, as well as coordinating fundraising and election strategy.


Its main counterpart is the Republican National Committee. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ...

Contents

Campaign role

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is responsible for articulating and promoting the Democratic platform and coordinating party organizational activity. When the President is a Democrat, the party generally works closely with the President. In presidential elections it supervises the national convention and, both independently and in coordination with the presidential candidate, raises funds, commissions polls, and coordinates campaign strategy. Following the selection of a party nominee, the public funding laws permit the national party to coordinate certain expenditures with the nominee, but additional funds are spent on general, party-building activities.[2] There are state committees in every state, as well as local committees in most cities, wards, and towns (and, in most states, counties).


The chairperson of the DNC (currently Howard Dean) is elected by vote of members of the Democratic National Committee. The DNC is composed of the chairs and vice-chairs of each state Democratic Party Committee, two hundred members apportioned among the states based on population and generally elected either on the ballot by primary voters or by the State Democratic Party Committee, a number of elected officials serving in an ex-officio capacity, and a variety of representatives of major Democratic Party constituencies. Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ...


Dean ran against numerous candidates to win his position in early 2005. Rather than focusing just on close "swing states," Dean proposed the "50 State Strategy". His goal is for the Democratic Party to be committed to winning elections at every level in every region of the country, with Democrats organized in every single voting precinct in the country.[3]


The DNC establishes rules for the caucuses and primaries which choose delegates to the Democratic National Convention, but the caucuses and primaries themselves are most often run not by the DNC but instead by each state. All DNC members are superdelegates and can influence a close Presidential race. Outside of the process of nominating a Presidential candidate, the DNC's role in actually selecting candidates to run on the Democratic Party ticket is minimal. A caucus is most generally defined as being a meeting of supporters or members of a political party or movement. ... The series of Presidential primary elections and caucuses is one of the first steps in the long, complex process of electing the President of the United States of America. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ...


DNC fundraising

In the 2001-2005 election cycle, the DNC and its affiliated committees (which includes numerous local committees and committees formed to coordinate expenditures for specific districts or races) raised a total of US $162,062,084, 42% of which was hard money. The largest contributor, with US $9,280,000 was the Saban Capital Group, founded in 2001 by Haim Saban, who also founded Fox Family group. Fred Eychaner, the owner of Newsweb Corp., gave the second highest amount of money to the DNC and its affiliates, US $7,390,000. The third largest contributor was Steve Bing of Shangri-La Entertainment, who gave US $6,700,000.[4] Campaign finance in the United States is the financing of electoral campaigns at the federal, state, and local levels. ... Haim Saban Haim Saban (born 15 October 1944 in Alexandria, Egypt) is a television and media proprietor. ... Stephen Leo Bing (b. ...


In the 2005-2006 election cycle, the DNC raised a total of US $61,141,823, all of it hard money. Most contributions came from small donors, giving less than $250, who accounted for over 80% of total dollars raised in the first half of 2006.[5] The three largest individual contributors were law firm Hill Wallack ($100,000), development firm Jonathan Rose & Co. ($100,000), and investment firm Bain Capital ($53,400).[6]


The DNC also relies on the monthly contributions of over 35,000 small-dollar donors through what is known as the Democracy Bonds program, set up by Howard Dean in the summer of 2005 [7].


In 2002, the Federal Election Commission fined the Democratic National Committee $115,000 for its part in fundraising violations in 1996.[8] The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... President Clinton with convicted fund-raiser Charlie Trie The 1996 United States campaign finance controversy was an alleged effort by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) to influence domestic American politics prior to and during the Clinton administration and also involved the fund-raising practices of the administration itself. ...


Current DNC leadership

The National Advisory Board exists for purposes of fundrasing and advising the executive. The present chair is Elizabeth Frawley Bagley, former U.S. Ambassador to Portugal. Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Michael Makoto Mike Honda (Japanese: 本田 誠 born June 27, 1941) is an American Democratic politician. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the current former unionist, see Linda Chavez. ... American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, commonly AFL-CIO, is a national trade union center, the largest federation of unions in the United States, made up of 54 national and international unions (including Canadian), together representing more than 10 million workers. ... Susan Turnbull has served as a Vice Chair of the Democratic National Committee since February 2005. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Lottie H. Shackelford is a United States civil servant, politician and vice chair of the 2004 Democratic National Convention. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Little Rock redirects here. ... The Michigan Democratic Party is the state-level party of the United States Democratic Party in Michigan. ... Andrew Tobias (born April 20, 1947) is an American journalist, author and columnist, whose main body of work is on investment, but who has also written on politics, insurance and other topics. ...


DNC National Chairpersons

Chairperson

Term

State[9]

Benjamin F. Hallett (1848-1852) Massachusetts
Robert Milligan McLane (1852-1856) Maryland
David Allen Smalley (1856-1860) Vermont
August Belmont (1860-1872) New York
Augustus Schell (1872-1876) New York
Abram Stevens Hewitt (1876-1877) New York
William H. Barnum (1877-1889) Connecticut
Calvin Stewart Brice (1889-1892) Ohio
William F. Harrity (1892-1896) Pennsylvania
James K. Jones (1896-1904) Arkansas
Thomas Taggart (1904-1908) Indiana
Norman E. Mack (1908-1912) New York
William F. McCombs (1912-1914) New York
Homer S. Cummings (1914-1916) Connecticut
Vance C. McCormick (1916-1919) Pennsylvania
George White (1920-1921) Ohio
Cordell Hull (1921-1924) Tennessee
Clem L. Shaver (1924-1928) West Virginia
John J. Raskob (1928-1932) New York
James A. Farley (1932-1940) New York
Edward J. Flynn (1940-1943) New York
Frank C. Walker (1943-1944) Pennsylvania
Robert E. Hannegan (1944-1947) Missouri
J. Howard McGrath (1947-1949) Rhode Island
William H. Boyle, Jr. (1949-1951) Missouri
Frank E. McKinney (1951-1952) Indiana
Stephen Mitchell (1952-1955) Illinois
Paul M. Butler (1955-1960) Indiana
Henry M. Jackson (1960-1961) Washington
John Moran Bailey (1961-1968) Connecticut
Lawrence F. O'Brien (1968-1969) Massachusetts
Fred R. Harris (1969-1970) Oklahoma
Lawrence F. O'Brien (1970-1972) Massachusetts
Jean Westwood (1972) Utah
Robert S. Strauss (1972-1977) Texas
Kenneth M. Curtis (1977-1978) Maine
John C. White (1978-1981) Texas
Charles T. Manatt (1981-1985) California
Paul G. Kirk, Jr. (1985-1989) Massachusetts
Ron Brown (1989-1993) New York
David Wilhelm (1993-1994) Ohio
Debra DeLee (1994-1995) Massachusetts
Christopher J. Dodd1 (1995-1997) Connecticut
Donald Fowler (1995-1997) South Carolina
Roy Romer1 (1997-1999) Colorado
Steven Grossman (1997-1999) Massachusetts
Edward G. Rendell1 (1999-2001) Pennsylvania
Joseph Andrew (1999-2001) Indiana
Terrence R. McAuliffe (2001-2005) Virginia
Howard Dean (2005-) Vermont

1 General Chairperson
List from http://rulers.org/usgovt.html#parties To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Categories: People stubs | 1815 births | 1898 deaths | Governors of Maryland ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... David Allen Smalley (April 6, 1809 - March 10, 1877) Born in Middlebury, Vermont, Smalley read law and practiced in Jericho, Vermont where he was postmaster from 1831 to 1836. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... August Belmont August Belmont, Sr. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the state. ... Abram Stevens Hewitt (1822 – 1903) was a teacher, lawyer, an iron manufacturer, U.S. Congressman, and a mayor of New York City. ... This article is about the state. ... William Henry Barnum (Boston Corners, Massachusetts, September 17, 1818 - April 30, 1889) was a United States politician, serving as a state representative, U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator, and finally as chairman of the Democratic National Committee. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Calvin Stewart Brice (September 17, 1845 - December 15, 1898) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... James Kimbrough Jones (1839 - 1908) was a U.S. politician. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Thomas Taggart Thomas Taggart (November 17, 1856–March 6, 1929) was a U.S. political figure. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the state. ... Homer Stille Cummings (1870 - 1956) was a U.S. political figure. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Vance Criswell McCormick (June 19, 1872–June 16, 1946) was an American politician and prominent businessman from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... George White (August 21, 1872 – December 15, 1953) was the 52nd Governor of Ohio. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Cordell Hull (October 2, 1871–July 23, 1955) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Clement Lawrence Shaver (known as Clem L. Shaver) was a West Virginia politician who was the Democratic National Committee Chairman from 1924 to 1928. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... John Jakob Raskob (1879-1950) was a financial executive and businessman who became chairman of the Democratic National Committee and a key supporter of Alfred E. Smiths candidacy for President of the United States. ... This article is about the state. ... In American history, James Farley led the Bonus army in 1932. ... This article is about the state. ... Edward J. Flynn of the Bronx, New York was a member of New York state assembly from 1918 to 1921. ... This article is about the state. ... Frank Comerford Walker (May 30, 1886–September 13, 1959) was a United States political figure. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Robert Emmet Hannegan was born on June 30, 1903, in St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... McGrath (middle left) with Theodore Francis Green (right) and Harry S. Truman (far right). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Paul Butler (1905 - 1961) was a U.S. lawyer. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Henry Martin Scoop Jackson (May 31, 1912 – September 1, 1983) was a U.S. Congressman and Senator for Washington State from 1941 until his death. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... John Moran Bailey (1904 - 1975) was a U.S. political figure. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... OBrien, c. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Fred Roy Harris, born November 13, 1930, in Cotton County, Oklahoma, is a former Democratic senator from Oklahoma (1964–1973). ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... OBrien, c. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Jean Westwood Jean Westwood was born in Price, Utah on November 22, 1923. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Robert Schwarz Strauss (born 1918) was a U.S. diplomat and political figure. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Kenneth Merwin Curtis (born February 8, 1931 in Leeds, Maine) is a former democratic politician, and is currently a principal in the law firm of Curtis Thaxter Stevens Broder & Micoleau Limited Liability Company, P.A. Curtis was a Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Navy and received his law degree... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... John C. White was Chairman of The Democratic National Committee from 1978 to 1981. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Charles Taylor Manatt (born June 9, 1936) was a U.S. Democratic political figure. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Paul Kirk Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Ronald Harmon Brown (August 1, 1941 – April 3, 1996), was the United States Secretary of Commerce, serving during the first term of President Bill Clinton. ... This article is about the state. ... David Wilhelm (born 2 October 1956) is an American political operative and businessman. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Debra DeLee was born in Chicago, Illinois and is currently President and CEO of Americans for Peace Now (APN), a national Zionist organization dedicated to enhancing Israel’s security through peace and to supporting the Israeli Peace Now movement. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944), is an American politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[3] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[2] Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Donald L. Fowler served as national chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 1995 to 1997. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Roy R. Romer (born October 31, 1928 in Garden City, Kansas, United States) was the 39th governor of Colorado and served as the superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District from 2001 to 2006. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Largest metro area Denver-Aurora Metro Area Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Steven (Steve) Grossman was national chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 1997 to 1999. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Edward Gene Ed Rendell (born January 5, 1944) is an American politician and member of the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Joseph Andrew was DNC Chair from the years 1999-2001 with General Chairman Roy Romer (1999) and Edward G. Rendell (1999-2001) In August of 2005, he accepted a position with Diebold, creators of Black Box Voting machines as a PR consultant. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Terry McAuliffe opening the 2004 Democratic National Convention Terrence Richard Terry McAuliffe (born 1957) is an American political leader from the Democratic Party; he served as Chairman of the Democratic National Committee from February 2001 to February 2005. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


References

  1. ^ Party History. Retrieved on 2007-02-17.
  2. ^ Public Funding of Presidential Elections. Federal Election Commission (2005-02). Retrieved on 2006-10-29.
  3. ^ A 50 State Strategy. Retrieved on 2007-02-17.
  4. ^ Top Soft Money Donors: 2002 Election Cycle. Retrieved on 2007-02-17.
  5. ^ Scream 2: The Sequel. Retrieved on 2007-02-17.
  6. ^ 2006 Top Contributors: Democratic National Committee. Retrieved on 2007-02-17.
  7. ^ 2006 Democracy Bonds. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.
  8. ^ "DNC fined for illegal 1996 fund raising", CNN.com, Sept. 23, 2002.
  9. ^ The Politcal Graveyard web site, A Database of Historic Cemeteries, accessed July 17, 2006.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Categories: Politics stubs ... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... The Democratic Governors Association is a Washington, D.C.-based organization founded in 1983, consisting of U.S. state and territorial governors affiliated with the Democratic Party. ... The College Democrats (officially named the College Democrats of America) is the official organization of the Democratic Party of the United States for college and university students. ... The Young Democrats of America (YDA), founded in 1932, is the official youth arm of the Democratic Party of the United States, although it severed official ties with the Democratic National Committee following passage of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 and became an independent 527 group. ... Microtargeting is a method used by United States Republican and Democratic political parties and candidates to track individual voters and identify potential supporters. ...

External links

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ...

 
 

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