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Encyclopedia > Delta Kappa Epsilon
Delta Kappa Epsilon
(ΔΚΕ)
Founded June 22, 1844 (1844-06-22) (age 163)
No. 12 Old South Hall, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
Type Social
Scope United States, Canada
Motto Kerothen Philoi Aei

"Friends From The Heart Forever" is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Yale redirects here. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...

Colors Gules (Crimson), Azure (Blue), Or (Gold)
Symbol Rampant Lion
Flower None
Chapters 52 active
Headquarters P.O. Box 8360
Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA
Homepage http://www.dke.org

Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or "Deke") was founded at Yale College in 1844 by 15 men of the sophomore class who, upon hearing that some but not all of them had been invited to join the two existing societies (Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon), instead elected to form their own fraternity. These men sought to establish a fellowship "where the candidate most favored was he who combined in the most equal proportions the gentleman, the scholar, and the jolly good fellow." Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For other uses, see Yale (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ... For other uses, see Gentleman (disambiguation). ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... For Hes A Jolly Good Fellow is a British and American song which is sung to congratulate a person on a significant event, such as a retirement. ...

Contents

Founding and history

Original version of the ΔΚΕ coat of arms

In the spring of 1844, due to undergraduate politics and a division in the Sophomore class, a number of men of high character and scholastic attainment did not receive bids from the two societies--Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon. So unfair, in fact, were the selections that some men who did receive bids promptly rejected them. There arose a feeling of such injustice that fifteen men resolved to form their own society, one which would be more fraternal in nature and less restricted to the limited (and, as they saw it, unfair) membership criteria of their rivals. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ...


This new society was founded June 22, 1844, in room number 12 Old South Hall, Yale College, New Haven, Connecticut. At this meeting, the Fraternity's secret and open Greek mottos were devised. The open motto is "Kerothen Philoi Aei" ("Friends from the Heart, Forever"). The pin and secret handshake were also devised. The DKE pin shows the Greek letters DΚΕ on a white scroll upon a black diamond with gold rope trim and a star in each corner. DKE's heraldic colours are azure (blue), or (gold), and gules (crimson) and its flag is a triband of those colours with a left-facing rampant lion in the middle. is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


The fifteen founders were: William Woodruff Atwater, Dr. Edward Griffin Bartlett, Frederic Peter Bellinger, Jr., Henry Case, Colonel George Foote Chester, John Butler Coyngham, Thomas Isaac Franklin, William Walter Horton, The Honorable William Boyd Jacobs, Professor Edward Van Schoonhoven Kingsley, Chester Newell Righter, Dr. Elisha Bacon Shapleigh, Thomas Du Bois Sherwood, Orson William Stow, and Albert Everett Stetson.


This first Chapter was denoted Phi chapter and is the only fraternity at Yale that has never gone inactive. It also holds the distinction of being the longest uninterrupted chapter of DKE.


Within three years of the founding at Yale, chapters were founded at Bowdoin, Princeton University, Colby College, and Amherst College. Since that time, DKE has grown to over 64 chapters and has initiated over 85,000 members across North America. Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ...


DKE is inextricably linked to the history of the United States of America, as its members have included five of forty-three Presidents of the United States: Rutherford B. Hayes, Theodore Roosevelt, Gerald Ford, George H. W. Bush, and George W. Bush. Another way to look at this impact, is that five of the most recent 25 US Presidents (20%) were Dekes (at the time of George W. Bush's election). Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Some might argue that Franklin Delano Roosevelt would be the 6th US President that was a DKE. FDR was a member of the Alpha Chapter of DKE at Harvard, also known as the "Dickey Club." However the Alpha Chapter derecognized by DKE International due to the chapter's stance on dual membership with other fraternities. Here is a detailed explanation of Harvard's complex club system: The Porcellian was the loftiest of Harvard's "final" clubs. The selection process was rigidly hierarchical. First you had to get into the Institute of 1770, the oldest and largest club. If you were among the first 70 or 80 of the 100 sophomores accepted, you were taken into Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity ("the Dickey"). Then you might join a "waiting" club, and at last a final club like Porcellian or A.D. Your chances improved if you were a "legacy," i.e., related to a member. Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ...


During the Civil War, the first Union officer killed in battle was a Deke, Theodore Winthrop of Phi. Six weeks after Lee's surrender at Appomattox, Philip Spence of Zeta commanded Confederate troops in their last organized battle of the war. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia...


In the election of 1876, the Republican Party chose between two Dekes, nominating Hayes rather than rival and fellow DKE James G. Blaine, who later served two administrations as Secretary of State and who authored the Fourteenth Amendment; Blaine also ran unsuccessfully for President. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... GOP redirects here. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Amendment XIV in the National Archives The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution (Amendment XIV) is one of the post-Civil War amendments (known as the Reconstruction Amendments), first intended to secure rights for former slaves. ...

Flag of ΔΚΕ

During the Spanish-American War, the first American officer to be killed was a Deke, Surgeon John B. Gibbs (Rutgers), and his brother in DKE J. Frank Aldritch (DePauw) died when the USS Maine was sunk. In this same war, Deke Theodore Roosevelt distinguished himself and started on his path to the Presidency. Flag of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. ... Flag of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Kingdom of Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and... For other ships of the same name, see USS Maine. ...


The fraternity's membership has also included dozens of American and Canadian politicians, businessmen, sports figures, and artists who have achieved iconic status, including among many others J.P. Morgan, Jr., William Randolph Hearst, Cole Porter, Henry Cabot Lodge, Dick Clark, Tom Landry, and George Steinbrenner. Deke flags have been carried to the North Pole by its discoverer, Admiral Robert Peary (Theta), and to the Moon by astronaut Alan Bean (Omega Chi). John Pierpont Morgan, Jr. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... Dick Clark redirects here. ... Thomas Wade Landry (September 11, 1924 – February 12, 2000) was an American football player and coach. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... Robert Peary in naval uniform Robert Edwin Peary (May 6, 1856 – February 20, 1920) was an American explorer who claimed to have been the first person, on April 6, 1909, to reach the geographic North Pole -- a claim that has subsequently attracted much criticism. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Alan LaVern Bean (born March 15, 1932 in Wheeler, Texas) is a former NASA Astronaut. ...

Image:Dke-pin.gif
Pin of ΔΚΕ

Delta Kappa Epsilon administers a charitable organization called the Rampant Lion Foundation. As well, DKE has championed an organization call ROAR, which stands for Restore Our Associational Rights. ROAR campaigns for the freedom of fraternities and Greek organizations in general to operate without interference and discrimination from university administrations or others. Restore Our Associational Rights, Inc. ...


Additional historical facts

Traditionally an Eastern Seaboard fraternity, DKE's Yale chapter had an early reputation as a Southerner's fraternity. Many wealthy plantation owners sent their sons to Yale where they joined DKE. Two of the original founders were from the South and 13 out of 38 members of 1845 and 1846 were from the South. DKE's first chapter in the South was Gamma chapter founded in 1847 (Vanderbilt University) followed by Psi chapter at the University of Alabama in the same year.


Delta Kappa Epsilon's first West Coast chapter was founded at the University of California, Berkeley on Halloween night, 1876. DKE is the fourth fraternity at the prestigious institution. Their rival, Stanford University, followed suit in 1901. Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Stanford redirects here. ...


Delta Kappa Epsilon became an international fraternity with the addition of the Alpha Phi chapter in 1898 at the University of Toronto, Canada.


DKE is the only fraternity that has a club in New York. The DKE Club of New York was founded in 1885 and is currently in residence at the Yale Club of New York City. The club is a rare survivor of the fraternity clubs that once proliferated at the turn of the century and then folded. The Yale Club of New York City, commonly called the Yale Club, is a prominent private club in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA. Its membership is restricted almost entirely to alumni and faculty of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ...


The Sigma Chi Fraternity was founded in 1855 when twelve members of the Miami University chapter of DKE (Kappa Chapter) split evenly over a debate on the office of Poet in the Erodelphian Literary Society. Six Deke members, led by Benjamin Piatt Runkle, rescinded their membership and later founded Sigma Chi because they refused to vote for a brother Deke simply because he was a Deke. The leader of the "loyal" Dekes was future Ambassador Whitelaw Reid. Frank Baird, a "loyal" Deke, had a hand in creating the Sigma Chi "White Cross" badge along with the founders of Sigma Chi. He was known as an artist on campus and assisted his former Deke brothers. Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... Benjamin Piatt Runkle, one of the original seven founders of Sigma Chi fraternity, was born in West Liberty, Ohio on September 3, 1836. ... Whitelaw Reid Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War. ...


Reportedly, the past president of Yale's DKE chapter is guaranteed to be one of the 15 juniors tapped to form the Yale's Skull and Bones senior secret society.[citation needed] For the pirate flag, see Jolly Roger. ...


Alumni

DKE counts many political, business, sports, education, science, and arts leaders. Listed is a sample of some famous Dekes.


Presidents of the United States

Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...

Vice Presidents of the United States

Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and a former Senator from the state of Indiana. ...

Justices of the United States Supreme Court

The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Harold Hitz Burton (June 22, 1888 - October 28, 1964) was an American Senator and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | U.S. District Court judges | American lawyers | 1857 births | 1945 deaths ... Potter Stewart (January 23, 1915 – December 7, 1985) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. ...

Newspaper publishers and editors

Otis Chandler (November 23, 1927–February 27, 2006) was best known as the publisher of the Los Angeles Times between 1960 and 1980. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Norman Chandler (September 14, 1899 - October 20, 1973, both Los Angeles, California) was the publisher of the Los Angeles Times from 1945 to 1960, and is largely responsible for the success of the newspaper. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Crain Communications Inc publishes a variety of trade newspapers. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... --207. ... The Houston Chronicle is a daily newspaper in Houston, Texas, United States. ... Eugene Collins Pulliam (May 3, 1889 - June 23, 1975) was an American newspaper publisher and businessman who was the founder and longtime president of Central Newspapers Inc. ... Whitelaw Reid Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War. ... The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ... James Cline Quayle (May 25, 1921 - July 7, 2000) was an American newspaper publisher and businessman who owned several newspapers in the United States including the Huntingdon Herald-Press in Indiana and the Wickenburg Sun in Arizona. ... Briton Hadden (Feb. ...

Agency heads

Sidney William Souers (March 30, 1892 - January 14, 1973) was an American admiral and intelligence expert. ... CIA redirects here. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...

Businessmen

John Fellows Akers (born 1934) is a U.S. computer businessman. ... International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) (NYSE: IBM) (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, New York, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... Steak n Shake (also spelled Steak n Shake) is a combination diner/fast food restaurant chain located throughout the Midwestern and Southern United States. ... The Chase Manhattan Bank, now part of JPMorgan Chase, was formed by the merger of the Chase National Bank and the Bank of the Manhattan Company in 1955. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Donald Raymond Fisher (February 6, 1916 - July 29, 1973) was a Major League Baseball pitcher who appeared in two games for the New York Giants in 1945. ... This article is about the clothing retailer. ... James Gamble (1803-1891) was a US-based Irish soapmaker and industrialist. ... Procter & Gamble Co. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... The Interpublic Group of Companies, Inc. ... H. J. Heinz Company (NYSE: HNZ), commonly known as Heinz, famous for its 57 Varieties slogan, is a processed food product company with its headquarters in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in the United States of America. ... Walter Hoving (December 2, 1897 – November 27, 1989) was a Swedish-born American businessman, best known as the sometimes imperious, always self-confident, head of Tiffany & Company from 1955 to 1980. ... Tiffany Blue seen here on a Tiffany gift box. ... The current logo for Howard Johnsons motor lodges. ... Ground Round Grill & Bar, an American casual dining restaurant, was founded in 1969 by Howard Johnsons. ... Herbert D. Kelleher (born March 12, 1931) is the co-founder, Chairman and former CEO of Southwest Airlines (based in the United States). ... This article is about the American airline. ... Craig McCaw at NSTAC meeting, June 2001 Craig McCaw (b. ... Cellular redirects here. ... J.P. Morgan, Jr. ... There have been multiple notable individuals named Fred Smith: Fred Smith, a North Carolina assemblyman and attorney Fred Smith, bassist for the 1970s New Wave band Television Fred Smith, a Memphis, Tennessee businessman who founded FedEx This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... The Federal Express was a passenger train operated on the Poughkeepsie Bridge Route. ... Dean Witter Reynolds was an American stock brokerage catering to the middle class. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... William Wrigley III (January 21, 1933 Chicago, IL - March 8, 1999 Chicago, IL) was President of the Wm. ... The Wm. ... Joseph C. Wilson IV was a United States career foreign service officer and later a diplomat between 1976 and 1998. ... Xerox Corporation (NYSE: XRX) (name pronounced ) is a global document management company, which manufactures and sells a range of color and black-and-white printers, multifunction systems, photo copiers, digital production printing presses, and related consulting services and supplies. ... Ted Forstmann Theodore J. Forstmann (b. ... Barbarians at the Gate: The Fall of RJR Nabisco (ISBN 0060161728) is a book by Bryan Burrough and John Helyar, about the leveraged buyout (LBO) of RJR Nabisco. ... Crocker National Bank was a United States bank headquartered in San Francisco, California. ...

Political figures

Dean Acheson Dean Gooderham Acheson (April 11, 1893 – October 12, 1971) was an American statesman and lawyer; as United States Secretary of State in the late 1940s he played the central role in defining American foreign policy for the Cold War. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Albert Jeremiah Beveridge ( October 6, 1862 – April 27, 1927 ) was a historian and United States Senator from Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was a major general in the United States Army, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the twentieth President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829—November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as 21st President of the United States. ... William Gaston Caperton III (born February 21, 1940) was twice elected as governor of the U.S. state of West Virginia and served from 1989 until 1997. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Largest metro area Charleston metro area Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... John Lester Hubbard Chafee (October 22, 1922 – October 24, 1999) was an American politician. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... This is a partial list of the Governors of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Royal Samuel Copeland (November 7, 1868 – June 17, 1938) was an American academic, homeopathic physician, and politician who held elected offices in both Michigan and New York. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the state. ... Mark Brandt Dayton (born January 26, 1947) was a Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party U.S. Senator from Minnesota who served from 2001 – 2007 in the 107th, 108th, and 109th Congresses. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... For his grandfather, see George Alexander Drew (Liberal-Conservative MP). ... The Premier of Ontario is the first minister for the Canadian province of Ontario. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Murphy J. Mike Foster, Jr. ... This is a list of the governors of Louisiana, from acquisition by the United Sates in 1803 to the present day; for earlier governors of Louisiana see List of colonial governors of Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Gordon Gray (May 30, 1909 – November 26, 1982) was an official in the government of the United States during the administrations of Harry Truman (1945-53) and Dwight Eisenhower (1953-61) associated with defense and national security. ... For the victim of Mt. ... Lister Hill was born in Montgomery, Alabama on December 29, 1896, the son of one of the Souths most distinguished surgeons, Dr. Luther Leonidas Hill. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Official campaign photo of Tony Knowles Anthony Carroll Tony Knowles (born January 1, 1943 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American Democratic politician and businessman who served as Governor of Alaska from December 1994 to December 2002. ... This is a list of the governors of the U.S. state of Alaska, of the Territory of Alaska and of the District of Alaska, and the military commanders of the Department of Alaska, as well as the governors of Russian America. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... Robert Todd Lincoln (August 1, 1843 – July 26, 1926) was the first son of Abraham Lincoln and Mary Ann Todd. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... This article is about the politician. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... Russell Billiu Long Russell Billiu Long (November 3, 1918 – May 9, 2003) was an American politician who served in the United States Senate as a Democrat from Louisiana from 1948 until 1987. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... Cover of Time Magazine (March 9, 1925) Nicholas Longworth (November 5, 1869-April 9, 1931) was a prominent American politician in the Republican Party during the first third of the 20th century. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Mario García Menocal, c. ... This page contains a list of presidents of Cuba. ... William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927–June 3, 2000) became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 8, 1974, during the Nixon administration. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... This article is about the senator. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... John De Witt Warner (Oct. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This article is about the state. ... GOP redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Thomas Francis Eagleton, LL.B., (born September 4, 1929) is a former U.S. Senator from Missouri. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is an American politician who was the 57th Governor of New York serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... This article is about the state. ... Donald Eugene Don Siegelman (born February 24, 1946, in Mobile, Alabama) is an American Democratic politician. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Michael Melville Wood was appointed United States ambassador to Sweden by the U.S. Senate on May 26, 2006. ... Clark T. Randt, Jr. ... Categories: Stub | 1860 births | 1919 deaths | U.S. Secretaries of State ...

Sports and entertainment

Jack N. Agrios is a Canadian lawyer. ... William Bartholomay is a Chicago executive who made his living in the Insurance industry. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–85) Other nicknames The Jints, The Gigantes, The G... The New York Giants beat the New York Yankees in 5 games. ... Paul Eugene Brown (September 7, 1908 - August 5, 1991) was an athletics coach of American football and a major figure in the development of the National Football League. ... Browns redirects here. ... City Cincinnati, Ohio Team colors Black, Orange and White Head Coach Marvin Lewis Owner Mike Brown Mascot Who Dey League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1968-1969) Western Division (1968-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC Central (1970-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team... This article is about the American football coach. ... Dick Clark redirects here. ... Dick Clark, host of American Bandstand American Bandstand was a long-running dance music television show that aired in various versions from 1952 to 1989. ... William Crudup (born July 8, 1968) is an American actor. ... Hugh Franklin Culverhouse (1919 – 1994) was a U.S. football administrator. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1976–present) American Football Conference (1976) AFC West (1976) National Football Conference (1977-present) NFC Central (1977-2001) NFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Buccaneer Red, Pewter, Black, Orange, White Mascot Captain Fear Personnel Owner Malcolm Glazer General Manager Bruce Allen Head... Robert James Jim Elder, O.C. (born 27 July 1934) is a Canadian horse rider famous for his accomplishments in Equestrian. ... Angelo Bartlett Bart Giamatti (April 4, 1938 – September 1, 1989) was the President of Yale University, and later, the 7th commissioner of Major League Baseball in the United States. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Steve Hansen is a former rugby union coach. ... Calvin Hill (born January 2, 1947in the Turners Station neighborhood of Dundalk, Maryland) was a running back with a 12 year National Football League career from 1969 to 1981. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... Browns redirects here. ... This photo from around 1913 shows Ives in his day job. He was the director of a successful insurance agency. ... See: American TV writer Trent Jones Robert Trent Jones, Sr. ... Robert J. Kelleher (b. ... Thomas Wade Landry (September 11, 1924 – February 12, 2000) was an American football player and coach. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, The Pokes Team colors White, Silver, Silver-Green, Royal Blue, Navy Blue Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division... Angelo Hank Luisetti (June 16, 1916 in San Francisco, California - December 17, 2002 in San Mateo, California) was a college mens basketball player and one of the great innovators to the game. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... “The Ring” redirects here. ... Joe McDonald (born in Lackawanna, New York on March 28, 1970) is a professional American sportswriter, who primarily covers the New York Mets, New York Yankees and New York Rangers for various publications in the New York area. ... Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team, a position he has held since 1966. ... This article is about the state-related university. ... David S. Milch (March 23, 1945, Buffalo, New York) is an American television writer and producer. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... NBA redirects here. ... The NBA staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Peru, Indiana. ... Root Boy Slim (born Foster MacKenzie III) (July 9, 1945--June 8, 1993) Asheville, North Carolina; was a singer and songwriter for the band He died in his sleep in his home in Orlando, Florida at the age of 48. ... Donald (Don) Arthur Schollander (born April 30, 1946) is an American former swimmer. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... George Michael Steinbrenner III (born July 4, 1930 in Rocky River, Ohio), often known as The Boss, is an American billionaire businessman and the principal owner of Major League Baseballs New York Yankees. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Matt Stover (born January 27, 1968 in Dallas, Texas, USA) is a kicker for the Baltimore Ravens in the National Football League (NFL). ... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot The Ravens: Edgar, Allan, & Poe League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore... NFL redirects here. ... Jonathan Harshman Winters III (born November 11, 1925 in Bellbrook, Ohio) is an American film and television actor. ... Frankie Albert (January 27, 1920 - September 5, 2002) was a quarterback in the NFL. Frankie Albert, who was born in Chicago, starred at Stanford University coached by T-formation apostle Clark Shaughnessy. ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Other famous Dekes

  • Alan Bean, Omega Chi - Apollo astronaut
  • John Baham, Zeta Zeta - astronaut
  • Edward Bellamy, Theta Chi - author
  • Dale Chihuly, Kappa Epsilon - World Renowned Glass Artist
  • Sutemi Chinda, Psi Phi - Secretary of State of the Empire of Japan (The Washington DC Cherry trees were presented by him and his wife on behalf of the people of Japan in 1912)
  • Melvil Dewey, Sigma - devised the Dewey Decimal System
  • Charles A. Ellis, Gamma Phi - designed the Golden Gate Bridge
  • Baron Seijiro Hirai, Psi Omega - President, Japanese Railways
  • Robert E. Peary, Theta - first man to reach the North Pole
  • Reuben J. Petty, Nu Zeta - Famous Author, received Pulitzer Prize (2005 ) for "The Linguistic Corruption of The Recalcitrant Youth"
  • Robert Paul Hastings, Alpha - Director of the Hastings College of Law, San Francisco in 1885-1890
  • Nathaniel Hawthorne, Theta - author
  • Calvin Plimpton, Sigma - President of Amherst College and American University of Beirut
  • Yung Wing, Phi - Chinese Diplomat to the United States. Founder of the Chinese Educational Mission in 1872.
  • Yuan Shikai, Phi Prime Minister, Chinese (Qing Dynasty) Empire
  • Chung Mun Yew, Phi - Director of Chinese Railroads
  • Liang Tun Yen, Phi - Secretary of State, Chinese (Qing Dynasty) Empire
  • Sal Capizzi, Theta Chi-Astronaut
  • Tom Bacon, Tau- Nutritionist/conditioning coach for James Russell, 2 Time NESCAC pole vault champion


For a more complete listing of prominent Dekes visit: Prominent Alumni Alan LaVern Bean (born March 15, 1932 in Wheeler, Texas) is a former NASA Astronaut. ... Project Apollo was a series of human spaceflight missions undertaken by the United States of America (NASA) using the Apollo spacecraft and Saturn launch vehicle, conducted during the years 1961 – 1975. ... Edward Bellamy, circa 1889. ... Dale Chihuly. ... Melvil Dewey (December 10, 1851–December 26, 1931) was the inventor of the Dewey Decimal Classification system for library classification. ... The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, also called the Dewey Decimal System) is a system of library classification developed by Melvil Dewey (1851–1931) in 1876, and since greatly modified and expanded in the course of the twenty-two major revisions which have occurred up until 2004. ... The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening into the San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. ... Robert Edwin Peary (May 6, 1856 - February 20, 1920) was an American explorer who is usually credited as the first person, on April 6, 1909, to reach the Geographic North Pole. ... For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... Nathaniel Hawthorne (born Nathaniel Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was a 19th century American novelist and short story writer. ... Calvin Hastings Plimpton (born 7 October 1918, Boston, Massachusetts; died 30 January 2007, Westwood, Massachusetts) was an American physician and educator, who served as president of Amherst College and American University of Beirut. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... The American University of Beirut (AUB; Arabic: ) is a private, independent, non-sectarian university in Beirut, Lebanon. ... Yung Wing (Chinese: 容闳; Pinyin: Róng Hóng) (November 17, 1828 - May 29, 1912) was the first Chinese student to graduate from a U.S. university, graduating from Yale University in 1854. ...


Chapters

A list of the Active Chapters of Delta Kappa Epsilon. ...

External links and references

  • All factual information can be found and verified in the Library of Congress book: "A Century and a Half of DKE" The Illustrated History of Delta Kappa Epsilon. Copyright 1997. Edited by Duncan Andrews (Rho, 1957), Published by Heritage Publishers, Inc ISBN 0-929690-33-8 Libray of Congress Number 97-70228 Book information assessable online at www.loc.gov [1]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Delta Kappa Epsilon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1567 words)
DKE's heraldic colours are azure (blue), or (gold), and gules (crimson) and its flag is a triband of those colours with a left-facing rampant lion in the middle.
DKE is inextricably linked to the history of the United States of America, as its members have included five of forty-three Presidents of the United States: Rutherford B. Hayes, Theodore Roosevelt, Gerald Ford, George H. Bush, and George W. Bush.
DKE is the fourth fraternity at the prestigious institution.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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