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Encyclopedia > Delphinus
Delphinus
Delphinus
Click for larger image
List of stars in Delphinus
Abbreviation: Del
Genitive: Delphini
Symbology: Dolphin
Right ascension: 20.7 h
Declination: +13.8°
Area: 189 sq. deg. (69th)
Main stars: 5
Bayer/Flamsteed stars: 19
Stars known to have planets: 3
Bright stars: 0
Nearby stars: 0
Brightest star: Rotanev (β Del) (3.63m)
Nearest star: HD 197076 (68.45 ly)
Messier objects: 0
Meteor showers: None
Bordering constellations: Vulpecula
Sagitta
Aquila
Aquarius
Equuleus
Pegasus
Visible at latitudes between +90° and −70°
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of September

Delphinus (pronounced /dɛlˈfaɪnəs/, Latin: dolphin), is a rather small (ranked 69th) northern constellation very close to the celestial equator. It was already included in Ptolemy's list of 48 constellations and also forms part of the modern list of 88 constellations approved by the IAU. Look up Delphinus in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Delphinus is the Latin word for dolphin. As a proper name, it may refer to— in taxonomy, the name of the genus for the Common Dolphin. ... This is a celestial map of the constellation Delphinus, the Dolphin. ... This is the list of notable stars in the constellation Delphinus, sorted by decreasing brightness. ... The genitive case is a grammatical case that indicates a relationship, primarily one of possession, between the noun in the genitive case and another noun. ... For other uses, see Dolphin (disambiguation). ... Equatorial Coordinates Right ascension (abbrev. ... In astronomy, declination (abbrev. ... Here is a list of the 88 modern constellations by their area in the sky, measured in square degrees. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Flamsteed designations for stars are similar to Bayer designations, except that they use numbers instead of Greek letters. ... An extrasolar planet, or exoplanet, is a planet beyond the Solar System. ... Sualocin (α Delphini) and Rotanev (β Delphini) are names of stars, the result of an enduring practical joke played by the Italian astronomer Nicolò Cacciatore, assistant to Giuseppe Piazzi, who reversed the letters in the Latin version of his own name (Nicolaus Venator). The two mysterious names Sualocin and Rotanev... The apparent magnitude (m) of a star, planet or other celestial body is a measure of its apparent brightness as seen by an observer on Earth. ... A light-year or lightyear (symbol: ly) is a unit of measurement of length, specifically the distance light travels in vacuum in one year. ... The Messier objects are a set of astronomical objects catalogued by Charles Messier in his catalogue of Nebulae and Star Clusters first published in 1774. ... A meteor shower, some of which are known as a meteor storm or meteor outburst, is a celestial event where a group of meteors are observed to radiate from one point in the sky. ... Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... This article is about the constellation; for the trigonometric function, see versine. ... Aquila (IPA: , Latin: ; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th century BC) and Aratus (3rd century BC) and now also part of the list of 88 constellations acknowledged by the IAU. It lies roughly at the celestial equator. ... Aquarius (IPA: , Latin: ) is the eleventh sign of the zodiac, situated between Capricornus and Pisces. ... Equuleus (IPA: , Latin: Despite its smallness and lack of bright stars (none are brighter than fourth magnitude), it was also one of Ptolemys 48 constellations. ... Pegasus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation, named after the mythological winged horse Pegasus. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dolphin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the star grouping. ... The celestial equator is a great circle on the imaginary celestial sphere, which could be constructed by inflating the Earths equator until it intersects with said sphere. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... IAU redirects here. ...


It looks remarkably like a leaping dolphin and thus can easily be recognized in the sky. Delphinus is surrounded (clockwise from north) by the little fox Vulpecula, the flying arrow Sagitta, the eagle Aquila, the water carrier Aquarius, the little horse Equuleus and finally the flying horse Pegasus. Vulpecula (IPA: , Latin: ) is a faint northern constellation located in the middle of the Summer Triangle, an asterism consisting of the bright stars Deneb, Vega and Altair. ... This article is about the constellation; for the trigonometric function, see versine. ... Aquila (IPA: , Latin: ; sometimes named the Vulture), is one of the 48 constellations listed by Ptolemy, also mentioned by Eudoxus (4th century BC) and Aratus (3rd century BC) and now also part of the list of 88 constellations acknowledged by the IAU. It lies roughly at the celestial equator. ... Aquarius (IPA: , Latin: ) is the eleventh sign of the zodiac, situated between Capricornus and Pisces. ... Equuleus (IPA: , Latin: Despite its smallness and lack of bright stars (none are brighter than fourth magnitude), it was also one of Ptolemys 48 constellations. ... Pegasus (IPA: ) is a northern constellation, named after the mythological winged horse Pegasus. ...

Contents

Notable features

Here are some of its stars:

  • α Del (Sualocin): B9 IV, 3.77m (multiple star system with 6 components)
  • β Del (Rotanev): F5 IV, 4m - 4.9 m
  • γ Del: one of the finest double stars in the sky.
    • γ1 Del: F7 V, 5.14m
    • γ² Del: K1 IV, 4.27m
  • δ Del: A7 IIIp, 4.43m
  • The above mentioned stars form an asterism called Job's Coffin.
  • ε Del (Deneb Dulfim, or the tail of the Dolphin) is a star of spectral class B6 III with a magnitude of 4
  • R Del: Mira-type variable star with a period of 285.5 days; magnitude range between 7.6 and 13.8

Sualocin (α Delphini) and Rotanev (β Delphini) are names of stars, the result of an enduring practical joke played by the Italian astronomer Nicolò Cacciatore, assistant to Giuseppe Piazzi, who reversed the letters in the Latin version of his own name (Nicolaus Venator). The two mysterious names Sualocin and Rotanev simply appeared... Sualocin (α Delphini) and Rotanev (β Delphini) are names of stars, the result of an enduring practical joke played by the Italian astronomer Nicolò Cacciatore, assistant to Giuseppe Piazzi, who reversed the letters in the Latin version of his own name (Nicolaus Venator). The two mysterious names Sualocin and Rotanev simply appeared... Gamma Delphini is a binary star in the constellation of Delphinus. ... In astronomy, an asterism is a pattern of stars seen in Earths sky which is not an official constellation. ... Deneb Dulfim is the designation of the star Epsilon Delphini in the constellation Delfin. ...

Notable deep sky objects

  • NGC 6891: Planetary nebula; 10.5m
  • NGC 6934: This globular cluster is of magnitude 9.75
  • NGC 7006: at a distance of about 185,000 light-years this globular cluster is extremely remote; 11.5m

NGC 6543, The Cats Eye Nebula NGC 6853, The Dumbbell Nebula A planetary nebula is an astronomical object consisting of a glowing shell of gas and plasma formed by certain types of stars at the end of their lives. ... The Globular Cluster M80 in the constellation Scorpius is located about 28,000 light years from the Sun and contains hundreds of thousands of stars. ...

History

The names of the two brightest stars of this constellation, Sualocin (Alpha Delphini) and Rotanev (Beta Delphini), are not, as one might expect, names dating from Antiquity, but instead are quite new. They first appeared in a star catalogue of 1814 that was published at the Palermo Observatory in Italy. When read backwards they form the name Nicolaus Venator which is the Latinized version of the name of the assistant director of that observatory at that time: Niccolò Cacciatore (both Cacciatore and Venator mean hunter).


Mythology

There are two major stories from Greek mythology behind this constellation.


According to the first one, Greek god Poseidon wanted to marry Amphitrite, a nereid. She, however, wanting to protect her virginity, fled to the Atlas mountains. Her suitor then sent out several searchers, among them a certain Delphinus. Delphinus accidentally stumbled upon her and was able to persuade Amphitrite to accept Poseidon's wooing. Out of gratitude the god placed the image of a dolphin among the stars. Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Mosaic from Herculaneum depicting Poseidon and Amphitrite In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite (not to be confused with Aphrodite) was a sea-goddess. ... In Greek mythology, the Nereids (NEER-ee-eds) are sea nymphs, the fifty daughters of Nereus and Doris. ...


The second story tells of the Greek poet Arion of Lesbos (7th century BC), a court musician at the palace of Periander, ruler of Corinth. Arion had amassed a fortune during his travels to Sicily and Italy. On his way home from Tarentum his wealth caused the crew of his ship to conspire against him. Threatened with death, Arion asked to be granted a last wish which the crew granted: he wanted to sing a dirge. This he did and while doing so flung himself into the Sea from where he was rescued by a dolphin which had been charmed by Arion's music. The dolphin carried Arion to the coast of Greece and left. Taranto is a coastal city in Apulia, southern Italy. ...


References

  • Ian Ridpath and Wil Tirion (2007). Collins Stars and Planets Guide, HarperCollins, London. ISBN 978-0007251209.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Delphinus (constellation)
  • The Deep Photographic Guide to the Constellations: Delphinus
  • Star Tales – Delphinus

  Results from FactBites:
 
Delphinux the Dolphin (551 words)
The constellation lies along the southern border of the milky way (north of, but close to the celestial equator.) It is neither large nor bright, but it is a distinctive constellation and once you find it, you will always remember it.
Delphinus is visible worldwide except for the Antarctic.
Delphinus was one of Ptolemy's original constellations from around 1200BC.
Delphinus (609 words)
Delphinus, "The Dolphin", is an ancient constellation located just west of Pegasus.
Amphitrite was so beguiled by Delphinus' pleadings she relented and returned to Poseidon and became the Queen of the Sea.
Delphinus was later put in the heavens as a constellation by a grateful Poseidon.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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