FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Dele
A dele or deleatur.
A dele or deleatur.

A dele or deleatur is a proofreading symbol used to mark something for deletion. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Proofreading means reading a proof copy of a text in order to detect and correct any errors. ...

Contents

Name

de-le (dē'lē)
Dele is the more common term in modern American English, likely coming from the imperative form of the Latin delere ("to delete"), and can also be used as a verb, e.g. "Dele that graph." The Oxford English Dictionary notes, however, that dele as an English word may instead have arisen as an abbreviation for the older word deleatur (lit. "let it be deleted"), and in German and French, for example, deleatur is still the word for this symbol. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and scholarly dictionary of the English language. ...


Origin

The origin of the symbol appears to be an archaic letter d, as an abbreviation for dele or deleatur, though it bears little resemblance to a modern d. Compare the markedly similar (if not identical in some cases) symbol pfennig symbol for the German penny, which is also an archaic d (for denarius). As with most hand-written letters and symbols, its appearance is rather variable. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The pfennig was a small German coin valued at 1/100 of a Deutsche Mark and other German currencies with the name Mark. ... First row : c. ...


Usage

A section of proofread text, with a dele in the left margin indicating the stricken text ("and other,") is to be deleted. (The marks in the right margin mean, from left to right and top to bottom: replace stricken hyphen with one en dash; insert semicolon; insert comma; and transpose circled text.)
A section of proofread text, with a dele in the left margin indicating the stricken text ("and other,") is to be deleted. (The marks in the right margin mean, from left to right and top to bottom: replace stricken hyphen with one en dash; insert semicolon; insert comma; and transpose circled text.)

The dele is used in proofreading and copy editing, where it may be written over the selected text itself (such that it often resembles a stretched cursive e), or in the margin alongside the selected text, which is usually struck through with a line. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A dash is a punctuation mark, and is not to be confused with the hyphen, which has quite different uses. ... Copy editing is the process of an editor making formatting changes and other improvements to text. ...


The stricken text or the dele itself may be framed by top and bottom curved brackets, as in this example, to indicate that the space left after deletion is to be closed up. As the need for such closing up can usually be inferred by context, however, the brackets are often omitted.


A dele can be undone with a stet. A stet is a proofreading mark used to instruct the writer to disregard a change the editor had previously marked. ...


External links

  • List of proofreading marks

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m