FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Definitions of Palestine and Palestinian

The term Palestine and the related term Palestinian have several overlapping (and occasionally contradictory) definitions. Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ...


See also: Palestinian territories, and Palestine (disambiguation). The West Bank The Gaza Strip The Palestinian territories or Occupied Palestinian Territory, also widely referred to as the Occupied Territories, a term which strictly speaking also includes the Golan Heights, are a non-sovereign territory in the Middle East, made up of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. ... The term Palestine may refer to: Palestine: A geographical region in the Middle East. ...

Contents


Palestine

Palestine Defined

The term Palestine is derived from the name of the Philistines, a people of uncertain origins, possibly Aegean, who, in the 12th century BCE, settled along the southern Mediterranean coastal plain of what is now Israel and the Gaza Strip and disappeared several centuries later. After crushing Bar Kokhba's revolt (132-135), the Romans Latinized the hitherto seldom-used Greek name Παλαιστίνη (Palaestina) and applied it to the entire region that had formerly included Iudaea Province (which combined Judea, Samaria, and Idumea). The Arabic toponym Filastin (فلسطين) is derived from this name. Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The historic Philistines (פלשתים Hebrew plishtim) (see other uses below) were a people who inhabited the southern coast of Canaan around the time of the arrival of the Israelites, their territory being named Philistia in later contexts. ... Aegean civilization is the general term for the prehistoric civilizations in Greece and the Aegean. ... (13th century BC - 12th century BC - 11th century BC - other centuries) (1200s BC - 1190s BC - 1180s BC - 1170s BC - 1160s BC - 1150s BC - 1140s BC - 1130s BC - 1120s BC - 1110s BC - 1100s BC - other decades) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 1200 BC - Ancient Pueblo Peoples... Bar Kokhba’s revolt (132-135 A.D.) against the Roman Empire, also known as The Second Jewish-Roman War or The Second Jewish Revolt, was a second major rebellion by the Jews of Iudaea. ... The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Ancient Roman polity in the centuries following its reorganization under the leadership of Octavian (better known as Augustus), until its radical reformation in what was later to be known as the Byzantine Empire. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Map of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... Iudaea was the name of a Roman province, which extended over Judaea (Palestine). ... Desert hills in southern Judea, looking east from the town of Arad Judea or Judaea (יהודה Praise, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) (Greek: Ιουδαία) is a term used for the mountainous southern part of the historic Land of Israel (Hebrew: ארץ ישראל Eretz Yisrael), an area now divided between Israel and the West Bank, and... Samaria, or Shomron (Hebrew שֹׁמְרוֹן, Standard Hebrew Å omÉ™ron, Tiberian Hebrew ŠōmÉ™rôn, Arabic سامريّون SāmariyyÅ«n (but commonly called in Arabic جبال نابلس Jibal Nablus), (in the New Testament Greek Σαμαρεία, in Russian Самария ) is a term used for the mountainous northern part of the area on the west bank of the Jordan... Edom (אֱדוֹם, Standard Hebrew Edom, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔḏôm) sounds like the Biblical Hebrew word for red and is a vividly apposite designation for the red sandstones of Edom. ... Arabic (; , less formally, ) is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Ancient Palestine

In historical contexts, especially predating the establishment of the State of Israel, Palestine was mostly a geographical term, particularly used in Greek, Latin, Arabic, and other languages taking their geographical vocabulary from them; it comprised the Roman sub-province of Syria Palaestina, roughly equivalent to ancient Canaan (including the Biblical kingdoms of Israel, Judah, Moab, Ammon, and Philistia) and thus included much of the land on either side of the Jordan River although with further political sub-divisions along the River Jordan valley . Physical map of the Earth (Medium) (Large 2 MB) Geography is the scientific study of the locational and spatial variation in both physical and human phenomena on Earth. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Arabic (; , less formally, ) is the largest member of the Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120 AD. In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin, provincia, pl. ... See related article Occupations of Palestine. ... Canaan or Knáan (Arabic کنعان, Hebrew כְּנַעַן, Septuagint Greek Χανααν) is an ancient term for a region roughly corresponding to present-day Israel/Palestine including the West Bank, western Jordan, southern and coastal Syria and Lebanon continuing up until the border of modern Turkey. ... The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... The Kingdom of Judah (Hebrew מַלְכוּת יְהוּדָה, Standard Hebrew Malḫut YÉ™huda, Tiberian Hebrew Malḵûṯ YÉ™hûḏāh) in the times of the Hebrew Bible, was the nation formed from the territories of the tribes of Judah, Simeon, and Benjamin after the Kingdom of Israel was divided, and was named after... Moab (מוֹאָב, Standard Hebrew Moʾav, Tiberian Hebrew Môʾāḇ Greek Μωάβ; Assyrian Muaba, Maba, Maab; Egyptian Muab) is the historical name for a mountainous strip of land in modern-day Jordan running along the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. ... Ammon is an Egyptian proper noun that can refer to at least two distinct entities. ... The historic Philistines (see note Philistines below) were a people that inhabited the southern coast of Canaan around the time of the arrival of the Israelites, their territory being named Philistia in later contexts. ... Northern part of the Great Rift Valley as seen from space (NASA) The Jordan River today The Jordan River (Hebrew: נהר הירדן nehar hayarden, Arabic: nahr al-urdun) is a river in Southwest Asia flowing through the Great Rift Valley into the Dead Sea. ...


See also: History of Palestine. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Is Jordan Part of Historical Palestine?

Before the establishment of the British mandate (see below), most of the area that is today Jordan was part of the Ottoman Vilayet of Syria (previously called the Vilayet of Damascus), the southern part of Jordan was part of the Vilayet of Hejaz. Palestine was divided between the Vilayet of Beirut and the Sanjak of Jerusalem. Throughout most of history the rift valley comprising Wadi Arabah, the Dead Sea and River Jordan has formed a political and administrative frontier, even within empires which controlled both territories. The exception was during the period of the Caliphate when what is today southern Israel/Palestine and southern Jordan were termed Al Jund al Filasteen and the northern parts of these land as Al Jund al Urdun. In 1920, most of modern Jordan was incorporated into the planned League of Nations mandate territory termed Palestine. Trans-Jordan became a separate political unit on April 11, 1921 and the Mandate came into force in September 1923. Imperial motto (Ottoman Turkish) Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (the Eternal State) The Ottoman Empire at the height of its power (1683) Official language Ottoman Turkish Capital Bursa (1335-1365), Edirne (1365-1453), Ä°stanbul (1453-1922) Imperial anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Sovereigns Padishah of the Osmanli Dynasty Population ca 40... Vilâyet (also eyalet or pashaluk) was the Turkish name for the provinces of the Ottoman Empire. ... Hejaz (also Hijaz, Hedjaz; Arabic: al-Ḥiǧāz) is a region in the northwest of present-day Saudi Arabia; its main city is Jeddah, but it is probably better-known for the holy city of Mecca. ... Beirut (Arabic: , transliterated BayrÅ«t - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... This page is about districts of the Ottoman Empire; for a region in Serbia and Montenegro, see Sandžak. ... The Jordan River flowing into the Dead Sea The Dead Sea (Arabic البحر الميت, Hebrew ים המלח) is the lowest exposed point on the Earths surface. ... This article is about the Jordan River in western Asia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An Anglicized/Latinized version of the Arabic word خليفة or Khalīfah, Caliph (  listen?) is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... The West Bank The Gaza Strip The Palestinian territories or Occupied Palestinian Territory, also widely referred to as the Occupied Territories, a term which strictly speaking also includes the Golan Heights, are a non-sovereign territory in the Middle East, made up of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. ... League of Nations mandates were territories established under Article 22 of the Covenant of the League of Nations, 28 June 1919. ... April 11 is the 101st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (102nd in leap years). ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


British Mandate of Palestine

Between July 1922 and 1948, the term Palestine referred to the British Mandate of Palestine. The term referred to all of what is now Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza Strip. and was used by both Arabs and Jews without any ethnic connotations. For example, the Jerusalem Post, an Israeli newspaper, was known as the Palestine Post from its founding in 1932 until 1950. Map of the territory under the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli newspaper in the English language. ...


Palestinian Authority

Sometimes people use the term Palestine to refer to lands currently under the administrative control of the Palestinian Authority, a quasi-governmental entity which governs but lacks full sovereignty. Since the late 1990s, this has included most of the Gaza Strip and large sections of the West Bank. The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ...


Palestine as a state

Modern usage of the term Palestine usually refers to a prospective Palestinian state, incorporating both the Gaza Strip and the West Bank. Some nationalists regard all the land west of the Jordan River, including territory of modern State of Israel, as the territory of a Palestinian state "from the river to the sea". Proposals for a Palestinian state vary depending on ones views of Palestinian statehood, as well as various definitions of Palestine and Palestinian (see also State of Palestine). ... Northern part of the Great Rift Valley as seen from space (NASA) The Jordan River today The Jordan River (Hebrew: נהר הירדן nehar hayarden, Arabic: nahr al-urdun) is a river in Southwest Asia flowing through the Great Rift Valley into the Dead Sea. ...


The term is also used to convey the sense that Palestine is already a state, either (a) consisting only of Gaza & West Bank or (b) including as well all land held by Israel (see views of Palestinian statehood). It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Proposals for a Palestinian state. ...


Palestinian

This section describes several viewpoints of what makes a person a "Palestinian".


By place of birth

A "Palestinian" can mean a person who is born in the geographical area known prior to 1918 as "Palestine", or a former citizen of the British Mandate territory called Palestine, or an institution related to either of these.


Mandate definition

Britain used the term "Palestinian" to refer to all persons legally residing in or born in the boundaries of the British Mandate of Palestine without regard to their ethnicity, religion, or place of origin. Map of the territory under the British Mandate of Palestine. ...


By place of origin

In its common usage, "Palestinian" refers to a person whose ancestors had lived in the territory corresponding to British Mandate Palestine for some length of time prior to 1948. This definition includes the inhabitants of the West Bank and Gaza Strip (including Dom and Samaritans, but excluding Israeli settlers and most Armenians), the Israeli Arabs (including Druze and Bedouin), the minority of Israeli Jews whose families moved there prior to Zionism, and the Arab refugees and emigrés from 1948 and their descendants (though not the pre-Nakba (1948) non-Bedouin population of Jordan.) This usage excludes people who immigrated into the area during the twentieth century. Samaritans are both a religious and an ethnic group. ... For Israeli settlements in Israel proper, see Settlements in Israel Israeli settlements are communities built for Israeli Jewish settlers in areas that it captured during the 1967 Six-Day War. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Druze (Arabic: duruzÄ« درزي, pl. ... Bedouin resting at Mount Sinai Bedouin, derived from the Arabic , a generic name for a desert-dweller, is a term generally applied to Arab nomadic groups, who are found throughout most of the desert belt extending from the Atlantic coast of the Sahara via the Western Desert, Sinai, and Negev... Poster promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s: Toward a New Life (in Romanian),The Promised Land (in Hungarian) 1844 Discourse on the Restoration of the Jews by Mordecai Noah, page one. ... Categories: Stub | 1948 Arab-Israeli War | Israeli-Palestinian conflict ... Bedouin resting at Mount Sinai Bedouin, derived from the Arabic , a generic name for a desert-dweller, is a term generally applied to Arab nomadic groups, who are found throughout most of the desert belt extending from the Atlantic coast of the Sahara via the Western Desert, Sinai, and Negev...


JSource, the Jewish Virtual Library, uses a similar but slightly narrower definition: "Although anyone with roots in the land that is now Israel, the West Bank and Gaza is technically a Palestinian, the term is now more commonly used to refer to Arabs with such roots...Most of the world's Palestinian population is concentrated in Israel, the West Bank, the Gaza Strip and Jordan, although many Palestinians live in Lebanon, Syria and other Arab countries." JSource Virtual Library definition of Palestinian


By citizenship

A more specific widespread usage of "Palestinian" sometimes heard is to refer to native residents of British Mandate Palestine who do not have Israeli or Jordanian citizenship, and to institutions outside the Israeli state and territories not incorporated into it.


By ethnic origin

Referring to the Arab subculture of the southern Levant

The word "Palestinian" is occasionally used by ethnographers and linguists to denote the specific Arab subculture of the southern Levant; in that sense, it includes not only the Arabs of British Mandate Palestine, but also the inhabitants of Jordan who arrived as refugees from Palestine and the Druze, while excluding both Bedouin (who culturally and linguistically group with Arabia) and ethnic minorities such as the Dom and Samaritans. However, some of this definition is not accepted. The Samaritans define themselves as Palestinian. The Levant Levant is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... The Levant Levant is an imprecise geographical term historically referring to a large area in the Middle East south of the Taurus Mountains, bounded by the Mediterranean Sea on the west, and by the northern Arabian Desert and Upper Mesopotamia to the east. ... The Druze (Arabic: duruzī درزي, pl. ... Bedouin resting at Mount Sinai Bedouin, derived from the Arabic , a generic name for a desert-dweller, is a term generally applied to Arab nomadic groups, who are found throughout most of the desert belt extending from the Atlantic coast of the Sahara via the Western Desert, Sinai, and Negev... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... The Dom are a small ethnic group within the Roma, or gypsies. ... Samaritans are both a religious and an ethnic group. ...


Referring to Jews in a national rather than religious sense

The major English language Zionist newspaper of the Yishuv was called The Palestine Post. Founded in 1932, in 1950 it was renamed into The Jerusalem Post.
The major English language Zionist newspaper of the Yishuv was called The Palestine Post. Founded in 1932, in 1950 it was renamed into The Jerusalem Post.

Some, particularly certain Palestinians and Arabs, still refer to Jews whose ancestors had lived in Palestine before Zionism as "Palestinians". Jews who lived in Palestine during the Middle Ages are also referred to as "Palestinian Jews" in a scholarly sense, eg. the authors of the "Palestinian Talmud". The name refers to the "Jerusalem Talmud" - its Hebrew name. Most early literature when referring to "Palestinians" meant to designate Jews, but after the modern State of Israel was born, Jews were identified as Israelis, their original self-definition. It was after the 1967 War that the word "Palestinian" began to be used to differentiate the Arab of the Palestinian region from the other Arabs of the region, eg the Egyptians, the Syrians, etc. Download high resolution version (1381x915, 552 KB)May 16, 1948 edition of Jewish newspaper The Palestine Post, soon renamed into The Jerusalem Post. ... Download high resolution version (1381x915, 552 KB)May 16, 1948 edition of Jewish newspaper The Palestine Post, soon renamed into The Jerusalem Post. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ... Yishuv is a Hebrew word meaning settlement. ... The Palestine Post was an English language Zionist newspaper founded on December 1, 1932 by American journalist-turned-newspaper-editor, Gershon Agron in the British mandate of Palestine and subsequently, in Israel. ... The May 16, 1948 Palestine Post headline announcing the creation of the state of Israel The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli newspaper in the English language, which also publishes on the Internet - [[1]] www. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Definitions of Palestine and Palestinian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (945 words)
Palestine was divided between the Vilayet of Beirut and the Sanjak of Jerusalem.
A "Palestinian" can mean a person who is born in the geographical area known prior to 1918 as "Palestine", or a former citizen of the British Mandate territory called Palestine, or an institution related to either of these.
Britain used the term "Palestinian" to refer to all persons legally residing in or born in the boundaries of the British Mandate of Palestine without regard to their ethnicity, religion, or place of origin.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m