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Encyclopedia > Defenders (comics)
Defenders


The Defenders, by Kevin Maguire Download high resolution version (800x1211, 184 KB)Cover to Defenders (vol. ... The Defenders, as drawn by Maguire Kevin Maguire (born 1960) is an American comic book artist and penciller, best known for his work on the Justice League series in the late 1980s for DC Comics. ...

Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Marvel Feature #1
Created by Roy Thomas
Ross Andru
Base(s) of operations Mobile
Roster
Main
Doctor Strange
The Hulk
Namor
Silver Surfer
Other
Nighthawk
Valkyrie
Hellcat
Clea
Hellstorm
Moondragon
Gargoyle
Andromeda
Iceman
Angel
Candy Southern
See: List of Defenders members

The Defenders are a Marvel Comics superhero group — usually presented as a "non-team" of individualistic "outsiders" each known for following their own agendas — that usually battles mystic and supernatural threats. This article is about the comic book company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Marvel Feature was the name of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics in the 1970s. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... Cover of The Amazing Spider-Man #136 pencilled by Andru. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... It has been suggested that Nighthawk (Supreme Power) be merged into this article or section. ... Valkyrie is a fictional character and Marvel Comics superheroine. ... Patsy Walker first assumes the identity of Hellcat in Avengers #144, vol. ... Clea is a fictional character, a sorceress in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Daimon Hellstrom, also known as the Son of Satan and Hellstorm, is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Moondragon is a fictional character in Marvel Comics universe. ... Gargoyle is a name shared by two fictional characters appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Andromeda Attumasen is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Iceman (Robert Bobby Louis Drake) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... Warren Kenneth Worthington III is a fictional character, a superhero that appears in Marvel Comics. ... Candace Candy Southern is a fictional character most often appearing in X-Men and Defenders stories in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Marvel Feature #1 (December, 1971) The Defenders were a loosely organized team of fictional characters, mostly but not solely superheroes, in the Marvel Universe. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ...


Its original and most popular incarnation is led by Doctor Strange and also includes The Silver Surfer, Namor, and the Hulk, all popular superheroes in their own right. They first appeared as The Defenders in Marvel Feature #1 (December 1971). [1] This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Marvel Feature was the name of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics in the 1970s. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


The group was featured in a series with a rotating line-up from 1972 until 1986, retitled near the end of the run as The New Defenders and featuring none of the original line-up. The concept was modified in the 1993-95 series Secret Defenders, in which Dr. Strange assembled teams on a single mission basis. In the 2000s, Marvel published a new miniseries featuring the classic line-up.

Contents

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After Steve Gerber became the writer, the series gained a cult following for the absurdism that marked his run. [citation needed] Gerber has been recognized as an influence on several of the writers that were going to redefine comics in the eighties, including Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman and Grant Morrison. [citation needed] Stephen Ross Gerber (born 20 September 1947, St. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... Grant Morrison (born January 31, 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer and artist. ...


History

The origin of the Defenders can be traced back to two crossover story arcs by Roy Thomas prior to the official founding of the team. The first, in Doctor Strange #183 (November 1969), Sub-Mariner #22 (February 1970), and The Incredible Hulk #126 (April 1970) occurred when the Dr. Strange series was cancelled and the storyline was completed in the other series. Dr. Strange teams with Sub-Mariner, then Hulk to protect the Earth from invasion by Lovecraftian inter-planar beings known as the Undying Ones and their leader, the Nameless One. Barbara Norriss, later the host of the Valkyrie, first appears in this story. In the second arc (featured in Sub-Mariner #34 and #35, February and March 1971), Namor enlists the aid of the Silver Surfer and the Hulk to stop a potentially devastating weather control experiment (and to inadvertently free a small island nation from a dictator) and face the Avengers. These two story arcs were reprinted in the first Essential Defenders volume. This article is about the author. ... The Undying Ones are a fictional race found in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Nameless One is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ... Valkyrie is a fictional character and Marvel Comics superheroine. ...


The Defenders first appeared as a feature in Marvel Feature #1 (December, 1971), where the founding members gathered to battle the alien techno-wizard Yandroth and decided to remain as a team. They soon got their own eponymous series where they first battled the Undying Ones. Marvel Feature was the name of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics in the 1970s. ... Yandroth is a fictional character, an Alien Techno-Wizard in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


The best-known and most prominent members of the Defenders are Doctor Strange, the Hulk, Namor the Sub-Mariner, the Silver Surfer, Nighthawk, Valkyrie, and Hellcat. Though the team was founded by Strange, Namor, and the Hulk, the others are generally considered to be core members of the team. A large number of other heroes worked alongside the team in its original incarnation, with a number becoming "official" members. Other notable members include Hawkeye, Devil-Slayer, Son of Satan, Clea, Moondragon, the Gargoyle, the Beast, Iceman, and The Angel. This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... This article is about the comic book character. ... It has been suggested that Nighthawk (Supreme Power) be merged into this article or section. ... Valkyrie is a fictional character and Marvel Comics superheroine. ... Patsy Walker first assumes the identity of Hellcat in Avengers #144, vol. ... Look up hawk-eye in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Devil-Slayer is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Daimon Hellstrom, also known as the Son of Satan and Hellstorm, is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Clea is a fictional character, a sorceress in the Marvel Comics Universe. ... Moondragon is a fictional character in Marvel Comics universe. ... Gargoyle is a name shared by two fictional characters appearing in the Marvel Comics universe. ... For other uses, see Beast (disambiguation). ... Iceman (Robert Bobby Louis Drake) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... Warren Kenneth Worthington III is a fictional character, a superhero that appears in Marvel Comics. ...


As of issue #125, Defenders was retitled to New Defenders as the "big four" (Doctor Strange, The Silver Surfer, The Hulk and Namor) were forced to leave the team. This was the result of an alien prophecy that stated that these four, operating as a group, would be responsible for destroying the world. The remaining group of Defenders finally disbanded in New Defenders #152, as a number of the members had apparently died and several others left the team to join X-Factor. Several of these seemingly-deceased members later returned in issues of Solo Avengers, in Strange Tales vol. 2 #5-7, followed by issues #3-4 of the relaunched Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme series. Elf with a Gun is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ... X-Factor is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ...


In 1992, after it was revealed in Hulk #370-371 that the prophecy had been falsified, the original Defenders were reunited and appeared in a story entitled The Return of the Defenders running through Hulk Annual #18, Namor Annual #2, Silver Surfer Annual #5 and Dr. Strange, Sorcerer Supreme Annual #2.


In 1993, Doctor Strange organized a new "team" called the Secret Defenders, whose membership varied for each mission. A number of then-popular heroes appeared in this series; the first group organized consisted of the membership of "New Fantastic Four" (Spider-Man, Wolverine, the Hulk and Ghost Rider), who battled the Human Torch in Fantastic Four #374-375. The supervillain Thanos also organized a team of "Secret Defenders" during this period, though that team had nothing to do with Strange's group. Eventually, leadership of the Secret Defenders passed to Doctor Druid, who faked his own death in Secret Defenders #25, the series' last issue. Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... Ghost Rider is the name of several fictional supernatural anti-heroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the Silver/Modern Age Human Torch, Johnny Storm. ... For other uses, see Fantastic Four (disambiguation). ... Doctor Doom, one of the most archetypal supervillains and his arch-enemies The Fantastic Four (in background). ... Thanos is a fictional character that appears in the Marvel Universe. ... Doctor Druid, also known as Doctor Droom and Druid, is a fictional character, a supernatural monster-hunter in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


In 2001-2002, The Defenders reunited in Defenders (volume 2) #1-12 thanks to Kurt Busiek and Erik Larsen, immediately followed by The Order #1-6, in which Yandroth manipulated Gaea into "cursing" the primary four Defenders (Doctor Strange, the Sub-Mariner, the Hulk and the Silver Surfer) so that they would be summoned to major crisis situations. These members were then mind controlled by Yandroth into forming the world-dominating "Order"; once the Order were freed from this control by their fellow heroes (including their teammates Hellcat, Nighthawk and Valkyrie), the Defenders apparently disbanded. Kurt Busiek (born September 16, 1960) is a comic book writer. ... Cover to The Savage Dragon (original miniseries) #1. ... Gaea is a fictional character appearing in the Marvel Comics universe, based loosely on the Gaia of Greek mythology. ... Mind control (or thought control) has the premise that an outside source can control an individuals thinking, behavior or consciousness (either directly or more subtly). ...

Cover to Defenders vol. 1 #34
Cover to Defenders vol. 1 #34

A Defenders five-issue miniseries debuted in July 2005, by Keith Giffen, J. M. DeMatteis and Kevin Maguire (as a team, best known for their work on DC's Justice League), featuring Doctor Strange attempting to reunite the original four Defenders to battle Dormammu and Umar. This series focuses mostly on humor as the characters spend most of their time arguing with and criticizing one another. Image File history File links Defenders_34. ... Image File history File links Defenders_34. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ... Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... John Marc DeMatteis (born December 15, 1953) is an American writer of comic books. ... The Defenders, as drawn by Maguire Kevin Maguire (born 1960) is an American comic book artist and penciller, best known for his work on the Justice League series in the late 1980s for DC Comics. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Dormammu is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Umar is a fictional character who resides in the Dark Dimension of the Marvel Comics multiverse. ...


Membership

For detailed information, please see List of Defenders members. Marvel Feature #1 (December, 1971) The Defenders were a loosely organized team of fictional characters, mostly but not solely superheroes, in the Marvel Universe. ...


"True" Defenders

Defenders membership was remarkably fluid, yet a few members were somewhat recognizable, most noticeably the three founders (Doctor Strange, Namor the Sub-Mariner and the Incredible Hulk), the Silver Surfer, Valkyrie, Nighthawk, Hellcat and Gargoyle. A secondary tier of Defenders might include such members as Hawkeye, Moon Knight, Luke Cage, Clea and the Son of Satan.


"Defenders for a Day"

A storyline in issues #63-65 of the original Defenders run had dozens of new applicants attempting to join the Defenders. All of them left shortly after for various reasons, mostly disappointment with the existing members. Among them were the Falcon, Quasar (then named Marvel Man), Captain Mar-Vell, Ms. Marvel, Nova (Richard Rider), Torpedo, Stingray, Havok, Polaris, Black Goliath, White Tiger, Captain Ultra and Tagak the Leopard Lord. Tagak is a fictional character in the Marvel Universe. ...


Fake Defenders

The same storyline also had a number of villains attempting to present themselves as new Defenders members in order to confuse the authorities and the public as they committed robberies. Members included android versions of Libra and Sagittarius, as well as the Beetle, Batroc the Leaper, the Shocker and others.


Secret Defenders

This group is sometimes counted as an extension of the original Defenders, despite being largely different in composition and goals. Its composition was perhaps even more fluid than that of the original Defenders, but typically included either Doctor Strange or Doctor Druid as leader, joined by a custom selection of heroes chosen for the mission at hand. At various times, War Machine, Darkhawk, Thunderstrike, Wolverine, Spider-Woman II, Ant-Man, Iceman, Nomad, and many others were members. Doctor Druid, also known as Doctor Droom and Druid, is a fictional character, a supernatural monster-hunter in the Marvel Comics universe. ... War Machine (Jim Rhodes) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Darkhawk (Chris Powell) is a fictional comic book superhero who appeared in his self-titled monthly series for 50 issues that was published by Marvel Comics from March 1991 to March 1995. ... Thunderstrike (Eric Masterson) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... Julia Carpenter, neé Julia Cornwall, the second Spider-Woman, a fictional character, and a now-retired superheroine in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Dr. Henry Hank Pym is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, created by writer Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby. ... Iceman (Robert Bobby Louis Drake) is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, a member of the X-Men. ... Nomad is the name of a number of superhero characters who have appeared in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ...


At the end of its existence, the group had a somewhat regular composition including Cadaver, Sepulchre, Joshua Pryce, and Doctor Druid. Sepulchre (also known as Shadowoman) is a fictional superhero published by Marvel Comics. ...


Legacy

In addition to the various official incarnations of Defenders, there have been other, unnamed teams put together by Doctor Strange that might be considered Defenders. During the latest story arcs in Marvel Team-Up, Doctor Strange assembled a team of heroes that has been nicknamed 'the Defenders'- consisting of the Hulk, Wolverine, Spider-Man, She-Hulk, Ms. Marvel and Nova- to combat the villain Titannus, subsequently creating a similar team to oppose Titannus' return. In the aftermath of the recent Civil War, Doctor Strange has also become a member of the New Avengers, providing the team with secure accommodation as they try to investigate the recent events that have turned the world upside-down. Marvel Team-Up is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... For the other Marvel Comics character called Ms. ... Nova, (Richard Rider), is a fictional superhero from Marvel Comics. ... Titannus is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Civil War is a 2006-2007 Marvel Comics crossover event built around a seven-issue limited series of the same name written by Mark Millar, and penciled by Steve McNiven. ... ...


Alternate versions

Ultimate Defenders

Promotional art (cover minus trade dress), The Ultimates 2 #6, featuring the Defenders. Art by Bryan Hitch.
Promotional art (cover minus trade dress), The Ultimates 2 #6, featuring the Defenders. Art by Bryan Hitch.

In the Ultimate Marvel universe, the Defenders are a group of amateur vigilantes who dress up as super-heroes. None of them have superpowers, although they claim to be experienced in crime-fighting. Henry Pym is invited to join them, and he accepts, adopting a new identity - Ant-Man. The Defenders are thrilled at the prospect of having an actual superhuman join their team, and convince Pym they are a serious project. Their first mission together is a disaster, and Pym, who wanted to remain out of the spotlight, is forced by the Valkyrie to reveal himself to save them, humiliating himself in the process. Their members include Ultimate versions of Luke Cage, Hellcat, Nighthawk, Valkyrie, Black Knight, and Son of Satan. They are later joined by Whiz-Kid, a wheelchair bound boy suffering from polio. He claims to have the ability to vary the temperature of certain inorganic materials. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (565x848, 165 KB)Cover to Ultimates (v2) #6. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (565x848, 165 KB)Cover to Ultimates (v2) #6. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover of Ultimates (v2) #12. ... Dr. Henry Hank Pym is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe, created by writer Stan Lee and artist/co-plotter Jack Kirby. ... Luke Cage, born Carl Lucas and also called Power Man, is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... Hellcat, real name Patsy Walker, is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... It has been suggested that Nighthawk (Supreme Power) be merged into this article or section. ... Valkyrie is a fictional character and Marvel Comics superheroine. ... The Black Knight is the name of several fictional characters, both heroic and villainous, in Marvel Comics universe. ... Daimon Hellstrom, also known as the Son of Satan and Hellstorm, is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Takaski Taki Matsuya or sometimes called the Wiz Kid is a fictional mutant character from Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the disease. ...

  • The Valkyrie claims to be a martial arts expert, and then admits that she can't even pass her orange belt.
  • Nighthawk injures himself during an apprehension of a cigarette raid.
  • The Defenders travel the city via taxi and are often late. Later they manage to buy a Pontiac Firebird, which they obtained by sending several letters asking for money for proper transportation because of Whiz-kid's condition.
  • To convince Pym that they are a real super-hero team they claim Dr Strange is a member, and that two X-Men (Iceman and Angel) will show as soon as the Defenders get corporate sponsorship. All of this is untrue, though it is a reference to the classic team, seeing as all of the characters they listed were members in the classic Marvel Universe.
  • Son of Satan is revealed to be a S.H.I.E.L.D spy.

The members of the team seem genuinely perplexed as to why characters such as Spider-Man are considered heroes and they are not, even though the group has not defeated any villains or saved anyone's lives from danger. When Pym points out that "you have to do something heroic," Nighthawk misses the point and insists that Pym is right: "it's all about marketing." The Defenders here appear to be much more interested in becoming celebrities as a self described super-hero team rather than actually going out and stopping crimes or saving lives. Even their eldest member, the Black Knight, when witnessing Iron Man flying towards a fire, is more concerned about him "stealing all the glory," while the Defenders try to hail a cab to get to the same fire. The Pontiac Firebird was a pony car built by the Pontiac division of General Motors between 1967 and 2002. ...


What If? Age of Apocalypse

In a reality in which Legion killed both Charles Xavier and Eric Lensherr, the Defenders were the sole group resisting the regime of the mutant tyrant Apocalypse. They were formed by Captain America (wielding Mjolnir), Captain Britain (wearing the Iron Man armor), Logan (without any adamantium implants), Molecule Man, Brother Voodoo (Sorcerer Supreme following the death of Doctor Strange) and The Thing (who wears a prosthetic arm). They are later joined by Sauron and Nate Summers Legion (David Charles Haller) was the Marvel Comics character responsible for creating the alternate timeline known as the Age of Apocalypse. ... Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional Marvel Comics superhero, known as the leader and founder of the X-Men. ... Magneto (Eric Magnus Lensherr) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Apocalypse (En Sabah Nur) is a fictional Marvel Comics supervillain and is one of the prominent foes of the superhero group the X-Men. ... This article is about the superhero. ... Captain Britain (Brian Braddock), briefly known as Britannic, is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in the comic books published by Marvel Comics. ... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... Molecule Man is a fictional character, an elemental supervillain of immense power in the Marvel Comics universe, and an enemy of Klaw. ... Brother Voodoo is a superhero in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the Marvel comics superhero. ... John Carpenters The Thing is a 1982 science fiction film directed by John Carpenter. ... Sauron is a Marvel Comics supervillain, an enemy of the X-Men. ... For members of the Marvel Comics superhero team, see X-Men. ...


Bibliography of Defenders titles

  • Marvel Feature (1971 series) #1-3 (December 1971 - June 1972)
  • The Defenders (1972 series) #1-152 (August 1972 - February 1986)
  • Giant-Size Defenders (1974 series) #1-5 (July 1974 - July 1975)
  • The Defenders Annual (1976)
  • The Return of the Defenders (Hulk Annual #18, Namor Annual #2, Silver Surfer Annual #2, Dr. Strange Annual #2 1992)
  • Secret Defenders (1993 series) #1-25 (March 1993 - March 1995)
  • Day of the Defenders (March 2001) #1 (reprint book to promote the launch of the new series)
  • Defenders, The (2001 series) #1-12 (March 2001 - February 2002)
  • The Order (2002 series) #1-6 (April 2002 - September 2002)
  • Defenders #1-5 (July 2005 - January 2006)
  • Avengers Defenders War (2002) collection reprinting a 1970s crossover story
  • Essential Defenders Vol. 1 (2005) collection reprinting the 1970s series
  • Essential Defenders Vol. 2 (2006) collection reprinting the 1970s series
  • Essential Defenders Vol. 3 (2007) collection reprinting the 1970s series
  • Defenders: Indefensible (2006 hardcover, 2007 paperback) collection reprinting the 2005-06 miniseries

This is a list of comics-related events in 1971. ... This is a list of comics-related events in 1971. ... 1992 1991 in comics 1993 in comics Notable events of 1992 in comics. ... 1993 1992 in comics 1994 in comics Notable events of 1993 in comics. ... 1993 1992 in comics 1994 in comics Notable events of 1993 in comics. ... 1995 1994 in comics 1996 in comics Notable events of 1995 in comics. ... This is a list of comics-related events in 2005. ... 2006 2005 in comics 2007 in comics Notable events of 2006 in comics. ...

Appearances in other media

Television

The team proper has never been depicted in other media. However, the animated television series Justice League and Justice League Unlimited depicted an homage to the team. Each series had an episode that feature a subgroup of DC Comics superheroes that play the equivalent roles of their Marvel Comics version.[2] . ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ...


Their members include (and their Marvel counterparts):

In the Justice League episode "The Terror Beyond," Grundy called Hawkgirl "Bird-Nose", which is what the Hulk called Nighthawk. Doctor Fate is a DC Comics superhero and wizard, best known as a member of the Justice Society of America. ... Aquaman is a fictional character, superhero in DC Comics. ... Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... Solomon Grundy is a DC Comics character, a large, strong zombie supervillain. ... Amazo is a fictional android from DC Comics. ...

  • The Defenders are mentioned in the first episode of Spider-Man: The Animated Series.

This article is about Spider-Man: The Animated Series. ...

Video Games

The four founding members of the Defenders each play a role in Marvel: Ultimate Alliance. The Silver Surfer is an unlockable character in the game. However, he can be unlocked with a special code (available to those who pre-ordered the game thru specific outlets) or by completing all Comic Book Missions. Both Dr. Strange and Namor are NPC-Striker characters in the GBA version. Dr. Strange is a playable character in most platforms. In all other versions, Bruce Banner originally only appears as an NPC character, though the Hulk was subsequently released as an optional downloadable playable character in the Xbox 360 version. The player can also get a Defenders team bonus for using a team of Dr. Strange, Silver Surfer, Luke Cage, Iceman, or the downloadable Hulk. They can also get the team bonus of Secret Defenders by using Ghost Rider, Hulk, Silver Surfer, and Doctor Strange. “GBA” redirects here. ...


Trivia

The character names Henry Crun, Minerva Bannister and Hercules Grytpype-Thynne, appearing or mentioned in Issue 148, were lifted from the classic 1950s BBC Radio comedy, The Goon Show. The Goon Show was a popular and influential British radio comedy programme, originally produced and broadcast by the BBC from 1951 to 1960 on the BBC Home Service. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Defenders (comics) - definition of The Defenders (comics) in Encyclopedia (1869 words)
The Defenders briefly reunited in Defenders (volume 2) #1-12, in which Yandroth manipulated Gaia into "cursing" the primary four Defenders (Doctor Strange, the Sub-Mariner, the Hulk and the Silver Surfer) so that they would be summoned to major crisis situations.
From Secret Defenders #12 -14 (February, April) the title characters were actually a loosely organized group of supervillains in a quest of finding and obtaining the Oracle of Ancient Knowledge.
In Defenders vol 2 #1 (March, 2001) six former Defenders were forced to regroup in a battle against Yandroth.
Defenders (comics) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (957 words)
Two members of the Defenders, the Hulk and Namor the Sub-Mariner, appeared in two cross-over story arcs prior to the official founding of the team.
The Defenders first appeared as a team in Marvel Feature #1 (December, 1971), where the founding members gathered to battle the alien techno-wizard Yandroth and decided to remain as a team.
The best-known and most prominent members of the Defenders are Doctor Strange, the Hulk, Namor the Sub-Mariner, the Silver Surfer, Nighthawk, Valkyrie, and Hellcat.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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