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Encyclopedia > Deerfield Academy
Deerfield Academy
Headmaster Margarita O'Byrne Curtis
School type Private
Religious affiliation None
Founded 1797
Location Deerfield, MA, USA
Enrollment 600
Faculty 110
Campus surroundings Rural
Mascot
School colors Green and White

Deerfield Academy is a private, coeducational prep school located in Deerfield, Massachusetts. It is a four-year boarding school with approximately 600 students and about 100 faculty, all of whom live on or near campus. Image File history File links Deerfield_Seal. ... Margarita OBryne Curtis was named Deerfield Academys 55th Head of School in July of 2006. ... 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Deerfield is a town located in Franklin County, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Deerfield is a town located in Franklin County, Massachusetts. ... A boarding school is an educational institution where some or all pupils not only study, but also live, amongst their peers. ...


Deerfield is part of an organization known as The Ten Schools Admissions Organization. This organization was founded more than forty years ago on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. Member schools include Deerfield, Choate Rosemary Hall, The Lawrenceville School, The Taft School, The Hill School, The Hotchkiss School, St. Paul's, Loomis Chaffee, Phillips Exeter Academy, and Phillips Academy. The Ten Schools Admissions Organization is a group formed more than forty years ago by prep schools in New England and the Mid-Atlantic on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. ... Choate Rosemary Hall   Choate Rosemary Hall is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... The Taft School is a private coeducational prep school located in Watertown, Connecticut. ... The Hill School (The Hill) is an American preparatory boarding school for boys and girls in grades nine through twelve. ... The Hotchkiss School is an independent, American college preparatory boarding school located in Lakeville, Connecticut. ... St. ... The Loomis Chaffee School is a college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in Windsor, Connecticut. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9-12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Andover, Phillips Andover, or simply P.A.) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ...


In 2006, Deerfield's endowment was valued at $330 million, or roughly $550,000 per student. Tuition is $36,130 for boarding students and $27,100 for day students; the average annual expense is $60,000 per student. Endowment may refer to many things: Finance Financial endowment; relating to funds or property donated to institutions or individuals. ...

Contents

History

Deerfield Academy was founded in 1797 when Massachusetts granted a charter to start a school in the town of Deerfield. The academy quickly established itself as one of the finest schools in the new republic, drawing boys from prominent families across New England. 1797 (MDCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...


Deerfield was never affiliated with a religion, but attendance at Congregationalist Church services was required by boarding students until the 1970s and school meetings included the singing of Christian hymns. Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ...


In the early twentieth century, Deerfield's fortunes rose with the appointment of Frank Boyden as Headmaster. At the time of Frank's appointment as headmaster, the school was almost completely bankrupt. The prestige enjoyed by the school today is a direct result of the foundations he laid over seven decades, including having trained scores of men as teachers and headmasters in their own right. His success would not have been possible without the support and assistance of his wife, Helen Childs Boyden. After 66 years of service, Frank Boyden retired in 1968. Boyden's long career and legacy at Deerfield are reviewed in The Headmaster, (1966) by Deerfield alumnus John McPhee. Frank Boyden (1879-1972) was headmaster of Deerfield Academy from 1902 to 1968. ... In the UK and elsewhere, a head teacher is the most senior teacher in a school. ... Frank Learoyd Boyden (1879-1972) was headmaster of Deerfield Academy from 1902 to 1968. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... is a book by John McPhee profiling Frank Boyden, the headmaster of Deerfield Academy, which grew out of a magazine profile in The New Yorker. ... John McPhee is widely recognized for his writing on geology. ...


In 1989, the Academy reestablished co-education, which Boyden had discontinued during the 1940s. 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Eric Widmer '57 served as headmaster from 1994 to 2006. He left to assume the position of Founding Headmaster at King's Academy in Madaba, Jordan, a school inspired in part by HM King Abdullah II '80's Deerfield years. It is scheduled to open in the fall of 2007. Dr. Eric Widmer (born 1939 in Beirut) is an American scholar and educator. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... King’s Academy (Arabic transliteration: كينغز أكاديمي) is a co-educational private boarding school scheduled to open in August 2007 in Madaba, Jordan. ... A 6th century mosaic map of Jerusalem Madaba, مادبا, is a capital city of Madaba Governorate, which has a population of about 60. ... King Abdullah and Queen Rania King Abdullah appears here at a summit in Mexico. ...


The current Head of School, Dr. Margarita Curtis, previously a Dean at Phillips Academy, is the first female in school history to hold the position.

The current girls' third boat bow seat at Deerfield. Note the school colors on the uniform.

Traditionally, the Academy's rival in both sports and academics is Choate Rosemary Hall. The Fall athletics season culminates with Choate Day, which features matches with Choate at every level of every sport. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...


Deerfield Academy is led by a Head of School selected by the Board of Trustees. During the Academy's history, the position has been known as Preceptor (1799-1851), Principal (1851-1902), Headmaster (1902-2006), and Head of School (2006-) 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Preceptors

1. Enos Bronson 1799 2. Claudius Herrick 1799-1800 3. Samuel Fisher 1800-1801 4. Henry Lord 1801-1802 5. John Hubbard 1802-1804 6. Allen Greeley 1804-1805 7. Avery Williams 1805-1806 8. John Chester 1806 9. Hosea Hildreth 1807-1810 10. Leonard Jewett 1811 11. Daniel Wells Jr. 1812 12. Aaron Arms Jr. 1813-1816 13. Edward Hitchcock 1816-1818 14. Henry Payson Kendall 1821-1823 15. Joseph Root Field 1823-1824 16. Jonathan A. Saxton 1824 17. Rufus Saxton 1825 18. Frederick H. Allen 1825 19. Zenas Clapp 1836 20. Daniel Hawks 1827 -. Jonathan A. Saxton 1828 21. Joseph Anderson 1828-1829 -. Zenas Clapp 1830 22. Charles Chapin Corse 1830-1831 23. Winthrop Bailey 1832-1835 24. Luther Barker Lincoln 1835-1844 25. Cotton M. Crittenden 1844-1851 Edward Hitchcock (24 May 1793 – 27 February 1864) was the third President of Amherst College, from 1845 to 1854. ... Rufus Saxton (October 19, 1824–February 23, 1908) was an American soldier who served as a Brigadier General of volunteers in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–1865). ...


Principals

26. Lucien Hunt 1851-1852 27. John H. Thompson 1852 28. Hezekiah R. Warriner 1853-1855 29. Jonathan C. Brown 1855 30. Robert Dickinson Smith 1856 31. Benjamin Smith Lyman 1856 32. Horatio Alger, Jr. 1856 33. George W. Bartlett 1856-1857 34. Virgil Maro Howard 1857-1872 35. Arthur Driver 1873-1874 36. Orpha Julina Hall 1874 37. Frances O. Allen 1875 -. Orpha Julina Hall 1876 38. Edgar Rollins Downs 1876-1877 39. Edward Plummer Baker 1877-1879 40. Joseph Y. Bergen Jr. 1879-1881 41. Starr Willard Cutting 1881-1886 42. Edward Everett Rankin 1886-1887 43. Walter Porter White 1887 44. Robert Hamilton Leland 1888-1892 45. Allen Latham 1892-1894 46. Albert Bell Tyler 1894 47. George Arthur Goodell 1895-1897 48. David F. Carpenter 1897-1899 49. Frank A. Kennedy 1899 50. Robert Pelton Sibley 1900-1902 Horatio Alger, Jr. ...


Headmasters

51. Frank Boyden 1902-1968 52. David Melville Pynchon 1968-1980 53. Robert Kaufmann 1980-1994 54. Eric Widmer 1994-2006 Frank Boyden (1879-1972) was headmaster of Deerfield Academy from 1902 to 1968. ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... Dr. Eric Widmer (born 1939 in Beirut) is an American scholar and educator. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Heads of School

55. Margarita O'Byrne Curtis 2006- Margarita OBryne Curtis was named Deerfield Academys 55th Head of School in July of 2006. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...


Prominent alumni

George Grennell, Jr. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Edward Hitchcock (24 May 1793 – 27 February 1864) was the third President of Amherst College, from 1845 to 1854. ... Amherst College is a private, independent, elite[1][2] liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... George Sheldon (1818-1916) was born in Deerfield, Massachusetts, and educated at Deerfield Academy. ... Rufus Saxton (October 19, 1824–February 23, 1908) was an American soldier who served as a Brigadier General of volunteers in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–1865). ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... William Lincoln Higgins (1867–1957) was a U.S. Congressman from Connecticut. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Paul Langdon Ward (1945-Present) was president of Sarah Lawrence College from 1960 to 1965. ... Sarah Lawrence College is a private, liberal arts college located in metropolitan New York City, about a thirty-minute train ride north of Manhattan. ... This article belongs in one or more categories. ... Pine Manor College, or PMC, is a private, womens liberal arts college located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. ... Picture of writer Budd Schulberg (born March 27, 1914 in New York City, New York) is an American screenwriter and novelist. ... Hastings Keith (1915-2005), was a U.S. Congressman from Massachusetts. ... Lyman Kirkpatrick (1916-1995), served as inspector general and executive director of the CIA. ... Inspector General is a fact finding officer whose responsibility is to investigate charges of corruption, fraud, waste and abuse and other complaints regarding government officials. ... Executive director is a title given to a person who is the head of an executive branch of an organization or company. ... “CIA” redirects here. ... H. Stuart Hughes (May 16, 1916 New York City – October 21, 1999 La Jolla, California) was an American historian, professor, and activist. ... Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Williams College is a private, coeducational, highly selective (17% admission rate this year) liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Robert M. Morgenthau Robert Morris Morgenthau (born July 31, 1919 in New York City) is currently the District Attorney for New York County. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, USA, coterminous with New York County. ... A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... James Colgate Cleveland (1920-1995) was a U.S. Congressman from New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... William Zinsser (b. ... Hon. ... This is a list of ambassadors from the United States. ... John Lester Hubbard Chafee (October 22, 1922 – October 24, 1999) was an American politician. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22... Arthur L. Nims, III (born Oklahoma, 1923) is a senior judge of the United States Tax Court. ... Seal of the United States Tax Court. ... Rev. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Andover and Phillips Andover) is a coed liberal arts high school, located in Andover, Massachusetts, near Boston. ... John Livingston Weinberg (January 25, 1925 – August 7, 2006) was an American banker. ... Goldman Sachs offices at the Fraumünsterplatz in Zürich (the light-colored building on the left) The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ... Ogden Rogers Reid (born June 24, 1925) was a member of the House of Representatives. ... NY redirects here. ... Henry W. Kendall (December 9, 1926 – February 15, 1999) was born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physiology or Medicine and Economics. ... John Ashbery John Ashbery (born July 28, 1927) is an American poet. ... James Wadsworth Symington (1927-) is an American politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area Greater St. ... Allen McIntyre Stack (January 23, 1928 in New Haven, Connecticut – September 12, 1999 in Honolulu, Hawaii) was a U.S. backstroke swimmer, who won the 100m Backstroke at the 1948 Summer Olympics in London. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... At the 1948 Summer Olympics, 11 swimming events were contested. ... The Games of the XIV Olympiad were held in 1948 at Wembley Stadium in London, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... John Gunther, Jr. ... John Gunther (August 30, 1901 – May 29, 1970) was an American author whose success came primarily in the 1940s and 1950s with a series of non-fiction books about the political situations in various corners of the world. ... Death Be Not Proud is a title that has been used by several writers. ... Flag of the National Geographic Society The National Geographic Society, is a not-for-profit scientific organization based in the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Presidential Medal of Freedom The Presidential Medal of Freedom is one of the two highest civilian awards in the United States and is bestowed by the President of the United States (the other major civilian award which is considered its equivalent is the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, which... John McPhee is widely recognized for his writing on geology. ... Richard Mellon Scaife (born July 3, 1932, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), a U.S. billionaire and owner–publisher of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... George Soros (pronounced ) [Shorosh] (born August 12, 1930, in Budapest, Hungary, as György Schwartz) is a American financial speculator, stock investor, philanthropist, and political activist. ... Skinner Memorial Chapel, Carleton College Carleton College is an independent, non-sectarian, coeducational, highly-selective, liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota, USA. The school was founded on November 14, 1866, by the Minnesota Conference of Congregational Churches as Northfield College. ... Bowdoin College,founded in 1794 by is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Thomas Care Reed (b. ... The Secretary of the Air Force is the civilian head of the United States Department of the Air Force, a component organization of the Department of Defense. ... Warren Zimmermann (1935 – 2004) served as the US ambassador to Yugoslavia from 1989 to the country’s dissolution in 1992. ... Yugoslavia (Jugoslavija in Latin, Југославија in Cyrillic, English: Land of the South Slavs) describes four political entities that existed one at a time on the Balkan Peninsula in Europe, during most of the 20th century. ... Steven C. Rockefeller (born 1936) is a son of former United States Vice President Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller and his first wife, Mary Rockefeller. ... Christopher Samuel Kit Bond (born March 6, 1939 in St. ... Dr. Eric Widmer (born 1939 in Beirut) is an American scholar and educator. ... King’s Academy (Arabic transliteration: كينغز أكاديمي) is a co-educational private boarding school scheduled to open in August 2007 in Madaba, Jordan. ... David Hamilton Koch (born 1940) was the Libertarian Partys Vice-Presidential candidate in the 1980 U.S. presidential election, sharing the party ticket with Ed Clark. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... Proposed Freedom Tower 383 Madison at night David M. Childs (born 1941 Princeton, New Jersey) is the Consulting Design Partner at Skidmore, Owings & Merrill who has projects all over the world and now is designing the Freedom Tower in New York. ... Bruce Faulkner Caputo (1943-) was a US Congressman from New York. ... NY redirects here. ... Pete Varney (full name Richard Fred Varney Jr. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... 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Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Kenneth Bensten Jr. ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline, perhaps receiving financial support through a scholarship. ... King Abdullah and Queen Rania King Abdullah appears here at a summit in Mexico. ... Matthew Fox (July 14, 1966) is an actor and former model. ... Michael Scott Trombley (born April 14, 1967 in Springfield, Massachusetts), is a retired professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1992-2002. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Nestor Carbonell (born December 1, 1967 in New York, New York) is an American actor best known for his role as Luis Rivera on the sitcom Suddenly Susan. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Silver 2004 The Paralympic Games are an official equivalent of the Olympics for athletes with physical disabilities. ... Skiing is the activity of gliding over snow using skis (originally wooden planks, now usually made from fiberglass or related composites) strapped to the feet with ski bindings. ... Chris Klug is a professional snowboarder. ... A bronze medal is a medal awarded to the third place finisher of contests (typically athletics competitions) such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. ... The 2002 Winter Olympic Games Snowboarding competition results were as follows. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ... Official language(s) English Capital Salt Lake City Largest city Salt Lake City Area  Ranked 13th  - Total 84,876 sq mi (219,887 km²)  - Width 270 miles (435 km)  - Length 350 miles (565 km)  - % water 3. ... Randal Williams (born May 21, 1978 in Bronx, New York) is a NFL tight end currently playing for the Oakland Raiders. ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most prestigious professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... Jamie Hagerman (born May 7, 1981 in North Andover, Massachusetts) is an American ice hockey player. ... Ice hockey at the 2006 Winter Olympics was held at the Torino Palasport Olimpico and the Torino Esposizioni in Turin, Italy. ... Neve and Gliz, the 2006 Olympics mascots, on display in Turin Italian €2 commemorative coin of 2006 celebrating the Turin games The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... “Torino” redirects here. ...

References

  • Cooke, Brian P. Frank Boyden of Deerfield: The Vision and Politics of an Educational Idealist. Lanham, Md.: Madison Books, 1994. 181 pp.
  • Cookson, Peter W. Preparing for power: America's elite boarding schools (1985) (ISBN 0-465-06268-7)
  • McLachlan, James. American Boarding Schools A Historical Study (1970)
  • McPhee, John. The Headmaster: Frank L. Boyden (1966) ISBN 0-374-51496-8
  • Moorhead, Andrea D. and Moorhead, Robert K. Deerfield, 1797-1997: A Pictorial History of the Academy (1997) (ISBN 0-9632800-1-5)

External links

  • Deerfield Academy website
  • Deerfield Academy at Boarding School Review
  • Deerfield Academy Admissions Video on SchoolFair.tv
  • King's Academy


The Ten Schools Admissions Organization

Choate Rosemary Hall - Deerfield Academy - The Hill School - The Hotchkiss School - The Lawrenceville School
Loomis Chaffee - Phillips Academy Andover - Phillips Exeter Academy - St. Paul's School - The Taft School The Ten Schools Admissions Organization is a group formed more than forty years ago by prep schools in New England and the Mid-Atlantic on the basis of a number of common goals and traditions. ... Choate Rosemary Hall   Choate Rosemary Hall is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... The Hill School (The Hill) is an American preparatory boarding school for boys and girls in grades nine through twelve. ... The Hotchkiss School is an independent, American college preparatory boarding school located in Lakeville, Connecticut. ... The Lawrenceville School is a coeducational, independent preparatory boarding school for grades 9-12 located on 700 acres in the historic community of Lawrenceville, in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, U.S. five miles southwest of Princeton. ... The Loomis Chaffee School is a college preparatory school for grades 9 through 12 located in Windsor, Connecticut. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Andover, Phillips Andover, or simply P.A.) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... Phillips Exeter Academy (most commonly called Exeter, also Phillips Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school for grades 9-12, located on 619 acres[1] in Exeter, New Hampshire, USA, fifty miles north of Boston. ... St. ... The Taft School is a private coeducational prep school located in Watertown, Connecticut. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Deerfield, Massachusetts - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (798 words)
Deerfield is a town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, United States.
The town is home to Deerfield Academy, founded in 1797, a private college preparatory school.
Deerfield is drained by the Deerfield and Connecticut rivers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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