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Encyclopedia > Deep Space Homer
The Simpsons episode
"Deep Space Homer"
Race Banyon, Homer and Buzz Aldrin approach the space shuttle
Episode no. 96
Prod. code 1F13
Orig. airdate February 24, 1994
Show runner(s) David Mirkin
Written by David Mirkin
Directed by Carlos Baeza
Couch gag The family runs to the couch, only to find a fat man sitting on it. They squeeze in to the left of him.[1]
Guest star(s) Buzz Aldrin as himself
James Taylor as himself
DVD
commentary
Matt Groening
David Mirkin
Mark Kirkland
David Silverman
Season 5
September 30, 1993May 19, 1994
  1. Homer's Barbershop Quartet
  2. Cape Feare
  3. Homer Goes to College
  4. Rosebud
  5. Treehouse of Horror IV
  6. Marge on the Lam
  7. Bart's Inner Child
  8. Boy-Scoutz N the Hood
  9. The Last Temptation of Homer
  10. $pringfield
  11. Homer the Vigilante
  12. Bart Gets Famous
  13. Homer and Apu
  14. Lisa vs. Malibu Stacy
  15. Deep Space Homer
  16. Homer Loves Flanders
  17. Bart Gets an Elephant
  18. Burns' Heir
  19. Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song
  20. The Boy Who Knew Too Much
  21. Lady Bouvier's Lover
  22. Secrets of a Successful Marriage
List of all The Simpsons episodes

"Deep Space Homer" is the fifteenth episode of The Simpsons' fifth season and first aired on February 24, 1994.[2] It is also the source of the Overlord meme. The episode was directed by Carlos Baeza and is the only episode that was the only episode of The Simpsons that was written by David Mirkin, who was also the executive producer at the time.[1] Buzz Aldrin and James Taylor both guest star as themselves.[2] Simpsons redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Colonel Buzz Aldrin, Sc. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... David Mirkin (born September 18, 1955 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American, feature film and television director, writer and producer. ... Al Jean (left) and David Mirkin (right), have both been writers for The Simpsons for more than ten years. ... David Mirkin (born September 18, 1955 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American, feature film and television director, writer and producer. ... The three people are caricatures of (left to right) Rich Moore, Wes Archer and David Silverman[1] The following is a list of directors who have worked on the Fox animated television series The Simpsons. ... Carlos Baeza is an animation director. ... The couch gag is a running visual joke in the opening credits of the animated television series The Simpsons. ... (left to right) Elvis Costello, Tom Petty, Keith Richards, Homer, Mick Jagger, Lenny Kravitz and Brian Setzer guest starred in the heavily promoted season 14 episode How I Spent My Strummer Vacation. This is a list of guest stars who appeared on The Simpsons. ... Colonel Buzz Aldrin, Sc. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ... The Simpsons DVD season boxsets have been released since 2001 in different regions all over the world. ... Matthew Abram Groening (born February 15, 1954[2] in Portland, Oregon;[1] his family name is pronounced , rhymes with raining) is an Emmy Award-winning American cartoonist and the creator of The Simpsons, Futurama and the weekly comic strip Life in Hell. ... David Mirkin (born September 18, 1955 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American, feature film and television director, writer and producer. ... Mark Kirkland is a director of episodes of The Simpsons. ... David Silverman (born on 15 March 1957 in New York City, New York) is an animator best known for directing numerous episodes of the animated TV series The Simpsons, where he would go on to be the supervising director of animation for several years, as well as animating on all... The Simpsons Season 5 DVD. The Simpsons 5th season (September 1993 - May 1994) began on September 30, 1993. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Homers Barbershop Quartet is the first episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Cape Feare is the second episode of The Simpsons fifth season, which premiered on the Fox network on October 7, 1993 after being held over from season four. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Rosebud is the fourth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Treehouse of Horror IV is the fifth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on October 28, 1993. ... Marge on the Lam is the sixth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Barts Inner Child is the seventh episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on November 11, 1993. ... Boy-Scoutz N the Hood is the eighth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... The Last Temptation of Homer is the ninth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... $pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling), also known as $pringfield, is the tenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Homer the Vigilante is the eleventh episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Bart Gets Famous is the twelfth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, which originally aired on February 3, 1994. ... Homer and Apu is the thirteenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on February 10, 1994. ... Lisa vs. ... Homer Loves Flanders is the sixteenth episode from the fifth season of The Simpsons. ... Bart Gets an Elephant is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Burns Heir is the eighteenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on April 14, 1994. ... Sweet Seymour Skinners Baadasssss Song is the nineteenth episode of The Simpsons fifth season, first aired on April 28, 1994. ... The Boy Who Knew Too Much is the 20th episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... Lady Bouviers Lover is the twenty-first episode of The Simpsons fifth season, which originally aired on May 12, 1994. ... Secrets of a Successful Marriage is the 22nd and final episode of The Simpsons fifth season. ... The following is an episode list for the Fox animated television series The Simpsons. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... The Simpsons Season 5 DVD. The Simpsons 5th season (September 1993 - May 1994) began on September 30, 1993. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The overlord meme is a cliché using the following template: The following variation is also popular: Here X describes (often in a humorous or overgeneralized fashion) some (often corporate or government) entity that is making a power grab. ... Carlos Baeza is an animation director. ... David Mirkin (born September 18, 1955 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American, feature film and television director, writer and producer. ... Colonel Buzz Aldrin, Sc. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ...

Contents

Plot

At work, Mr. Burns gives the Worker of the Week award to an Inanimate Carbon Rod. Homer, who has never won the award, is infuriated, and feels dejected that no one likes him. He turns to the TV for solace and ends up on a channel that is broadcasting a live space shuttle launch, which he finds dull. NASA learns that its Nielsen ratings have declined, and decide to send an "average shmoe" into space, realizing the popularity of blue collar comedy programs. Homer telephones NASA to complain about their "boring space launches", which makes NASA determine that they have found their man. But when they arrive at Moe's, Homer thinks he is in trouble and blames Barney for making the prank call. When Homer realizes what NASA's proposal entails, he steps in and takes credit for the call. A NASA scientist then knocks them out with a blackjack. Springfield Nuclear Power Plant Springfield Nuclear Power Plant is a fictional nuclear power plant in the television animated cartoon series The Simpsons. ... Mr. ... For other uses, see Carbon (disambiguation). ... NASAs Space Shuttle, officially called Space Transportation System (STS), is the United States governments current manned launch vehicle. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... When TV viewers or entertainment professionals in the United States mention ratings they are often referring to Nielsen Ratings, a system developed by Nielsen Media Research to determine the audience size and composition of television programming. ... A blue-collar worker is a working class employee who performs manual or technical labor, such as in a factory or in technical maintenance trades, in contrast to a white-collar worker, who does non-manual work generally at a desk. ... The word comedy has a classical meaning (comical theatre) and a popular one (the use of humor with an intent to provoke laughter in general). ... An exterior of Moes Tavern, in The Simpsons. ... Barnard Barney Gumble is a character on The Simpsons, voiced by Dan Castellaneta. ... Hercules fights the Lernaean Hydra with a club A club or cudgel is perhaps the simplest of all melee weapons. ...


NASA takes both Homer and Barney to Cape Canaveral to train them into astronauts. They pit the two in competition against one another as they can only take one to space. Under NASAs' alcohol ban, Barney quickly develops superior skills, even doing acrobatics while singing. Barney is selected to fly with Buzz Aldrin and fictional astronaut Race Banyon. However, when Barney toasts his victory with champagne he goes berserk and injures himself, although the champagne was non-alcoholic. Homer wins by default and is selected for space flight, but he is very nervous about going. He runs from the space shuttle and talks with Marge on the phone, and she says that Homer ought to take advantage of going into space. He agrees and gets into the Corvair space shuttle. The launch is also a Nielsen ratings smash. Cape Canaveral from space, August 1991 Cape Canaveral (Cabo Cañaveral in Spanish) is a strip of land in Brevard County, Florida, United States, near the center of that states Atlantic coast. ... Colonel Buzz Aldrin, Sc. ... Champagne is often consumed as part of a celebration Champagne is a sparkling wine produced by inducing the in-bottle secondary fermentation of wine to effect carbonation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Marjorie Marge Simpson (née Bouvier) is a fictional character featured in the animated television series The Simpsons and is voiced by Julie Kavner. ... The Chevrolet Corvair remains one of General Motors most unusual creations. ...


When on the shuttle, Homer smuggles potato chips on board. He opens the bag, but is unaware that they will clog the instruments. His appetite seems to save the day as he floats after the chips in zero-G, but he flies into an ant farm, destroying it, sowing panic across the world because of Kent Brockman reports that the space shuttle has been taken over by giant space ants. Although James Taylor comes in to make a modified adaptation of "You've Got a Friend", the disaster continues on board, with . The ants destroy the navigation system but, luckily, James Taylor suggests that they blow the bugs out the front hatch. The astronauts do, but Homer fails to put on his "shuttle belt" and is sucked out of the hatch. Buzz pulls him inside but due to the vacuums' sheer force, Homer breaks the handle. He inadvertently uses the carbon rod to seal the door shut. They return to Earth, landing at a journalist convention. Potato chips A potato chip or crisp is a thin slice of a potato, deep fried or baked until crisp. ... Zero G is the pseudonym of an elite hacker rumored to be female and a child prodigy of MIT. Zero G emerged in the late 1990s. ... Ants tunneling through an Ant Farm The Ant Farm is essentially a colony of ants enclosed between two panes of glass. ... Kenton Kent Brockman, (nee Brockelstein), is a recurring fictional character from the animated TV series The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ... Youve Got a Friend is a song from the early 1970s which marked the singer-songwriter movement. ...


Although Buzz Aldrin declares Homer the hero, the press see the rod as being the bigger hero. The rod is then featured on magazine covers with the words "In Rod We Trust" printed below its photos. It is even given its own ticker-tape parade. Back at home, Homer is disappointed that he did not get as much respect as he had hoped, but the family still honors him for his achievement, reassuring him that he is only one of a handful of people who get the opportunity to go into space.[1][2][3] Ticker-tape parade in New York City in honor of the Apollo 11 astronauts, August 1969 A ticker-tape parade is a parade event, held in a downtown urban setting, allowing the jettison of large amounts of shredded paper products from nearby office buildings onto the parade route, creating a...


Production

Computer animation was used in the sequence where Homer eats a bag of potato chips by chasing them within the shuttle.

"Deep Space Homer" was written by then-executive producer David Mirkin and is his only writers credit for an episode of The Simpsons. Mirkin had worked on the idea for the episode for a long time, and it was based on when NASA would try sending normal people into space to spark interest amongst the general public.[4] Screencap from Simpsons episode Deep Space Homer This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Screencap from Simpsons episode Deep Space Homer This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... David Mirkin (born September 18, 1955 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American, feature film and television director, writer and producer. ...


There was some controversy amongst the shows writing staff when the episode was in production. There were differing opinions among the writers because some thought it was too "large" of in idea, that someone like Homer would go into space.[4] Several writers were concerned, including Matt Groening particularly was concerned and felt that the idea was so big that it gave the writers "nowhere to go". As a result, every single aspect of the show was worked on hard to make it work. Several silly gags were toned down and done more realistically, for example, an original idea was that everyone at NASA was as stupid as Homer.[5] James L. Brooks was supportive of the idea. One of the main things that became a focus was the relationship between Homer and his family and Homer trying to be a hero.[4] James L. Brooks (born May 9, 1940) is a three-time Academy Award, nineteen-time Emmy and Golden Globe-winning American producer, writer, and film director. ...


Buzz Aldrin and James Taylor both guest star as themselves in this episode. Some of the writers were concerned about Aldrin's line "second comes right after first" and felt it was too insulting. An alternative line was written, "first to take a soil sample", but Aldrin had no problem with saying the original line.[4] James Taylor's version of "Fire and Rain" was recorded specifically for the episode and contains some altered lyrics. Taylor's original recording session was included as an extra on the DVD.[4] Colonel Buzz Aldrin, Sc. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ... Fire and Rain was the breakout single released in February 1970 by singer-songwriter James Taylor. ...


Although the episode was directed by Carlos Baeza, the potato chip sequence was directed by David Silverman. Some computer animation was used in the sequence in order to make the potato chip rotation as smooth as possible.[6] Carlos Baeza is an animation director. ...


Cultural references

Homer as the "Star Child"

The two blue collar TV shows the people at NASA watch are Home Improvement and Married... with Children.[1] In the scene where the family arrives at Cape Canaveral, the car is a parody of The Beverly Hillbillies, with Marge sitting in Granny's position.[4] Homer and Barney's duel is a reference to the classic Star Trek episode "The Gamesters of Triskelion", complete with one of Star Trek's fight themes (originally from the episode "Amok Time") and the NASA administrators betting on the combatants in "quatloos".[1] Homer running while lying on the floor and trying to read the back of his head is an homage to the Three Stooges. The TV anchor is a parody of Tom Brokaw, and is voiced by Harry Shearer. A lot of words containing the letter L were intentionally written into the dialogue because the writers "enjoy the way Tom says them."[4] Image File history File links Deep_Space_Homer1f13. ... Image File history File links Deep_Space_Homer1f13. ... A blue-collar worker is a member of the working class who performs manual labor and earns an hourly wage. ... This article is about the television series. ... Married… with Children was a long-running American sitcom about a dysfunctional family living in Chicago. ... For the 1993 film, see The Beverly Hillbillies (film) The Beverly Hillbillies was an American television program about a hillbilly family transplanted in Southern California. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... The Gamesters of Triskelion is a second season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast January 5, 1968 and repeated May 3, 1968. ... Amok Time is an episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ... The Three Stooges were an American vaudeville and comedy act of the mid 20th century best known for their numerous short subject films. ... Thomas John Brokaw (born February 6, 1940 in Webster, South Dakota) is a popular American television journalist, Previously working on regularly scheduled news documentaries for the NBC television network, and is the former NBC News anchorman and managing editor of the program NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw. ... Harry Julius Shearer (born December 23, 1943) is an American comedic actor and writer. ...


The music at the start of episode of Itchy & Scratchy show cartoon parodies the theme from the original Star Trek series. Itchy bursts out of Scratchy's stomach in a parody of the Alien from the film series of the same name. Itchy comes out to torture Scratchy in an EVA pod much like those aboard the Discovery.[4] Homer hopes that his crew will not be sent to "that terrible Planet of the Apes", only to suddenly figure out the film's ending; he then performs Charlton Heston's final scene in the film. Barney and Homer's training parodies The Right Stuff. [7] There are other allusions to the film in the episode, including Homers walk to the shuttle, and the shuttles re-entry.[4] The Itchy & Scratchy Show is a show-within-a-show of The Simpsons which usually appears as a segment of the fictional Krusty the Klown TV show, watched regularly by Bart and Lisa Simpson and other characters on the animated series. ... The xenomorph as it appears in Alien vs. ... The Alien film series is the group of films that take place in the Alien universe. ... The Scratch Orchestra was founded by Cornelius Cardew. ... Planet of the Apes is a 1968 science fiction film about an astronaut (Charlton Heston) who finds himself stranded on an Earth-like planet two thousand years in the future. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... The Right Stuff is a 1979 book (ISBN 0374250332) by Tom Wolfe, and a 1983 film adapted from the book. ...


The film contains numerous references to Stanley Kubrick´s 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey. In the space shuttle, Homer floats in zero gravity, eating potato chips. This echoes the docking scene in 2001, with the use of the music piece The Blue Danube. At the end of the episode, Bart throws a marker into the air; in slow motion it rotates in mid-air, before a jump cut replaces it with a cylindrical satellite. This parodies a similar transition scene between "The Dawn of Man" and the future sequence in the film, including the use of the famous Richard Strauss piece Also sprach Zarathustra.[7] “Kubrick” redirects here. ... The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau op. ... This article is about the German composer of tone-poems and operas. ... Also sprach Zarathustra, op. ...


Reception

Buzz Aldrin guest starred in the episode.

"Deep Space Homer" is one of David Silverman's favourite episodes.[6] One of Matt Groening's least favorite jokes is when Homer's face turns into the faces of Popeye and Richard Nixon.[5] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Colonel Buzz Aldrin, Sc. ... David Silverman (born on 15 March 1957 in New York City, New York) is an animator best known for directing numerous episodes of the animated TV series The Simpsons, where he would go on to be the supervising director of animation for several years, as well as animating on all... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


NASA loved the episode, and astronaut Edward Lu asked for a copy of it to be sent on a supply ship to the International Space Station. The DVD remains there for astronauts to view.[4] "Deep Space Homer" is MSNBC's fourth favorite episode, citing Homer's realization that Planet of the Apes is set on Earth as "pure genius."[8] Empire magazine named it a "contender for greatest ever episode", and listed it as the third best movie parody in the show.[7] In his book, Planet Simpson, Chris Turner names the episode as being one of his five favorites, saying it is "second to none," which is ironic as he actually listed "Last Exit to Springfield" as being the best. He described the long sequence that begins with Homer eating potato chips in the space shuttle and ends with Kent Brockman's dramatic speech as being "simply among the finest comedic moments in the history of television".[9] This article is about the American space agency. ... Edward Tsang Lu (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ) (born July 1, 1963) is an American physicist and astronaut, a veteran of two space shuttle missions and an extended stay aboard the International Space Station. ... “ISS” redirects here. ... MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation or Planet Simpson is a book about The Simpsons which examines its satirical humour and its impact on pop culture. ... Last Exit to Springfield is the 17th episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ...


Both Buzz Aldrin and James Taylor received praise for their guest performances. IGN.com ranked James Taylor as being the twenty-first best guest appearance in the show's history.[10] The Phoenix.com published their own list of "Top 20 guest stars" and Taylor placed eighteenth.[11] For other uses, see IGN (disambiguation). ...


Legacy

"Deep Space Homer" is the source of the "Overlord meme", which is lifted from Kent Brockman's line "And I, for one, welcome our new insect overlords" and is commonly used on internet forums when a "participant vastly overstates the degree of opression or social control expected to arise from the topic in question" or to express express mock submission, usually for the purpose of humor.[12] It has been used in media, such as New Scientist magazine.[13] Kenton Kent Brockman, (nee Brockelstein), is a recurring fictional character from the animated TV series The Simpsons, voiced by Harry Shearer. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c d e Martyn, Warren; Wood, Adrian (2000). Deep Space Homer. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-09-26.
  2. ^ a b c Deep Space Homer. The Simpsons.com. Retrieved on 2007-09-26.
  3. ^ Richmond, Ray; Antonia Coffman (1997). The Simpsons: A Complete Guide to our Favorite Family. Harper Collins Publishers. ISBN 0-00063-8898-1. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Mirkin, David. (2005). The Simpsons season 5 DVD commentary for the episode "Deep Space Homer" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  5. ^ a b Groening, matt. (2005). The Simpsons season 5 DVD commentary for the episode "Deep Space Homer" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  6. ^ a b Silverman, David. (2005). The Simpsons season 5 DVD commentary for the episode "Deep Space Homer" [DVD]. 20th Century Fox.
  7. ^ a b c Colin Kennedy. "The Ten Best Movie Gags In The Simpsons", Empire, September 2004, pp. 76. 
  8. ^ Patrick Enwright. "D’Oh! The top 10 ‘Simpsons’ episodes ever", MSNBC, 2007-07-31. Retrieved on 2007-10-08. 
  9. ^ Turner, Chris. Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation, 69–70. ISBN 0-679-31318-4. 
  10. ^ Goldman, Eric; Iverson, Dan; Zoromski, Brian. Top 25 Simpsons Guest Appearances. IGN. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  11. ^ The Simpsons 20 best guest voices of all time. The Phoenix.com (2006-03-29). Retrieved on 2007-08-03.
  12. ^ Turner, Chris. Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation, 300. ISBN 0-679-31318-4. 
  13. ^ The British government welcomes our new insect overlords. New Scientist magazine. Retrieved on 2007-10-19.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Homer Simpson: Information from Answers.com (6690 words)
Homer is the husband of Marge Simpson and the father of Bart Simpson, Lisa Simpson, and Maggie Simpson.
Homer is the son of Abraham "Abe" J. Simpson and Mona Simpson (also known as Penelope Olson, Muddy May Suggins and various other guises to keep the authorities away from her human rights extremist past).
Homer has an IQ of 55 and dropping, which is due to his heredity "Simpson Genes", his alcohol problem, and from the presence of a crayon in the frontal lobe of his brain that remained lodged there when he inserted sixteen crayons up his nose as a child.
Deep Space Homer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1504 words)
"Deep Space Homer" is the fifteenth episode of The Simpsons' fifth season.
He runs from the space shuttle and talks with Marge on the phone, and she says that Homer ought to take advantage of going into space.
Homer opening a packet of potato chips in space has a possibly coincidental similarity to an incident on the Gemini 3 spaceflight when John Young smuggled a corned beef sandwich onboard.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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