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Encyclopedia > December 2004
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- 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December-
2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief...

< December 2004 >
S M T W T F S
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31  
Other events in December 2004
World - Sci-Tech - Sports
Britain and Ireland - Canada - United States

Deaths in December

30 Artie Shaw
29 Julius Axelrod
28 Jacques Dupuis
28 Jerry Orbach
28 Susan Sontag
26 Reggie White
26 Sir Angus Ogilvy
23 P. V. Narasimha Rao
23 Doug Ault
19 Renata Tebaldi
16 Bobby Mattick
15 Chiang Fang-liang
14 Fernando Poe, Jr.
10 M.S. Subbulakshmi
8 Leslie Scarman
8 "Dimebag" Darrell Abbott
3 Shiing-Shen Chern
2 Alicia Markova
1 Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands
2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... Featured articles Hydrogen car. ... This page deals with events in the English-speaking nations of Europe that occurred in December 2004. ... December 30 is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 1 day remaining. ... Arthur Jacob Arshawsky (May 23, 1910 – December 30, 2004), better known as Artie Shaw, was an accomplished jazz clarinetist, composer, bandleader, and writer. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... Julius Axelrod won a Nobel Prize in 1970 Julius Axelrod (May 30, 1912 – December 29, 2004) was an influential American biochemist. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... Jacques Dupuis (1923-2004) was a Belgian Jesuit priest who wrote several significant works on Catholicism and religious pluralism, including Toward a Christian Theology of Religious Pluralism (1997). ... Jump to: navigation, search December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... Jerry Orbach as Detective Lennie Briscoe in Law & Order Jerome Bernard Jerry Orbach (October 20, 1935 – December 28, 2004) was an American actor best known for his starring role as the street-smart, wisecracking NYPD Detective Lennie Briscoe in the Law & Order television series and for his musical theater roles. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search Susan Sontag Susan Sontag (January 28, 1933 – December 28, 2004) was a well-known American essayist, novelist, left-leaning intellectual, and activist. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... Reggie White Autobiography cover The Reverend Reginald Howard Reggie White (December 19, 1961 – December 26, 2004), nicknamed the Minister of Defense (a dual reference to his football prowess and to his Evangelical Christian ordination) was one of footballs most prolific sackers in college, the USFL and the NFL. // Career... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Right Honourable Sir Angus James Bruce Ogilvy, KCVO (14 September 1928–26 December 2004) was a member of the British Royal Family, the husband of HRH Princess Alexandra of Kent, a first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. Sir Angus is remembered as an astute businessman... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... Pamulaparthi Venkata Narasimha Rao (June 28, 1921 – December 23, 2004) was the ninth Prime Minister of the Republic of India, and led possibly the most critically important administration in national history. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Douglas Reagan Ault (March 9, 1950 - December 22, 2004) was a Major League Baseball first baseman/designated hitter who played for the Texas Rangers (1976) and Toronto Blue Jays (1977-78, 1980). ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Italian opera singer Renata Tebaldi (February 1, 1922 - December 19, 2004) was one of the most famous sopranos of the post-war period. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Robert James Mattick (December 5, 1915 Sioux City, Iowa _ December 16, 2004 Scottsdale, Arizona) was a shortstop, manager and scout in Major League Baseball, most notably in the Toronto Blue Jays organization. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Faina Chiang Fang-liang (蔣方良; pinyin: Jiǎng Fāngliáng) (May 15, 1916–December 15, 2004) was the wife of President Chiang Ching-kuo and served as First Lady of the Republic of China on Taiwan from 1978 to 1988. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Fernando Poe, Jr. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Madurai Shanmukhavadivu Subbulakshmi, மதுரை ஷண்முகவடிவு சுப்புலக்ஷ்மீ (popularly known as M.S. or M.S.S.) (September 16, 1916 - December 11, 2004) was a renowned carnatic vocalist. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Leslie George Scarman, Baron Scarman, PC (29 July 1911 – 8 December 2004) was a Law Lord (retired) and a cross bench member of the British House of Lords. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Dimebag Darrell Abbott performing live with Pantera, circa 2000. ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chen Xingshen Shiing-shen Chern (陳省身; pinyin: Chén Xǐngshēn; October 26, 1911–December 3, 2004) was a Chinese mathematician, who was one of the leading differential geometers of the twentieth century. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Dame Alicia Markova (1 December 1910 – 2 December 2004) was an English prima ballerina. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Prince Bernhard in his later years. ...

Ongoing events

Indian Ocean earthquake
in India
Ukrainian presidential election
U.S. presidential election controversy
The following is a list of figures who died in 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ...

Ongoing armed conflicts

Arab-Israeli conflict
Conflict in Chechnya
Second Congo War
Conflict in Iraq (Occupation of Iraq)
Darfur conflict in Sudan
Civil war in Côte d'Ivoire
Second Sudanese Civil War Israel (in Blue) and the Arab League states (in Green) The Arab-Israeli conflict is a long-running conflict in the Middle East regarding the existence of the state of Israel and its relations with Arab states and with the Palestinian population (see Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Chechen Republic (Chechen: Нохчийн Республика/Noxçiyn [Nokhchiyn] Respublika, Russian: Чеченская Республика), informal Chechnya (Chechen: Нохчичьо/Noxçiyçö/Nokhchiyno, Russian: Чечня), sometimes incorrectly refered to as Ichkeria, Chechnia or Chechenia, is currently a constituent republic of the Russian Federation. ... The Second Congo War was a conflict that took place largely in the territory of Democratic Republic of the Congo (formerly Zaire). ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... Armed insurgents French troops try to separate the belligerents. ... Wikimedia needs your help in its 21-day fund drive. ...


Ongoing wars This is a list of lists of wars, sorted by country, date, region, and type of conflict. ...

Election results in December

December 26: Ukraine presidential rerun
December 12: Romania presidential run-off
December 11: Taiwan legislative
December 8: Ghanaian presidential
December 12: Mozambique presidential
December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... A presidential election was held in Romania on November 28, 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Ghanaian presidential election was held on 7 December 2004. ... December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mozambique held a presidential election on 1–2 December 2004. ...

Ongoing trials

Chile: Augusto Pinochet
ICTY: Slobodan Milošević
Iraq: Iraqi Special Tribunal
Saddam Hussein, among others
India: Jayendra Saraswathi
United States: Robert Blake
United States: Zacarias Moussaoui
Jump to: navigation, search General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... The International Criminal Tribunal for Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, more commonly referred to as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, acronym ICTY, is a body of the United Nations (UN) established... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević   listen[?] (Serbian: Слободан Милошевић, pronounced ; born 20 August 1941) is a former President of Serbia and of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia as well as leader of the Socialist Party of Serbia. ... The Iraqi Special Tribunal is a body established under Iraqi national law to try Iraqi nationals or residents accused of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes or other serious crimes committed between 1968 and 2003. ... Jump to: navigation, search Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, sometimes spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Swamigal (born July 18, 1935 as Subramanyam Mahadeva Iyer) is the 69th Acharya (guru of the Kanchi matha). ... Robert Blake on the cover of the Baretta Season 1 DVD set. ... Moussaoui mugshot Zacarias Moussaoui (born May 30, 1968) is a French terrorist of Moroccan descent involved in the conspiracy that resulted in the September 11, 2001 attacks. ...

Related pages

About this page
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Wikipedia Announcements The following is a list of articles devoted to events from 2004 in narrow subject areas: Culture 2004 in architecture 2004 in film 2004 in games 2004 in literature 2004 in music 2004 in television 2004 in video gaming 2004 in Art People Deaths in 2004 State leaders in 2004...

December 31, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The FARC-EPs flag The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) is a militant and revolutionary guerrilla group established in 1964-1966 as the military wing of the Colombian Communist Party, and is Colombias... Simón Trinidad during his capture on January 2, 2004. ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... Jump to: navigation, search Taipei 101 (臺北 101) is a 101-floor skyscraper in Xinyi District, Taipei, Taiwan. ... Jump to: navigation, search National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... The Canadian dollar, CAD or C$, is the unit of currency of Canada. ... ... The United States dollar, or American dollar, is the official currency of the United States. ... The pound sterling, which strictly speaking refers to basic currency unit of sterling, now the pound, is the currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Khan Yunis (Arabic: خان يونس) is a city/refugee camp in the southern part of the Gaza Strip. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... General Pervez Musharraf (Urdu: ; born August 11, 1943, Near Delhi, India) became de facto Head of Government (using the title Chief Executive and assuming extensive powers) of Pakistan on October 12, 1999 following a bloodless coup détat. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero (born August 4, 1960) is the Prime Minister of Spain. ... In 2004, the new Socialist government of Spain began a process to legalise same-sex marriage in Spain. ... The Cortes Generales (English: General Courts) is the Spanish legislature. ...

December 30, 2004

December 30 is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 1 day remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Khan Yunis (Arabic: خان يونس) is a city/refugee camp in the southern part of the Gaza Strip. ... Jump to: navigation, search Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Shimon Peres   Shimon Peres[?] (Hebrew שִׁמְעוֹן פֶּרֶס) (born August 21, 1923), an Israeli politician, is the head of the Israeli Labour Party and served as 8th Prime Minister of Israel from 1984-1986 and 1995-1996 and Foreign Affairs Minister of Israel from 2001-2002, and became Vice Premier in a coalition... The Sudan Peoples Liberation Army (SPLA) is a rebel group that was formed in 1983. ... A ceasefire is a temporary stoppage of a war, or any armed conflict, where each side of the conflict agrees with the other to suspend aggressive actions. ... A civil war is a war in which the competing parties are segments of the same country or empire. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1983 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Basque Country (Euskal Herria in Basque) straddles the western Pyrenees mountains that define the border between France and Spain, extending down to the coast of the Bay of Biscay. ... Autonomy is the condition of something that does not depend on anything else. ... A fine is money paid as a financial punishment for the commission of minor crimes or as the settlement of a claim. ... A typical spam advertisement Spam by e-mail is a type of spam that involves sending identical (or nearly identical) messages to thousands (or millions) of recipients. ... Categories: Politics stubs | Liberal related stubs | Senegalese people ... Jump to: navigation, search Separatism involves setting oneself or others apart. ... Flag of Casamance Casamance is the area of Senegal south of The Gambia including the Casamance River. ... This page contains a list of presidents of Zimbabwe. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... Verdens Gang, commonly known as VG, is Norways largest newspaper with a circulation of 390,510 copies in 2002. ... Sumatra (also spelled Sumatara and Sumatera) is the sixth largest island of the world (approximately 470,000 km²) and is the largest part of Indonesia. ... Who can refer to: WHO, World Health Organization The Who, a British rock band The Guess Who, a Canadian rock band who (pronoun), an English language interrogative pronoun. ... Aboriginal tradition holds that the First Peoples have inhabited parts of what is now called Canada since the dawn of time. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or commonly mad cow disease) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... ... República Cromagnon (Spanish for Cro-Magnon Republic) is a nightclub in Buenos Aires, Argentina. ... Jump to: navigation, search A nightclub (often shortened to club in both the UK and US) is an entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... Buenos Aires (Good Airs in Spanish, originally meaning Fair Winds) is the capital of Argentina and its largest city and port, as well as one of the largest cities in South America. ...

December 29, 2004

December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) (Arabic الجبهة الشعبية لتحرير فلسطين - al-Jabhah al-Shaabiyah li-Tahrīr Filasṭīn) is a secular, Marxist-Leninist, nationalist Palestinian organization, founded after the Six-Day War in 1967. ... Mustafa Barghouti (also often written Mustafa Barghouthi; born 1954) is a Palestinian democracy activist and a candidate for presidency of the Palestinian National Authority in 2005. ... ... (Redirected from 2005 Palestinian Presidential Elections) The 2005 Palestinian presidential election — the first to be held since 1996 — took place on January 9, West Bank and Gaza Strip. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... A death toll is the number of dead as a result of war, violence, accident, natural disaster, extreme weather, or disease. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... The Anarchist Black Cross was originally called the Anarchist Red Cross. The band Redd Kross was originally called Red Cross. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... Israel (in Blue) and the Arab League states (in Green) The Arab-Israeli conflict is a long-running conflict in the Middle East regarding the existence of the state of Israel and its relations with Arab states and with the Palestinian population (see Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Knesset (כנסת, Hebrew for assembly) is the Parliament of Israel. ... Aphorism Critical legal studies Jurisprudence Law (principle) Legal research Letter versus Spirit List of legal abbreviations Legal code Natural justice Natural law Philosophy of law Religious law External links Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Law Look up law on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The term terrorism is largely synonymous with political violence, and refers to a strategy of using coordinated attacks which typically fall outside of the time, place, and manner of conduct commonly understood as within the bounds of conventional warfare. ... ... Federal Assembly of Russia (Федеральное Собрание) is the name of the parliament of the Russian Federation, according to the Constitution of Russian Federation, 1993. ... Jump to: navigation, search November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search The October Revolution, also known as the Bolshevik Revolution, was the second phase of the Russian Revolution of 1917, the first having been instigated by the events around the February Revolution. ... The conflict forces many civilians to live in internally displaced person (IDP) camps. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... The government of the United States, established by the United States Constitution, is a federal republic of 50 states, a few territories and some protectorates. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The Russian Federal Space Agency, formerly the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (RKA) (in Russian: Российское авиационно-космическое агентство) is the government agency responsible for Russias space science program and general aerospace research. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search ISS Statistics Crew: 2 As of August 21, 2005 Perigee: 352. ...

December 28, 2004

  • The Shiveluch volcano on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula erupts, causing a large earthquake and producing a 6,500 foot plume of hot ash. (Russian Information Agency) (Washington Times) (KVERT) (webcam)
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict
  • Conflict in Iraq: In an apparent coordinated attack, insurgents raid a police station in Dijla and execute 12 police officers. Three Iraqi policemen are shot at a checkpoint outside of Tikrit. Four policemen and one national guardsman are gunned down at a police station in Ishaki. A local police commander is assassinated in Baquba. A car bomb detonated near a US-Iraqi military convoy in Samarra kills three national guardsmen and three civilians. All these attacks occurred in the Sunni Triangle. (BBC)
  • The death toll from tsunamis resulting from the Indian Ocean Earthquake is known to be at least 59,000 and still rising. (BBC)
  • In Colombia, government soldiers search for at least seven people taken hostage by FARC rebels last Friday. Kidnappers have not made any demands as of yet. (BBC)
  • Ukrainian presidential election: Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych challenges the result of the re-run of the presidential election and threatens to take the case to the Supreme Court. (Guardian) (BBC)
  • A scrap metal plant, located in Muskogee, Oklahoma, USA, explodes. The blast is felt about 50 miles away. The cause of the explosion, which occurred at the Yaffe Iron and Metals plant, is unknown. [2]

Jump to: navigation, search December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shiveluch (Шивелуч) is the northernmost active volcano in Kamchatka, Russia, located at 56°63 N, 161°32 E. It is sometimes called Sheveluch (Шевелуч). ... Jump to: navigation, search ... Kamchatka is the land of volcanoes. ... Jump to: navigation, search Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes catastrophic movement of a part of the Earths surface. ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Shadow 200 UAV flying over Iraq. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Sheikh Izz ad-Din al-Qassam (Arabic: عزّ الدين القسّام) (1882-1935) was born in Latakia, Syria and immigrated to the British Mandate of Palestine. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Israeli troops remove protesters from Gaza synagogue Neve Dekalim was an Israeli settlement in the Gaza Strip, founded in 1983 after the Israeli withdrawal from the Sinai Peninsula. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... Tikrit (تكريت, also transliterated as Takrit or Tekrit) is a town in Iraq, located 140 km northwest of Baghdad on the Tigris river (at 34. ... Baquba (بعقوبه; also transliterated as Baqubah and Baqouba) is the capital of Iraqs Diyala province. ... ... The two Shiite mosques in Samarra A soldier descends a Minaret in Samarra, Iraq. ... Map of the Sunni Triangle The Sunni Triangle refers to a roughly triangular area of Iraq to the northwest of Baghdad. ... The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... The FARC-EPs flag The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) is a militant and revolutionary guerrilla group established in 1964-1966 as the military wing of the Colombian Communist Party, and is Colombias... (Redirected from 2004 Ukrainian presidential election) The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... The Prime Minister of Ukraine is appointed by the President and ratified by the Verkhovna Rada (parliament). ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... The Supreme Court of Ukraine (in Ukrainian, Верховний Суд України) is the highest judicial body in the system of courts of general jurisdiction in Ukraine. ... Muskogee is a city located in Muskogee County, Oklahoma. ...

December 27, 2004

  • In Mulhouse, France, a suspected gas explosion kills 17 people (BBC) (Scotsman)
  • Newly discovered observations from March 2004 rule out the possibility that asteroid 2004 MN4 (later named 99942 Apophis in July 2005) will hit Earth in 2029. (Space.com)
  • The U.S. dollar hits a new low against the euro: USD 1.3640 to EUR 1.00. (AP)
  • Ukrainian Transport Minister Heorhiy Kyrpa, a staunch supporter of Viktor Yanukovych, is found shot dead at his home just outside of Kiev. It is unclear whether he was murdered or committed suicide. (BBC) (Reuters)
  • Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: Israeli police arrest Palestinian presidential candidate Mustafa Barghouti. A Jerusalem police spokesman says Mr Barghouti was "detained for questioning because he has the right to transit through Jerusalem but not be in Jerusalem itself". (BBC)
  • The death toll from tsunamis resulting from the Indian Ocean earthquake is known to be at least 20,000 and possibly as high as 45,000. (BBC) London Free Press Independent Online
  • Ukrainian opposition presidential candidate Viktor Yushchenko claims victory. Official results may not come out for days. (Reuters) (BBC)
  • Conflict in Iraq:

Jump to: navigation, search December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mulhouse (Mülhausen in German, Milhüsa in Alsatian) is a town and commune in eastern France. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... Jump to: navigation, search Whoever deleted this is a mean guy. ... Close approach of Apophis on April 13, 2029 The white bar indicates uncertainty in the range of positions 99942 Apophis (previously better known by its provisional designation 2004 MN4) is a Near-Earth asteroid that caused a brief period of concern in December 2004 because initial observations indicated a relatively... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... 2029 is a Common year starting on Monday. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... Heorhiy Kyrpa (Ukrainian Георгій Кирпа)(July 20, 1946 in Klubivka, Khmelnytska oblast - December 27, 2004 in Bortnychi, near Kyiv) was a Ukrainian reforming bureaucrat, a manager in the transportation sector and politician. ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович, Ukrainian: Янукович Віктор Федорович ) (born July 9, 1950) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004 and current leader of Ukrainian Party of Regions. ... A monument to St. ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Mustafa Barghouti (also often written Mustafa Barghouthi; born 1954) is a Palestinian democracy activist and a candidate for presidency of the Palestinian National Authority in 2005. ... Jump to: navigation, search Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם [â–¶]; Yerushalayim; Arabic: القُدس [â–¶] al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... Jump to: navigation, search The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Iraqi Islamic Party (Hizb al-Islami al-Airaqi), a Sunni political party in Iraq. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Abdul Aziz al-Hakim (b. ... The Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI) is an Iraqi political party; its support comes from the countrys Shia Muslim community and from their fellow religionists in neighbouring Iran. ... Jump to: navigation, search Shia Islam (Arabic: or follower. ...

December 26, 2004

  • The first survey of language use in the People's Republic of China reveals that 53% of its population can communicate in Standard Mandarin, the official spoken language of the country. (China Daily)
  • An earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the strongest earthquake in 40 years, strikes in the Indian Ocean off the western coast of Sumatra. While initial reports state that the resulting tsunamis killed approximately 100 people, by the end of the day this estimate has increased to over 14,000 people in coastal areas of Thailand, Sri Lanka, the Maldives, India, Bangladesh, Burma, Indonesia and Malaysia. Tremors are also felt as far as Singapore, eastern countries of Africa, and north-western Australia. A state of emergency is declared in Sri Lanka, where over 11,000 people are feared dead. (USGS) (CNN) (BBC) (The Star) (Wikinews) (Channel News Asia) (The Times of India)
  • Ukrainians go to the polls in a rerun of the presidential runoff vote, supervised by about 12,000 international observers. Turnout is reported to be comparable to the two previous votes, just short of 55 percent at 1300 GMT. Early exit polls suggest opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko has won by a wide margin (Reuters) (Guardian) (BBC)

December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Standard Mandarin is the official Chinese spoken language used by the Peoples Republic of China, the Republic of China on Taiwan, Malaysia and Singapore. ... Jump to: navigation, search The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami hits Thailand The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December 26, 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes catastrophic movement of a part of the Earths surface. ... Sumatra (also spelled Sumatara and Sumatera) is the sixth largest island of the world (approximately 470,000 km²) and is the largest part of Indonesia. ... Jump to: navigation, search The tsunami that struck Malé in the Maldives on December 26, 2004. ... // Etymology World map showing Africa (geographically) The name Africa came into Western use through the Romans, who used the name Africa terra — land of the Afri (plural, or Afer singular) — for the northern part of the continent, as the province of Africa with its capital Carthage, corresponding to modern-day... (Redirected from 2004 Ukrainian presidential election) The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ...

December 25, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The FARC-EPs flag The Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia – Ejército del Pueblo (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – Peoples Army, or FARC-EP) is a militant and revolutionary guerrilla group established in 1964-1966 as the military wing of the Colombian Communist Party, and is Colombias... Distinguish from the type of ape called a gorilla. ... San Rafael is a municipality in the Colombian department of Antioquia. ... Motto: Capital Medellín Governor Area 63,612 km² Population  - Total (2003)  - Density   5,750,478 90 people/km² Adjective antioqueño Antioquia was one of the states in the original United States of Colombia, and is now a department in the northwest part of the Republic of Colombia. ... This article is about the European Space Agency. ... This is an artists concept of Cassini during the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) maneuver, just after the main engine has begun firing. ... Jump to: navigation, search NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... This is an artists concept of Cassini during the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) maneuver, just after the main engine has begun firing. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... The Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) near Pasadena, California builds and operates unmanned spacecraft for NASA. JPL-run projects include the Galileo Jupiter mission and the Mars rovers, including the 1997 Mars Pathfinder and the twin 2003 Mars Exploration Rovers. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 140 kPa Hydrogen >93% Helium >5% Methane 0. ... Titan (tye-tun, Greek Τιτάνας) is the largest moon of Saturn and the second largest moon in the solar system[1], after Jupiters moon Ganymede. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926) is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda... The Royal Christmas Message (currently coined The Queens Christmas Message) is broadcast by the British Sovereign to the Commonwealth at Christmas. ... Jump to: navigation, search // Definition and linguistics The original phrase common wealth or the common weal is a calque translation of the Latin term res publica (public matters), from which the word republic comes, which was itself used as a synonym for the greek politeia as well as for the... Multiculturalism is a policy that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures, especially as they relate to one another in receiving nations. ... The armed forces of the United Kingdom are known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, officially the Armed Forces of the Crown. ...

December 24, 2004

  • 400 m asteroid 2004 MN₄(later named 99942 Apophis in July 2005) is estimated to have a roughly one-in-forty chance of colliding with Earth in 2029. Its Torino scale rating is 4. (Space.com) (SpaceRef.com)
  • The government of Indonesia announces a criminal investigation of five executives from Newmont Mining Corp., the world's largest gold mining company, based in Denver, Colorado, USA, on charges related to heavy-metal pollution. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer)

Jump to: navigation, search December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The metre, or meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ... Jump to: navigation, search Whoever deleted this is a mean guy. ... Close approach of Apophis on April 13, 2029 The white bar indicates uncertainty in the range of positions 99942 Apophis (previously better known by its provisional designation 2004 MN4) is a Near-Earth asteroid that caused a brief period of concern in December 2004 because initial observations indicated a relatively... 2029 is a Common year starting on Monday. ... The Torino Scale is a method for categorizing the impact hazard associated with near-Earth objects (NEOs) such as asteroids and comets. ... Newmont Mining Corporation (NYSE: NEM), based in Denver, Colorado, USA, is the worlds largest producer of gold, with active mines in Canada, Bolivia, Australia, Indonesia, New Zealand, Turkey, and Uzbekistan. ... Jump to: navigation, search General Name, Symbol, Number gold, Au, 79 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 6, d Appearance metallic yellow Atomic mass 196. ... This article refers to the state capital of Colorado. ... State nickname: The Centennial State Other U.S. States Capital Denver Largest city Denver Governor Bill Owens (R) Senators Wayne Allard (R) Ken Salazar (D) Official languages English Area 269,837 km² (8th)  - Land 268,879 km²  - Water 962 km² (0. ...

December 23, 2004

December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes catastrophic movement of a part of the Earths surface. ... The moment magnitude scale (a successor to the Richter Scale), was introduced in 1979 by Tom Hanks and Hiroo Kanamori and is used by seismologists to compare the energy released by earthquakes. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... Orthographic projection over Macquarie Island Macquarie Island is located in the Southern Ocean, about halfway between Australia and Antarctica. ... Chamelecón is a suburb of San Pedro Sula in Honduras. ... Cortés is one of the 18 departments (departamentos) into which the Central American nation of Honduras is divided. ... Mara Salvatrucha, MS-13 or M-18 or M, are various Central American street gangs that are also active in the United States. ... A gang is a group of individuals who share a common cause for identity and, in current usage, engage in illegal activities. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... Pornography (from Greek πορνογραφία pornographia — literally writing about or drawings of harlots) (also informally referred to as porn or porno) is the representation of the human body or human sexual behaviour with the goal of sexual arousal, similar to, but (according to some) distinct from, erotica. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... A buffer zone is any area that serves the purpose of keeping two or more other areas distant from one another, for whatever reason. ...

December 22, 2004

  • Gambian journalists march in protest of the murder of Deyda Hydara, newspaper editor who had criticised new strict press legislation. UNESCO also condemns the killing. (BBC) (UNESCO portal)
  • Switzerland increases its financial support for the forthcoming re-run of election in Ukraine. (NZZ)
  • The Police Service of Northern Ireland confirm that the haul in last Monday's Northern Bank Belfast bank heist was £22 million, comprising £1.15 million in new Northern Bank £100 and £50 notes, £12 million in new Northern Bank £20 and £10 notes, £5 million in used Northern Ireland notes issued by various banks, and the remainder in other sterling banknotes. Since Northern Irish notes are rarely seen outside Northern Ireland, the gang may have difficulty in laundering most of their haul. (Scotsman)
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict:
  • The British charity organization Save the Children withdraws from Darfur after rebels kill their aid workers. (BBC) (IAfrica) (AllAfrica)
  • The Indian election commission investigates railways minister Laloo Prasad for allegations of electoral bribery. He has given money to dalit women in public. (ExpressIndia) (BBC)
  • A Pakistani court restores bail for Asif Ali Zardari. (BBC) (GEO)
  • In Mozambique, the national election commission declares Armando Guebuza, presidential candidate of ruling party Frelimo, the winner of the election. He received 64% of the vote despite alleged irregularities. (AllAfrica) (Afrol) (BBC)
  • In the Philippines, the funeral of Fernando Poe, Jr, movie star and presidential candidate, attracts large numbers of supporters. Security is high due to rumors of potential anti-government revolt. The detained ex-president Joseph Estrada condemns incumbent president Gloria Arroyo in his eulogy. (Reuters) (Philippine Daily Inquirer)

Jump to: navigation, search December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UNESCO logo The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, commonly known as UNESCO, is a specialized agency of the United Nations system established in 1946. ... The Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) is the police service that covers Northern Ireland. ... Northern Bank, is a commercial bank in Northern Ireland. ... Belfast (Béal Feirste in Irish) is the second-largest city in Ireland. ... The pound sterling, which strictly speaking refers to basic currency unit of sterling, now the pound, is the currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... British banknotes are the banknotes of the United Kingdom and British Islands, denominated in pounds sterling (GBP). ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) promotes health by protecting human rights. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Jump to: navigation, search A prime minister may be either: chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and... Jump to: navigation, search The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... Jump to: navigation, search Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... The peace process describes efforts by interested parties to effect a lasting solution to long-running conflicts, such as in Northern Ireland (see Belfast Agreement) or the Arab-Israeli conflict. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (also known as the disengagement plan, תוכנית ההינתקות) is a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to remove all permanent Israeli presence in the Gaza Strip and from what Israel refers to as northern Samaria (part of what is known as the West Bank... A bulldozer is a powerful crawler (caterpillar tracked tractor) equipped with a blade. ... It has been suggested that Apartheid wall be merged into this article or section. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Shimon Peres   Shimon Peres[?] (Hebrew שִׁמְעוֹן פֶּרֶס) (born August 21, 1923), an Israeli politician, is the head of the Israeli Labour Party and served as 8th Prime Minister of Israel from 1984-1986 and 1995-1996 and Foreign Affairs Minister of Israel from 2001-2002, and became Vice Premier in a coalition... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... The Star of David The Star of David (Magen David in Hebrew or Mogen Dovid in Ashkenazi Hebrew, Shield of David, Solomons Seal, or Seal of Solomon) is a generally recognized symbol of Judaism and Jewish identity. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ... Jump to: navigation, search The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of... Simon Wiesenthal Simon Wiesenthal, honorary KBE, (December 31, 1908 – September 20, 2005) was an Austrian-Jewish architectural engineer who became a Nazi hunter after surviving the Holocaust. ... Jump to: navigation, search Allegorical personification of Charity as a mother with three infants by Anthony van Dyck Charity is a term in Christian theology (one of the three theological virtues), meaning loving kindness towards others; it is held to be the ultimate perfection of the human spirit, because it... Save Children Logo Save the Children is an international non-profit organization dedicated to providing humanitarian aid. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... The Election Commission of India is a constitutional body created to hold free and fair elections in India. ... Dalit may have the following meanings. ... Traditionally, bail is some form of property deposited or pledged to a court in order to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (skipping bail, or jumping bail, is also illegal). ... Asif Ali Zardari Asif Ali Zardari is the husband of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who was sacked from office twice on charges of corruption while Asif Zardari remained a senator. ... Armando Emílio Guebuza (b. ... The Mozambican Liberation Front (FRELIMO, pronounced fray-LEE-moo; Portuguese: Frente de Libertação de Moçambique) is a political party that has ruled Mozambique since independence in 1975. ... Fernando Poe, Jr. ... Joseph Marcelo Ejercito Estrada, widely known as Erap (born April 19, 1937) is a popular film actor in the Philippines and was the 13th President of the Philippines from June 30, 1998 to January 20, 2001. ... PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials GMA, is the current and 14th President of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Jump to: navigation, search A eulogy is a funeral oration given in tribute to a person or people who have recently died. ...

December 21, 2004

  • European Union ministers postpone a controversial vote on the proposed Directive on the patentability of computer-implemented inventions in the EU after Poland asks for more time to think about it. (Reuters)(BBC)
  • The Boeing Delta 4 Heavy rocket launches successfully for the first time. (MSNBC)
  • Conflict in Iraq:
    • US forces say twenty-two people have been killed and at least 67 injured in an attack at a US military base in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul. The dead include 13 US Soldiers, making the attack one of the deadliest attacks on US forces since the start of the war. (BBC) (CNN)
    • Christian Chesnot and Georges Malbrunot, the two French hostages held in Iraq since August, are freed. Their captors claim they were freed because of France's anti-war stance. (BBC)
  • Former British Home Secretary David Blunkett's office is found to have assisted in the fast-tracking of his lover's nanny's visa-application, thereby confirming the allegation that led to his dismissal. (BBC)
  • The White House announces that allegations of abuse of prisoners in Iraq and Guantanamo Bay by US military personnel will be "fully investigated". The allegations were prompted by a memo, obtained by ACLU FOIA requests, dated two months after the Abu Ghraib scandal broke which reference an executive order that authorized questionable interrogation techniques. The White House spokesman flat out denied this in saying "there is no executive order on interrogation techniques". (BBC) (White House) (ACLU)
  • Japan issues a tourist visa to former Taiwanese leader Lee Teng-hui despite protests from the People's Republic of China that such a move would harm bilateral relations. The PRC considers Lee a Taiwan independence agitator. (BBC)
  • Same-sex marriage in Canada: The Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador finds the banning of same-sex marriage unconstitutional, making that province the eighth of Canada's provinces and territories to legalize same-sex marriage. (CBC)
  • Arab-Israeli Conflict: The leaders of the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) urge US President George W. Bush to make the creation of an independent Palestinian state an absolute priority at their annual meeting, which is being held in Bahrain. (BBC)
  • UK Prime Minister Tony Blair makes a surprise visit to Baghdad. (BBC) (Guardian) (Number 10)
  • Author J.K. Rowling announces that the sixth book in her Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, will be published on 16 July 2005. The share price of her British publisher, Bloomsbury, rises 7.5% on the news. (Reuters)
  • Up to £30 million are reported stolen from the headquarters of the Northern Bank in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Two members of the bank's senior staff and their families are reported to have been held hostage before the robbery. This is likely to be the second biggest bank robbery in British history, and the fourth largest in the world. (BBC) (Reuters) (Glasgow Evening Times)
  • Pakistan's Anti Terrorism Court cancels the bail of Asif Ali Zardari, leader of the Pakistan People's Party and husband of Benazir Bhutto. Zardari was released last month after eight years in prison. He was charged with corruption and conspiracy to murder. (GEO) (BBC)
  • A court in Chile upholds the indictment and house arrest of Augusto Pinochet. Prosecution lawyers claim that his hospitalization for a heart condition was a political ploy. Pinochet's lawyers intend to appeal. (BBC) (Bloomberg)
  • A court in Nigeria upholds the election of Nigerian president Olusegun Obasanjo. Opposition parties, led by Muhammadu Buhari, have challenged the result, and the EU and US question the election's validity. (AllAfrica) (BBC) (Vanguard, Nigeria)
  • A bus accident in Peru claims 49 lives and injures 15. (Reuters)
  • Archaeologists in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, find the remains of a 7,500-year-old man on the island of Marawah. (Khaleej Times) (Reuters)
  • French President Jacques Chirac demands improved hospital security after two nurses are killed. A suspected mental patient was released. (Reuters Alertnet)
  • The US government decides to settle a suit in which Hungarian Jews have demanded compensation for a train full of valuables the US Army took at the end of World War II. (Wired News) (New York Post)
  • The USA pressures Iceland not to grant Bobby Fischer sanctuary. (Reuters)
  • Zahira Sheikh, a key witness in the Best Bakery case, is declared hostile by the prosecution after she goes back on her police statement during retrial of the case. (Times of India) (Indian Express)

Jump to: navigation, search December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search The European Union (EU) Directive on the patentability of computer-implemented inventions (2002/0047/COD) was a proposal for an EU law which aimed to harmonise EU national patent laws and practices, which involved the granting of patents for computer-implemented inventions provided they meet certain... Delta IV evolution (US Govt) The Delta IV family of rockets are EELVs (evolved expendable launch vehicles) built by Boeing IDS in a purpose-built facility in Decatur, Alabama. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... MosÅ«l (36°22′ N 43°07′ E Arabic: al-Mawsil), Kurdish: Mûsil, or Nineveh (Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ, Ninewa) is a city in northern Iraq/Central Assyria. ... Christian Chesnot is a French journalist working for Radio France who, along with Georges Malbrunot, was taken hostage on August 20, 2004, by the Islamic Army in Iraq. ... George Malbrunot, along with Christian Chesnot, is a French journalist working for Le Figaro taken hostage on August 20, 2004, by the Islamic Army in Iraq. ... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... The Home Secretary (official full title Secretary of State for the Home Department) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Jump to: navigation, search David Blunkett The Right Honourable David Blunkett (born June 6, 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside. ... Jump to: navigation, search The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... ... The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non_governmental organization devoted to defending civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. ... The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) is the implementation of freedom of information legislation in the United States. ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... Jump to: navigation, search Lee Teng-hui (Chinese: 李登輝; Taiwanese Romanization: Lí Teng-hui; pinyin: Lǐ DÄ“nghuÄ«; born January 15, 1923) is a politician in the Republic of China on Taiwan. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Foreign relations between Japan and China. ... Taiwan independence (Chinese: 台灣獨立, pinyin: Táiwān dúlì, Taiwanese Romanization: Tâi-oân To̍k-li̍p; abbreviated to 台獨, Táidú, Tâi-to̍k) is a political movement whose goal is primarily to create an independent and sovereign Republic of Taiwan (out of the lands currently administered... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital St. ... Flag of Newfoundland and Labrador Same-sex marriage in Newfoundland and Labrador: Newfoundland and Labrador has issued marriage licences to same-sex couples since December 21, 2004. ... Israel (in Blue) and the Arab League states (in Green) The Arab-Israeli conflict is a long-running conflict in the Middle East regarding the existence of the state of Israel and its relations with Arab states and with the Palestinian population (see Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... Jump to: navigation, search Cover of the original novel in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article is about the book. ... Jump to: navigation, search July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bloomsbury Publishing plc is an independent, London-based publishing house best known as the publisher of the Harry Potter series of novels, written by J. K. Rowling. ... The pound sterling, which strictly speaking refers to basic currency unit of sterling, now the pound, is the currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... Northern Bank, is a commercial bank in Northern Ireland. ... Belfast (Béal Feirste in Irish) is the second-largest city in Ireland. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267... Traditionally, bail is some form of property deposited or pledged to a court in order to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (skipping bail, or jumping bail, is also illegal). ... Asif Ali Zardari Asif Ali Zardari is the husband of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who was sacked from office twice on charges of corruption while Asif Zardari remained a senator. ... The Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) is a mainstream political party in Pakistan. ... Jump to: navigation, search Benazir Bhutto at a Pakistan Peoples Party event in Newark, CA, 28 September 2004. ... Conspiracy, in common usage, is the act of working in secret to obtain some goal, usually understood with negative connotations. ... Jump to: navigation, search General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... Olusegun Obasanjo (born March 5, 1937) has been the President of Nigeria since 1999. ... Muhammadu Buhari Muhammadu Buhari (born December 17, 1942) was a military ruler of Nigeria (December 31st, 1983 - August 27th, 1985) and an unsuccessful candidate for president in the May 29th, 2003 Presidential Elections. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... A bus is a large wheeled vehicle, intended to carry numerous persons in addition to the driver. ... Abu Dhabi or Abu Zaby (Arabic language: أبوظبي) is the largest of the seven emirates that comprise the United Arab Emirates and was also the largest of the former Trucial States. ... Marawah is a low-lying island off the coast of Abu Dhabi. ...   Jacques René Chirac[?], known as Jacques Chirac, (born November 29, 1932 in Paris, France) is a French politician. ... US Army Seal HHC, US Army Distinctive Unit Insignia The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Jump to: navigation, search World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atom bomb . Known in the USSR as: the Great Patriotic War World War II, also known as the Second... Jump to: navigation, search Bobby Fischer. ... The Best Bakery case is the name used to refer to a case involving an incident which occurred on March 1, 2002, at a bakery (called Best Bakery) in Vadodara, India during the 2002 Gujarat violence in which 14 people were murdered, many of them burned to death. ... A witness who is called by and who testifies for the opposing party or, less frequently, who, when offering testimony adverse to the party who called him, may at request to the judge be termed a hostile witness, which means that the witness is then subject to direct questions in... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of law that regulates governmental sanctions (such as imprisonment and/or fines) as retaliation for crimes against the social order. ...

December 20, 2004

  • Analysts attribute a sharp drop in the price of crude oil to the unexpected outcome of the auction of Yukos' Siberian production unit yesterday. The value of the January futures contract fell 64 cents to $45.64 on the Nymex.
  • China announces reforms to its legal system effective in 2005, including the introduction of jury trials and a 10% increase in the number of judges. Jurors will be elected to a five-year term, and must have at least two years' university education. (BBC) (Xinhua)
  • The Head of the Egyptian Coptic Christian Church, Pope Shenouda III, has gone into seclusion in a desert monastery to draw attention to grievances among Egyptian Christians. (BBC)
  • U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld has admitted that he had used a machine to sign letters of condolence to relatives of more than 1,000 troops killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, but pledged to sign the letters personally in future. (BBC)
  • In Sudan, fighting has not stopped after a ceasefire between government troops and rebels. Although the government of Sudan has said that they have stopped the Darfur offensive, there are still reports of battles. Foreign Minister Mustafa Osman Ismail rules out any withdrawal from the positions government troops have taken. An observing African Union helicopter was shot at. (BBC)(Iafrica)
  • Prachanda, leader of the Maoist guerillas in Nepal, announces his intention to disrupt elections if the government refuses to abolish the monarchy. Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba has given them until January 13, 2005 to begin peace talks. (Reuters)
  • An explosion in a Chinese coal mine kills 14. (Reuters)(BBC)
  • Rice University computer scientists find a security hole in Google's desktop search program. (New York Times)
  • African National Congress of South Africa accuses U.S. officials covering up adverse side effects of AIDS medications. (Iafrica) (Reuters)
  • Police arrest former Miss World Yukta Mookhey's uncle, aunt and two cousins in a case of harassment for dowry. (Hindustan Times) (Indian Express) (Times of India)
  • Rumaisa Rahman, the smallest baby ever to be born according to medical records, and her twin sister Hiba, are announced to have been born in a Chicago hospital.(AOL)

Jump to: navigation, search December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For people whose family name is Price see Price (disambiguation). ... Nodding donkey pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario, 2001 Petroleum (from Latin petrus – rock and oleum – oil), mineral oil, or crude oil, sometimes colloquially called black gold, is a thick, dark brown or greenish flammable liquid, which exists in the upper strata of some areas of the Earths... Jump to: navigation, search Yukos Oil Company (ОАО НК ЮКОС) is a petroleum company in Russia which, until recently, was controlled by Russian billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky and a number of prominent Russian businessmen. ... Siberia Siberia (Russian: , common English transliterations: Sibir’, Sibir; from the Tatar for “sleeping land”) is a vast region of Russia and northern Kazakhstan constituting almost all of northern Asia. ... Jump to: navigation, search In finance, a futures contract is a standardized contract, traded on a futures exchange, to buy or sell a certain underlying instrument at a certain date in the future, at a set price specified on the last trading date. ... A jury trial is a trial where a judge or judges are supplemented by a jury, made up of citizens who are usually randomly selected and are generally not justice professionals. ... Jesus Christ in a Coptic icon. ... Jump to: navigation, search As a noun, Christian is an appellation and moniker deriving from the appellation Christ, which many people associate exclusively with Jesus of Nazareth. ... A church building is a building used in Christian worship. ... HH Pope Shenouty III, 117th Pope of Alexandria and All Africa, and Patriarch of the Apostolic See of St Mark His Holiness Pope Shenouda III of Alexandria, born Nazeer Gayed, has been Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church since November 14, 1971. ... Solitude (also seclusion, isolation) means lack of contact with other people. ... Buddhist monastery near Tibet A monastery is the habitation of monks. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Jump to: navigation, search Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) has been the Secretary of Defense of the United States since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... A ceasefire is a temporary stoppage of a war, or any armed conflict, where each side of the conflict agrees with the other to suspend aggressive actions. ... Darfur (Arabic دار فور, meaning home of the Fur) is a region of far western Sudan, bordering the Central African Republic, Libya, and Chad. ... Mustafa Osman Ismail (born 1955) is the foreign minister of Sudan since February 18, 1998. ... Anthem: Let us all unite and celebrate together Official languages The African languages, as well as Arabic, English, French and Portuguese Some member states have other official languages. ... The worlds most popular helicopter, the Bell 206 of Canadian Helicopters Robinson Helicopter Company (USA) R44, a four seat development of the R22 A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more horizontal rotors (propellers). ... Pushpa Kamal Dahal, commonly known as Chairman Prachanda or Comrade Prachanda (born December 11, 1954), is the leader of the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). ... The Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) or CPN(M) is a Maoist political party and military organization founded in 1994 and led by Pushpa Kamal Dahal (referred to as Chairman Prachanda). It launched what it refers to as the Nepalese Peoples War on February 13, 1996, and now controls... A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ... Sher Bahadur Deuba (born June 13, 1946) was the prime minister of Nepal. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Coal is a fossil fuel extracted from the ground by deep mining, coal mining (open-pit mining or strip mining). ... Rice University William Marsh Rice University, commonly called Rice University, but formerly known as Rice Institute, is located in the Museum District of Houston, Texas. ... Jump to: navigation, search Google, Inc (NASDAQ: GOOG), is a U.S. public corporation, initially established as a privately-held corporation in 1998, which designed and managed the Internet Google search engine. ... Jump to: navigation, search The African National Congress (ANC) is a centre-left political party, and has been South Africas governing party (in a coalition) since the establishment of majority rule in May 1994. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon made its public debut when host Jeremy Irons wore it during the 1991 Tony Awards. ... The Miss World pageant (not to be confused with Miss Universe) is an international beauty pageant founded in the United Kingdom by Eric Morley in 1951. ... Yukta Mookhey (born 1977) is an Indian model. ... A dowry (also known as trousseau) is a gift of money or valuables given by the brides family to that of the groom to permit their marriage. ... Rumaisa Rahman (born 19 September 2004) is a baby who, according to medical records, is the smallest born baby in history to survive birth after complications due to her size. ... Fraternal twin boys in the tub The term twin most notably refers to two individuals (or one of two individuals) who have shared the same uterus (womb) and are usually, but not necessarily, born on the same day. ... Jump to: navigation, search Chicago, colloquially known as the Second City and the Windy City, is the third-largest city in population in the United States and the largest inland city in the country. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ...

December 19, 2004

December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... Karbalā (Arabic: ; also transliterated as Kerbala or Kerbela) is a city in Iraq, located about 100 km southwest of Baghdad at 32. ... Najaf (Arabic: ) is a city in Iraq, about 160 km south of Baghdad, located at 31. ... Jump to: navigation, search Yukos Oil Company (ОАО НК ЮКОС) is a petroleum company in Russia which, until recently, was controlled by Russian billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky and a number of prominent Russian businessmen. ... Baikalfinansgroup (Russian: Байкалфинансгруп) is a Russian energy group that won the December 19, 2004 auction for a 76. ... 1998 Russian Federation one rouble coin. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... A tax is a compulsory charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... Mikhail Khodorkovsky speaking at an Open Russia forum. ... An aerial view of Parliament of India at New Delhi. ... Saparmurat Atayevich Niyazov [sap-ar-moor-at ni-yaz-obv] (Turkmen Saparmyrat Ataýewiç Nyýazow; Russian: Сапармурат Атаевич Ниязов) (born February 19, 1940) has been the most powerful figure in Turkmenistan since 1985. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is an American politician and the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Person of the Year is an annual issue of U.S. newsmagazine TIME that features a profile ostensibly on the man, woman, couple, group, idea, place, or machine that for better or worse, has most influenced events in the preceding year. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Suprnova. ... Jump to: navigation, search BitTorrent is the protocol and the name of the peer-to-peer (P2P) file distribution tool written by programmer Bram Cohen and written in Python and is released under the BitTorrent Open Source License (a modified version of the Jabber Open Source License), as of version...

December 18, 2004

  • Hundreds of Sikh demonstrators protest outside a Birmingham, England theatre against a play (Behzti) depicting sex abuse and murder in a Sikh temple. Theatre stormed by a few demonstrators. (BBC)
  • 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy:
    • Voting machine manufacturer Diebold will pay a $2.6 million settlement to the State of California over the lawsuit filed by the state in September alleging that Diebold was not truthful about the security and reliability of its electronic voting machines. (internetnews.com)
    • In a sharp change from their traditional role, several members of the U.S. Electoral College have filed a protest of the official election results, one even casting his electoral vote "provisionally" upon a revote. These electors have called for a member of the U.S. Senate to protest the election results on January 6th. (AP) (Sacramento Bee) (Burlington Union)
  • In Topeka, Kansas, USA, infant Victoria Jo Stinnett is returned to her father three days after her mother was allegedly strangled to death and she was cut from her mother's uterus and abducted. The AMBER Alert system is credited with helping to safely recover the child. (CNN)
  • Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
    • Palestinians fire several Qassam rockets at the civilian town Sderot and the northern Negev, causing damage but no casualties. (Haaretz)
    • Another three Palestinians were killed by Israeli soldiers on Saturday during an Israeli incursion into the Khan Younis refugee camp in the Gaza Strip, raising the death toll to 11. According to Palestinian sources, three of those killed were civilians, the rest were militants from Hamas and Fatah's Abu Reish Brigades. The IDF has officially ended Khan Yunis raid, dubbed "Operation Orange Iron", and threatened to return if mortar shelling will be renewed by militants. (BBC), (Haaretz)
    • Palestinians have been unable to bury the dead because Israeli forces were in control at the local cemetery, medics told the Reuters news agency. (BBC)
    • Six Palestinians were rescued from a collapsed tunnel under an Israel-controlled corridor in the Egypt-Gaza border area. (BBC)
  • Former Chilean President Augusto Pinochet has been taken to hospital after suffering a stroke. (BBC)
  • Darfur conflict: The African Union has given both sides involved in the Darfur conflict a deadline of 1700 GMT to halt the fighting in the region which currently violates the ceasefire agreement. If this condition is not met, talks in Nigeria to find a solution to the conflict would end. (BBC)
  • Conflict in Iraq:
    • Former senior Iraqi official Ali Hassan al-Majid (aka "Chemical Ali") is questioned by Iraqi judges in a pre-trial hearing. He is accused of crimes committed by the regime, such as the gassing of Iraqi Kurds in 1988. (BBC) (Reuters)
    • Iraqi insurgents attack election offices in northern Iraq, killing two people and wounding nine, six weeks before the country is due to go to the polls. (Reuters)

Jump to: navigation, search December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Sikh man wearing a turban A Sikh is a follower of Sikhism, a religious faith originating in the Punjab. ... The city from above Centenary Square. ... Jump to: navigation, search England is the worst place known to mankind ... Behzti (in Punjabi, Dishonour) is a play written by the British Sikh playwright United Kingdom in December 2004 when the opening night was disrupted by a riot at the Birmingham Repertory theatre. ... The word temple has different meanings in the fields of architecture, religion, geography, anatomy, and education. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... Diebold, Incorporated NYSE: DBD is a security systems corporation which is engaged primarily in the sale, manufacture, installation and service of self-service transaction systems (such as ATMs), electronic and physical security products (including vaults and currency processing systems), and software and integrated systems for global financial and commercial markets. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Barbara Boxer (D) Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... -1... Jump to: navigation, search The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... In U.S. elections, when someone shows up at a polling place to cast a vote, but is not on the list of people who may vote there (is not registered in that precinct, or his registation is otherwise invalid or inaccurate), he may be allowed to cast a provisional... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Jump to: navigation, search Founded Incorporated December 5, 1854 February 14, 1857  County Shawnee County Mayor Bill Bunten Area  - Total  - Water 147. ... Bobbie Jo Stinnett (1981 - December 16, 2004) was a woman murdered in Skidmore, Missouri. ... In the USA and Canada, an AMBER alert is a notification to the general public by commercial radio, broadcast television, e-mail, electronic traffic-condition signs, and now cellular text messages, regarding a confirmed abduction of a child. ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Qassam rocket is a simple steel rocket filled with explosives, developed by the Palestinian armed group Hamas. ... Sederot (שדרות; unofficially also spelled Sderot) is a city in the Southern District of Israel in Israel. ... Ruins in the Negev desert The Negev (Hebrew נֶגֶב, Tiberian Hebrew Néḡeḇ; Arabic النقب an-Naqab) is the desert region of southern Israel. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Khan Yunis (Arabic: خان يونس) is a city/refugee camp in the southern part of the Gaza Strip. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Jump to: navigation, search The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Graves at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York A cemetery or graveyard is a place (usually an enclosed area of land) in which dead bodies are buried. ... Reuters Group plc is best known as a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... The city of Gaza is the principal city in the Gaza Strip. ... Jump to: navigation, search General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... A stroke or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) occurs when the blood supply to a part of the brain is suddenly interrupted by occlusion (an ischemic stroke- approximately 90%of strokes) or by hemorrhage (a hemorrhagic stroke - approximately 10% of strokes). ... The country of Sudan The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ... Anthem: Let us all unite and celebrate together Official languages The African languages, as well as Arabic, English, French and Portuguese Some member states have other official languages. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Ali Hassan al-Majid Ali Hassan al-Majid (born 1941), is an Iraqi official and commander. ... Kurds are one of the Iranian peoples and speak Kurdish, a north-Western Iranian language related to Persian. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ...

December 17, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Jump to: navigation, search Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) has been the Secretary of Defense of the United States since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Democratic Party, founded in 1792, is the second-oldest political party in the world (after the Tories of the United Kingdom). ... Jump to: navigation, search The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party [1]), is one of the two major political parties in the United States (the other being the Democratic Party). ... A Norwegian soldier (a Corporal, armed with an MP-5) A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment to defend that country or its interests. ... Alternative meanings: vehicle armour, Armor (novel) A hoplite wearing a helmet, a breastplate and greaves (and nothing else). ... {{{mWf}}} Caution: This article contains several potentially morbid photographs that depict nude, abused, and deceased persons. ... Havana (Spanish: San Cristóbal de La Habana; UN/LOCODE: Habana (CU HAV)) is the capital of Cuba and, with a population of 2. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Jump to: navigation, search // Religion In the years following the Cuban Revolution, the Roman Catholic Church suffered persecution. ... Hezbollah militant Guerrilla carrying Hezbollah Flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God) is a political and military organization in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... Al-Manar logo Al Manar (المنار) is the TV station of the controversial Lebanese organization Hezbollah (sometimes spelled Hizbullah). ... ... In the politics and government of Commonwealth countries such as Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom, a public inquiry is an official review of events or actions ordered by the government. ... Jump to: navigation, search Islam [â–¶] (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, the worlds second-largest religion, and the fastest growing religion in the world. ... Political separatism is a movement to obtain sovereignty and split a territory or group of people (usually a people with a distinctive national consciousness) from one another (or one nation from another; a colony from the metropolis). ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... ... Jump to: navigation, search The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... The Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 is an Act of Congress. ... Seal of the United States Director of National Intelligence The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) is a United States cabinet-level official coordinating all 15 components of the Intelligence Community, and is the principal intelligence adviser to the president and the statutory intelligence advisor to the National Security Council. ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Labour (העבודה HaAvoda) is an Israeli political party. ... Jump to: navigation, search Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Likud party logo Likud or ליכוד literally means consolidation. The Likud is a right-wing Israeli political party. ... Israels unilateral disengagement plan (also known as the disengagement plan, תוכנית ההינתקות) is a proposal by Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to remove all permanent Israeli presence in the Gaza Strip and northern Samaria (part of what is known as The West Bank to the Palestinians, the UN, and... Shimon Peres   Shimon Peres[?] (Hebrew שִׁמְעוֹן פֶּרֶס) (born August 21, 1923), an Israeli politician, is the head of the Israeli Labour Party and served as 8th Prime Minister of Israel from 1984-1986 and 1995-1996 and Foreign Affairs Minister of Israel from 2001-2002, and became Vice Premier in a coalition... The internal affairs (United States terminology) division of a law enforcement agency investigates incidents and plausible suspicions of lawbreaking and professional misconduct attributed to officers on the force. ... The Caterpillar D9 is a large track-type tractor (commonly referred to as a bulldozer) with caterpillar tracks designed and manufactured by Caterpillar Inc. ... A helicopter gunship is a military helicopter armed for attacking targets on the ground, using automatic cannon and machinegun fire, rockets, and precision guided missiles such as the Hellfire. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... A civilian is a person who is not a member of a military. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... An Israeli settlement refers to a housing development for Israeli Jewish settlers in areas which came under the control of Israel as a result of the 1967 Six-Day War beyond the boundaries defined by the 1949 Armistice Agreements. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... An Anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) is a missile the primary purpose of which is to hit and destroy tanks. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Power lines leading to a trash dump hover just overhead in El Carpio, a Nicaraguan refugee camp in Costa Rica A refugee is a person seeking asylum in a foreign country in order to escape persecution. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Smuggling tunnels are secret tunnels, usually hidden underground, used for smuggling of goods, illegal weapons and people. ... A bulldozer is a powerful crawler (caterpillar tracked tractor) equipped with a blade. ... Jump to: navigation, search The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Jump to: navigation, search The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through a dedicated payroll tax. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or, especially in India, disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership and/or transferring the management of a service or activity from the government to the private sector. ... Main article: History of the European Union Attempts to unify the disparate nations of Europe precede the modern nation states; they have occurred repeatedly throughout the history of the continent. ... Turkey formally applied to join the European Community—the organisation that has since developed into the European Union—on April 14, 1987. ... Official language Turkish Capital Nicosia (LefkoÅŸa) (35° 10′ 28″ N, 33° 21′ 25″ E) Founder Rauf DenktaÅŸ President Mehmet Ali Talat Prime Minister Ferdi Sabit Soyer House Speaker Fatma EkenoÄŸlu Area  - Total  - % water 3,355 km² 2. ... Map showing West Java in Indonesia West Java (Jawa Barat) is a province of Indonesia, located on the island of Java. ... Image:Flyingcolumn westcbbffdbork-DB668. ... Traditionally, bail is some form of property deposited or pledged to a court in order to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (skipping bail, or jumping bail, is also illegal). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... Jump to: navigation, search Species N. glauca N. longiflora N. rustica N. sylvestris N. tabacum Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005 Tobacco (, L.) refers to a genus of broad-leafed plants of the nightshade family indigenous to North and South America or to the dried and cured leaves. ... The KatyÅ„ massacre, also known as the Katyn Forest Massacre, was the mass execution of Polish citizens (mostly military officers POWs) by the Soviet Union during World War II. // Background Initially the expression referred to the massacre of the Polish military officers confined at the Kozielsk Prisoner of War (POW... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... A bug is the common name for a covert listening device, usually a combination of a miniature radio transmitter with a microphone. ... Geneva (French: Genève) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland located where Lake Geneva (French: Lac Léman, but the Genevois and Genevoise are fond of calling it Lac de Genève) empties into the Rhône River. ...

December 16, 2004

December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marc Dutroux (born 6 November 1956 in Brussels) is one of the most notorious criminals in Belgian history. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (Dutch: Brussel, French: Bruxelles, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium and is considered by many to be the headquarters of the European Union, as two of its four main institutions have their headquarters in the... Turkey formally applied to join the European Community—the organisation that has since developed into the European Union—on April 14, 1987. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in Leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article describes the geography of Nepal. ... Maoism or Mao Zedong Thought (Chinese: 毛澤東思想, pinyin: Máo Zédōng Sīxiǎng), also called Marxism-Leninism–Mao Zedong Thought or Marxism-Leninism-Maoism (MLM), is a variant of communism derived from the teachings of Mao Zedong (1893–1976). ... Commuting is the process of travelling from a place of residence to a place of work. ... This page contains a list of presidents of Zimbabwe. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... Jump to: navigation, search Inuit woman Inuit (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐃᓄᐃᑦ, singular Inuk or Inuq / ᐃᓄᒃ) is a general term for a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples inhabiting the Arctic coasts of Alaska, the eastern islands of the Canadian Arctic, Labrador, and the ice-free coasts of Greenland. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in which the party commencing the action, the plaintiff, seeks a legal remedy. ... ... The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (the IACHR or, in Spanish, CIDH) is one of the two bodies that comprise the inter-American system for the promotion and protection of human rights. ... Jump to: navigation, search Global mean surface temperatures 1856 to 2004 Mean temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming describes an increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans. ... Physics In physics, melting is the process of heating a solid substance to a point (called melting point) where it turns liquid. ... An ice cap is a dome-shaped water ice mass that covers less than 50,000 km² of land area (usually covering a highland area). ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border The Arctic is the area around the Earths North Pole. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Buenos Aires (Good Airs in Spanish, originally meaning Fair Winds) is the capital of Argentina and its largest city and port, as well as one of the largest cities in South America. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years The term climate change is used to refer to changes in the Earths global climate or regional climates. ... The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... In English Common Law habeas corpus is the name of several writs which may be issued by a judge ordering a prisoner to be brought before the court. ... The Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 or ATCSA is a British Act of Parliament introduced as emergency legislation after the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York. ... The Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, also known as the European Convention on Human Rights, was adopted under the auspices of the Council of Europe[1] in 1950 to protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. ... The main entrance to the temple proper, seen from the eastern end of the Naga causeway Angkor Wat (or Angkor Vat) is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built for king Suryavarman II in the early 12th century as his state temple and capital city. ... These lollipops, above, were found to contain heroin when inspected by the DEA. Smuggling is illegal transport, in particular across a border. ... Jump to: navigation, search Islam [â–¶] (Arabic: الإسلام al-islām) the submission to God is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions, the worlds second-largest religion, and the fastest growing religion in the world. ... A chess table is a table with a chessboard painted or engraved on it. ... Jump to: navigation, search Bobby Fischer. ... Historic detention cell In middle school and high school, detention very specifically refers to a period after the end of the school day (or sometimes, before the school day) when students who have misbehaved must remain in a designated classroom for a certain time period as punishment for their misbehavior. ... Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen (German: Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen) is a state-supported university located on the Neckar river, in the city of Tübingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... This article is about the musical instrument. ...

December 15, 2004

December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... CNNfn was an US cable television news network owned by Time Warner between 1996 and December 15, 2004. ... ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Jump to: navigation, search David Blunkett The Right Honourable David Blunkett (born June 6, 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside. ... The Right Honourable Charles Rodway Clarke (born September 21, 1950) is a British Labour Party politician. ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ... The Right Honourable Ruth Maria Kelly (born 9 May 1968) is a British politician. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... The Right Honourable David Wright Miliband (born 15 July 1965 in London) is a United Kingdom politician, Labour Member of Parliament for South Shields in north-east England. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. ... A bus is a large wheeled vehicle, intended to carry numerous persons in addition to the driver. ... Jump to: navigation, search The euro (€; ISO 4217 code EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... The National Liberation Army (Albanian: Ushtria Çlirimtare Kombëtare - UÇK), also known as the Macedonian UÇK, is a military organization that operates in the Republic of Macedonia. ... Distinguish from the type of ape called a gorilla. ... It has been suggested that Suburbia be merged into this article or section. ... Jump to: navigation, search Skopje (see also different names) is the capital city of the Republic of Macedonia. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Democratic Party, founded in 1792, is the second-oldest political party in the world (after the Tories of the United Kingdom). ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States dollar, or American dollar, is the official currency of the United States. ... ... A payload launch vehicle carrying a prototype exoatmospheric kill vehicle is launched from Meck Island at the Kwajalein Missile Range on Dec. ... The Missile Defense Agency is the section of the United States governments Department of Defense responsible for developing a layered defense against ballistic missiles. ... A missile (British English: miss-isle; U.S. English: missl) is, in general, a projectile—that is, something thrown or otherwise propelled. ... Kodiak Island is a large island on the south coast of Alaska, separated from the Alaska mainland by the Shelikof Strait. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Last Frontier, The Land of the Midnight Sun Other U.S. States Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Governor Frank Murkowski (R) Senators Ted Stevens (R) Lisa Murkowski (R) Official languages English Area 1,067,653 mi² / 1,717,854 km² (1st)  - Land 1... Jump to: navigation, search 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE: S), headquartered in Reston, Virginia, is one of the largest telecommunications companies in the United States. ... The United States dollar, or American dollar, is the official currency of the United States. ... NEXTEL Communications (NASDAQ: NXTL) is a telecommunications firm based in the United States which provides a national mobile communications system. ... Sprint Nextel Corporation is to be a new telecommunications company created by the announced merger of Sprint and Nextel, to be completed August 12, 2005. ... Wireless was an old-fashioned term for a radio receiver, referring to its use as a wireless telegraph. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... The Bush administration and many parties have expressed concern about the state of human rights in Iraq after the 2003 occupation of Iraq. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... A mock execution is a method of torture, whereby the subject is made to believe that he is being led to his execution. ... Sign warning of possible electric shock hazard An electric shock may occur upon contact of a human or animal body with electricity. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Legislative elections were held in Iraq on January 30, 2005. ... Look up terrorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... A Declaration of War is a formal declaration issued by a national government indicating that a state of war exists between that nation, and one or more others. ... There are various types of trains designed for particular purposes, see rail transport operations. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... Johannnes Pieter Pronk (The Hague 16 March 1940), better known as Jan Pronk, is a Dutch politician. ... Norwegian Blue Helmet in Sarajevo, 1992 - 1993, photo by Mikhail Evstafiev. ... An election was held in the Pitcairn Islands, the last remaining British dependency in Oceania, to elect a Mayor, a Council Chairman, and four Councillors to sit on the Island Council. ... Jay Warren (born 1956) is a Pitcairn politician, who was elected Mayor of the the last remaining British dependency in Oceania in the general election held on 15 December 2004, defeating Brenda Christian, who had held the Mayoralty in an interim capacity following the dismissal from the post of her... The Pitcairn Islands, a small group of islands in the eastern Pacific, are (as of 2005) the last remaining British colony in Oceania. ...

December 14, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Irwin Cotler The Honourable Irwin Cotler PC , OC , BA , BCL , LL.D. , LL.M. , Ph. ... Nicholas John Griffin (born 1959) is the National Chairman of the British National Party (BNP) and a racist wanker. ... This article is about the 19th century scientist. ... Jump to: navigation, search The British National Party (BNP) is the largest political party of the far-right in the United Kingdom. ... Traditionally, bail is some form of property deposited or pledged to a court in order to persuade it to release a suspect from jail, on the understanding that the suspect will return for trial or forfeit the bail (skipping bail, or jumping bail, is also illegal). ... Hate speech is a controversial term for speech intended to degrade, intimidate, or incite violence or prejudicial action against someone based on their race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or disability. ... Jump to: navigation, search Map of the Persian Gulf. ... A national flag is a flag which symbolises a country and which can usually be flown by citizens of that country. ... Israel (in Blue) and the Arab League states (in Green) The Arab-Israeli conflict is a long-running conflict in the Middle East regarding the existence of the state of Israel and its relations with Arab states and with the Palestinian population (see Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Damascus by night, pictured from Jabal Qasioun; the green spots are minarets Damascus (Arabic officially دمشق Dimashq, colloquially ash-Sham الشام) is the capital city of Syria and is the oldest inhabited city in the world. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Khaled Mashal, also known as Khaled Mashaal (b. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... Newsnight is a British daily news analysis, current affairs and politics programme broadcast between 22. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... Intifada (also Intefadah or Intifadah; from Arabic: انتفاضة shaking off) is an Arabic language term for uprising. It came into common usage in English as the popularised name for two recent Palestinian campaigns directed at ending the Israeli military occupation. ... Nonviolence (or non-violence) is a set of assumptions about morality, power and conflict that leads its proponents to reject the use of violence in efforts to attain social or political goals. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The Fatah Hawks are a Palestinian militant group, an offshoot of the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade which has links to the dominant Fatah Movement. ... Jump to: navigation, search National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... DPP Flag The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Pan-Green Coalition, or Pan-Green Force (Chinese: 泛綠軍; pinyin: fànlǜjūn), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ... There are various types of trains designed for particular purposes, see rail transport operations. ... Punjab (ਪੰਜਾਬ, पंजाब) is a state in northwest India, part of a larger Punjab region. ... Jump to: navigation, search It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Hindu people. ... Vaishno Devi is a shrine revered by Hindus in the mountains of Jammu and Kashmir state. ... ... The Green Zone is a 10 km² (4 mile²) area in central Baghdad that is the main base for coalition officials in Iraq. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ...   Jacques René Chirac[?], known as Jacques Chirac, (born November 29, 1932 in Paris, France) is a French politician. ... Millau viaduct in France, currently the worlds tallest vehicular bridge. ... The Tarn River (from the Latin tarnis meaning rapid or walled in) is a 375 kilometre (235 miles) long tributary river of the Garonne, and flows through the départements of Lozère (Languedoc-Roussillon région), Aveyron, and then the eponymous Tarn and Tarn-et-Garonne départements, the... Jump to: navigation, search The Tower at sunrise The Eiffel Tower (French: Tour Eiffel) is a puddled iron tower built on the Champ de Mars, beside the River Seine, in Paris, France. ... Jump to: navigation, search Cynomolgus Monkey at Batu Caves, Malaysia Monkeys, Mori Sosen (1749-1821) A monkey is any member of two of the three groupings of simian primates. ... Binomial name Macaca munzala The Arunachal Macaque (Macaca munzala) is a macaque native to Arunachal Pradesh in north-eastern India. ... Species see text The macaques form the genus Macaca of Old World monkeys. ... 1903 has the latest occurring solstices and equinoxes for 400 years, because the Gregorian calendar hasnt had a leap year for seven years or a century leap year since 1600. ... Families 13, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all lemurs, monkeys, apes, and humans. ...

December 13, 2004

December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cannibalism is the act or practice of eating members of the same species, e. ... Yoo Young-Chul (유영철, born 1970) is a self-confessed South Korean serial killer and cannibal. ... Jump to: navigation, search Death Penalty World Map Color Key: Blue: Abolished for all crimes Green: Abolished, except for crimes committed under certain circumstances (such as crimes committed in time of war) Orange: Abolished in practice Red: Legal form of punishment Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty... Jump to: navigation, search Seoul (서울, listen ( ♫)) is the capital of South Korea and is one of the most populous cities in the world, located in the northwestern part of the country on the Han River. ... In France, the Conseil dÉtat (English: Council of State and sometimes Counsel of State) is an organ of the French national government. ... Hezbollah militant Guerrilla carrying Hezbollah Flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God) is a political and military organization in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... Al Manar is the TV station of the controversial Lebanese organization Hezbollah (sometimes spelled Hizbullah). ... Jump to: navigation, search A race is a population of humans distinguished from other populations. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article may be confusing for some readers, and should be edited to enhance clarity. ... Scott Peterson on trial Scott Lee Peterson (born 24 October 1972 in San Diego, California) is a former agriculture chemical salesman convicted in a high-profile California murder case (and, under California law, which treats the killing of a fetus as a murder, a double murder case). ... Jump to: navigation, search Capital punishment in the United States is officially sanctioned by 36 of the 50 states, as well as by the federal government. ... Jump to: navigation, search General Augusto José Ramón Pinochet Ugarte (born November 25, 1915) was head of the military government that ruled Chile from 1973 to 1990. ... A forced disappearance occurs when an organization (usually a ruling government, and usually one that is a police state or dictatorship) forces a person to disappear from public view. ... Jump to: navigation, search The 1970s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1970 and 1979. ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her residence. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... Jump to: navigation, search Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United... Jump to: navigation, search The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... ... This article is about the American politician, former Senator, and 2004 Vice Presidential candidate. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty (R) Senators Mark Dayton (D) Norm Coleman (R) Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George Voinovich (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... EPA redirects here. ... The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency is the head of the United States federal governments Environmental Protection Agency, and is thus responsible for enforcing the nations Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, as well as numerous other environmental statutes. ... Michael O. Leavitt Michael Okerlund Leavitt (born February 11, 1951) is an American, Latter-day Saint politician, who is currently the Secretary of Health and Human Services. ... Jump to: navigation, search The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Tommy G. Thompson Tommy George Thompson (born November 19, 1941) is a politician and was the 19th United States Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A car bomb is a bomb that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The Green Zone is a 10 km² (4 mile²) area in central Baghdad that is the main base for coalition officials in Iraq. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... US Army Seal HHC, US Army Distinctive Unit Insignia The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Strategic bombing is a military strategem used in a total war style campaign that attempts to destroy the economic ability of a nation-state to wage war. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ... During his campaign, George W. Bushs foreign policy platform included support for a stronger economic and political relationship with Latin America, especially Mexico, and a reduction of involvement in nation building and other small-scale military engagements. ... Human Rights Watch is an international non-governmental organization based in New York City, USA, that conducts advocacy and research on human rights issues. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18... Jump to: navigation, search A non-governmental organization (NGO) is an organization that is not part of a government and was not founded by states. ... ... Jump to: navigation, search Although technically in Giza, The Great Pyramids have become a symbol of Cairo internationally Cairo (Arabic: القاهرة; transliterated: al-Qāhirah) is the capital city of Egypt (and previously the United Arab Republic) and has a metropolitan area population of approximately 15. ... Hosni Mubarak, President of Egypt Muhammad Hosni Said Mubarak (Arabic : محمد حسنى سيد مبارك ) (born May 4, 1928) commonly known as Hosni Mubarak (Arabic: حسنى مبارك ) has been the President of the Arab Republic of Egypt for twenty-four years, since 14 October 1981. ... // Monarchs WālÄ«s (Governors) of Egypt, 1805-1867 Muḩammad ‘AlÄ« 1805-1848 IbrāhÄ«m 1848 Mu&#7721sdfsdfsdfssdf;ammad ‘AlÄ« (restored) 1848-1849 ‘Abbās I 1849-1854 Sa‘īd 1854-1863 Ismā‘īl 1863-1867 Khedives of Egypt, 1867-1914 Ismā‘īl 1867-1879 TawfÄ«q 1879... A presidential election was held in Romania on November 28, 2004. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Traian Băsescu (born November 4, 1951) is a Romanian politician. ... Oracle Corporation (NASDAQ: ORCL), one of the major companies developing database management systems, tools for database development, and enterprise resource planning software, dates from 1977 and has offices in more than 145 countries around the world. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions or M&A refers to the aspect of corporate finance strategy and management dealing with the merging and acquiring of different companies as well as assets. ... PeopleSoft, Inc. ...

December 12, 2004

December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gary Brolsma in the Numa Numa video Numa Numa is an Internet meme based on the Romanian techno song Dragostea Din Tei by O-Zone (see the song article for the discussion of title translation). ... Jump to: navigation, search Gary Brolsma Numa Numa is an Internet meme based on the Moldovan Romanian pop song Dragostea Din Tei by O-Zone. ... Newgrounds logo. ... ... Telephone tapping or Wire tapping/ Wiretapping (in US) describes the monitoring of telephone conversations by a third party, often by covert means. ... Mohamed ElBaradei Mohamed ElBaradei (Arabic: محمد البرادعي) (born June 17, 1942, Egypt) is the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), an inter-governmental organization under the auspices of the United Nations. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... The IAEA flag The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), established as an autonomous organization on July 29, 1957, seeks to promote the peaceful use of nuclear energy and to inhibit its use for military purposes. ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The international prototype, made of platinum-iridium, which is kept at the BIPM under conditions specified by the 1st CGPM in 1889. ... This article is concerned solely with chemical explosives. ... Rafah (Arabic: رفح Hebrew: רפיח) is a town in the Gaza Strip, on the Egyptian border, and a nearby town on the Egyptian side of the border, on the Sinai Peninsula. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... The Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades (كتائب شهداء الاقصى) are one of the militias of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafats al-Fatah faction. ... The Fatah Hawks are a Palestinian militant group, an offshoot of the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade which has links to the dominant Fatah Movement. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Jump to: navigation, search Shrapnel is the collective term for fragments and debris thrown out by an exploding shell or landmine. ... Marwan Barghouti (born June 6, 1959) is a Palestinian leader from the West Bank and a leader of the Fatah movement that forms the backbone of the Palestinian Authority and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). ... The 2005 Palestinian presidential election — the first to be held since 1996 — took place on January 9, 2005 in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known as Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President (Raees) of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005 and took office on January 15, 2005. ... A presidential election was held in Romania on November 28, 2004. ... Traian Băsescu (born November 4, 1951) is a Romanian politician. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... Massive ordinance air-burst bomb. ... General Santos City, or GenSan for short, is a city in Mindanao in the Philippines. ... Jump to: navigation, search Supermarkets, past and present, include: // Transnational Originating (HQ) country first. ...

December 11, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Christophe Lafaille is a French climber who made numerous difficult ascensions, and a few first ascent. ... Shishapangma is the fourteenth highest mountain in the world and the lowest of the eight-thousanders. ... Cho Oyu, Lhotse, Makalu and Mount Everest as seen from the International Space Station. ... The Prime Minister of Vanuatu is the effective head of the government of Vanuatu. ... Serge Rialuth Vohor (born 1955) is a politician from Vanuatu. ... Ham Lini (born 1951?) is a politician in Vanuatu, who currently serves as Prime Minister of that country (since December 11, 2004). ... Jump to: navigation, search City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... This page is about negotiations; for the board game, see Diplomacy (game). ... The Pan-Blue Coalition, or Pan-Blue Force (Chinese: 泛藍軍; pinyin: fàn lán jūn), is a political coalition in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Kuomintang (KMT), the People First Party (PFP), and the tiny New Party (CNP). ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ... DPP Flag The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... The Pan-Green Coalition, or Pan-Green Force (Chinese: 泛綠軍; pinyin: fànlǜjūn), is an informal political alliance in early 21st century Taiwan, consisting of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), and the Taiwan Independence Party (TAIP). ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Jump to: navigation, search The skull and crossbones symbol traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ... The Security Service of Ukraine (Служба безпеки України, СБУ; Ukrainian: Sluzhba Bezpeky Ukrayiny, or SBU as its sometimes referred to in English) is Ukraines main government security agency. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... Bernard Bailey Kerik (born September 4, 1955) is an American law_enforcement officer. ... The United States Secretary of Homeland Security is the head of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the body concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... A scandal is a widely publicized incident involving allegations of wrong-doing, disgrace, or moral outrage. ... A nanny is defined as a childs nurse. The traditional nanny was a servant in a large household and reported directly to the lady of the house. ...

December 10, 2004

  • Israeli troops kill Rania Siam, an 8-year-old Palestinian girl, as she eats lunch in the kitchen of her home in Khan Yunis, Gaza Strip. Earlier, three mortar shells are fired into the nearby Israeli settlement of Neve Dekalim injuring four people, one of them a child. Hamas claims responsibility. Israeli troops fire in the general direction the source of mortar fire. The Israeli army says it will investigate Rania Siam's death. (NYT)
  • A riot forms in Puerto Rico between members of the PIP, the FUPI, the Socialist party and members of the police in front of the federal court business, where PIP and PNP backers had shown two days before the outcome of the 2004 Puerto Rican elections are decided by a judge. Several people, including seven policemen, are severely injured. (El Vocero, in Spanish)
  • Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is acquitted of bribery thanks to the statute of limitations. The court's ruling implied that Berlusconi probably was guilty of bribing a judge in 1991, but said that too much time had passed for him to be punished. Financial Times Reuters
  • The 2004 Nobel Prizes are handed out at twin ceremonies in Oslo and Stockholm. (Canadian Press) (BBC)
  • "Godfather of Soul" James Brown is diagnosed with prostate cancer and will undergo surgery next week. (BBC)
  • A bomb explodes at a market in the Pakistani city of Quetta, leaving at least ten people dead. (BBC)
  • The Inter-American Court of Human Rights orders Guatemala to pay USD $7.9 million in compensation to 317 survivors of the 1982 Plan de Sánchez massacre in which soldiers and paramilitaries killed 268 villagers. (Reuters)
  • Austrian Interior Minister Ernst Strasser resigns. (Der Standard)
  • An explosion at a Chinese coal mine in Shaanxi province claims 33 lives. (IOL) (ChannelNewsAsia) (SwissInfo)
  • President of Ghana John Kufuor is re-elected to his second term in office. (GhanaWeb) (Reuters)
  • A Malaysian freighter is spilling oil in the Aleutians. Weather is hampering rescue and clean-up efforts. A rescue helicopter sent Wednesday to rescue the crew crashed. (Reuters) (Seattle Times)
  • Princess Cristina of Spain is reported to be pregnant for the fourth time. (Reuters) (SwissInfo)
  • Camp X-Ray Prisoner Controversy: "Australian Taleban" David Hicks, held at the US military camp in Guantanamo Bay, says he has been beaten, kicked, handcuffed and blindfolded, his head slammed into concrete, forced to run in leg shackles, routinely deprived of sleep and offered the services of a prostitute by US troops. (BBC)
  • Conflict in Iraq: Cpl Wassef Ali Hassoun, a U.S. Marine who turned up in Lebanon after disappearing from Iraq, is charged with desertion. (BBC)

Jump to: navigation, search December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rania Siam was an 8-year-old Palestinian girl killed by Israel Defense Forces as she ate lunch in the kitchen of her home in Khan Yunis, Gaza Strip on December 10, 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... The Puerto Rican Independence Party (Partido Independentista Puertorriqueño (PIP) in Spanish) is a Puerto Rican political party that campaigns for the independence of Puerto Rico from the United States. ... The Puerto Rican Socialist Party -- or Partido Socialista Puertorriqueño (PSP for its abbreviation in Spanish) -- was a Puerto Rican political party that existed from the 1971 to 1993 and advocated independence and a socialist government for Puerto Rico. ... The term federal court, when used by itself, can refer to: Any court of the national government in a country that has a federal system such as that of the United States (United States federal courts) or Mexico In some countries, a particular court, for example, the Federal Court of... The New Progressive Party of Puerto Rico —or Partido Nuevo Progresista de Puerto Rico (PNP) in Spanish— is a political party that campaigns for Puerto Rico to become a state of the United States. ... The Puerto Rico General Elections of 2004 took place on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... Jump to: navigation, search A prime minister may be either: chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and... Jump to: navigation, search Silvio Berlusconi listen [â–¶] (born September 29, 1936) is the current Prime Minister of Italy. ... A statute of limitations is a statute in a common law legal system setting forth the maximum period of time, after certain events, that legal proceedings based on those events may begin. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Edward Appletons medal Photographs of Nobel Prize Medals. ... Jump to: navigation, search County Oslo NO-03 Landscape Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² 426 km² 0. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Old town in Stockholm from the air Stockholm [â–¶] is the capital of Sweden, located on the east coast at the entrance of lake Mälaren. ... Jump to: navigation, search James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... Prostate cancer is a group of cancerous cells (a malignant tumor) that begins most often in the outer part of the prostate. ... Quetta is the capital of the province Balochistan in Pakistan. ... The Inter-American Court of Human Rights is an autonomous judicial institution based in the city of San José, Costa Rica. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Republic of Guatemala Guatemalas Plan de Sánchez massacre took place in the village of Plan de Sánchez, Rabinal municipality, department of Baja Verapaz, on 18 July 1982. ... Coal is a fossil fuel extracted from the ground by deep mining, coal mining (open-pit mining or strip mining). ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a northwestern province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains... Jump to: navigation, search John Agyekum Kufuor (born December 8, 1938) is the current president of Ghana since January 7, 2001. ... Cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship that carries goods and materials from one port to another. ... Looking down the Aleutians from an airplane. ... Her Royal Highness, The Infanta Cristina, Duchess of Palma de Mallorca (Cristina Federica Victoria Antonia de la Santísima Trinidad de Borbón y de Grecia), styled HRH The Infanta Cristina (born June 13, 1965), is the younger daughter of King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofía. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Camp Delta. ... For the U.S. chaplain, see David Hicks David Hicks outside his family home in Adelaide David Matthew Hicks (born 7 August 1975), also known as Abu Muslim al-Austraili and Mohammed Dawood, is an Australian being held prisoner by the United States Government at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. ... Jump to: navigation, search Map of Cuba with location of Guantanamo Bay indicated. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Wassef Ali Hassoun (born January 1, (1980) is a United States Marine Corps Corporal who is to be charged with desertion for leaving his unit and apparently engaging with others in a hoax to make it appear that he had been captured by terrorists on June 19, 2004 while serving... Jump to: navigation, search United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the U.S. military. ... Desertion is the act of abandoning or withdrawing support from an entity to which one has given an oath, or has claimed to owe allegiance, responsibility or loyalty. ...

December 9, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Nicholson or Jim Nicholson could be James Nicholson, an United States navy captain Jim Nicholson, a United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs and former chairman of the Republican National Committee Jim Nicholson, an Ulster Unionist Party politician This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages... Anthony Joseph Principi (born April 16, 1944) was the 4th United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs. ... Jump to: navigation, search City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... The House of Lords, in addition to having a legislative function, has a judicial function as a court of last resort within the United Kingdom. ... The Roma people (pronounced rahma, singular Rom, sometimes Rroma, and Rrom) along with the closely related Sinti people are commonly known as Gypsies in English, and as Tsigany in most of Europe. ... Prague (Czech: Praha, see also other names) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. ... The Enlargement of the European Union is the growth in size of the European Union, from the six founding member states in 1952, to the 25 current member states. ... Alfred Dubs, Baron Dubs of Battersea in the London Borough of Wandsworth is a United Kingdom politician. ... The Succession to the Crown Bill was a British Private Members Bill aimed at reforming the manner of succession to the British Monarchy published in the House of Lords by Labour peer Lord Dubs on December 9, 2004, and withdrawn by him on January 14, 2005, after the Government... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... The Parliament of Canada (French: Parlement du Canada) is Canadas legislative branch, seated at Parliament Hill in Ottawa, Ontario. ... The Supreme Court Building in Ottawa The Supreme Court of Canada is Canadas highest court and is located in the capital city of Ottawa. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC , MP , LL.B , BA (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the Prime Minister of Canada. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... The National Congress (Spanish: Congreso Nacional) is the unicameral legislative branch of the government of Ecuador. ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Mustafa Barghouti (also often written Mustafa Barghouthi; born 1954) is a Palestinian democracy activist and a candidate for presidency of the Palestinian National Authority in 2005. ... IDF or idf may refer to: the International Diabetes Federation the Israel Defense Forces the AIDC Ching-kuo Indigenous Defence Fighter of Taiwan. ... Jump to: navigation, search Feminism is a diverse collection of social theories, political movements, and moral philosophies, largely motivated by or concerning the experiences of women, especially in terms of their social, political, and economic situation. ... The International Rescue Committee was founded at the request of Albert Einstein to assist opponents of Adolf Hitler. ... The term Congo Civil War may refer to: the Congo Crisis (1960-65), dating from independence to the rise of former President Mobutu Sese Seko the First Congo War (1996-97), which led to the overthrow of Mobutu by Laurent Kabila the Second Congo War (1998-ongoing) that has involved... Pantera logo Pantera was a popular Heavy Metal band from Dallas, Texas, USA. Some metal fans consider them power metal. ... Jump to: navigation, search The acoustic archtop guitar used in Jazz features steel strings The guitar is a stringed musical instrument. ... Jump to: navigation, search Dimebag Darrell Abbott performing live with Pantera, circa 2000. ... Damageplan was a Heavy Metal band, showcasing the patented Power Groove sound that was originally demonstrated by Vinnie and Dime whilst with Pantera, especially on the Vulgar Display of Power album. ... Skyline of downtown Columbus, Ohio, viewed across the Scioto River. ...

December 8, 2004

December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ... The Church of La Compañía on the Plaza de Armas in Cuzco Cuzco is a city in southeastern Peru in the Huatanay Valley (Sacred Valley), of the Andes mountain range. ... The South American Community of Nations (CSN) (Spanish: Comunidad Sudamericana de Naciones, Portuguese: Comunidade Sul-Americana de Nações) will be a continent-wide free trade zone that will unite two existing free-trade organizations—Mercosur and the Andean Community—eliminating tariffs for non-sensitive products by 2014 and sensitive... Civil unions in New Zealand were ratified on 9 December 2004 when Parliament passed the Civil Union Bill to establish the institution of civil union for same-sex and opposite-sex couples. ... The New Zealand Parliament is the legislative body of the New Zealand government. ... Jump to: navigation, search A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing same-sex couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married opposite-sex couples (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by... Jump to: navigation, search Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... Jump to: navigation, search The southern side of the White House The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. ... John W. Snow John William Snow, Ph. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... Jump to: navigation, search The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... George W. Bushs second term as President of the United States began at noon on January 20, 2005 and is expected to end with the swearing-in of the 44th President of the United States at noon, Washington, D.C. time, on January 20, 2009. ... The United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs is the head of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the department concerned with veterans benefits and related matters. ... Anthony Joseph Principi (born April 16, 1944) was the 4th United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Jump to: navigation, search Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... Seal of the United States Director of National Intelligence The Director of National Intelligence (DNI) is a United States cabinet-level official coordinating all 15 components of the Intelligence Community, and is the principal intelligence adviser to the president and the statutory intelligence advisor to the National Security Council. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Unknown Rebel — This famous photo, taken by Associated Press photographer Jeff Widener, depicts a lone protester whose actions halted the progress of a column of advancing tanks for over half an hour. ... YB Datuk Tan Chai Ho (拿督陈财和国会议员) is the Deputy Home Affairs Minister of Malaysia. ... Jump to: navigation, search Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search International Business Machines Corporation (IBM, or colloquially, Big Blue) NYSE: IBM (incorporated June 15, 1911, in operation since 1888) is headquartered in Armonk, NY, USA. The company manufactures and sells computer hardware, software, and services. ... The tower of a personal computer. ... Lenovo Group Limited, formerly known as Legend Group Limited, is the largest personal computer manufacturer in the Peoples Republic of China, and as of 2004 is the eighth largest in the world. ... Jump to: navigation, search A computer is a device or machine for processing information from data according to a program — a compiled list of instructions. ... Seer has several possible meanings: A fortune teller or prophet The fictional character on the television series Charmed The Seasonal energy efficiency ratio standard for air conditioning appliances This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Sri Jayendra Saraswathi Swamigal (born July 18, 1935 as Subramanyam Mahadeva Iyer) is the 69th Acharya (guru of the Kanchi matha). ... Jump to: navigation, search It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Hindu people. ... Tamil Nadu (தமிழ் நாடு, Land of the Tamils) is a state at the southern tip of India. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... Vienna (German: Wien [viːn]; Hungarian: Bécs) is the capital of Austria, and also one of Austrias nine federal states (Bundesland Wien). ... Jump to: navigation, search The skull and crossbones symbol traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ... Jump to: navigation, search The skull and crossbones symbol traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ...

December 7, 2004

December 7 is the 341st day (342nd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Jump to: navigation, search A glass of red wine Wine is an alcoholic beverage that is made by fermenting grapes or grape juice. ... Article I, Section 8, Clause 3 of the United States Constitution, known as the Commerce Clause, empowers the United States Congress To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes. ... Frans Cornelis Adrianus van Anraat (born August 9, 1942 in Den Helder) is a Dutch businessman who is accused of selling raw materials for the production of chemical weapons to Iraq during the reign of Saddam Hussein. ... Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ... Jump to: navigation, search Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, sometimes spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... The Iran-Iraq War, also called the First Persian Gulf War, or the Imposed War (جنگ تحمیلی) in Iran, was a war between the armed forces of Iraq and Iran lasting from September 1980 to August 1988. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki Official languages None Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Eliot Spitzer Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959 in Bronx, New York) is the current Attorney General for New York State and a candidate for the 2006 Democratic nomination for Governor of New York. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The Hamas emblem shows two crossed swords, the Dome of the Rock, and a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Islamic Jihad (Arabic: Harakat al-Jihad al-Islami) is a militant Islamist group based in the Syrian capital, Damascus. ... Jump to: navigation, search The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of... Nāblus (sometimes Nābulus; Arabic: نابلس; pronounced Naablus) ( Hebrew שכם pronounced Shkhem ); 32°13′ N 35°16′ E) is a major city in the West Bank and, with a population of over 100,000, is one of the largest Palestinian population centers in the Middle East. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... // BTselem (Hebrew בצלם, in the image of, as in Genesis 1:27) is an non-governmental organization (NGO) that describes itself as The Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... An affidavit is a formal sworn statement of fact, written down, signed, and witnessed (as to the veracity of the signature) by a taker of oaths, such as a notary public. ... Jump to: navigation, search NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... Thomas Charles Feeney III (born May 21, 1958), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 2003, representing the 24th District of Florida (map). ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George Voinovich (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George Voinovich (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... John Kenneth Blackwell (born February 28, 1942) is an American politician of the Republican party, who currently (as of 2005) serves as the secretary of state for the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Jump to: navigation, search John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... German identity document sample An identity document is a piece of documentation designed to prove the identity of the person carrying it. ... Genetic fingerprinting or DNA testing is a technique to distinguish between individuals of the same species using only samples of their DNA. Its invention by Sir Alec Jeffreys at the University of Leicester was announced in 1985. ... A retinal scan is a biometric technique that uses the unique patterns on a persons retina to identify them. ... Fallujah (Arabic: الفلوجة; sometimes transliterated as Falluja and less commonly Fallouja, Falloujah, Faloojah, Faloojeh) is a city with a pre-war population of about 350,000 inhabitants in the Iraqi province of Al Anbar, located roughly 69km (43 miles) west of Baghdad on the Euphrates. ... Hamid Karzai, (Pushtu: حامد کرزي Dari: حامد کرزی) (born December 24, 1957) is the current and first democratically elected President of Afghanistan (since December 7, 2004). ... The President of Afghanistan is Afghanistans Head of State. ...

December 6, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Houston Rockets are a National Basketball Association team based in Houston, Texas. ... Calvin Murphy is a hall of fame professional basketball player who played guard for the Houston Rockets from 1970-1983. ... Jump to: navigation, search The name Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish), which means ourselves or we ourselves (not as sometimes incorrectly translated, ourselves alone or we alone) has been applied to a series of political movements since 1905 in Ireland, each of which claim or claimed sole... Gerry Adams Gerard Gerry Adams (Irish name Gearóid Mac Ádhaimh; born October 6, 1948) is an Irish politician, Member of Parliament for West Belfast, and president of Sinn Féin. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267... Image:Flyingcolumn westcbbffdbork-DB668. ... The Rev. ... In the Irish context, Unionists form a group of exclusively Protestant people in Ireland, of all social classes, who wish to see the continuation of the 1801 Act of Union, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which the Northern Ireland provincial state created in that latter... The Democratic Unionist Party is a hardline Unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267... Martin McGuinness, MP, MLA Martin McGuinness was born James Martin McGuinness in Derry, Northern Ireland, on May 23, 1950, and is an Irish republican politician. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Jump to: navigation, search Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... The Oil-for-Food Programme was established by the United Nations in 1996 to allow Iraq to sell oil on the world market in exchange for food, medicine and the like. ... ... The term Consulate can refer to: the office or the period in office of a consul a diplomatic consulate the French Consulate which governed between 1799 and 1804 a brand of menthol cigarettes Consulate This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The term Consulate can refer to: the office or the period in office of a consul a diplomatic consulate the French Consulate which governed between 1799 and 1804 a brand of menthol cigarettes Consulate This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share... Jump to: navigation, search The Basques are an indigenous people who inhabit parts of both Spain and France. ... Jump to: navigation, search It has been suggested that ETA military be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about explosive devices. ... The city of León, located at 42. ... Ávila is a town in the south of Old Castile, the capital of the province of the same name, now part of the autonomous community of Castile and Léon, Spain. ... Santillana del Mar is a historic town situated in Cantabria, Spain. ... Ciudad Real is a city in Castile-La Mancha, Spain, the capital of the province of Ciudad Real. ... Málaga is a port city in Andalucia, southern Spain, on the Costa del Sol coast of the Mediterranean. ... Plaza Mayor and city hall, Valladolid The unfinished cathedral and the Plaza de Cervantes, near the University of Valladolid The church of Santa María la Antigua, Valladolid Valladolid is an industrial city in central Spain, upon the Rio Pisuerga. ... View over Alicante and the Mediterranean Alicante (Castillian Spanish) or Alacant (Valencian Catalan) is the capital of the province of Alicante and of the comarca of the Alacantí, in the southern part of the Land of Valencia, Spain, a historic Mediterranean port. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Javier Solana Dr Francisco Javier Solana Madariaga (born July 14, 1942 in Madrid, Spain) is the High Representative of the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and the Secretary-General of both the Council of the European Union (EU) and the Western European Union (WEU). ...

December 5, 2004

  • In Taiwan, rallies are held in support of candidates in this week's elections to the Legislative Yuan (parliament). Party sources estimate that separate rallies held in Taipei by the Kuomintang and Taiwan Solidarity Union drew around 100,000 each. (VOA) (TaipeiTimes)
  • A referendum in Hungary to grant citizenship to ethnic Hungarians living in other countries appears to have failed due to insufficient turnout. The proposal has angered the governments of countries with significant Hungarian populations, particularly Romania. The Prime Minister of Hungary, Ferenc Gyurcsány, opposed the referendum. (Reuters)
  • 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy:
    • Hundreds gather at the Ohio statehouse to demand a recount of votes, citing fraud that took votes from John Kerry and gave them to George W. Bush. (AP)
    • A lawsuit challenging the Volusia County, Florida election is thrown out for being a day late. The suit claims paperwork is missing from 59 of Volusia's 179 precincts and that precinct printouts show different numbers. (AP)
  • The Thai government drops millions of origami cranes on its restive, predominantly Muslim provinces of Narathiwat, Pattani and Yala, saying that they are a gesture of goodwill and peace. (Channel News Asia) (BBC)
  • Conflict in Iraq:
    • More than 20 are killed and many more injured in a series of attacks on Iraqis working for the United States by Iraqi insurgents today. (ABC)(BBC)(Reuters)
  • French Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin seeks to ban Hizbullah's TV channel al-Manar from broadcasting in France due to purported anti-Semitic content, most recently involving a commentator speaking of "Zionist attempts to transmit AIDS to Arab countries". al-Manar claims to be anti-Israeli rather than anti-Semitic. (BBC)
  • In a prisoner exchange between Israel and Egypt, Egypt releases Azzam Azzam, an Israeli Druze businessman sentenced to 15 years imprisonment by Egypt in 1997 on charges of spying for Israel, while Israel releases 6 Egyptian students who allegedly infiltrated Israel to kidnap soldiers. (Haaretz) (BBC)
  • With more than 1000 people dead or missing, devastation in the northern agricultural regions, and damaged infrastructure after Monday's storm and Thursday's Typhoon Nanmadol, Philippines President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo suspends logging and pledges to prosecute violators. (Malaysia Star)(Boston Globe) (New York Times)
  • Well-known and well-loved Austinite John Marques, 25, was killed inexplicably in a low-speed motorcycle accident. John Marques was locally famous for his bright blue hair and his old truck with 'I BE BEST TROLL' on the tailgate.

Jump to: navigation, search December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Election for the 6th Legislative Yuan (第六屆立法委員選舉) of the Republic of China on Taiwan was held on December 11, 2004. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... Jump to: navigation, search City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... The Kuomintang (KMT) or Nationalist Party of China (Traditional: 中國國民黨; Simplified: 中国国民党; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-kuo Kuo-min-tang; Tongyong Pinyin: Jhongguo Guomindang) is a conservative political party currently active in the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. ... The Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) (Traditional Chinese: 台灣團結聯盟, pinyin: Táiwān túanjíe líanméng) is a political party in Taiwan (Republic of China) which advocates Taiwan independence. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Hungary: Prime Ministers of Hungary, 1848-1849 Count Lajos Batthyány: 17 March - 2 October 1848 Baron Ádám Récsey: 3 October - 26 November 1848 Lajos Kossuth: 26 November 1848 - 11 August 1849 Bertalan Szemere: 11 August - 13 August 1849 Prime Ministers of Hungary... Ferenc Gyurcsány (pronounced ), born in June 4, 1961 is the Prime Minister of Hungary. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... Jump to: navigation, search John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Volusia County is a county located in the state of Florida. ... Following the 1932 revolution which imposed constitutional limits on the monarchy, Thai politics were dominated for a half century by a military and bureaucratic elite. ... A crane and papers of the same size used to fold it Origami (折り紙 or 折紙 origami paper folding) is the art of Japanese paper folding. ... Genera Grus Anthropoides Balearica Bugeranus Cranes are large, long-legged and long-necked birds of the order Gruiformes, and family Gruidae. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) is an adherent of Islam. ... Narathiwat is a town in southern Thailand, capital of the Narathiwat province. ... Mueang Pattani is a city in the far south of Thailand, near the boundary to Malaysia. ... Yala can refer to several things: Yala National Park, Sri Lanka Yala province, Thailand Amphoe Mueang Yala, capital of the province Yala Yala language, am African language spoken in the Niger-Congo area This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... Jean-Pierre Raffarin Jean-Pierre Raffarin   listen? (born August 3, 1948) is a French conservative politician. ... Hezbollah militant Guerrilla carrying Hezbollah Flag Hezbollah (Arabic ‮حزب الله‬, meaning Party of God) is a political and military organization in Lebanon founded in 1982 to fight Israel in southern Lebanon. ... Al-Manar logo Al Manar (المنار) is the TV station of the controversial Lebanese organization Hezbollah (sometimes spelled Hizbullah). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other meanings, please see Zionism (disambiguation) Zionism is a political movement and an ideology that supports a Jewish homeland in the Land of Israel, where the Jewish nation originated and where Jewish kingdoms and self governing states existed at various times in history. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon made its public debut when host Jeremy Irons wore it during the 1991 Tony Awards. ... The Arab states include 22 countries spanning Asia and Africa. ... Azzam Azzam (1963) is an Israeli Druze who was convicted of spying for Israel by Egypt, and jailed there for 8 years. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Druze (Arabic: duruzÄ« درزي, pl. ... Spy and secret agent redirect here; for alternate use, see Spy (disambiguation) and Secret agent (disambiguation). ... Seal of the President of the Philippines The Presidents is the head of state and of the government of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947) is a politician and the current (14th) president of the Philippines. ... Austinite is: a rare secondary mineral (brown, colorless, green, yellowish white, or white) found in the oxidized zone of some arsenic-rich base-metal deposits. ...

December 4, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mozambique held a presidential election on 1–2 December 2004. ... The Mozambican Liberation Front (FRELIMO, pronounced fray-LEE-moo; Portuguese: Frente de Libertação de Moçambique) is a political party that has ruled Mozambique since independence in 1975. ... Armando Emílio Guebuza (b. ... Map of Mozambique with Maputo highlighted Maputo is the capital of Mozambique. ... Pulwama is a district in Jammu and Kashmir, India. ... Jump to: navigation, search Jammu and Kashmir is the northern-most state of the Republic of India, with Srinagar as its summer capital and Jammu as its winter capital. ... Major is the name most commonly given to the military rank equivalent to NATO rank code OF-3. ... Rashtriya Rifles is a military force in India. ... An improvised explosive device (IED) is a formal name for explosive devices as used in unconventional warfare by terrorists, guerrillas or commando forces in a theater of operations. ... Maju Mantilla (Miss World 2004), Copyright Peruprensa María Julia Maju Mantilla García was born in 1984 in Trujillo, a city in Perus northern coast. ... The Miss World pageant (not to be confused with Miss Universe) is an international beauty pageant founded in the United Kingdom by Eric Morley in 1951. ...

December 3, 2004

December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... General Dragomir MiloÅ¡ević was the commander of the Sarajevo-Romanija Corps of the Bosnian Serb Army whis besieged Sarajevo for three years during the 1992-1995 war in Bosnia. ... Sarajevo is the capital and largest city of Bosnia and Herzegovina, located at 43°52′ N 18°25′ E. According to the 1991 census, its population was 429,672; currently estimated at around 290,000. ... This is the history of Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... The International Criminal Tribunal for Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, more commonly referred to as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, acronym ICTY, is a body of the United Nations (UN) established... Jump to: navigation, search USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... A mile is any of several units of distance, or, in physics terminology, of length. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Chinese Peoples Liberation Army (PLA) (Simplified Chinese: 中国人民解放军; Traditional Chinese: 中國人民解放軍; pinyin: ), which includes an army, navy, air force, and strategic nuclear forces, serves as the military of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... After the 2004 U.S. Presidential election there were allegations of massive fraud, including but not limited to forging vote totals, miscounting votes for one candidate as votes for the other, widespread voter intimidation and irregularities with the distribution of voting machines. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George Voinovich (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Gilberto Rodríguez Orejuela, alias El Ajedrecista (The Chess Player), is a 65 year-old Colombian drug lord, who led the Cali Cartel, based in the south part of Colombia, around the city of Cali. ... Jump to: navigation, search A WANTED poster of Escobar Pablo Emilio Escobar Gaviria (January 12, 1949 – December 2, 1993) gained world infamy as a Colombian drug lord who became one of the richest men in the world by smuggling cocaine into the United States and countries around the world. ... Jump to: navigation, search Yukos Oil Company (ОАО НК ЮКОС) is a petroleum company in Russia which, until recently, was controlled by Russian billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky and a number of prominent Russian businessmen. ... List of Presidents of Russia Boris Yeltsin1 ( July 10, 1991 – December 31, 1999) two terms. ... Jump to: navigation, search Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Владимир Владимирович Путин, pronunciation [â–¶], Pútin; born 7 October 1952) is a Russian politician and the current President of the Russian Federation. ... Jump to: navigation, search Kosovo and Metohia (Serbian: Косово и Метохија / Kosovo i Metohija, Albanian: Kosovë / Kosova), in English most often called just Kosovo, is a province of Serbia. ... The KLA insignia The Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA or UÇK; Albanian: Ushtria Çlirimtare e Kosovës) was a group of Albanian militants which operated in Kosovo during the late 1990s. ... Ramush Haradinaj Ramush Haradinaj was born on July 3, 1968 in village GloÄ‘ani near Dečani, Kosovo, SFRY, former prime minister of Kosovo and indicted war criminal. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... A street map of Baghdad Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad For other meanings see Baghdad (disambiguation) Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... US soldier firing an M224 60-mm mortar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in one of eight photos from Rewards for Justice, all undated. ... ... The United States Agency for International Development (or USAID) is the US government organization responsible for most non-military foreign aid. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article covers invasion specifics. ... An aerial view of Parliament of India at New Delhi. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... The President of Ukraine (in Ukrainian, Президент України, Prezydent Ukrayiny) is the head of state and acts in its name. ... Leonid Kuchma Leonid Danylovych Kuchma (Леонід Кучма) (born August 9, 1938) was the second President of Ukraine from July 19, 1994 to January 23, 2005. ... Jump to: navigation, search Ansar al-Islam (Arabic: انصار الاسلام, Supporters or Partisans of Islam) is a Kurdish Sunni Islamist group, promoting a radical interpretation of Islam and holy war. ... Jack Ruby murdered Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, in a very public manner In its most common use, assassination has come to mean the killing of an important person. ... The Prime Minister of Iraq is Iraqs head of government. ... Iyad Allawi Dr Iyad Allawi (اياد علاوي) (born 1945) is an Iraqi politician, and was the interim Prime Minister of Iraq prior to Iraqs 2005 legislative elections. ... State visits usually involve a military review. ... ... Jump to: navigation, search The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... New York City, officially named the City of New York, is the most populous city in the United States, the most densely populated major city in North America, and is at the center of international finance, politics, entertainment, and culture. ... Bernard Bailey Kerik (born September 4, 1955) is an American law_enforcement officer. ... The United States Secretary of Homeland Security is the head of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the body concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... Jump to: navigation, search Tom Ridge Thomas Joseph Ridge (born August 26, 1946) is a former Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001), Assistant to the President for Homeland Security (2001–2003), and the first United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2003–2005). ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Tommy G. Thompson Tommy George Thompson (born November 19, 1941) is a politician and was the 19th United States Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). ... Jump to: navigation, search It has been suggested that ETA military be merged into this article or section. ... Plaza de Cibeles (Cibeles square) and the Palacio de Comunicaciones (Communications Palace) Coat of arms. ... The supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, is the highest court in that jurisdiction and functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be appealed. ... The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Rabbi (Classical Hebrew רִבִּי ribbÄ«;; modern Ashkenazi and Israeli רַבִּי rabbÄ«) in Judaism, means teacher, or more literally great one. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root-word RaV, which in biblical Hebrew means great or distinguished,. In the ancient Judean schools the sages were addressed as רִבִּי (Ribbi or Rebbi... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ... The Jewish Agency for Israel also known as The Jewish Agency (or sochnut in Hebrew), was previously called the Jewish Agency for Palestine (during the British Mandate of Palestine) is an Israeli organisation that advocates for Israel and is composed mainly, but not entirely, of Jewish people. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Reuters Group plc is best known as a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... The Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Portuguese: Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ) is the largest federal university of Brazil, where state-owned colleges are the best and most qualified institutions. ... Jump to: navigation, search Orders Saurischia    Sauropodomorpha    Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs are animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 100 million years. ... Binomial name Unaysaurus tolentinoi Leal, Azevodo, Kellner, & da Rosa, 2004 Unaysaurus tolentinoi is one of the oldest dinosaurs every known. ... World map showing Europe (geographically) When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Map of Pangaea Pangaea (derived from Παγγαία, Greek for all earth) is the name given to the supercontinent that existed during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras, before the process of plate tectonics separated the component continents into their current configuration. ... Map of the Philippines showing the island groups of Luzón, Visayas, and Mindanao. ... The Walt Disney Company (most commonly known as Disney) NYSE: DIS is one of the largest media and entertainment corporations in the world. ... Roy Edward Disney (born January 10, 1930) is the son of Roy Oliver Disney and the former Edna Francis. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article reads like an advertisement. ... A corporation is a legal entity (distinct from a natural person) that often has similar rights in law to those of a Civil law systems may refer to corporations as moral persons; they may also go by the name AS (anonymous society) or something similar, depending on language (see below). ...

December 2, 2004

Jump to: navigation, search December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... (Redirected from 2004 U.S. presidential election controversy) Introduction After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have changed the election result, if proven. ... U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George Voinovich (R) Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... In several countries, Secretary of State is a senior government position. ... Jump to: navigation, search John Kenneth Blackwell (born February 28, 1948) is an American politician of the Republican party, who currently (as of 2005) serves as the secretary of state for the U.S. state of Ohio. ... After the 2004 U.S. Presidential election there were allegations of massive fraud, including but not limited to forging vote totals, miscounting votes for one candidate as votes for the other, widespread voter intimidation and irregularities with the distribution of voting machines. ... The Inter-American Court of Human Rights is an autonomous judicial institution based in the city of San José, Costa Rica. ... ... Lori Helene Berenson (born November 13, 1969) is a U.S. citizen currently serving a 20-year prison term in Peru for terrorism-related crimes. ... The term terrorism is largely synonymous with political violence, and refers to a strategy of using coordinated attacks which typically fall outside of the time, place, and manner of conduct commonly understood as within the bounds of conventional warfare. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... Aung San Suu Kyi Daw Aung San Suu Kyi (born June 19, 1945 in Rangoon, now known as Yangon) is a nonviolent pro-democracy activist in Burma, now known as Myanmar. ... In justice and law, house arrest is the situation where a person is confined (by the authorities) to his or her residence. ... This article is about Irans civilian nuclear program. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Galloway featured on BBC Newsnight George Galloway (born on August 16, 1954) is a British politician noted for his left-wing views, confrontational style, and rhetorical skill. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Jump to: navigation, search Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein Ê»Abd al-MajÄ«d al-TikrÄ«t, sometimes spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... ... Jump to: navigation, search The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... State nickname: Cornhusker State Other U.S. States Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Governor Dave Heineman (R) Senators Chuck Hagel (R) Ben Nelson (D) Official languages English Area 200,520 km² (16th)  - Land 199,099 km²  - Water 1,247 km² (0. ... List of Nebraska Governors David Butler Republican 1867-1871 William H. James Republican 1871-1873 Robert Wilkinson Furnas Republican 1873-1875 Silas Garber Republican 1875-1879 Albinus Nance Republican 1879-1883 James W. Dawes Republican 1883-1887 John Milton Thayer Republican 1887-1892 James E. Boyd Democratic 1892-1893 Lorenzo... Jump to: navigation, search Mike Johanns Mike Johanns speaks after being nominated by George W. Bush for U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Michael Owen Johanns (born June 18, 1950) is an American Republican politician and is the current U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Cabinet meeting on May 16, 2001. ... Ann Margaret Veneman (born June 29, 1949) was the 27th United States Secretary of Agriculture, and was a director of Calgene, the first company to market genetically-engineered food. ... Surveillance photo of Mijailović at the crime scene Mijailo Mijailović (born December 6, 1978) is a Serbian living in Sweden since 1992. ... Anna Lindh Photo: Pawel Flato Anna Lindh (June 19, 1957 – September 11, 2003) was a Swedish Social Democratic politician who served as Swedish Minister for Foreign Affairs from 1998 until her death. ... The Supreme Court of Sweden (Högsta Domstolen in Swedish) is the supreme court and the third and final instance in all civil and criminal cases in Sweden. ... The NATO flag NATO 2002 Summit in Prague The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), sometimes called North Atlantic Alliance, Atlantic Alliance or the Western Alliance, is an international organisation for defence collaboration established in 1949, in support of the North Atlantic Treaty signed in Washington, D.C., on April 4... Norwegian Blue Helmet in Sarajevo, 1992 - 1993, photo by Mikhail Evstafiev. ... Pocket badge of the SFOR The Stabilisation Force (SFOR) was a NATO-led multinational force in Bosnia and Herzegovina which was tasked with upholding the Dayton Agreement. ... Categories: Organization stubs | Bosnia and Herzegovina ... December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bhopal Disaster of 1984 was the worst industrial disaster in the history of the world. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... Legislative elections were held in Iraq on January 30, 2005. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

December 1, 2004

December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... Television is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound over a distance. ... Tom Brokaw Thomas John Brokaw (born February 6, 1940) is a television journalist and the former NBC News anchorman and managing editor of the program NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw. ... NBC Nightly News logo, with Tom Brokaw at the news desk NBC Nightly News is the flagship evening news program for NBC News and broadcasts from Studio 3B in New York City. ... The 2005 Palestinian presidential election — the first to be held since 1996 — took place on January 9, 2005 in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. ... Marwan Barghouti (born June 6, 1959) is a Palestinian leader from the West Bank and a leader of the Fatah movement that forms the backbone of the Palestinian Authority and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). ... Jump to: navigation, search Yasser Arafat (Arabic: ياسر عرفات‎) (August 4 or August 24, 1929 – November 11, 2004), born Muhammad `Abd ar-Rauf al-Qudwa al-Husayni (محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني) and also known as Abu `Ammar (ابو عمّار), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004); President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) (1993... Jump to: navigation, search The Fatah official emblem shows two fists holding rifles and a hand grenade superimposed on a map of the land they claim as Palestine (roughly, present-day Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). ... Jump to: navigation, search The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV positive and people living with AIDS. The Red Ribbon made its public debut when host Jeremy Irons wore it during the 1991 Tony Awards. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a person for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or substance (known as an invention) which is new, inventive and useful. ... Jump to: navigation, search Ariel Sharon, the eleventh Prime Minister of Israel, spent many years in the Israel Defense Forces before being elected in March 2001. ... Likud party logo Likud or ליכוד literally means consolidation. The Likud is a right-wing Israeli political party. ... Shinui (שינוי) is a Zionist, secular, liberal party in Israel. ... In economics, a subsidy is generally a monetary grant given by government to lower the price faced by producers or consumers of a good, generally because it is considered to be in the public interest. ... (Redirected from 2004 Ukrainian presidential election) The presidential election held in November and December 2004 in Ukraine was mostly a political battle between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and former Prime Minister and opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. ... Verkhovna Rada. ... Viktor Yanukovych Campaign Poster 2004 Viktor Fedorovych Yanukovych (Russian: Виктор Федорович Янукович1) (born July 9, 1950 in Yenakiieve, Donetska oblast) was Prime Minister of Ukraine from November 21, 2002 to December 31, 2004. ... Viktor Andriyovych Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Віктор Андрійович Ющенко) (born 23 February 1954) is the President of Ukraine. ... Jump to: navigation, search Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... Boris Tadić   listen? (Борис Тадић) (born January 15, 1958) is the President of Serbia. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... CBS (Columbia Broadcasting System) is a major television network and radio broadcaster in the United States. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The United Church of Christ (UCC) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States, generally considered within the Reformed tradition, and formed in 1957 by the merger of two denominations, the Evangelical and Reformed Church and the Congregational Christian Churches. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... Jump to: navigation, search Italic text The Fox Broadcasting Company, usually referred to as just Fox (the company itself prefers the capitalized version FOX), is a television network in the United States. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is a television and radio network in the United States. ... TBS Superstation is a popular American cable TV network that shows sports and variety programming. ... The Prime Minister of France (Premier ministre de la France) is the functional head of the Cabinet of France. ... Alain Marie Juppé (born August 15, 1945) is a French politician; among other positions, he was Prime Minister of France from 1995 to 1997. ... Armed insurgents French troops try to separate the belligerents. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Republic of Côte dIvoire or Côte dIvoire (ko-t de--vwär or COAT dee-VWAAR) (often called Ivory Coast in English; see below about the name) is a country in West Africa. ... You may be looking for: Media in mainland China (that is, in the Peoples Republic of China, excluding Hong Kong and Macau) Media in Hong Kong Media in Macao This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Shaanxi (Simplified Chinese: 陕西; Traditional Chinese: 陝西; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal System Pinyin: Shensi, pronounced like Shahn-shee) is a northwestern province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... The term Congo Civil War may refer to: the Congo Crisis (1960-65), dating from independence to the rise of former President Mobutu Sese Seko the First Congo War (1996-97), which led to the overthrow of Mobutu by Laurent Kabila the Second Congo War (1998-ongoing) that has involved... The Douglas DC-9 is a twin-engined jet airliner, first manufactured in 1965 and, in much modified form and under a succession of different names, still in production today as the Boeing 717. ... Lion Air is a no-frills, low-cost domestic airline based in Jakarta, Indonesia, established in 1999. ... Map of Central Java province within Indonesia Central Java (Indonesian: Jawa Tengah) is a province of Indonesia. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Jump to: navigation, search The United Nations, or UN, is an international organization established in 1945. ... The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... Jump to: navigation, search Jerusalem (31°46′ N 35°14′ E; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם [â–¶]; Yerushalayim; Arabic: القُدس [â–¶] al-Quds; see also names of Jerusalem) is an ancient Middle Eastern city of key importance to the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States and a former Governor of the State of Texas. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC , MP , LL.B , BA (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the Prime Minister of Canada. ... The term terrorism is largely synonymous with political violence, and refers to a strategy of using coordinated attacks which typically fall outside of the time, place, and manner of conduct commonly understood as within the bounds of conventional warfare. ... Jump to: navigation, search David Blunkett The Right Honourable David Blunkett (born June 6, 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside. ... ... The Home Secretary (official full title Secretary of State for the Home Department) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Jump to: navigation, search A prime minister may be either: chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the civil service and... Jump to: navigation, search The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953 in Edinburgh, Scotland) is the current Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ...

Last month

2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13...

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2005: January February March April May June July August September
2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2001: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2000: January February March April May June July August September October November December
Jump to: navigation, search 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in April • 26: Augusto Roa Bastos • 24: Ezer Weizman • 23: Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen • 23: John Mills • 16: Marla Ruzicka • 9: Andrea Dworkin • 6: Prince Rainier III • 5: Dale Messick • 5: Saul Bellow • 2: Pope John... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Atlantic hurricane season • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak in Asia • Bali bombings investigation • California wildfires • UK Conservative Party leadership election • DeLay political financing scandal • Dengue outbreak in Singapore • FIDE World Chess Championship 2005 • Fiji Week, 2005 • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2004(MMIV) is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8 Richard Girnt... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... 2003(MMIII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2003. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2002(MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a month starting on Monday with 31 days. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: February - Iraq disarmament crisis: British and U.S. forces carry out bombing raids attempting to disable Iraqs air defense network. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: April 1: An EP-3E United States Navy plane collides with a Chinese Peoples Liberation Army fighter jet. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: May 1 - Chandra Levy disapears while jogging. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: June 5-June 9 - Houston, Texas is devastated by flooding when Tropical Storm Allison dumps 36 inches of rain on the city. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: July 3 - Mordecai Richler July 23 - Eudora Welty July 31 - Poul Anderson Films: July 4 - Cats and Dogs July 6 - Kiss of the Dragon starring Jet Li July 18 - Jurassic Park III July 27 - Planet of... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: August 25 - Aaliyah Films: August 10 - Osmosis Jones played by Chris Rock, starring Bill Murray August 24 - Bubble Boy Categories: 2001 by month ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: September 4 - Google Inc. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: October 2 - Bankruptcy of Swissair. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: December 2 - Enron files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection five days after Dynegy canceled a US$8. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article is about the year 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: January 1- Millennium celebrations take place throughout the world. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in February, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in March, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in April, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in June, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in July, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in August, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in September, 2000. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in October, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in November, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in December, 2000. ...


News collections and sources

  • Wikipedia:News collections and sources.
  • Wikipedia:News sources - This has much of the same material organised in a hierarchical manner to help encourage NPOV in our news reporting.

  Results from FactBites:
 
What's New - December, 2004 (730 words)
December 20, 2004: I appreciate the patience of those subscribers who were inundated with 16 copies of last week's newsletter.
December 12, 2004: The is something going on in the knight's tour puzzle world that I don't quite understand (which is OK with me!).
December 9, 2004: I implemented some code in the Oscilloscope program the other day which uses Delphi's MouseEnter and MouseLeave messages to turn the label on and off in the spectrum bar graph.
The Great Earthquake and Tsunami of 26 December 2004 in Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean - Prelimiminary Report by ... (6022 words)
The region where the great earthquake occurred on 26 December 2004, marks the seismic boundary formed by the movement of the Indo-Australian plate as it collides with the Burma subplate, which is part of the Eurasian plate.
The epicenter of the 26 December 2004 earthquake was near the triple point junction of three tectonic plates where major earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred in the past.
Map of Sumatra showing Simeulue Island to the west near the epicenter of the 26 December 2004 earthquake where uplift and elongation of the island were observed and reported.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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