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Encyclopedia > December 2003


December 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - Look up December in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Template:DecemberCalendar2006 December is the twelfth and last month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ...


Events

See also:
2004 Canadian Federal Election
2004 Taiwan Presidential Election
2004 U.S. Presidential Election
Bloody Sunday Inquiry
Search for Beagle 2
Kyoto Protocol
Liberian Crisis
Same-sex Marriage
SCO v. IBM
Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... Presidential election results map. ... For other incidents referred to by this name, see Bloody Sunday. ... Beagle 2 was an unsuccessful British landing spacecraft that formed part of the European Space Agencys 2003 Mars Express mission. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 at Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... Politics of Liberia takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President is the head of state and head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... On March 7, 2003, the SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera Systems) filed a $1 billion lawsuit in the US against IBM for allegedly devaluing its version of the UNIX operating system. ... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ...

Road Map to Peace

North Korean Crisis
War on Terrorism
The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... North Korea has been attempting to obtain nuclear weapons since the late 1970s. ... The War on Terrorism or War on Terror (in U.S. foreign policy circles, the global war on terrorism or GWOT ) is a campaign by the United States government and some of its allies with the stated goal of ending worldwide terrorism by stopping terrorist groups and ending state sponsorship...

Afghanistan timeline December 2003

Occupation of Iraq
Timeline of Afghan history December 31, 2003 In the Shkin region of Afghanistan a series of clashes between U.S. forces and rebels killed at least three militants and injured three U.S. soldiers. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ...

Iraq Timeline

(Redirected from 2003 occupation of Iraq timeline) Timeline of events during U.S.-led occupation of Iraq, following 2003 invasion of Iraq, and relevant quotations about nature of occupation from officials. ...

December 31, 2003

December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... Location of Baghdad within Iraq Baghdad (Arabic: , Persian: بغداد (Meaning in Persian : from angels) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... Founded on May 11, 1927 in California, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) is a professional honorary organization dedicated to the advancement of the arts and sciences of motion pictures. ... Film refers to the celluloid media on which movies are printed Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2003. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...

December 30, 2003

December 30 is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 1 day remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A mailbomb (or mail bomb), also called parcel bomb or letter bomb, is an explosive device sent via the postal service, and designed to explode when opened, injuring or killing the recipient, usually someone the sender has a personal grudge against, or more indiscriminately as part of a terrorist campaign. ... The European Central Bank (ECB) in Frankfurt am Main, Germany is the central bank of the eurozone, in charge of monetary policy for the 12 countries that use the euro currency. ... ▶ (help· info) is the largest city in the German state of Hesse and the fifth-largest city in Germany. ... Europol (the name is a contraction of European Police Office) is the European Unions criminal intelligence agency. ... Arms of The Hague The Hague (with capital T; Dutch: Den Haag, or officially s-Gravenhage) is the administrative capital of the Netherlands, located in the west of the country, in the province South Holland of which it is also the capital. ... Bologna (from Latin Bononia, Bulåggna in the local dialect) is the capital city of Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy, between the Po River and the Apennines. ... Romano Prodi (born in Reggio Emilia on August 9, 1939) is an Italian politician and a former President of the European Commission. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A prescribed dietary supplement supplies nutrients (usually vitamins or minerals) that are missing or not consumed in sufficient quantity in a persons diet. ... Species See text Ephedra is a genus of gymnosperm shrubs, the only genus in the family Ephedraceae and order Ephedrales. ... A medication is a licenced drug taken to cure or reduce symptoms of an illness or medical condition. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... For detail on the political scandal, see Plame affair Image:Plame and Wilson. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... In this map of China, the light-coloured areas represent Mainland China, while yellow coloured area refers to Taiwan. ... Falun emblem. ... The Information Centre for Human Rights and Democracy is a human rights organization based in Hong Kong that provides information human rights abuses in mainland China for news outlets. ...

December 29, 2003

December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Papal Nuncio (also known as an Apostolic Nuncio) is a permanent diplomatic representative (head of mission) of the Holy See to a state, having ambassadorial rank. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop heading a diocese of particular importance due to either its size, history, or both, called an archdiocese. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting Americas people from harm and its property from damage. ... Fidel Castro Ruz (born August 13, 1926) has been the leader of Cuba since 1959, when, leading the 26th of July Movement, he overthrew the regime of Fulgencio Batista. ... The yacht Granma Granma is the ship that transported the fighters of the Cuban Revolution to Cuba in 1956. ... ▶ (help· info) (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945) was Chancellor of Germany from 1933 and Führer (Leader) of Germany from 1934 to his death by suicide. ... Official FBI Seal The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force and intelligence agency which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... An almanac (also spelled almanack, especially in Commonwealth English) is an annual publication containing tabular information in a particular field or fields often arranged according to the calendar. ...

December 28, 2003

December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Parliamentary elections were held in the Republic of Serbia on December 28, 2003. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... The Serbian Radical Party (Serbian: Српска радикална странка, Srpska radikalna stranka) is a Fashist political party in Serbia. ... A General Election was held in Guatemala on 9 November 2003. ... Pres. ...

December 27, 2003

  • The estimate of the number of dead in the Bam earthquake increases to 40,000, according to the provincial governor. Iran has refused earthquake aid from Israel.[13]
  • The U.S. Department of Agriculture announces that it believes the BSE infected cow detected in Washington State was imported from Canada in 2001. The location of the other 73 cows imported with it is unknown. [14]
  • Romano Prodi, the President of the European Commission, survives a letter bomb attack. [15] [16]
  • British scientists are continuing their efforts to make contact with the Mars probe Beagle 2, which was designed to perform advanced studies of the Martian soil in an effort to find microbial life. [17]

December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bam (Persian: بم), pronounced [bæm], is a city in southern Iran, in Kerman Province, south of city of Kerman and north of the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... Official language(s) None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 18th 184,824 km² 385 km 580 km 6. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, with the District of Columbia, forms the United States of America. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Romano Prodi (born in Reggio Emilia on August 9, 1939) is an Italian politician and a former President of the European Commission. ... The President of the European Commission is notionally the highest ranking unelected official within the European Union. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... A mailbomb (or mail bomb), also called parcel bomb or letter bomb, is an explosive device sent via the postal service, and designed to explode when opened, injuring or killing the recipient, usually someone the sender has a personal grudge against, or more indiscriminately as part of a terrorist campaign. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... Beagle 2 was an unsuccessful British landing spacecraft that formed part of the European Space Agencys 2003 Mars Express mission. ...

December 26, 2003

  • A powerful earthquake occurs near the southern Iranian city of Bam at 0156 GMT (5.26am local time). The USGS estimates its magnitude as 6.7 on the Richter scale. The BBC reports that "70% of the modern city of Bam" is destroyed. Iranian government officials estimate the death toll at over 20,000 with a further 50,000 injured. Bam Citadel the largest adobe structure of the world is destroyed. The area of the citadel is about 180,000 square meters and the construction date of parts of it goes back for about 2500 years. [18][19][20]
  • The death toll in the Chinese gas-leak rises to 191. [21]
  • Fearing the state's BSE outbreak may extend beyond a single farm, the U.S. Department of Agriculture quarantines a second cattle farm in Washington State. [22]

December 26 is the 360th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, 361st in leap years. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes catastrophic movement of a part of the Earths surface. ... Bam (Persian: بم), pronounced [bæm], is a city in southern Iran, in Kerman Province, south of city of Kerman and north of the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... The Arg-é Bam (ارگ بم in Persian, Bam citadel) was the largest adobe building in the world, located in Bam, a city in the Kerman province of southeastern Iran. ... Renewal of the surface coating of an adobe wall in Chamisal, New Mexico Adobe is a building material composed of water, sandy clay and straw or other organic materials, which is shaped into bricks using wooden frames and dried in the sun . ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... Official language(s) None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 18th 184,824 km² 385 km 580 km 6. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, with the District of Columbia, forms the United States of America. ...

December 25, 2003

  • Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf survives a suicide bomber attack on his motorcade, the second attempt to assassinate him in two weeks. [23]
  • Following Beagle 2's expected landing, US probe Mars Odyssey (already in Martian orbit) listens for the lander's distinctive musical callsign. A further scan for the lander is conducted using the Jodrell Bank radio telescope. No signal is detected. [24][25]
  • Israeli-Palestinian Conflict:
    • An Israeli helicopter gunship attacks a car in Gaza City, killing Islamic Jihad commander Mekled Hameid and two fellow militants, together with two bystanders. [26]
    • A suicide-bomber strikes a bus stop Tel Aviv, killing four civilians and himself. [27]
    • Israel announces closure of the West Bank and Gaza. [28]
  • A UK lab confirms the presence of BSE in samples taken from a cow in Washington [29]. Mexico joins the list of countries which have banned imports of US beef.
  • Reports emerge of a major leak of natural gas in a gas field near the south-western Chinese city of Chongqing. Over 100 people are believed dead and up to 40,000 people have been evacuated from the area surrounding the leak. [30]
  • A Boeing 727 of United Transit Airlines originating in the Guinean capital, Conakry, stopping in Freetown, Sierra Leone, and bound for Beirut, clips a building during takeoff and crashes into the Atlantic Ocean off Benin. Over 100 people die, most of them Lebanese. [31]

December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A suicide bombing is a bomb attack on people or property, committed by a person who knows the explosion will cause his or her own death in addition to the attacks primary purpose (see suicide, suicide weapons). ... Beagle 2 was an unsuccessful British landing spacecraft that formed part of the European Space Agencys 2003 Mars Express mission. ... Artists concept of the 2001 Mars Odyssey Spacecraft 2001 Mars Odyssey is an unmanned spacecraft orbiting the planet Mars. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... The 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... The Parkes 64 metre radio telescope in New South Wales, Australia (the bigger of the two shown) In contrast to an ordinary telescope, which produces visible light images, a radio telescope sees radio waves emitted by radio sources, typically by means of a large parabolic (dish) antenna, or arrays of... Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip are at the center of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ... The article is about the Middle Eastern city. ... Islamic Jihad (Arabic: Harakat al-Jihad al-Islami) is a militant Islamist group based in the Syrian capital, Damascus. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Map of the Gaza Strip from The World Factbook. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... Natural gas (commonly referred to as gas in many countries, but note that gas is also an American and Canadian shortening of gasoline) is a gaseous fossil fuel consisting primarily of methane. ... Chongqing (Simplified Chinese: 重庆; Traditional Chinese: 重慶; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Chung-ching; Postal System Pinyin: Chungking) is the largest and most populous of the Peoples Republic of Chinas four provincial-level municipalities, and the only one in the less densely populated western half of China. ... Sun Country Airlines B727-200 The Boeing 727 is a large commercial jet airliner carrying as many as 189 passengers. ... Union des Transports Aeriens (UTA) (United Transit Airlines in the English language) was a French international airline. ... Conakry (also Konakry, Malinké Kɔnakiri), population 2,000,000 (2002), is the capital of Guinea. ... Freetown, population 1,070,200 (2004), is the largest city and capital of Sierra Leone, lying on the Freetown Peninsula on the Atlantic coast. ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut (Arabic: , transliterated Bayrūt - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ...

December 24, 2003

December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Baghdad within Iraq Baghdad (Arabic: , Persian: بغداد (Meaning in Persian : from angels) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... The Sheraton Ishtar is a hotel in Baghdad, Iraq. ... A rocket propelled grenade (RPG) is a man-portable, shoulder-launched weapon capable of firing an explosive device longer distances than an otherwise unassisted soldier could throw. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... Mabton is a city incorporated during the first few years of the 20th century, and located in Yakima County, Washington, at the eastern edge of the Yakama Indian reservation. ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal republic George... Beef A salt beef with mustard bagel Beef is meat obtained from a bovine. ... Air France Boeing 747 Air France (Compagnie Nationale Air France) is a subsidiary of Air France-KLM. Before the take-over of KLM, it was essentially the national airline of France, employing 71,654 people (at January 2005). ... The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. ... The City of Los Angeles (from Spanish; Los Ángeles) is the second-largest city in the United States in terms of population, as well as one of the worlds most important economic, cultural, and entertainment centers. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: United States Wikinews has news related to this article: United States United States government CIA World Factbook Entry for United States House. ... Carlos Diego Mesa Gisbert (born August 12, 1953) was the President of Bolivia from October 17, 2003 until his resignation on June 6, 2005. ...

December 23, 2003

December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Supreme Court Building in Ottawa The Supreme Court of Canada (French: Cour suprême du Canada) is Canadas highest court and is located in the capital city of Ottawa. ... Species Cannabis indica Cannabis ruderalis Cannabis sativa Cannabis is a genus of flowering plant that includes one or more species. ... The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... City seal Yakima (IPA: ) is a city in central Washington and the county seat of Yakima County, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 71,845 and a metropolitan of 229,094. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) Seal of the Governor of California (without the Roman numerals designating the governors sequence) See also: List of pre-statehood governors of California, List of Governors of California The Governor of California is the highest executive authority... â–¶ (help· info) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Actor, and Republican politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... ... Location in the state of California Formed 1850 Seat San Luis Obispo Area  - Total  - Water 9,364 km² (3,616 mi²) 806 km² (311 mi²) 8. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes catastrophic movement of a part of the Earths surface. ... Locations of the 15 sniper attacks numbered chronologically. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... This article may be confusing for some readers, and should be edited to be clearer. ... Life imprisonment is a term used for a particular kind of sentence of imprisonment. ... Parole can have different meanings depending on the context. ... Lee Boyd Malvo Lee Boyd Malvo (alias John Lee Malvo) (born February 18, 1985), along with John Allen Muhammad, was arrested on October 24, 2002 in connection with the Beltway sniper attacks. ... In the criminal law, murder is the crime where one human being causes the death of another human being, without lawful excuse, and with intent to kill or with an intent to cause grievous bodily harm (traditionally termed malice aforethought) (see attempted murder where the mens rea (the Latin for...

December 22, 2003

December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The FCCs official seal. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... News Corporation (abbreviated to News Corp) NYSE: NWS is one of the worlds largest media conglomerates. ... DirecTV Group Inc. ... DirecTV is a direct broadcast satellite (DBS) service that transmits digital satellite television and audio to households in the United States and the rest of the Americas. ... You may be looking for the arena found in Vancouver, see GM place General Motors Corporation NYSE: GM, also known as GM, is a United States-based automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... The renminbi (Traditional Chinese: 人民幣, Simplified Chinese: 人民币, literally means peoples currency) is the official currency of the Peoples Republic of China. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Parmalat SpA, an Italian dairy and food company and Europes biggest dairy company, was declared bankrupt in late 2003. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Italy. ... â–¶ (help· info) (born September 29, 1936) is the current Prime Minister of Italy. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister who helps form the governmental foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ... Ahmed Maher (born 1935) was the foreign minister of Egypt from 2001 until 2004. ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... Prayer is an effort to communicate with God, or to some deity or deities, or another form of spiritual entity, or otherwise, either to offer praise, to make a request, or simply to express ones thoughts and emotions. ... Al-Aqsa Mosque The Al-Aqsa Mosque (Arabic: المسجد الاقصى, â–¶ (help· info), literally the farthest mosque), is part of the complex of religious buildings in Jerusalem known as either the Majed Mount or Al-Haram al-Sharif (the Noble Sanctuary) to Muslims and the Har ha-Bayit (Temple Mount) to Jews and... Emblem of the Municipality of Jerusalem Jerusalem and the Old City. ... The Magen David Adom emblem The Magen David Adom is Israels national emergency medical, disaster, ambulance and blood bank service. ... The following is a partial list of people who have declined a British honour, such as a knighthood or an Order of the British Empire. ... The Sunday Times is the name of several Sunday newspapers. ... David Bowie David Bowie (born David Robert Jones on January 8, 1947) is an English rock musician and actor. ... David Hockney,CH (born July 9, 1937) is a British artist, based in California. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was a British writer who emigrated to the United States. ... The Honourable Nigella Lucy Lawson (born January 6, 1960) is a British journalist, cookery writer and television presenter. ... Harold Pinter Harold Pinter, CH, CBE (born October 10, 1930) is a British playwright and theatre director. ... ... An infidel Is an unbeliever with respect to a particular religion, especially Christianity or Islam. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... On March 7, 2003, the SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera Systems) filed a $1 billion lawsuit in the US against IBM for allegedly devaluing its version of the UNIX operating system. ... The SCO Group, Inc. ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a controversial United States copyright law which criminalizes production and dissemination of technology that can circumvent measures taken to protect copyright, not merely infringement of copyright itself, and heightens the penalties for copyright infringement on the Internet. ... Linus Benedict Torvalds (born December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish software engineer best known for initiating the development of Linux. ... The Linux mascot Tux created by Larry Ewing The Linux kernel is a free software Unix-like operating system kernel that was begun by Linus Torvalds in 1991 and subsequently improved with the assistance of developers around the world. ... A mailing list is a collection of names and addresses used by an individual or an organization to send material to multiple recipients. ... Novell, Inc. ... Wikibooks has more about this subject: Guide to UNIX Unix or UNIX is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1960s and 1970s by a group of AT&T Bell Labs employees including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and Douglas McIlroy. ... Global earthquake epicenters, 1963–1998 An earthquake is a sudden and sometimes catastrophic movement of a part of the Earths surface. ... San Simeon (ZIP Code: 93452) is a settlement on the Pacific coast of San Luis Obispo County, California notable in two respects: Its position along Pacific Coast Highway is almost precisely halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, each of those towns being roughly 230 mi (370 km) away. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... Time zones are areas of the Earth that have adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ... Paso Robles (full name: El Paso de Robles) is a city located in San Luis Obispo County, California. ...

December 21, 2003

December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A watch Attempting to understand time has long been a prime occupation for philosophers, scientists and artists. ... A collection of magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles, generally financed by advertising and/or purchase by readers. ... Person of the Year is an annual issue of U.S. newsmagazine TIME that features a profile ostensibly on the man, woman, couple, group, idea, place, or machine that for better or worse, has most influenced events in the preceding year. ... An Editor is a person who prepares text—typically language, but also images and sounds—for publication by correcting, condensing, or otherwise modifying it. ... ... A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment (such as a uniform and weapon) to defend that country or its interests. ... The armed forces of the United States of America consist of the United States Army United States Navy United States Air Force United States Marine Corps United States Coast Guard Note: The United States Coast Guard has both military and law enforcement functions. ... The United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is a Cabinet department of the federal government of the United States that is concerned with protecting the American homeland and the safety of American citizens. ... The exact definition of terrorism is highly controversial. ... Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor, née Spencer) (1 July 1961–31 August 1997) was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales. ... The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Clarence House, London Clarence House is a royal home in London, situated in The Mall. ... The Prince of Wales The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (Charles Philip Arthur George Mountbatten-Windsor) (born 14 November 1948), is the eldest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. ... Mohamed Abdel Moneim Fayed (Arabic: محمد الفايد ) (b. ... Emad El-Din Mohamed Abdel Moneim Fayed (April 15, 1955 - August 31, 1997) was the son of Mohamed Al-Fayed, owner of the British department store Harrods and the Hôtel Ritz Paris. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) (est 1975) (Kurdish: Yaketi Nishtimani Kurdistan) // Mission The Patriotic Union of Kurdistan has been working for self-determination, human rights, democracy and peace for the Kurdish people of Iraq, since its establishment in 1 June 1975. ... Uday Hussein Uday Saddam Hussein al-Tikriti (June 18, 1964 – July 22, 2003) Arabic: عدي صدام حسين; also transliterated as Odai) was the eldest son of Saddam Hussein, the deposed president of Iraq, and his first wife, Sajida Talfah. ... Wesley Clark Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general in the U.S. Army. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Official languages English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Senators Lindsey Graham (R) Jim DeMint (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 6 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012,012 51. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 305 km 80 km 25. ...

December 20, 2003

  • The Holy See announces plans to beatify the last Austro-Hungarian emperor Karl. Karl, who was overthrown in 1918 and died in exile in 1922, is expected to be beatified, a step to sainthood, in the next year. Karl's widow, Zita of Bourbon-Parma died in 1989. His son, former Crown Prince Otto von Habsburg was until recently a German MEP. [70] [71]
  • CCTV footage at Hampton Court Palace near London, once home of King Henry VIII of England, is released, and claimed to show a "ghost". The footage, taken in October 2003, shows a man in 16th century clothes closing a firedoor that had blown open. The palace markets itself as one of Britain's most haunted locations. [72] [73]
  • Celebrations marking the Bicentennial of the Louisiana Purchase culminate in New Orleans, Louisiana. [74]
  • Irish charity fundraiser John O'Shea attacks Manchester United football manager Sir Alex Ferguson as "greedy" for demanding £90,000 to attend a cancer charity function in Ireland in 1999. According to O'Shea, a sports celebrity demanding 'appearance money' from a charity is unheard of in his experience. Ferguson's appearance fee amounted to half the money raised. The fundraisers, until now unaware that Ferguson had taken half the proceeds, denounce his behaviour and say if they had known about it at the time they would have cancelled the event.
  • Former Argentinian president Carlos Menem is charged with tax fraud for failing to declare a Swiss bank account containing $600,000. If convicted he could be debarred from public office. [75]
  • The World Court says it will hear legal arguments about Israel's construction of a controversial barrier in the West Bank to separate Israeli and Palestinian areas. The hearings will begin on 23 February 2004. [76]
  • Spanish Prime Minister José María Aznar pays a surprise visit to Spanish troops in Iraq. [77]
  • Massive landslides in the Philippines caused by heavy rain result in the deaths of up to 90 people. [78]
  • A Malaysian opposition website is shut down by its British web-hosting company amid claims of "political censorship" from the opposition. [79]
  • Zimbabwean opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai tells his supporters to "fight fear" as they campaign against President Robert Mugabe. His comments follow the decision of Zimbabwe's police to occupy the offices of Zimbabwe's only privately owned newspaper in defiance of a court order that the newspaper could resume publication. [80]
  • Eleven people, mainly young people from Germany, die in a bus crash in Belgium. [81]
  • In Comoros, leaders signed an agreement clearing the way for legislative elections in April. [82]

December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In Catholicism, beatification (from Latin beatus, blessed, via Greek μακαριος, makarios) is a recognition accorded by the church of a dead persons accession to Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in their name (intercession of saints). ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... An emperor is a (male) monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. ... Karl I, a. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ... From left to right: Otto von Habsburg, his son Karl, Cardinal Mindszenty and Ottos mother Zita in 1972 Zita of Bourbon-Parma (German: Zita von Bourbon-Parma) (May 9, 1892 - March 14, 1989) was the last Empress of Austria and Queen of Hungary. ... Crown Princess redirects here, for the ship, see Crown Princess (ship). ... Otto von Habsburg (as citizen of Germany) or Otto Habsburg-Lothringen (as citizen of Austria), sometimes known as Archduke Otto of Austria (Franz Josef Otto Robert Maria Anton Karl Max Heinrich Sixtus Xavier Felix René Ludwig Gaetano Pius Ignazius von Habsburg), born November 20, 1912, is the current head of... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP) is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... Closed-circuit cameras are often used to discourage crime Closed-circuit television (CCTV), as a collection surveillance cameras doing video surveillance, is the use of television cameras for surveillance. ... The clock tower straddles the entrance between the inner and outer courts Hampton Court Palace is a former royal place on the north bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames about 12 miles (19 km) southwest and upstream of Central London, nowadays open to... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Reputed ghost of a monk. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... From Frank Bond, Louisiana and the Louisiana Purchase. ... New Orleans (local pronunciations: , , or ) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced in standard French accent) is a major U.S. port city and historically the largest city in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... John OShea can refer to: John OShea (footballer) John OShea (director) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Manchester United Football Club is an English football club, based at Old Trafford Football Ground in Manchester, Lancashire. ... Sir Alex Ferguson (born Alexander Chapman Ferguson December 31, 1941 in Govan, Glasgow) is a Scottish football manager and former player, currently managing Manchester United F.C. He has won more trophies than any other manager in the history of English football and been in charge of Manchester United for... When normal cells are damaged beyond repair, they are eliminated by apoptosis. ... Motto: En Unión y Libertad (English: In Union and Liberty) Anthem: Himno Nacional Argentino Capital Buenos Aires Largest city Buenos Aires Official language(s) Spanish Government President Democratic Republic Néstor Kirchner Independence - May Revolution - Declared - Recognised from Spain 25 May 1810 9 July 1816 in 1821 (by Portugal... Carlos Saúl Menem (born July 2, 1930) was President of Argentina from July 8, 1989 to December 10, 1999 for the Justicialist Party (Peronist). ... The World Court refers collectively to the Permanent Court of International Justice (PCIJ) and its successor the International Court of Justice (ICJ). ... The term Palestinian has other usages, for which see definitions of Palestinian. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister A prime minister may be either: chief or leading member of the cabinet of the top-level government in a country having a parliamentary system of government; or the official, in countries with a semi-presidential system of government, appointed to manage the... â–¶ (help· info) (born February 25, 1953, in Madrid, Spain) was Prime Minister of Spain from 1996 to 2004. ... The front page of the English Wikipedia Website. ... Morgan Tsvangirai - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Robert Mugabe Robert Gabriel Mugabe KCB (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... TheBus, established by Mayor Frank Fasi, is Honolulus only public transit system. ...

December 19, 2003

December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Parmalat SpA, an Italian dairy and food company and Europes biggest dairy company, was declared bankrupt in late 2003. ... Colonel Muammar al-Qaddafi Muammar Abu Minyar al-Qaddafi 1 (Arabic: معمر القذافي Mu`ammar al-Qadhdhāfī) (born 1942), leader of Libya since 1970 and a controversial Arab statesman. ... Look up country in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) generally include nuclear, biological, chemical and, increasingly, radiological weapons. ... For the tower in Miami, see Freedom Tower (Miami) The Freedom Tower is the name given to the planned centerpiece building of the new World Trade Center complex in New York City, whose predecessors were destroyed in the attacks of September 11, 2001. ... The World Trade Center in New York City (sometimes informally referred to as the WTC) was a complex of seven buildings designed by Japanese-American architect Minoru Yamasaki and leased by Larry Silverstein from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey around a central plaza, near the south... NYC and New York, New York redirect here. ... A foot (plural: feet) is a non-SI unit of distance or length, measuring around a third of a metre. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is a document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal republic George... L. Paul Bremer Lewis Paul Bremer III, known as Paul Bremer and Jerry among his friends, (born September 30, 1941) was named Director of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance for post-war Iraq following the Iraq War of 2003, replacing Jay Garner on May 6, 2003[1]. In his role as... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Prime Minister of Japan (内閣総理大臣 Naikaku sōri daijin) is the English political nomenclature of the head of government of Japan. ... Junichiro Koizumi Junichiro Koizumi (Japanese: 小泉純一郎, Koizumi Junichirō, born January 8, 1942) is the current Prime Minister of Japan. ... Vancouver International Airport (IATA: YVR, ICAO: CYVR) is located about 15 kilometres driving distance from downtown Vancouver, British Columbia on Sea Island in Richmond. ... Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. ... The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) A virus is a microscopic parasite that infects cells in biological organisms. ... World map showing Asia. ... The Australian dollar, AUD or A$, is the official currency of the Commonwealth of Australia, including the Australian Antarctic Territory, Christmas Island, Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Heard Island and McDonald Islands and Norfolk Island, as well as the independent Pacific island states of Kiribati, Nauru and Tuvalu. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... The Hon. ... The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is the trade group that represents the U.S. recording industry. ... File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... A subpoena (pronounced suh-pee-nuh) is a writ commanding a person to appear under penalty (from Latin). ... This article or section should include material from Bell Atlantic This article or section should include material from GTE Verizon Communications (NYSE: VZ) is a local exchange telephone company formed by the merger of Bell Atlantic, a former Bell Operating Company, and GTE, which was the largest independant local exchange... A peer-to-peer (or P2P) computer network is a network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than concentrating it in a relatively few servers. ... Beagle 2 was an unsuccessful British landing spacecraft that formed part of the European Space Agencys 2003 Mars Express mission. ... The European Space Agency (ESA), established in 1975,is an inter-governmental organisation dedicated to exploration of space with currently 17 member states. ... Concept model of the Mars Express spacecraft Mars Express is a Mars exploration mission of the European Space Agency and the first planetary mission attempted by the agency. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... December 25 is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 6 days remaining. ... The Daily News is the name of several daily newspapers. ... Same-sex marriage was legalized across Canada by the Civil Marriage Act enacted on July 20, 2005. ... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English, French (in some areas) Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 4th 1,076,395... This article is about the year. ... In law, a class action is an equitable procedural device used in litigation for determining the rights of and remedies, if any, for large numbers of people whose cases involve common questions of law and fact. ... In modern society, gay is a word which can be used as either a noun or adjective. ... Lesbian describes a homosexual woman. ... The University of Delaware (UD OR UDel) is the largest university in the state of Delaware. ... Colgate in mid-August, towards the end of Autumn. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...

December 18, 2003

December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... NASA Logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... The Spitzer Space Telescope Facility launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Monday, Aug. ... Lyman Spitzer Lyman Spitzer, Jr. ... Elephants Trunk nebula - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Bodes Galaxy, also known as M81 and NGC 3031, is a spiral galaxy located 12 million light years from Earth in the Ursa Major constellation. ... Terrorism is the unconventional use of violence for political gain. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... José Padilla (also known as Abdullah al-Muhajir) (born October 18, 1970) of Puerto Rican descent, is accused of being a terrorist by the United States government. ... ... The term dirty bomb is most often used to refer to a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD), a radiological weapon which combines radioactive material with conventional explosives. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the name given to a worldwide network of militant Islamist organizations under the leadership of Osama bin Laden. ... Unlawful combatant (also illegal combatant or unprivileged combatant) describes a person who engages in combat without meeting the requirements for a lawful belligerent according to the laws of war as specified in the Third Geneva Convention. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Appeal. ... Unlawful combatant (also illegal combatant or unprivileged combatant) describes a person who engages in combat without meeting the requirements for a lawful belligerent according to the laws of war as specified in the Third Geneva Convention. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Camp Delta. ... A pre-9/11 view of The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Saddam shortly after capture. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Johann Mühlegg is a German-born top level cross-country skier who has competed in several international competitions representing Spain after becoming a Spanish citizen in 1999. ... Olga Danilova (born June 10, 1970) is an athlete who competes in nordic skiing events for Russia. ... Cross-country skiing (also known as XC skiing) is a winter sport popular in many countries with large snowfields, primarily Northern Europe and Canada. ... (Redirected from 2002 Winter Olympic Games) The XIX Olympic Winter Games were held in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Doping drugs on display at The Olympic Museum in Lausanne, Switzerland In sports, doping refers to the use of performance-enhancing drugs, such as anabolic steroids, particularly those that are forbidden by the organizations that regulate competitions. ... Darbepoetin alfa is a drug, a synthetic hormone, that increases red blood cell levels, and is used to treat anemia and related conditions. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... January 16 is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For more detail of Sharons recent illness, see Illnesses of Ariel Sharon; for an overview, see Health problems. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... The road map for peace is a plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict proposed by a quartet of international entities: the United States, the European Union, Russia, and the United Nations. ... Alternate meanings: See Red hat Red Hat, Inc. ... Sistina Software was an organization that focused on storage solutions architected around a Linux platform. ... Khartoum (Arabic الخرطوم al-Ḫará¹­Å«m elephant trunk) is the capital of Sudan, as well as the capital of the state of Khartoum. ... Al Jazeera logo Al Jazeera (الجزيرة), meaning The Island or The (Arabian) Peninsula (whence also Algiers) is an Arabic television channel based in Qatar. ...

December 17, 2003

December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tux is the official Linux mascot. ... The Linux mascot Tux created by Larry Ewing The Linux kernel is a free software Unix-like operating system kernel that was begun by Linus Torvalds in 1991 and subsequently improved with the assistance of developers around the world. ... Linus Benedict Torvalds (born December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland) is a Finnish software engineer best known for initiating the development of Linux. ... Saddam shortly after capture. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Seal of the United States Department of Defense The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate, and is a member of the Cabinet. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a US politician currently serving as the 21st United States Secretary of Defense since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Development of the Geneva Conventions from 1864 to 1949 The Geneva Conventions consist of four treaties formulated in Geneva, Switzerland that set the standards for international law for humanitarian concerns. ... Map of Cuba with location of Guantánamo Bay indicated. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Location of Baghdad within Iraq Baghdad (Arabic: , Persian: بغداد (Meaning in Persian : from angels) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... The exact definition of terrorism is highly controversial. ... November 17 (also known as 17N or N17) was a Marxist Greek organisation listed in U.S. State Department list of Foreign Terrorist Organizations. ... Thomas Kean Thomas Howard Kean (born April 21, 1935) was the Republican Governor of New Jersey from 1982 to 1990. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... Ian Kevin Huntley (born 31 January 1974 in Grimsby, U.K.) is a former school caretaker, who in 2003 was convicted of murdering two schoolgirls - Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman - in a case that is known as the Soham murders. ... Maxine Carr was Ian Huntleys girlfriend at the time he committed the August 4, 2002 Soham murders. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Soham murders were the murders by Ian Huntley of two ten-year-old girls (Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman) in Soham, a small town in Cambridgeshire, England, on August 4, 2002. ... The Soham murders were the murders by Ian Huntley of two ten-year-old girls (Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman) in Soham, a small town in Cambridgeshire, England, on August 4, 2002. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... For the Sanskrit word Soham Soham is a small town in the English county of Cambridgeshire. ... Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is an atypical form of pneumonia. ... The National Weather Service (NWS) is one of the six scientific agencies that make up the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States government. ... Earth, also known as Terra, and Tellus mostly in the 19th century, is the third-closest planet to the Sun. ... The Sun is the star at the center of our Solar system. ... Peter Jackson in New York (USA), at the premiere of King Kong, December 5, 2005 Peter Jackson is also a brand of cigarettes owned by Imperial Tobacco and a mens clothing store that sells suits in Australia. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... The One Ring, as envisaged by Gerald Stiehler The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy saga by British author J. R. R. Tolkien, his magnum opus (disputed — see talk page) and a sequel to his well-received earlier work, The Hobbit. ... World map showing Europe Europe is conventionally considered one of the seven continents which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiogeographic one. ... Titanic is a 1997 dramatic film released by Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox. ... Image of Kinshasa and Brazzaville, taken by NASA. Brazzaville (population 600,000) is the capital and largest city of the Republic of the Congo and is located on the Congo River. ... Blood transfusion is the taking of blood or blood-based products from one individual and inserting them into the circulatory system of another. ... The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... George Homer Ryan (born February 24, 1934 in Maquoketa, Iowa) was the governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1999 until 2003. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Official languages English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich (D) Senators Richard Durbin (D) Barack Obama (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 4. ... The following is a list of Governors of the State of Connecticut, from the Colonial period through present day. ... John Grosvenor Rowland (born May 24, 1957 in Waterbury, Connecticut) was the Governor of Connecticut from 1995 to 2004. ... Islam is the second largest religion in France, with approximately 4 million people with a Muslim cultural or ethnic background, of which an estimated 1. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ... â–¶ (help· info), (born November 29, 1932 in Paris) is a French politician who is currently President of the French Republic. ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי transliterated: Yehudi) is used in many ways but generally refers to a follower of Judaism, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity; and often a combination of these attributes. ... A yarmulke (also yarmulka, yarmelke) (Yiddish יאַרמלקע yarmlke) or Kippah (Hebrew כִּפָּה kippāh, plural kippot) is a thin, usually slightly rounded cloth cap worn by Jews. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion centered on the stories it teaches about the life, and actions of Jesus Christ according to the Christians book of faith, the New Testiment. ... A cross is a geometrical figure consisting of two lines or bars intersecting each other at a 90° angle, dividing one or two of the lines in half. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with 30 days. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Space exploration is the physical exploration of outer space objects and generally anything that involves the technologies, science, and politics regarding space endeavors. ... Space tourism is the recent phenomenon of space travel by individuals for the purpose of personal pleasure. ... The Wright Brothers, Orville Wright (August 19, 1871 - January 30, 1948) and Wilbur Wright (April 16, 1867 - May 30, 1912), are sometimes credited with the design and construction of the first practical aeroplane, and making the first controllable, powered heavier-than-air flight along with many other aviation milestones. ... SpaceShipOne is small, having a three-person cabin and short but wide wings. ... A sub-orbital spaceflight (or sub-orbital flight) is a spaceflight that does not involve putting a vehicle into orbit. ... A spaceplane is a rocket plane designed to pass the edge of space. ... Space Adventures Ltd. ... ISS Statistics Crew: 2 As of August 21, 2005 Perigee: 352. ... This article is about general United States currency. ...

December 16, 2003

December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Space Adventures Ltd. ... Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft approaching International Space Station Soyuz 19 spacecraft as seen from Apollo CM Soyuz spacecraft of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) Early 7K-OK Soyuz at National Space Centre, Leicester, England Soyuz (Soyus, Союз, union) is a series of spacecraft designed by Sergey Korolev for the Soviet... ISS Statistics Crew: 2 As of August 21, 2005 Perigee: 352. ... Saddam shortly after capture. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... Rep. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: צבא ההגנה לישראל Tsva Ha-Haganah Le-Yisrael ([Army] Force [for] the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels armed forces (army, air force and navy). ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Polish missile wz. ... Combatants U.S.-led coalition Iraq Commanders General Norman Schwarzkopf, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Colin Powell Saddam Hussein Strength Casualties The 1991 Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of approximately 30 nations mandated by the United Nations and led by the United... The French Navy commando Jaubert storm the Alcyon in a mock assault. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Dubai or Dubayy (in Arabic: دبيّ, IPA , generally in English) refers to either one of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates on the Arabian Peninsula, or that emirates main city, sometimes called Dubai City to distinguish it from the emirate. ... Al-Arabiya is an Arabic-language satellite news channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates which began broadcasting in February 2003, launched with an investment of $300 million from the Saudi-owned MBC, the Lebanese Hariri Group, and others. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Main article: League of Nations The term United Nations was coined by Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II, to refer to the Allies. ... A large number of international organizations and other bodies have a secretary general or secretary-general as their chief administrative officers or in other administrative capacities. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... A session of the Security Council in progress The United Nations Security Council is the most powerful organ of the United Nations. ... Mission Santa Barbara, known as the queen of the missions. Santa Barbara is a city in California, United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... December 18 is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Stansted Airport (IATA: STN, ICAO: EGSS) is a medium-sized passenger airport with a single runway, located in the English county of Essex about thirty miles north of London. ... London Heathrow Airport (IATA: LHR, ICAO: EGLL), often referred to simply as Heathrow, is the United Kingdoms busiest and best-connected airport. ... There is also a Birmingham International Airport in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Emergency contraception or EC refers to any type of contraception that is taken after unprotected sexual intercourse or after sexual intercourse during which the primary contraception is believed to have failed (e. ... A medical prescription (â„ž) is an order (often in written form) by a qualified health care professional to a pharmacist or other therapist for a treatment to be provided to their patient. ...

December 15, 2003

December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wesley Clark Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general in the U.S. Army. ... Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević, on trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, The Hague Slobodan MiloÅ¡ević â–¶ (help· info) (Serbian: Слободан Милошевић, pronounced []; born 20 August 1941) is a former President of Serbia and of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia as well as leader of the Socialist Party of Serbia. ... The International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia since 1991, more commonly referred to as the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, acronym ICTY, is a body of the United Nations (UN) established... Colin Luther Powell, (born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 23, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... Prostate cancer is a disease in which cancer develops in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. ... Saddam shortly after capture. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... A large number of international organizations and other bodies have a Secretary General or Secretary-General as their chief administrative officers or in other administrative capacities. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Capital punishment, also referred to as the death penalty, is the judicially ordered execution of a prisoner as a punishment for a serious crime, often called a capital offense or a capital crime. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Safeway was a chain of 479 supermarkets and convenience stores in the UK that is now part of Wm Morrison Supermarkets. ... A shop that sells food, either a Supermarket or a much smaller place. ... Morrisons is a chain of supermarkets in the UK. It is operated by the company Wm Morrison Supermarkets plc. ... Main article: League of Nations The term United Nations was coined by Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II, to refer to the Allies. ...

December 14, 2003

  • Occupation of Iraq:
    • Iraq's Civil Administrator L. Paul Bremer announces that Saddam Hussein was captured by US forces. Saddam was found approximately 15 km south of his home town of Tikrit at 2030 local time on December 13. Hussein was captured without resistance in a so-called "spider-hole" at a farmhouse in the town of ad-Dawr. He is in Coalition custody at an undisclosed location. At a press conference, Bremer presents video of Saddam in custody with a full beard, which is later shown removed. Bremer says that Saddam is in good health and is being "co-operative and talkative". He says that Saddam will "face justice" before an Iraqi court and under Iraqi law. [151] [152] [153] [154]
    • In an address to his nation, US president George W. Bush comments on the capture of Saddam, "Now the former dictator of Iraq will face the justice he denied to millions." [155]
    • British Prime Minister Tony Blair welcomes the capture of Saddam, urging the Iraqi people "to reach out and to reconcile." Other world leaders offer similar sentiments: Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov says that the arrest "will contribute to the strengthening of security in Iraq and to the process of political regulation in the country," while UN Secretary General Kofi Annan comments that Saddam's capture provides a chance "to give fresh impetus to the search for peace and stability in Iraq". [156] [157]
    • A car bomb explodes at a police station in Khaldiyah, 60 km west of Baghdad, killing at least 17 and wounding 30. [158]
  • Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf narrowly escapes a bombing. "The president's motorcade passed a minute before the blast", according to officials. [159]
  • In an interview with The Washington Post newspaper, a 78-year-old African-American Los Angeles woman claims to be the illegitimate daughter of the late U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond. [160]
  • The famous Italian opera house La Fenice in Venice reopens after being destroyed by fire in 1996. It was rebuilt at the cost of 90mn.[161]
  • Jason White, quarterback of the University of Oklahoma Sooners, wins the Heisman Trophy, awarded to the best player in college football. [162]

December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... L. Paul Bremer Lewis Paul Bremer III, known as Paul Bremer and Jerry among his friends, (born September 30, 1941) was named Director of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance for post-war Iraq following the Iraq War of 2003, replacing Jay Garner on May 6, 2003[1]. In his role as... Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti, (Arabic ), born April 28, 1937 , was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... Tikrit (تكريت, also transliterated as Takrit or Tekrit) is a town in Iraq, located 140 km northwest of Baghdad on the Tigris river (at 34. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A spider hole A spider hole is military slang for a small one-person foxhole, often camouflaged so that it can be used for ambushes. ... Ad-Dawr is a small agricultural town near the Iraqi town of Tikrit, Saddam Husseins birthplace. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Washington Post is the largest and oldest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The City of Los Angeles (from Spanish; Los Ángeles) is the second-largest city in the United States in terms of population, as well as one of the worlds most important economic, cultural, and entertainment centers. ... Illegitimacy was a term in common usage for the condition of being born of parents who are not validly married to one another; the legal term is bastardy. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Teatro La Fenice (the phoenix) is an opera house in Venice, Italy. ... Location within Italy Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venessia in the local dialect), the city of canals, is the capital of the region of Veneto and of the province of Venice, 45°26′N 12°19′E, population 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... The euro (symbol: €; banking code: EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, the Republic of Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... Jason White (born June 19, 1980) was a quarterback for the University of Oklahoma football team (1999-2004). ... The quarterback is a position in the offensive backfield of American and Canadian football, directly behind players of the line. He is generally the leader of the offensive team when it is on the field, responsible for initiating play by receiving the snap of the ball from the center. ... The University of Oklahoma (OU) is an institution of higher learning located in Oklahoma. ... The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award, named after former college football player and coach John W. Heisman, is considered the most prestigious award in American college football and is given annually to the top player in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ...

December 13, 2003

December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ... The Strait of Gibraltar as seen from space. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will a Leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... Lord Patten of Barnes The Right Honourable Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944) is a prominent British Conservative politician. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... In music, a tenor is a male singer with a high voice (although not as high as a countertenor). ... Luciano Pavarotti The Italian tenor Luciano Pavarotti (born October 12, 1935), is one of the most famous living singers, not only in the world of opera, but across all genres. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... â–¶ (help· info) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Actor, and Republican politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... An armistice is the effective end of a war, when the warring parties agree to stop fighting. ...

December 12, 2003

December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Osama bin Laden, leader of al-Qaeda Al-Qaeda (Arabic: , el-Qā‘idah or al-Qā‘idah; the foundation or the base) is the name given to an international Islamic fundamentalist campaign comprised of independent and collaborative cells that all profess the same cause of reducing outside influence upon Islamic... Since its inception, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Nazism. ... Concentration camp inmates during the Holocaust The Holocaust was Nazi Germanys systematic genocide (ethnic cleansing) of various ethnic, religious, national, and secular groups during World War II. Early elements include the Kristallnacht pogrom and the T-4 Euthanasia Program established by Hitler that killed some 200,000 people. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda... When normal cells are damaged beyond repair, they are eliminated by apoptosis. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... A monarch (see sovereign) is a type of ruler or head of state. ... British Columbia Ferry Services Inc. ... Arbitration, in the law, is a form of alternative dispute resolution — specifically, a legal alternative to litigation whereby the parties to a dispute agree to submit their respective positions (through agreement or hearing) to a neutral third party (the arbitrator(s) or arbiter(s)) for resolution. ... Emblem of the Brussels-Capital Region Flag of The City of Brussels Brussels (French: Bruxelles, Dutch: Brussel, German: Brüssel) is the capital of Belgium, the French community of Belgium, the Flemish community and of the European Union. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, (born August 28, 1938 in Windsor, Ontario) is the 21st Prime Minister of Canada, succeeding Jean Chrétien on December 12, 2003. ... The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), the head of the Government of Canada, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Cabinet of Canada (French: Cabinet du Canada) plays an important role in the Canadian government in accordance with the Westminster System. ... Anne McLellan, Deputy Prime Minister (2003-Present) The Deputy Prime Minister of Canada (French: Vice-premier ministre du Canada) is an honourary position in the Canadian government, conferred at the discretion of the Prime Minister on a member of the Cabinet. ... The Honourable A. Anne McLellan, P.C. , M.P. , LL.M. , LL.B. , B.A. (born August 31, 1950, in Hants County, Nova Scotia) is the Deputy Prime Minister of Canada. ... In the Cabinet of Canada, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness is responsible for overseeing the federal governments domestic security department, Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada. ... The Honourable Ralph Edward Goodale , PC , BA , LL.B The Honourable Ralph Edward Goodale, PC , BA , LL.B (born October 5, 1949, in Regina, Saskatchewan) is Canadas current Minister of Finance. ... The Minister of Finance is one of the most important positions in the Cabinet of Canada. ... The Honourable Pierre Stewart Pettigrew, PC , MP (born in Quebec City on April 18, 1951) is a Canadian politician. ... The post of Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs is the member of the Cabinet of Canada resposible for the federal governments relations with the governments of the provinces and territories of Canada. ... The Honourable Lucienne Robillard, PC, MP (born June 16, 1945) is a Canadian politician and Cabinet minister. ... The Honourable Irwin Cotler PC, MP, OC, BA, BCL, LLD, PhD is Canadas Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada. ... Minister of Justice of Canada is the minister in the Cabinet of Canada who is responsible for the Department of Justice and is also Attorney General of Canada. ... Bill Graham The Honourable William C. (Bill) Graham, PC, MP, Q.C., B.A.(Hon. ... In the Cabinet of Canada, the Minister of Foreign Affairs is responsible for overseeing the federal governments international relations department, Foreign Affairs Canada. ... The Honourable David Pratt, PC , BA (born January 3, 1955) is a Canadian politician. ... The Minister of National Defence (French: Ministre de la Défense nationale) is the Canadian politician within the Cabinet of Canada responsible for the Department of National Defence which oversees the military of Canadas Canadian Forces. ... Jean-Bertrand Aristide (born July 15, 1953) is a Haitian politician and former Roman Catholic priest who was President of Haiti in 1991, from 1994 to 1996, and again from 2001 to 2004. ... Mick Jagger, seen here on Box of Pin Ups, 1964. ... Maariv (Hebrew evening) is a daily newspaper in Israel. ... For more detail of Sharons recent illness, see Illnesses of Ariel Sharon; for an overview, see Health problems. ... Various anti-tank and anti-personal land mines A landmine is a type of self-contained explosive device which is placed onto or into the ground, exploding when triggered by a vehicle or person. ...

December 11, 2003

December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A KMail folder full of spam emails collected over a few days. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 35th 110,862 km² 320 km 690 km 7. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Electronic voting machine used in all Brazilian elections and plebiscites. ... A pre-9/11 view of The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... Halliburton Energy Services NYSE: HAL is a multinational corporation based in Houston, Texas. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941), widely known as Dick Cheney is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States under President George W. Bush. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 75 24 Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 2nd 1,542,056 km² 11. ... City motto: Concordia Salus (Latin: Well-being through harmony) Province Quebec Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area  - % water 366. ... Motto: « Don de Dieu feray valoir Â» (I shall put Gods gift to good use) Site in the province of Quebec Official logo Provincial region Province Country Capitale-Nationale Quebec Canada Gentilé Québécois, Québécoise Mayor Andrée Boucher Jan. ... The front of the Ursulines Monastary, on Ursulines Street. ... The Honourable John James Jean Charest (sha-ræ), PC, MNA (born June 24, 1958) is a Quebecois lawyer and politician. ... Overview The United States has the largest economy by country, second-largest by economic union (after the EU), and most technologically powerful economy in the world, with a per capita GDP of $39,689 (2nd Quarter 2004 annualized) . In this market-oriented economy, private individuals and business firms make most... The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) is one of several stock market indices created by Wall Street Journal editor and Dow Jones & Company founder Charles Dow. ... May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (145th in leap years). ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Inuit (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐃᓄᐃᑦ, singular Inuk or Inuq / ᐃᓄᒃ) is a general term for a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples inhabiting the Arctic coasts of Siberia, Alaska, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Québec, Labrador and Greenland. ... The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (the IACHR or, in Spanish, CIDH) is one of the two bodies that comprise the inter-American system for the promotion and protection of human rights. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1856 to 2004 Mean temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is an increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans. ... The greenhouse effect, first discovered by Joseph Fourier in 1824, is the process by which an atmosphere warms a planet. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 at Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ...

December 10, 2003

December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) was a series of UN-sponsored conferences about information and communication that took place in 2003 and 2005. ... Geneva (French: Genève, German: Genf, Italian: Ginevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland, situated where Lake Geneva (known in French as Lac Léman) flows into the Rhône River. ... Elections for the President and Vice President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) were held on March 20, 2004. ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) (Chinese: 民主進步黨; abbrev. ... Hsiu-lien Annette Lu (呂秀蓮, pinyin: LÇš Xiùlián) (born June 7, 1944) is the vice president of Republic of China on Taiwan and a politician of the Democratic Progressive Party. ... Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ... The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA) is U.S. Congressional legislation which regulates the financing of political campaigns. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America. ... British Columbia Ferry Services Inc. ... Striking Teamsters, wielding pipes, clash with armed police in the streets of Minneapolis, 1934. ... The Dublin and Monaghan Bombings on May 17, 1974 left 33 people dead and almost 300 injured, the largest number of casualties in any single day in The Troubles connected to Northern Ireland. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... The Ulster Volunteer Force (more commonly referred to as the UVF or by some of its supporters The Peoples Army) is a loyalist paramilitary group in Northern Ireland. ... Terrorism is the unconventional use of violence for political gain. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) was the police force in Northern Ireland from 1922 to 2001. ... The 20th Dáil was elected on February 28, 1973 and first met on March 14 when the 14th Government of Ireland was appointed. ... Shirin Ebadi Shirin Ebadi (Persian: شیرین عبادی; born June 21, 1947) is a Persian (Iranian) lawyer and human rights activist. ... The Nobel Peace Prize Medal featuring a portrait of Alfred Nobel The Nobel Peace Prize is one of five Nobel Prizes bequested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... County Oslo NO-03 Landscape Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² 426 km² 0. ... The War on Terrorism or War on Terror (in U.S. foreign policy circles, the global war on terrorism or GWOT ) is a campaign by the United States government and some of its allies with the stated goal of ending worldwide terrorism by stopping terrorist groups and ending state sponsorship... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Human rights abuse. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( â–¶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The Iraqi Governing Council. ... A war crime is a punishable offense, under international (criminal) law, for violations of the law of war by any person or persons, military or civilian. ... A crime against humanity is a term in international law that refers to acts of murderous persecution against a body of people, as being the criminal offence above all others. ... Bath Party flag The Arab Socialist Bath Party (also spelled Baath or Baath; Arabic: حزب البعث العربي الاشتراكي) was founded in 1945 as a radical, left-wing, secular Arab nationalist political party. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... Combatants United States, United Kingdom, Australia, other nations Iraq Commanders Tommy Franks Saddam Hussein Strength 300. ... WTO Logo The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international, multilateral organization which sets the rules for the global trading system and resolves disputes between its member states, all of whom are signatories to its about 30 agreements. ... Main article: League of Nations The term United Nations was coined by Franklin D. Roosevelt during World War II, to refer to the Allies. ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... The Japan Self-Defense Forces (Japanese: 自衛隊, Jieitai) or JSDF, are the military forces in Japan that were established after the end of World War II. The force has been engaged in no real combat but has been engaged in some international peacekeeping operations. ... The Northwest Territories, Canada conducted a general election on November 24, 2003, to elect the 19 members of the Legislative Assembly. ... The Honourable Joseph (Joe) Handley, MLA, (August 9, 1943 - ) is the premier of the Northwest Territories, Canada. ... This is a list of the premiers and Commissioners who held governing power in the Northwest Territories, Canada. ... Motto: None Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Yellowknife Largest city Yellowknife Commissioner Tony Whitford Premier Joe Handley (Consensus government - no party affiliations) Area 1,346,106 km² (3rd) Land 1,183,085 km² Water 163,021 km² (12. ... Scott Brison, Nova Scotia MP for Kings--Hants The Honourable Scott A. Brison, PC, MP, BComm (born May 10, 1967, Windsor, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian politician. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada) is Canadas principal centrist political party. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm with Queen Elizabeth II as its reigning monarch and head of state. ... Acadians are the original French settlers of parts of the northeastern region of North America comprising what is now the Canadian provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. ... Hon. ...

December 9, 2003

December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ... Moscow (Russian: Москва́, Moskva, IPA: â–¶ (help· info)) is the capital of Russia, located on the river Moskva. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta is recognized as the lead United States agency for protecting the public health and safety of people by providing credible information to enhance health decisions, and promoting health through strong partnerships with state health departments and other organizations. ... Negatively stained flu virions. ... The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) A virus is a microscopic parasite that infects cells in biological organisms. ... A vaccine is an antigenic preparation used to produce active immunity to a disease, in order to prevent or ameliorate the effects of infection by any natural or wild strain of the organism. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Senator Bob Kerrey Joseph Robert Kerrey (born August 27, 1943) was Governor of Nebraska from 1983 to 1987, and a U.S. Senator from Nebraska (1989–2001) and a Democrat. ... The Commissions seal The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission, was set up in late 2002 to prepare a full and complete account of the circumstances surrounding the September 11, 2001 attacks including preparedness for and the immediate response... Joseph Maxwell Cleland (born August 24, 1942) is an American politician of Georgia. ... The Export-Import Bank of the United States (“Ex-Im Bank”, “Exim Bank” or “Eximbank”) is an independent bank established by Congress that finances or insures foreign purchases of U.S. goods for customers unable or unwilling to accept credit risk. ... Albert Arnold Gore Jr. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American physician and politician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Presidential election results map. ... Roadside sign showing tariffs for the M6 Toll. ... The West Midlands is a geographical term describing the western half of central England, known as the Midlands. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal republic George... Tal Afar (also Talafar) is a city in northern Iraq, about 30 miles west of Mosul. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... OH-58 Kiowa OH-58D Kiowa Warrior The OH-58 Kiowa scout is a helicopter manufactured by Bell Helicopter Textron. ... An RPG is a hand-held, shoulder-launched antitank weapon capable of firing an unguided rocket containing an explosive warhead. ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ... A car bomb is an improvised explosive device that is placed in a car or truck and is intended to be exploded while there. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... // Mosque; Aswan, Egypt. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... Location of Baghdad within Iraq Baghdad (Arabic: , Persian: بغداد (Meaning in Persian : from angels) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... Taiwan Strait Area The political status of Taiwan is a controversy over whether Taiwan, including the Pescadores (Penghu), should remain the effective territory of the Republic of China (ROC), become unified with the territories now governed by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC), or become the Republic of Taiwan. ... The Premier ( Chinese: 总理 pinyin: zŏnglĭ), sometimes referred to as the Prime Minister, is the Chairman of the State Council of the Peoples Republic of China and head of Central Peoples Government. ... Wen Jiabao (Simplified Chinese: 温家宝; Traditional Chinese: 溫家寶; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Wen Chia-pao) (born September 1942) is the Premier of the State Council of the Peoples Republic of China. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... The One-China policy (Chinese: 一個中國) is the principle that there is one China and both mainland China and Taiwan are part of that China. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Gavin Newsom Gavin Christopher Newsom (born October 10, 1967) is the 42nd Mayor of San Francisco, California. ... In American politics, the Green Party is a third party which has been active in some areas since the 1980s, but first gained widespread public attention for Ralph Naders presidential runs in 1996 and 2000. ... Matt Gonzalez (born June 1965) is a former district supervisor, president of the Board of Supervisors, and mayoral candidate in San Francisco, California. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Willie Brown Willie Lewis Brown, Jr. ... The United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development is the head of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Melquiades Rafael Mel Martinez (born October 23, 1946) is a Republican Cuban-born American politician and U.S. Senator from Florida. ... Shanghai (Chinese: 上海 pinyin: â–¶ (help· info); Shanghainese IPA: ; Lumazi: Zanhe) , situated on the banks of the Yangtze River Delta, is Chinas largest city. ... This racing bicycle is built using lightweight, shaped aluminium tubing and carbon fiber stays and forks. ...

December 8, 2003

December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A genetically modified food is a food product derived in whole or part from a genetically modified organism (GMO) such as a crop plant, animal or microbe such as yeast. ... Italic textGMO is a three-letter abbreviation that could mean: genetically modified organism Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad (AAR reporting mark GMO) This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The European Union and the United States have strong disagreements over the EUs regulation of genetically modified food. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003, signed into law by President Bush on December 16, 2003, establishes the first national standards for the sending of commercial e-mail and requires the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to enforce its provisions. ... King Harald V of Norway (Photo from the October 2003 State Visit to Brazil). ... Cystoscopic view of a papillary bladder tumor (top); the bladder wall is visible on the bottom right Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. ... County Oslo NO-03 Landscape Viken Municipality NO-0301 Administrative centre Oslo Mayor (2004) Per Ditlev-Simonsen (H) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 224 454 km² 426 km² 0. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Enron Corporation Enron Corporation is an energy trading and communications company based in Houston, Texas that employed around 21,000 people in mid-2001 (before bankruptcy). ... For a time, WorldCom (WCOM) was the United States second largest long distance phone company (AT&T was the largest). ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 17th 199,905 km² 340 km 610 km 1. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ... William John Bill Janklow (born September 13, 1939), American politician with the Republican Party, was a four-term Governor of South Dakota and briefly a member of the United States House of Representatives. ... In the criminal law, murder is the crime where one human being causes the death of another human being, without lawful excuse, and with intent to kill or with an intent to cause grievous bodily harm (traditionally termed malice aforethought) (see attempted murder where the mens rea (the Latin for... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ... The Honourable John Lynch-Staunton (born June 19, 1930 in Montreal) is a former Canadian senator and was the first leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... San Juan is the capital city of Puerto Rico. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A group of “quad bike” all terrain vehicles The term all-terrain vehicle is used to describe a number of small open motorised buggies and tricycles designed for off-road use. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... The 2003 Rugby Union World Cup was the fifth world cup in rugby history. ... Introducing. ... A pianist is a person who plays the piano. ... Havana (Spanish in full: San Cristóbal de La Habana; UN/LOCODE: Habana (CU HAV)) is the capital of Cuba and, with a population of 2. ... In 2002 Greece, in an attempt to fight illegal gambling, passed the ambiguous and controversial law 3037/2002 which was seen by many to ban all electronic games, including those running on home computers. ...

December 7, 2003

December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... List of Presidents of Nicaragua list may not be complete José Núñez 1839 Evaristo Rocha 1839 Patricio Rivas 1839 Joaquín del Cosío 1839 Hilario Ulloa 1839 Tomás Valladares 1839-1840 Patricio Rivas 1840-1841 Pablo Buitrago 1841-1843 Juan de Dios Orozco 1843 Manuel Pérez... President Arnoldo Alemán José Arnoldo Alemán Lacayo was born on 23 January 1946, in Managua to an official in the government of Anastasio Somoza García. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... In broad terms, political corruption is the misuse of public (governmental) power for illegitimate, usually secret, private advantage. ... Robert Mugabe Robert Gabriel Mugabe KCB (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... The Commonwealth of Nations, usually known as The Commonwealth, is an association of independent sovereign states, almost all of which are former territories of the British Empire. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Пу́тин, â–¶ (help· info), Pútin; born 7 October 1952) is a Russian politician, and the current President of the Russian Federation. ... (Redirected from 2003 Russian election) Legislative elections were held in the Russian Federation on December 7, 2003. ... Communist Party supporters attend a May Day rally in Moscow The Communist Party of the Russian Federation (Коммунистическая партия Российской Федерации = КПРФ) is a Russian political party. ... Vladimir Zhirinovsky Vladimir Volfovich Zhirinovsky (Влади́мир Во́льфович Жирино́вский in Russian) (b. ... The Liberal Democratic Party of Russia (Либерально-Демократическая Партия России, Liberalno-Demokratičeskaja Partija Rossii) is a nationalist political party in Russia. ... For other uses of this term, see Taliban (disambiguation) Flag flown by the Taliban. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Mosul (36°22′N 43°07′E; Arabic: , Kurdish: Mûsil, Assyrian: ܢܝܢܘܐ NînÄ›wâ) is a city in northern Iraq. ...

December 6, 2003

December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Australian Democrats (in regular parlance, just the Democrats), is an Australian social liberal party formed in 1977 from the earlier Australia Party by Don Chipp, who left the Liberal Party of Australia to do so. ... Andrew Bartlett Andrew John Julian Bartlett (born 4 August 1964), Australian politician, has been a member of the Australian Senate for the state of Queensland since 1997, representing the Australian Democrats, of which he is Deputy Leader and Party Whip. ... The Liberal Party of Australia is an Australian liberal conservative political party. ... The Parliament of Australia is the legislative branch of Australia. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... James Baker James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930), American politician and diplomat, was Chief of Staff in the President Ronald Reagans first administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W. Bush and as United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... A lesion is a non-specific term referring to abnormal tissue in the body. ... Minaret, July 2001 Ghazni is a city in central Afghanistan, situated on a plateau at 7280 feet above sea level. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Respiratory disease properly named influenza(say: in-floo-en-zah ). Some specific varities of influenza with a vaccination available are: A-New Caledonia, A-California, B-Shanghai. ... A vaccine is an antigenic preparation used to produce active immunity to a disease, in order to prevent or ameliorate the effects of infection by any natural or wild strain of the organism. ... The Commonwealth of Nations, usually known as The Commonwealth, is an association of independent sovereign states, almost all of which are former territories of the British Empire. ... George Clinton George Clinton (born July 22, 1941) is an American musician, considered one of the fathers of funk. ... P-Funk is an abbreviated, compound name for two bands, Parliament and Funkadelic. ... Motto: Nickname: Founded Incorporated March 22, 1786   County Leon County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor John Marks Area  - Total  - Water 254. ...

December 5, 2003

December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... Southern Federal District (Northern Caucasus) is one of the seven federal districts of Russia. ... Capital Grozny Area - total - % water 78th - 15,500 km² - negligible Population - Total - Density 49th - est. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... The University of California (UC) is a public university system within the State of California. ... The Berkeley Lab is perched on a hill overlooking the Berkeley central campus and San Francisco Bay. ... Aerial view of the lab and surrounding area. ... Los Alamos National Laboratory, aerial view from 1995. ... The Commonwealth of Nations, usually known as The Commonwealth, is an association of independent sovereign states, almost all of which are former territories of the British Empire. ... Location of Abuja in Nigeria Abuja, estimated population 1,078,700, is the capital city of Nigeria in western Africa. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is the Queen regnant of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Antigua and Barbuda... Robert Mugabe Robert Gabriel Mugabe KCB (born February 21, 1924) has been the head of government in Zimbabwe, first as Prime Minister and later as first executive President, since 1980. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the countrys 25th Prime Minister. ... The Anglo-Saxons refers collectively to the groups of Germanic tribes who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century, forming the basis for the modern English nation. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada) is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... On March 6, 2003, the SCO Group (formerly known as Caldera Systems) filed a $1 billion lawsuit in the US against IBM for allegedly devaluing its version of the UNIX operating system. ... The 22nd Southeast Asian Games were held in Hanoi, Vietnam from 5 December - 13 December 2003. ... Ho Chi Minh City(Vietnamese: Thành phố Hồ Chí Minh) is the largest cityin Vietnam, located near the delta of the Mekong River. ... The 2006 FIFA World Cupâ„¢ (officially titled 2006 FIFA World Cup Germanyâ„¢, sometimes referred to as the Football World Cup) finals are scheduled to take place in Germany between 9 June and 9 July 2006. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... For an explanation of often confusing terms such as Great Britain, Britain, United Kingdom and England, see British Isles (terminology). ... Dieu et mon droit (Royal motto) (French for God and my right)3 Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685... UEFA logo The Union of European Football Associations, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced you-AY-fuh), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ...

December 4, 2003

December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of Prime Ministers of Poland. ... Leszek Miller Leszek Miller (born 3 July 1946) was Prime Minister of Poland from September 2001 to May 2, 2004. ... The Bell 206 of Canadian Helicopters Robinson Helicopter Company (USA) R44, a four seat development of the R22 A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more horizontal rotors (propellers). ... Motto: Contemnit procellas (It defies the storms) Semper invicta (Always invincible) Voivodship Masovian Municipal government Mayor MirosÅ‚aw Kochalski (acting) Area 516,9 km² Population  - city  - urban  - density 1,692,900 (2004) 2,400,000 3258/km² Founded City rights 13th century turn of the 13th century Latitude Longitude 52... A fruit stand at a market. ... The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... A tariff is a tax placed on imported and/or exported goods, sometimes called a customs duty. ... The old steel cable of a colliery winding tower Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon being the primary alloying material. ... Sanctions is the plural of sanction (see also penalty). ... WTO Logo The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international, multilateral organization which sets the rules for the global trading system and resolves disputes between its member states, all of whom are signatories to its about 30 agreements. ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal republic George... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... A quarter is: One of four equal parts of a single thing (sometimes referred to as a fourth in US English). ... Famous people with the family name Reagan include: Ronald Reagan, the 40th President of the United States Nancy Reagan, the wife of Ronald Reagan and influential First Lady Ron Reagan, President Reagans son and liberal journalist Michael Reagan, President Reagans son and conservative talk show host John Henninger... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Criminal Police Organization – Interpol (ICPO-Interpol) was created in 1923 to assist international criminal police co-operation. ... A Red notice is one of several types of colour coded notices circulated by Interpol on behalf of member nations. ... The following is a list of Presidents of Liberia: Joseph Jenkins Roberts 1847-1856 Stephen Allen Benson 1856-1864 Daniel Bashiel Warner 1864-1868 James Spriggs Payne 1868-1870 Edward J. Roye 1870-1871 Joseph Jenkins Roberts 1871-1876 James Spriggs Payne 1876-1878 Anthony W. Gardiner 1878-1883 Alfred... Charles Taylor announces his resignation on Liberian TV, 2003 Charles Ghankay Taylor (born January 28, 1948) was the President of Liberia from 1997 to 2003. ...

December 3, 2003

December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Deng Pufang (邓朴方 pinyin deng4 pu2 fang1), (born in April 1944), is the first son of Deng Xiaoping and his third wife Zhuo Lin. ... Sergio Vieira de Mello Sergio Vieira de Mello (March 15, 1948 - August 19, 2003) was a Brazilian United Nations (UN) diplomat who worked for the UN for over 34 years, earning respect and praise around the world for his efforts in the humanitarian and political programs of the UN. Son... The flag of the Mothers, painted on the floor in Plaza de Mayo, Buenos Aires. ... The United Nations Prizes in the Field of Human Rights were instituted by a General Assembly resolution in 1966. ... Australia Post is the government-owned postal service of Australia. ... Pavonazzeto marble sculpture, see Erotic art in Pompeii Pornography (from Greek πορνογραφία pornographia — literally writing about or drawings of prostitutes) (also informally referred to as porn or porno) is the representation of the human body or human sexual behaviour with the goal of sexual arousal, similar to, but distinct from, erotica. ... The term child pornography (sometimes referred to as CP, child porn, or kiddie porn) generally refers to pornography featuring one or more children; however, a precise definition can be elusive, as the terms pornography and child vary in definition according to region and country. ... Sydney, the Emerald City or the Harbour City, is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian state of New South Wales, as well as Australias largest and oldest city (founded in 1788). ... The Daily Telegraph is a tabloid newspaper published in Sydney, New South Wales, by Rupert Murdochs News Corporation. ... Watershed of the river Weser Kassel (until 1926 officially Cassel) is a city situated along the Fulda River, one of the two sources of the Weser river, in northern Hesse in west-central Germany. ... Armin Meiwes Armin Meiwes (born 1961 in Germany) is an Internet user who became known as Der Metzgermeister (The Master Butcher). ... Cannibalism in Brazil in 1557 as described by Hans Staden. ... A penal code can be defined as that portion of a states laws that deal with defining the elements of particular crimes and specifying the punishment for each crime. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 at Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... Ratification is the process of adopting an international treaty, or a constitution or other nationally binding document (such as an amendment to a constitution) by the agreement of multiple subnational entities. ... Wanted poster for the ICTR The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is a court under the auspices of the United Nations for the prosecution of offenses committed in Rwanda during the genocide which occurred there during April, 1994, commencing on April 6. ... This article discusses the history of Rwanda. ... Canada is a constitutional monarchy and a Commonwealth Realm (see Monarchy in Canada) with a federal system of parliamentary government, and strong democratic traditions. ... Minister of Natural Resources in the Cabinet of Canada is the minister responsible for Natural Resources Canada. ... The Honourable Harbance Singh (Herb) Dhaliwal, PC (born December 12, 1952) is a Canadian politician. ... Motto: SatyamÄ“va JayatÄ“ Hindi:सत्यमेव जयते (Sanskrit: Truth Alone Triumphs) Anthem: Jana Gana Mana Capital New Delhi Largest city Mumbai (Bombay) Official language(s) Hindi, English, and 21 other languages Government President Prime Minister Federal republic APJ Abdul Kalam Dr. Manmohan Singh Independence  - Declared  - Republic From the United Kingdom 1947-08... A Cabinet is a body of high-ranking members of government, typically representing the executive branch. ... Politics is the process by which decisions are made within groups. ... The Prime Minister of Canada (French: Premier ministre du Canada), the head of the Government of Canada, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... The Right Honourable Paul Edgar Philippe Martin, PC, MP, BA, LLB (born August 28, 1938, in Windsor, Ontario) is the Prime Minister of Canada. ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Abidjan is the largest city and former capital of Côte dIvoire. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ... As a noun, Christian is an appellation and moniker deriving from the appellation Christ, which many people associate exclusively with Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article is in need of attention. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... Laurent Koudou Gbagbo (born May 31, 1945) is the president of Côte dIvoire (since 2000). ... A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم) (sometimes also spelled Moslem) is an adherent of Islam. ... An aerial view of Parliament of India at New Delhi. ... The Smokefree Environments Amendment Bill was passed by the New Zealand parliament on December 3, 2003. ...

December 2, 2003

December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (born July 28, 1954) is the 53rd and current President of Venezuela. ... DeCSS is a computer program capable of decrypting content on a DVD video disc encrypted using the Content-Scrambling System (CSS). ... Jon Lech Johansen (born November 18, 1983), also known as DVD Jon, is a Norwegian who was involved in the release of the DeCSS software. ... This article is about general United States currency. ... The euro (symbol: €; banking code: EUR) is the currency of twelve European Union member states: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, the Republic of Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain, collectively known as the Eurozone. ... The term current account usually refers to the current account of the balance of payments (BOP) and contains the import and export items of goods and services as well as transfer payments including net investment income. ... Protectionism is the economic policy of protecting a nations manufacturing base from the effects of foreign competition (including Dumping) by means of high tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, and other means of reducing importation. ... Andrei Nikolayevich Illarionov (Андрей Николаевич Илларионов) is the economic policy advisor to Russian President Vladimir Putin. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Пу́тин, â–¶ (help· info), Pútin; born 7 October 1952) is a Russian politician, and the current President of the Russian Federation. ... Kyoto Protocol Opened for signature December 11, 1997 at Kyoto, Japan Entered into force February 16, 2005. ... An election is a decision making process whereby people vote for preferred political candidates or parties to act as representatives in government. ... Mark Latham Mark William Latham (born February 28, 1961), an Australian politician, was Leader of the Federal Parliamentary Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition from December 2003 to January 2005. ... The Honourable Simon Findlay Crean (born 26 February 1949) is an Australian politician. ... The Australian Labor Party or ALP is Australias oldest political party. ... Hon Kim Beazley Kim Christian Beazley (born December 14, 1948), Australian politician, is a former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia, and has been Leader of the Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition since 28 January 2005. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Liberal Party of Australia is an Australian liberal conservative political party. ... The office of Prime Minister is in practice the most powerful political office in the Commonwealth of Australia. ... John Winston Howard (born 26 July 1939) is an Australian politician and the countrys 25th Prime Minister. ... A general election is an election in which all members of a given political body are up for election. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Colin Luther Powell, (born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 23, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... This article is about the proposal for peace between Israel and Palestine. ... Seal of the United States Department of Defense The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is appointed by the President with the approval of the Senate, and is a member of the Cabinet. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a US politician currently serving as the 21st United States Secretary of Defense since January 20, 2001, under President George W. Bush. ... The Plain English Campaign is a pressure group based in the United Kingdom. ... â–¶ (help· info) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Actor, and Republican politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of California. ... Lord Patten of Barnes The Right Honourable Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944) is a prominent British Conservative politician. ... The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. ... Negatively stained flu virions. ... The old steel cable of a colliery winding tower Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon being the primary alloying material. ... For other uses of the initials WTO, see WTO (disambiguation). ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKEx: 4338) is the worlds largest software company, with 2005 global annual sales of 40 billion US dollars and nearly 60,000 employees in more than 90 countries and regions. ... Windows Vista is the next version of Microsofts Windows operating system, superseding Windows XP. It was previously known by its codename Longhorn, after the Longhorn Saloon, a popular bar in Whistler, British Columbia (see the other Microsoft codenames). ... The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search, or GIMPS, is a collaborative project of volunteers, who use Prime95 and MPrime, special software that can be downloaded from the Internet for free, in order to search for Mersenne prime numbers. ... In mathematics, a prime number (or prime) is a natural number greater than one whose only positive divisors are one and itself. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with decimal representation. ... In mathematics and computer science, a numerical digit is a symbol, e. ... In mathematics, a Mersenne prime is a prime number that is one less than a prime power of two. ... A pre-9/11 view of The Pentagon, looking east with the Potomac River and Washington Monument in the distance. ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal republic George... Unlawful combatant (also illegal combatant or unprivileged combatant) describes a person who engages in combat without meeting the requirements for a lawful belligerent according to the laws of war as specified in the Third Geneva Convention. ... For other uses of this term, see Taliban (disambiguation) Flag flown by the Taliban. ... Yaser Esam Hamdi was a U.S. citizen captured in Afghanistan while fighting U.S. forces with the Taliban in 2001. ...

December 1, 2003

December 1 is the 335th (in leap years the 336th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with the post-invasion period in Iraq and its occupation. ... The abbreviation G.I. or GI is most commonly used to shorten government issue, and has different meanings depending on the part of speech in which it is used. ... Location of Baghdad within Iraq Baghdad (Arabic: , Persian: بغداد (Meaning in Persian : from angels) is the capital of Iraq and of Baghdad Province. ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV-positive people and those living with AIDS. World AIDS Day, observed December 1 each year, is dedicated to raising awareness of the global AIDS epidemic caused by the spread of HIV infection. ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Tommy G. Thompson Tommy George Thompson (born November 19, 1941) is a politician and was the 19th United States Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). ... The Red Ribbon is the global symbol for solidarity with HIV-positive people and those living with AIDS. AIDS, or Aids, is an acronym for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or acquired immune deficiency syndrome and is defined as a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to 1956) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government  â€¢ President  â€¢ Vice President Federal republic George... In the United Kingdom, the Secretary of State for International Development is a Cabinet minister responsible for promoting development overseas, particularly in the third world. ... The Right Honourable Hilary James Wedgwood Benn (November 26, 1953) British politician and is Labour Member of Parliament of Leeds Central and Secretary of State for International Development Hilary Benn speaking in Oxford, January 2005 Hilary Benn is a fourth generation MP, being the son of former Labour Cabinet Minister... The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Iraq War or war in Iraq, is both an informal and a formal American term for the military conflict in Iraq including the 2003 Invasion of Iraq by the United States, and occupation by the U.S., U.K., and other forces. ... The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national public service broadcaster of the United Kingdom (see British television). ... The Premier ( Chinese: 总理 pinyin: zŏnglĭ), sometimes referred to as the Prime Minister, is the Chairman of the State Council of the Peoples Republic of China and head of Central Peoples Government. ... Wen Jiabao (Simplified Chinese: 温家宝; Traditional Chinese: 溫家寶; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Wen Chia-pao) (born September 1942) is the Premier of the State Council of the Peoples Republic of China. ... â–¶ (help· info) or Peking is the capital of the Peoples Republic of China (PRC). ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Wanted poster for the ICTR The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is a court under the auspices of the United Nations for the prosecution of offenses committed in Rwanda during the genocide which occurred there during April, 1994, commencing on April 6. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... Genocide is defined by the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (CPPCG) article 2 as any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group, as such: Killing members of the group; Causing... King Harald V of Norway (Photo from the October 2003 State Visit to Brazil). ... Cystoscopic view of a papillary bladder tumor (top); the bladder wall is visible on the bottom right Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Crown Prince Haakon Magnus of Norway was born on July 20, 1973 in Oslo and is styled HRH The Crown Prince. ... // High public office A regent, from the Latin regens who reigns is anyone who acts as head of state, especially if not the monarch (who has higher titles). ... The Office of the President of the Republic of China is located in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City. ... Chen Shui-bian, President of the Republic of China Chen Shui-bian (ch. ... The Legislative Yuan building in Zhongzheng District, Taipei City (the view is blocked by the childrens hospital building of the National Taiwan University Hospital). ... National motto: None Official language Mandarin Chinese Capital and largest city Taipei President Chen Shui-bian Vice President Annette Lu Premier Frank Hsieh Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 138th 35,980 km² 2. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA)(TYO: 7661 ) is the worlds leading aircraft and aerospace manufacturer, headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, with its largest production facilities in Everett, Washington, about 30 miles north of Seattle, Washington. ... A chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... A chief executive officer (CEO) or chief executive is the highest-ranking corporate officer or executive officer of a corporation, company, or agency. ... Philip M. Condit (born August 2, 1941) was the former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Boeing company. ... ... For other uses of the abbreviation CFO see CFO (disambiguation) The Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of a company is the corporate officer primarily responsible for managing the financial risks of a business (see External Link below). ... Business ethics is a form of applied ethics that examines ethical rules and principles within a commercial context; the various moral or ethical problems that can arise in a business setting; and any special duties or obligations that apply to persons who are engaged in commerce. ... A scandal is a widely publicized incident involving allegations of wrong-doing, disgrace, or moral outrage. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated as DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... Air Canada Boeing 767-300 British Airways Boeing 767-300 The Boeing 767 is a commercial passenger airplane manufactured by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. ... USAF KC-135R Stratotanker, two F-15s (twin fins) and two F-16s, on an aerial refueling training mission Aerial refueling, also called in-flight refueling (IFR) or air-to-air refueling (AAR), is the practice of transferring fuel from one aircraft to another during flight. ... DC-10, retired from American Airlines fleet at gate McDonnell Douglas was a major American aerospace manufacturer, producing a number of famous commercial and military aircraft. ... The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large, global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ... Lewis Platt (April 11, 1941 - September 8, 2005) succeeded John A. Young as president and chief executive officer of Hewlett-Packard (HP) in 1990, and then succeeded co-founder David Packard as the companys chairman of the board in 1993. ... Flandreau is a city located in Moody County, South Dakota. ... This article may be confusing for some readers, and should be edited to be clearer. ... A jury trial is a trial in which the judge of the facts, as opposed to the judge of the law, is a jury, made up of citizens who are usually randomly selected and are generally not legal professionals. ... Governors of South Dakota Arthur C. Mellette Republican 1889-1893 Charles H. Sheldon Republican 1893-1897 Andrew E. Lee Populist 1897-1901 Charles N. Herreid Republican 1901-1905 Samuel H. Elrod Republican 1905-1907 Coe I. Crawford Republican 1907-1909 Robert S. Vessey Republican 1909-1913 Frank M. Byrne Republican... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ... William John Bill Janklow (born September 13, 1939), American politician with the Republican Party, was a four-term Governor of South Dakota and briefly a member of the United States House of Representatives. ...

Events by month

2006: January
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2003: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2002: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2001: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2000: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... To suggest a relevant news story for the main page, refer to the criteria then add your suggestion at the candidates page. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Ongoing events • Iraqi legislative election • Bill C-38 (Canada gay marriage) • Tsunami relief Upcoming events • March 11: Red Nose Day 2005 in the UK. Deaths in February • 26 – Jef Raskin • 25 – Hugh Nibley • 25 – Peter Benenson • 21... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in April • 26: Augusto Roa Bastos • 24: Ezer Weizman • 23: Sir Joh Bjelke-Petersen • 23: John Mills • 16: Marla Ruzicka • 9: Andrea Dworkin • 6: Prince Rainier III • 5: Dale Messick • 5: Saul Bellow • 2: Pope John... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby... Ongoing events • 2005 Atlantic and Pacific hurricanes • 2005 Maharashtra floods • 2005 Gujarat Flood • Expo 2005 in Aichi, Japan • Fuel prices • Gomery Comm. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in August August 31: Michael Sheard August 26: Lord Fitt August 24: Jack Slipper August 24: Maurice Cowling August 24: Dr. Tom Pashby August 23: Brock Peters August 22: Lord Lane August 21: Robert Moog August... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Atlantic hurricane season • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Bali bombings investigation • California wildfires • UK Conservative Party leadership election • DeLay political financing scandal • Dengue outbreak in Singapore • Fuel prices / Peak oil • Harriet Miers nomination and hearings • Hurricane Wilma • Irans nuclear program • Kashmir earthquake • London bombings... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in October 28: Richard Smalley 26: Emil Kyulev 24: José Azcona del Hoyo 24: Rosa Parks 23: Stella Obasanjo 22: Liam Lawlor 22: Shirley Horn 20: Endon Mahmood 17: Ba Jin 10: Milton Obote 7: Charles... Ongoing events • Abramoff-Reed gambling scandal • Al Jazeera bombing memo • Avian influenza (H5N1) outbreak • Black sites scandal • Conservative leadership race (UK) • Fuel prices • Irans nuclear program • Jilin chemical plant explosions • Kashmir earthquake • Malawi food crisis • Malaysian prisoner abuse scandal • New Delhi bombings investigation • Niger food crisis • North Indian cyclone... December 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → 31 December 2005 (Saturday) 25-year-old Scottish human rights worker Kate Burton and her parents are freed unharmed in the Gaza Strip by the Palestinian gunmen who kidnapped them two days earlier. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → January 31, 2004 The United States defence budget is set to exceed US$400 billion next year—an almost 7% increase—according to budget proposals inadvertently posted on the Pentagons website. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → // February 29, 2004 Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigns as president of Haiti and flees the country for the Central African Republic. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths • 08 Abu Abbas • 20 Queen Juliana • 28 Peter Ustinov • 30 Alistair Cooke More March 2004 deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Israeli-Palestinian conflict Occupation of Iraq Same-sex marriage in... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in April • 18 Ratu Sir Kamisese Mara • 19 Norris McWhirter • 22 Pat Tillman • 24 Estée Lauder Other recent deaths Ongoing events EU Enlargement Exploration of Mars: Rovers Haiti Rebellion Reconstruction of Iraq – Occupation & Resistance Israeli... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes • 22 Sacha Distel • 21 Jerry Goldsmith • 21... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8 Robert... September 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: September 2004 in sports Events Deaths in September • 27 Tsai Wan-lin • 24 Françoise Sagan • 20 Brian Clough • 18 Russ Meyer • 15 Johnny Ramone • 12 Fred Ebb • 11 Peter VII of Alexandria • 8... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: October 2004 in sports Deaths in October • 29 HRH Princess Alice • 25 John Peel • 24 James Cardinal Hickey • 23 Robert Merrill • 19 Paul Nitze • 18 K. M. Veerappan • 16 Pierre Salinger • 10 Christopher Reeve • 9... November 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Events Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John... ← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003: January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for February, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for March, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for April 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → A timeline of events in the news for May, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2003. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2003. ... 2002 (MMII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for January, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December February 27, 2002 Alicia Keys wins five Grammys. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for March, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for April, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for May, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for June, 2002. ... July 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December // Events See also: Afghanistan timeline July 2002 July 31, 2002 The Foreign Relations Committee of the United States Senate begins hearings on the proposed invasion of Iraq The Stock Market continues its recovery from the Stock... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for August, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for September, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for October, 2002. ... 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for November, 2002. ... 2002 : January _ February _ March _ April _ May _ June _ July _ August _ September _ October _ November _ December _ → A timeline of events in the news for December, 2002. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a month starting on Monday with 31 days. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: February - Iraq disarmament crisis: British and U.S. forces carry out bombing raids attempting to disable Iraqs air defense network. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: March 3 - A U.S. Air Force Materials Command C-23 Sherpa transport crashes during stormy weather in the U.S. state of Georgia, killing 21. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: April 1: An EP-3E United States Navy plane collides with a Chinese Peoples Liberation Army fighter jet. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: May 1 - Chandra Levy disapears while jogging. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: June 5-June 9 - Houston, Texas is devastated by flooding when Tropical Storm Allison dumps 36 inches of rain on the city. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: July 3 - Mordecai Richler July 23 - Eudora Welty July 31 - Poul Anderson Films: July 4 - Cats and Dogs July 6 - Kiss of the Dragon starring Jet Li July 18 - Jurassic Park III July 27 - Planet of... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths: August 25 - Aaliyah Films: August 10 - Osmosis Jones played by Chris Rock, starring Bill Murray August 24 - Bubble Boy Categories: 2001 by month ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: September 4 - Google Inc. ... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: October 2 - Bankruptcy of Swissair. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of the Volunteer The United Nations Year of Dialogue Among Civilizations Events January January 1 - A black monolith measuring approximately nine feet tall appears in Seattles Magnuson Park, placed by an anonymous... 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: December 2 - Enron files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection five days after Dynegy canceled a US$8. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Events: January 1- Millennium celebrations take place throughout the world. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in February, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in March, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in April, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in May, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in June, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in July, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in August, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in September, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in October, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in November, 2000. ... 2000 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December This is a timeline for events in December, 2000. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
December 2003 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5877 words)
The footage, taken in October 2003, shows a man in 16th century clothes closing a firedoor that had blown open.
Following electoral success in the Northwest Territories general election, 2003 Joe Handley is unopposed for election as premier of the Northwest Territories by the legislature.
It is due to open fully on December 13.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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