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Encyclopedia > Decebalus
Decebalus, from Trajan's Column
Decebalus, from Trajan's Column

Decebalus (ruled 87106) (Decebal in Romanian) was a Dacian king. The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Trajans Column is a monument in Rome raised by Apollodorus of Damascus at the order of the Senate. ... This article is about the year 87. ... For other uses, see number 106. ... Dacia, in ancient geography the land of the Daci, named by the ancient Greeks Getae, was a large district of Southeastern Europe, bounded on the north by the Carpathians, on the south by the Danube, on the west by the Tisa, on the east by the Tyras or Nistru, now...


After the death of Great King Burebista, Dacia split into four or five small states. The situation continued until Diurpaneus managed to consolidate the core of Dacia around Sarmizegetusa, in today's Hunedoara county. He reorganized the Dacian army and in 85 the Dacians began raiding the heavily fortified Roman province of Moesia, located south of the Danube. Dacian Kingdom, during the rule of Burebista, 82 BC Burebista,[1] the greatest king of Dacia, ruled between 70 BC and 44 BC. He unified the Thracian population from Hercynia (todays Moravia) in the west, to the Bug River in the east, and from the northern Carpathians to Dionysopolis... Sarmisegetuza was the most important Dacian military, religious and political center. ... Hunedoara (Hungarian: Hunyad) is a county (Judeţ) in Western Romania, in South-Western Transylvania, with the capital city at Deva (population: 77,259). ... Events Roman Empire Dacians under Decebalus engaged in two wars against the Romans from this year to AD 88 or 89. ... Moesia is an ancient province situated in the areas of modern Serbia and Bulgaria. ... The Danube (ancient Danuvius, Iranian *dānu, meaning river or stream, ancient Greek Istros) is the longest river in the European Union and Europes second longest river. ...


In 87, Domitian decided to send his prefect of the Praetorian Guards, Cornelius Fuscus, to punish and conquer the Dacians with five or four legions. Two Roman legions (among which V Alaudae) were ambushed and defeated at Tapae (near modern Bucova), and Fuscus killed. Diurpaneus changed his name into Decebalus[1]. This article is about the year 87. ... Titus Flavius Domitianus (24 October 51 – 18 September 96), commonly known as Domitian, was a Roman Emperor of the gens Flavia. ... Legio V Alaudae, the larks, sometimes known as Gallica, was levied by Julius Caesar in 52 BC from native Gauls. ...


In 88, Tettius Iulianus commanded another Roman army in a campaign against the Dacians, who were defeated at the battle of Tapae; revolts of the Germans on the Rhine required the military force of Moesia, and the Romans were forced to pay large sums of money in the form of tribute to the Dacians for maintaining peace in this region. The humiliating situation for the Romans lasted until Trajan acceded as Emperor of the Roman Empire in 98. Immediately he engaged in a series of military campaigns which would expand the Roman Empire to its maximum extent. Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s BC - 0s - 10s - 20s - 30s - 40s - 50s - 60s - 70s - 80s - 90s - 100s Years: 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 Events Pope Clement I succeeded Pope Anacletus I Han Hedi succeeded Han Zhangdi as emperor of... The Battle of Tapae (101) was the decisive battle of the first Dacian War, in which Roman Emperor Trajan effectively defeated Dacian King Decebaluss army. ... The Rhine (German: ; Dutch: ; French: ; Italian: ; Romansh: ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe at 1,320 kilometres (820 miles), with an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second. ... This article is about the Roman Emperor. ... Events Roman emperor Nerva succeeded by Trajan Tacitus finished his Germania (approximate date) Births Deaths January 27: Nerva, Roman emperor Apollonius of Tyana, Greek/Roman philosopher and mathematician (b. ...


Decebalus was defeated by the Romans when they invaded Dacia in 101, again in Tapae, but he was left as a client king under a Roman protectorate. Three years later, Decebalus destroyed the Roman troops in Dacia, and the Romans were forced to send reinforcements. boobs Births Herodes Atticus, Greek rhetoritician Ptolemy, Greek mathematician, astronomer and geographer. ... The Battle of Tapae (101) was the decisive battle of the first Dacian War, in which Roman Emperor Trajan effectively defeated Dacian King Decebaluss army. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Satellite state. ...


After a long siege of Sarmizegetusa and a long battle, the Romans conquered Dacia. After his army was defeated, rather than being captured as a prisoner by the Roman soldiers, Decebalus committed suicide by slashing his own throat, as depicted on Trajan's Column (spiral 22, panel b). It is likely, however, that in the process of dying Decebalus was captured by a Roman Cavalry Scout named Tiberius Claudius Maximus, and although he did indeed kill himself, official Roman propaganda claimed that they killed him. His head and right hand were henceforth sent to Rome. Tiberius Claudius Maximus' tomb cites two occasions where the legionary was decorated for his part in the Dacian wars, one of which being the acquisition and recovery of Decebalus' head. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Trajans Column is a monument in Rome raised by Apollodorus of Damascus at the order of the Senate. ... Roman legionaries, 1st century. ...


Notes

  1. ^ "Decebalus" means "strong as ten (men)" (cf. Sanskrit daśabala); Dece- being derived from Proto-Indo-European *dekm- ('ten') and -balus from PIE *bel-, 'strong'. Cf. Proto-Albanian *dek(a)t-, from PIE *dekm- (Demiraj, 1999).

The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... The Proto-Indo-European language (PIE) is the hypothetical common ancestor of the Indo-European languages. ... Albanian ( IPA ) is a language spoken by about 6 million people, primarily in Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro, and Macedonia but also in other parts of the Balkans, along the eastern coast of Italy and in Sicily, as well as by a significant diaspora in Scandinavia, Germany, the United Kingdom, Egypt, Australia...

See also

Combatants Dacians Roman Empire Commanders Decebal Trajan Strength around 100,000 (based on population estimate) 70,000-80,000 Casualties Unknown Unknown The Dacian Wars (101-102, 105-106) were two short wars between the Roman Empire and Dacia during Emperor Trajans rule. ... Regalianus (died 260) had been made general by emperor Valerian and like many others of his rank he was proclaimed Roman emperor in 260 after the capture and execution of Valerian by the Sasanid Persians. ... The Thirty Tyrants, or Thirty Pretenders (Latin: Tyranni Triginta) were a group of thirty men and two women declared by the author of the notoriously unreliable Historia Augusta, writing under the name Trebellius Pollio, to have been pretenders to the throne of the Roman Empire in the time of the...

References

  • "Assorted Imperial Battle Descriptions", De Imperatoribus Romanis.
  • Speidel, M. (1984), Roman Army Studies, pp. 173-187.

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Statue of Decebalus (627 words)
The Statue of Dacian king Decebalus is a 40-meter high statue that is the tallest rock sculpture in Europe.
Decebalus, from Trajans Column Decebalus (ruled 87-106 CE) (Decebal in Romanian) was a Dacian king.
Decebalus then sent an invitation to Longinus, a leader of the Roman army who had made himself a terror to the king in the wars, and persuaded him to meet him, on the pretext that he would do whatever should be demanded.
Decebalus - Definition, explanation (383 words)
Decebalus (ruled 87-106 CE) (Decebal in Romanian) was a Dacian king.
Decebalus was defeated by the Romans when they invaded Dacia in 102, but he was left as a client king under a Roman protectorate.
Regalianus was, according to Tyranni Triginta a descendent of Decebalus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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