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Encyclopedia > Decca Records
It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. (Discuss)
Decca Records
Parent company Universal Music Group
Founded 1929
Founder(s) Edward Lewis
Distributing label Decca Records (In the US and UK)
Genre(s) classical music
Country UK
Web address http://www.deccaclassics.com


Decca Records is a British record label established in 1929. Image File history File links Please see the file description page for further information. ... The Decca Music Group is a recording lable. ... Image File history File links Decca_logo. ... Universal Music Group (UMG), formerly MCA Music Entertainment (see Music Corporation of America), is the largest major label in the record industry. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to present) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York, New York Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government • President • Vice President Federal republic... Classical music in its widest sense is held to refer to music deriving from learned traditions, taught through institutions either specifically devoted to music (e. ... A record label is a brand created by companies that specialize in producing, manufacturing, distributing and promoting audio and sometimes video recordings (especially music videos), on various formats including compact discs, LPs, DVD-Audio, SACDs, and cassettes. ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Contents


The label

Within years of its founding by former stockbroker Edward Lewis, Decca Records Ltd was the second largest record label in the world, calling itself "The Supreme Record Company". The term "Decca" was never determined to signify a specific meaning or name, but some theories cite the opening musical notes of a Beethoven symphony: "D-E-C-C-A". A cameo of Beethoven graced the British Decca label for many years.


Popular music

Decca bought out the bankrupt UK branch of Brunswick Records in 1932, which added such stars as Bing Crosby and Al Jolson to its roster. Decca also bought out the Melotone and Edison Bell record companies. By 1939, Decca was the only record company in UK aside from EMI. Brunswick Records is a United States based record label. ... Bing Crosby Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career flourished from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Al Jolson Al Jolson (born Asa Yoelson in Seredzius, Lithuania on May 26, 1886 – October 23, 1950) was an American singer and the son of Jewish immigrants. ... Melotone Records has been the name of two unrelated record companies, one based in Australia and the other in the United States of America. ... The EMI Group is a major record label, based in Kensington in London, in the United Kingdom. ...


In 1934 a US branch of Decca was launched, which quickly became a major player in the depressed American record market thanks to its roster of popular artists, particularly Bing Crosby, and the shrewd management of former US Brunswick General Manager Jack Kapp. Motto: E pluribus unum (1789 to present) (Latin: Out of Many, One) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York, New York Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government • President • Vice President Federal republic... Jack Kapp is the founder of Kapp Records based in New York. ...


Artists signed to Decca in the 1930s and 1940s included Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, Billie Holiday, the Andrews Sisters, Ted Lewis, Judy Garland, The Mills Brothers, Billy Cotton, Guy Lombardo, Chick Webb, Bob Crosby, Jimmy Dorsey, Connee Boswell and Jack Hylton. Louis Armstrongs stage personality matched his flashy trumpet as captured in this photo by William P. Gottlieb. ... William Count Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was a jazz pianist, organist, and bandleader. ... Billie Holiday photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1949 For the Canadian broadcaster, see Billie Holiday (broadcaster). ... The Andrews Sisters on the cover of the reissue collection The Best of the Andrew Sisters: The Millennium Collection. ... Theodore Leopold Friedman, better known as Ted Lewis (June 6, 1890-August 25, 1971), was an American entertainer, bandleader, singer, and musician. ... Judy Garland, circa 1943. ... The Mills Brothers were a major African-American jazz and pop vocal group of the 20th century producing more than 2,000 recordings that sold more than 50 million copies and garnered at least three dozen gold records. ... William Edward Cotton (May 6, 1899 – March 25, 1969), better known as Billy Cotton, was a British band leader and entertainer, one of the few whose orchestra survived the dance band era. ... Guy Lombardo, photographed by William P. Gottlieb, 1947 Gaetano Alberto Guy Lombardo (June 19, 1902 - November 5, 1977) was a Canadian bandleader and violinist. ... William Henry Webb, usually known as Chick Webb (February 10, 1905 - June 16, 1939) was a jazz and swing music drummer and band leader. ... Bob Crosby (August 23, 1913 - March 9, 1993) was an American bandleader and singer. ... James Jimmy Dorsey (February 29, 1904 - June 12, 1957) was a prominent jazz clarinetist, saxophonist and big band leader. ... Jack Hylton (July 2, 1892–January 29, 1965) was a band leader and impresario in the North-West of England. ...


In 1942, Decca released "White Christmas" by Bing Crosby, which became the best-selling single of all time. White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ... Bing Crosby Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor whose career flourished from 1926 until his death in 1977. ...


From the late 1940s on, the US arm of Decca had a sizable roster of Country artists, including Kitty Wells, Johnny Wright, Ernest Tubb, Webb Pierce and Red Foley. In the late 1950s, Patsy Cline was signed to the US Decca label from 4 Star Records. As part of a leasing deal Patsy’s contract was owned by 4 Star though she recorded for Decca as part of this deal she recorded an album but saw little money, in 1960 she signed with Decca outright and released two more albums and numerous singles while she was alive and several more albums and singles produced after her untimely death in a 1963 plane crash. Loretta Lynn signed to Decca in the early 1960s and remained with the label for the next several decades. Owen Bradley was the A&R man for all of these artists. Country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic Music, Blues, Gospel music, and Old-time music. ... Kitty Wells Kitty Wells (born Muriel Deason on August 30, 1919) is an American country musician from Nashville, Tennessee, known from about 1955 as the Queen of Country Music. ... Johnny Wright is a successful music manager. ... Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914 - September 6, 1984), nicknamed the Texas Troubadour, was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music. ... Webb Pierce (born August 8, 1921 - died February 24, 1991), was an American country music singer. ... Clyde Julian Red Foley ( June 17, 1910 - September 19, 1968) was a country music singer. ... Patsy Cline Patsy Cline (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was an American country music singer. ... Loretta Lynn Loretta Lynn (born April 14, 1935) is an American country singer who was the leading country female vocalist during much of the 1960s and 1970s. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ...


The American RCA label severed its longtime affiliation with EMI's His Master's Voice (HMV) label in 1957, which allowed British Decca to market and distribute Elvis Presley's recordings in the UK. For other uses, see RCA (disambiguation). ... The EMI Group is a major record label, based in Kensington in London, in the United Kingdom. ... His Masters Voice, often abbreviated to HMV, is a famous trademark in the music business, and for many years was the name of a large record company. ... His Masters Voice, often abbreviated to HMV, is a famous trademark in the music business, and for many years was the name of a large record company. ... Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock n Roll was an American singer, music producer and actor. ...


British Decca had several missed opportunies. In 1960, they refused to release "Tell Laura I Love Her" by Ray Peterson and even destroyed thousands of copies of the single. A cover version by Ricky Valance was released by EMI on the Columbia label which was #1 on the British charts for three weeks. In 1962 British Decca executive Dick Rowe turned down a chance to record a young group from Liverpool called The Beatles in favor of local beat combo Brian Poole and the Tremeloes. In retrospect this was a historic mistake, and the Decca audition has subsequently accumulated significant legend. Later refusals of note include The Yardbirds and Manfred Mann. Ray A. Peterson (April 23, 1935 - January 25, 2005) was an American pop music singer. ... In popular music a cover version is a new rendition of a previously recorded song. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Liverpool waterfront by night, as seen from the Wirral. ... The Beatles were a pop and rock music group from Liverpool, England, who continue to be held in the very highest regard for their artistic achievements, their huge commercial success, and their groundbreaking role in the history of popular music. ... Here Comes My Baby: The Ultimate Collection cover. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Yardbirds album cover The Yardbirds were an early British rock band, noted for spawning the careers of several of rock musics most famous guitarists, including Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page. ... Cock-A-Hoop Groovin Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ...


Ironically, the turning down of The Beatles, led indirectly to the signing of Decca's biggest Sixties artists, The Rolling Stones. Dick Rowe was judging a talent contest with George Harrison, and Harrison mentioned to him that he should take a look at The Stones, whom he had just seen live for the first time a couple of weeks before. Rowe saw the Stones, and quickly signed them to a contract. The Rolling Stones are a British rock group who rose to prominence during the 1960s. ... George Harrison, MBE (February 24, 1943 – November 29, 2001) was a popular British guitarist, singer, songwriter, record producer, and film producer, best known as a member of The Beatles. ...


Other artists released on British Decca or through one of its licensed or subsidiary labels at at least one point during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s include Wishbone Ash, Bill Haley , Pat Boone, Little Richard, Fats Domino, Chuck Berry, Carl Perkins, Bloodstone, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, Link Wray, Engelbert Humperdinck, Buddy Holly, The Crickets, Tommy Steele, Terry Dene, The Everly Brothers, Bobby Darin, Ricky Nelson, Lord Rockingham's XI, Duane Eddy, The Coasters, Ray Charles, The Drifters, Eddie Cochran, Del Shannon, Roy Orbison, Leapy Lee, The Crystals, The Ronettes, Ike and Tina Turner, The Bachelors, The Big Three, Dave Berry, Anthony Newley, The Zombies, Billy Fury, Eden Kane, Jess Conrad, Bobby Vee, Brenda Lee, Tom Jones, Glass Harp, The Who, David Bowie, The Fortunes, Kathy Kirby, Jet Harris & Tony Meehan, Louise Cordet, Heinz, Marc Bolan, The Move, Graham Bond, John Mayall, Rod Stewart, The Nashville Teens, Paul & Barry Ryan, The Animals, The Tornados, Unit Four Plus Two, The Caravelles, Bern Elliott & The Fenmen, The Mojos, Them, Los Bravos, Lulu, The Small Faces, Twinkle, The Alan Price Set, Warm Sounds, Procol Harum, Amen Corner, Denny Laine, Frijid Pink, Brotherhood Of Man, Honeybus, Timebox, Ten Years After, Cat Stevens, White Plains, The Rattles, The Flower Pot Men, Marmalade, Junior Campbell, Camel, Caravan, Giles, Giles and Fripp, Peter Skellern, Matthews' Southern Comfort and Genesis. Wishbone Ash are a British classic rock band, formed in Devon, 1969, forming out of the ashes of the groups as The Empty Vessels, then Tanglewood. ... Bill Haley, with his band, the Comets, was one of the first rock and roll acts to tour the United Kingdom. ... Pat Boone Pat Boone (born June 1, 1934) is a singer whose smooth style made him one of the most popular performers of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Little Richard on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, (issue RS 58, May 28, 1970) Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932 in Macon, Georgia) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist, and an early African-American pioneer of rock and roll. ... Fats Domino Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928 in New Orleans, Louisiana), is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Chuck Berry Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born October 18, 1926) is an immensely influential African American guitarist, singer, and composer, and one of the pioneers of rock & roll music. ... Carl Perkins Carl Lee Perkins (April 9, 1932 – January 19, 1998) was an American pioneer of rockabilly music, a mix of rhythm and blues and country music that evolved at Sun Records in Memphis in the early 1950s. ... Chalcedony Knife, AD 1000-1200 Chalcedony is one of the cryptocrystalline varieties of the mineral quartz, having a waxy luster. ... Jerry Lee Lewis (born September 29, 1935) is an American rock and roll and country music singer, songwriter, and pianist, as well as an early pioneer of rock and roll music. ... John R Cash (February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was a vastly influential American country music and rock music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... Link Wray and His Ray Mens The Swan Singles Collection 1963-1967 Fred Lincoln Link Wray Jr (May 2, 1929 – November 5, 2005) was a rock and roll guitar player most noted for introducing a new sound for electric guitars in his major hit, the 1958 instrumental Rumble, by... Engelbert Humperdinck Engelbert Humperdinck, born May 2, 1936 in what was then known as Madras, India as Arnold George Dorsey, is a well-known pop singer of the 1950s-present. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936 – February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of Rock and Roll. ... The Crickets were the backing band formed by singer/songwriter Buddy Holly in the 1950s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Don (born Isaac Donald Everly February 1, 1937 in Brownie, a small coal-mining town (now defunct) near Central City, Muhlenberg County, Kentucky) and Phil Everly (born Philip Everly January 19, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) are country-influenced rock and roll performers who had their greatest success in the 1950s. ... Bobby Darin (May 14, 1936 – December 20, 1973) was born Robert Walden Cassotto and was one of the most popular rock and roll American teen idols of the late 1950s. ... Ricky Nelson Ricky Nelson can also mean Ricky Nelson (wrestler) or Ricky Lee Nelson, baseball player. ... Duane Eddy (born April 26, 1938) is an American guitarist best know for his Twangy guitar style. ... The Coasters were an American doo wop and early rock and roll group, evolving from The Robins, a Los Angeles based doo wop group. ... For Ray Charles of the Ray Charles Singers, and longtime vocal conductor for Perry Como, see Ray Charles (elder). ... The Drifters were a long-lived American doo wop/R&B band, originally formed by Clyde McPhatter (of Billy Ward & the Dominoes) in 1953. ... Eddie Cochran Eddie Cochran (October 3, 1938 – April 17, 1960) was an early American rockabilly musician and an important influence on popular music during the 1960s. ... Del Shannon should not be confused with Dell Shannon, the pseudonym under which Elizabeth Livingston wrote police procedurals for 26 years. ... Roy Orbison at a London press conference, late 1988. ... Leapy Lee (b. ... The Crystals were one of the most successful girl groups of the 1960s. ... The Ronettes were an American girl group of the 1960s, best known for their work with producer Phil Spector. ... Tina Turner on the cover of her 1991 album Simply the Best Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock on November 26, 1939) is an African American R&B, pop, rock and soul singer, Buddhist and occasional actress probably best known for her scorching performances with the Ike and Tina Turner... The Bachelors:A pop music group of the sixties originating from Dublin,Ireland. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Dave Berry was born David Holgate Grundy in Woodhouse, Sheffield, England, on February 6, 1941. ... George Anthony Newley (b. ... For the undead creature of Vodun lore, see zombie. ... Billy Fury (April 17, 1940 - January 28, 1983) was a British pop singer of the 1960s. ... Eden Kane (born Richard Graham Sarstedt, on 29 March 1942, in Delhi, India) was an archetypal, early 1960s, British pop singer. ... Bobby Vee (born April 30, 1943) is an American pop music singer. ... Brenda Lee on the cover of her collection, part of The Millennium Collection Brenda Lee, real name Brenda Mae Tarpley (born December 11, 1944), was an American teen idol and country singer from Lithonia, Georgia. ... Sir Tom Jones Sir Thomas Jones Woodward, OBE (born 7 June 1940), known as Sir Tom Jones, is a Welsh pop singer. ... Glass Harp was a Youngstown, Ohio based power trio consisting of guitarist Phil Keaggy, drummer John Sferra and bassist Dan Pecchio. ... The Who are a British rock band that first came to prominence in the 1960s. ... David Bowie (born David Robert Hayward-Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English rock singer, musician and actor. ... Hailing from Birmingham, England, the Fortunes first came to prominence and international acclaim during that Golden Era of Popular Music - the swinging mid-sixties. ... Kathy Kirby (born October 20, 1940 with the name Kathleen ORourke) was a popular British singer of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Jet Harris was the bass guitarist with The Shadows until April 1962 Terence Jet Harris was born on 6th July 1939 in Kingsbury, London, England. ... Tony Meehan, (March 2, 1943 – November 28, 2005), was one of the founder members of the British group The Shadows, along with Jet Harris, Hank B. Marvin and Bruce Welch. ... Heinz has several meanings: Heinz is the common trading name for the H. J. Heinz Company, known for their pickles, ketchup, baked beans and soups. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Move ca. ... A founding father of British R&B boom in the 60s, Bonds story is one of the greatest tragedies of british rock. ... John Mayall, OBE, (born 29 November 1933) is a pioneering British blues singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist. ... Roderick David Stewart (born January 10, 1945 in Highgate, London) is an English born singer and songwriter of Scottish descent, most known for his uniquely raspy, gravelly, hoarse-sounding voice and personable singing style, as exemplified in his signature song Maggie May. In a career now entering its fifth decade... The Nashville Teens The Nashville Teens was a rock group formed 1962 in Surrey. ... Paul Ryan (October 24, 1948, Leeds, Yorkshire - November 29, 1992) was a British singer and songwriter. ... Barry Ryan Barry Ryan (born October 24, 1948) is an English pop singer. ... The US edition of The Animals self-titled debut album. ... Tornados is a British instrumental group of the 1960s who acted as the in-house back-up group for many of Joe Meeks productions. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... The Caravelles were a duo girl-group who is best known for their 1963 #3 smash You Dont Have To Be A Baby To Cry. ... The Mojos The Mojos were a merseybeat band from the 1960s, best known today for their hit British single Everythings Alright. In spite of having one of the best reputations among the Liverpool merseybeat scene, Everythings Alright remained their only major hit, with only a few other singles... Them can refer to: the name of a former band, starring Van Morrison. ... Lulu on the cover of her 2002 album Together Lulu (real name Marie McDonald McLaughlin Lawrie) is a Scottish singer and songwriter most known for the 1960s international hit record To Sir, With Love. She was born on November 3, 1948 in Glasgow, and shot to fame at the age... For the Scottish movie Small Faces, see Small Faces (movie). ... In the Forgotten Realms setting, based on the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Twinkle is Drizzts defensive scimitar; his offensive scimitar is Icingdeath. ... Alan Price (born April 19, 1941 in Fairfield, Washington, Tyne and Wear, England) is a musician, songwriter, and actor. ... Procol Harum Procol Harum is a British progressive rock band, formed in the early 1960s. ... Amen Corner may refer to: Amen Corner (band) Amen Corner (musical) Amen Corner (place) The Amen Corner is a play by James Baldwin, which addresses themes of the role of the church in the African-American family and the effect of a poverty born of racial prejudice on the African... Denny Laine playing a double-necked guitar Denny Laine (born Brian Hines, on October 29, 1944, in Birmingham, England) is a British songwriter and musician best known for his roles as former guitarist and singer of The Moody Blues and, later, co-founder (along with Paul McCartney) of Wings. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Brotherhood of Man is a 70s British pop group that won Eurovision in 1976 with Save your Kisses for Me. They took a similar style as the Swedish pop group ABBA, who also won Eurovision in 1974 Singles United we stand Where are you going to my love Save your... The Honeybus were a versatile 1960s British band, who, since their heyday, have often been pigeonholed as one-hit wonders, a tag which belies the rich legacy of material left behind by the band. ... From software project management. ... Ten Years After is a British blues rock band popular in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ... Cat Stevens (born Stephen Demetre Georgiou on July 21, 1948, and now named Yusuf Islam) is best known for his tenure as a popular British singer-songwriter. ... White Plains is the name of some places in the United States of America: White Plains, Georgia White Plains, Kentucky White Plains, Maryland White Plains, New York White Plains, North Carolina White Plains, New York was the site of the American Revolutionary War Battle of White Plains. ... The Flowerpot Men were a British band formed in 1967 and concentrated on a trio of singers. ... Marmalade were a Scottish pop/rock group, fronted by vocalist Dean Ford, real name Thomas McAleese (born 5 September 1946). ... William Campbell who was born in Glasgow, Scotland, UK on May 31, 1947 well known for his stage name, Junior Campbell. ... Species Camelus bactrianus Camelus dromedarius A camel is either of the two species of large even-toed ungulate in the genus Camelus, the Dromedary (single hump) and the Bactrian Camel (double hump). ... Look up caravan and Caravan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Giles, Giles and Fripp were a quirky late sixties band featuring brothers Michael Giles on drums, Peter Giles on bass guitar, and rounded out by Robert Fripp on guitar. ... Peter Skellern, born 14 March 1947, in Bury, Lancashire, is a British singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Iain Matthews (known in the 1960s first as Ian MacDonald, and from the late 1960s until 1989 as Ian Matthews) is a British musician and songwriter. ... Genesis is a British rock band, formed in 1967. ...


British Decca lost a key source for American records when Atlantic Records switched British distribution to Polydor Records in 1966 in order for Atlantic to gain access to British recording artists which they didn't have under Decca distribution. Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is a record label founded in 1947 by Ahmet Ertegun and Herb Abramson, principally as a R&B label. ... Polydor Records is a record label once headquartered in Germany. ...


The 1970s were disastrous for Decca. The Rolling Stones left the label in 1970, and other artists followed. Decca's deals with numerous other record labels began to fall apart; RCA abandoned Decca to set up its own UK office in 1971. The Moody Blues were the only international rock act that remained on the label. Although Decca had set up the first of the British "progressive" labels, Deram Records, in 1966, by the time the punk era set in 1977, Decca had become known primarily as a classical label which had only sporadic pop success with such acts as John Miles, novelty creation Father Abraham and the Smurfs, and productions by longtime Decca associate Jonathan King. Decca sadly became a label of last resort, dependent on re-release of its back catalogue. Contemporary signings such as the pre-stardom Adam Ant and Slaughter & The Dogs were firmly second division and second rate when compared to likes of PolyGram, CBS, EMI, and newcomer Virgin's rosters of hitmakers. For other uses, see RCA (disambiguation). ... The Moody Blues were best known for fusing an orchestral sound with rock and roll, as seen in one of their most popular songs, Nights in White Satin. ... Deram Records was setup by Decca Records (UK) as a label for alternative artists. ... John Miles is a British vocalist, guitarist and keyboard player best known for his 1976 Top 3 hit Music. ... Jonathan King is the stage name of Kenneth George King (born December 6, 1944, London), a wealthy pop music impresario who in 2001 received a seven year prison sentence for four indecent assaults and two more serious sexual offences on schoolboys aged 14 and 15. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Original UK 45 rpm single picture cover: Slaughter & The Dogs - Where Have All The Boot Boys Gone? Slaughter and the Dogs were an early British punk band in the late 1970s, best remembered today for having Steven Morrissey as their singer for a brief period. ... PolyGram was the name from 1972 of the major label recording company started by Philips as a holding company for its music interests in 1945. ... Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ... Virgin Records is a British recording label founded by British entrepreneur Richard Branson, and Nik Powell in 1972 after a period of selling discount records via their small shop in London. ...


Classical music

In classical music, Decca had a long way to go from its modest beginnings to catching up with the established HMV and Columbia labels (later merged as EMI). Decca’s emergence as a major classical label may be attributed to three concurrent events: the development of the FFRR technique, the introduction of the long-playing record, and the recruitment of John Culshaw to Decca’s London office. His Masters Voice, often abbreviated to HMV, is a famous trademark in the music business, and for many years was the name of a large record company. ... The EMI Group is a major record label, based in Kensington in London, in the United Kingdom. ... A gramophone record, (also vinyl record, phonograph record, LP record, or simply record) is an analogue sound recording medium consisting of a flat disc with an inscribed modulated spiral groove. ... John Culshaw (born Southport 28 May 1924, died London 27 April 1980), was a pioneering classical record producer for Decca. ...


FFRR

FFRR (full frequency range recording) was a spin-off of Decca’s technical work during the Second World War in the field of radar, and enabled a greatly enhanced frequency range (high and low notes) to be captured on recordings. Critics regularly commented on the startling realism of the new Decca recordings. The Decca recording engineers Arthur Haddy and Kenneth Wilkinson developed in 1954 the famous Decca tree, a stereo main microphone recording system for big orchestras. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... M*A*S*H , see Corporal Walter (Radar) OReilly. ... The Decca tree is a stereo main microphone recording system for big orchestras. ...


The LP

The Long-Playing record was launched in the USA by Columbia Records (not connected with the British company of the same name). It enabled recordings to play for up to half an hour without a break, compared with the three minutes playing time of the existing records. The new records were made of vinyl (the old discs were made of shellac), which enabled the FFRR recordings to be transferred to disc very realistically. In the UK Decca took up the LP promptly and enthusiastically, giving the company an enormous advantage over EMI, which for some years tried to stick exclusively to the old format, thereby forfeiting competitive advantage to Decca, both artistically and financally. Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ...


John Culshaw

John Culshaw, who joined Decca in 1946 in a junior post, rapidly became a senior producer of classical recordings. He revolutionised recording – of opera, in particular. Hitherto, the practice had been to put microphones in front of the performers and simply record what they performed. Culshaw was determined to make recordings that would be ‘a theatre of the mind’, making the listener’s experience at home not second best to being in the opera house, but a wholly different experience. To that end he got the singers to move about in the studio as they would onstage, used discreet sound effects and different acoustics, and recorded in long continuous takes. His skill, coupled with the incomparable Decca engineering, took Decca into the first flight of recording companies. His pioneering recording (begun in 1958) of Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen conducted by Georg Solti was a huge artistic and commercial success (to the chagrin of other companies). In the wake of Decca’s lead, artists such as Herbert von Karajan, Joan Sutherland and later Luciano Pavarotti were keen to join the company’s roster. John Culshaw (born Southport 28 May 1924, died London 27 April 1980), was a pioneering classical record producer for Decca. ... Wagner may refer to more than one place in the United States: Wagner, South Dakota Wagner, Wisconsin Wagner may refer to more than one person: Richard Wagner, German composer Cosima Wagner, daughter of Franz Liszt and wife of Richard Wagner Heinrich Leopold Wagner, dramatist and author John Peter Honus Wagner... Valkyrie Warrior Maiden by artist Arthur Rackham (1912) Der Ring des Nibelungen translated commonly into English as The Ring of the Nibelung or The Nibelungs Ring, is a series of four epic operas. ... Sir Georg Solti, KBE (pronounced ) (born György Stern, 21 October 1912 - 5 September 1997) was a world-renowned Hungarian-born British orchestral and operatic conductor, who was still actively engaged in performing right up until his death. ... Herbert von Karajan (Salzburg April 5, 1908 Anif near Salzburg – July 16, 1989) was an Austrian conductor. ... Dame Joan Sutherland, OM, AC, DBE is an Australian opera singer noted for her contribution to the bel canto revival of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Luciano Pavarotti The Italian tenor Luciano Pavarotti (born October 12, 1935), is one of the most famous living singers, not only in the world of opera, but across all genres. ...


In the 1970s, after Culshaw had left the company, the classical division began to lose its way, rather as the popular music side of the company did at the same time. By the start of the present century, Decca was making comparatively few major classical recordings, and its roster of stars was much diminished, with Cecilia Bartoli being perhaps the best-known. Its back catalogue, however, remains one of the glories of classical music. The Solti Ring was voted best recording of all time by readers of the influential magazine The Gramophone. Cecilia Bartoli The Italian mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli (born 4 June 1966) is a popular opera singer and recitalist. ... The Gramophone is a glossy publication devoted to classical music and particularly recordings of classical music. ...


Later history

PolyGram acquired the remains of Decca U.K. within days of Sir Edward Lewis's death in January 1980. PolyGram was the name from 1972 of the major label recording company started by Philips as a holding company for its music interests in 1945. ...


The American branch of Decca functioned separately for many years as it was sold off during World War II; it bought Universal Pictures in 1952, and eventually merged with MCA in 1962, becoming a subsidiary company under MCA. Because MCA held the rights to the name Decca in the US and Canada, British Decca sold its records in the United States and Canada under the label London Records. In Britain, London Records became a mighty catch-all licensing label for foreign recordings from the nascent post-WW II American independent and semi-major labels such as Cadence, ABC-Paramount, and Liberty. Conversely, US Decca recordings were marketed in Britain by UK Decca on Brunswick Records and Coral Records through 1968 when it began using the MCA Records imprint. The Decca name was dropped by MCA in 1973 in favor of the MCA Records label. The Decca label is currently in use by Universal Music Group worldwide; this is possible because Universal Studios (which officially dropped the MCA name after the Seagram buyout in 1997) acquired PolyGram, British Decca's parent company in 1998, thus consolidating Decca trademark ownership. Combatants Allies: • Poland, • UK & Commonwealth, • France/Free France, • Soviet Union, • USA, • China, ...and others Axis: • Germany, • Italy, • Japan, ...and others Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total: 50 million Full list Military dead: 8 million Civilian dead: 4 million Total: 12 million Full list World War II... Universal Studios Theme Parks. ... The Music Corporation of America, legally incorporated as MCA, Inc. ... London Records is a record label headquartered in the United Kingdom, originally marketing records in the United States, Canada and Latin America from 1947 through the 1980s. ... Brunswick Records is a United States based record label. ... Coral Records was a Decca Records subsidiary based in the United States of America. ... Universal Music Group (UMG), formerly MCA Music Entertainment (see Music Corporation of America), is the largest major label in the record industry. ... The current Universal Studios logo Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal, has production studios and offices located at 100 Universal City Plaza Drive in Universal City, California, an unincorporated area of Los Angeles County between Los Angeles and Burbank. ... The Seagram Company Ltd. ...


Today, Decca is a leading label for both classical music and Broadway scores; its most recent hit was Wicked (2003), which reached #140 on the Billboard Top 200 Albums chart. Wicked is a musical that premiered on Broadway at the George Gershwin Theatre on October 30, 2003. ... An example of a Billboard Magazine. ...


See also

The following is a partial list of record labels, both past and present. ...

External link

  • Official site

  Results from FactBites:
 
Decca Records - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1450 words)
Decca Records is a British record label established in 1929.
Decca’s emergence as a major classical label may be attributed to three concurrent events: the development of the FFRR technique, the introduction of the long-playing record, and the recruitment of John Culshaw to Decca’s London office.
FFRR (full frequency range recording) was a spin-off of Decca’s technical work during the Second World War in the field of radar, and enabled a greatly enhanced frequency range (high and low notes) to be captured on recordings.
Decca Records (386 words)
Decca Records was a record label from 1929 to 1980.
In 1934 a USA branch of Decca was launched, which quickly became a major player in the depressed United States record market thanks to it's roster of popular artists and the shrewd management of Jack Kapp[?].
In 1962 Decca executives turned down a chance to record a young group called the Beatles in favor of Brian Poole and the Tremeloes[?]; in retrospect this was an historic mistake.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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