FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Decathlon" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Decathlon

Decathlon is an athletic event combining 10 track and field events. Events are held over two consecutive days and the winners are determined by the combined performance in all events. Performance is judged on a points system in each event, not by the position achieved. The decathlon is contested by male athletes, while female athletes contest the Heptathlon. Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... A heptathlon is a sportive contest made up of seven events (from the Greek hepta (seven) and athlon (contest)). More specifically, the term heptathlon refers to an athletics event consisting of seven events. ...


The decathlon is a menu of athletic events, testing an individual’s speed, strength, skill, endurance, and personality. The word is of Greek origin (deka [ten] +athlon [contest]). The decathlon includes five events on each of two successive days. The first day schedules the 100-metre run, long jump, shot put, high jump, and 400 metres. It is a day of speedy movement, explosive power, and jumping ability. Day 2 consists of the 110-metre hurdles, discus, pole vault, javelin, and 1500 metres. The importance of this day is on technique and endurance.

Contents

Events

Day one:

Day two: Sprints are short running races in athletics. ... Long jumper at the GE Money Grand Prix in Helsinki, July 2005. ... Shot put The shot put is an athletics (track and field) event involving putting (throwing in a pushing motion) a heavy metal ball (called the shot) as far as possible. ... Gold medal winner Ethel Catherwood of Canada scissors over the bar at the 1928 Summer Olympics. ... Sprints are short running races in athletics. ...

Hurdling In track and field athletics there are sprint hurdle races and long hurdle races. ... Statue of discus thrower in Botanic Garden, Copenhagen, Denmark The Discus throw is an athletic throwing event in track and field competition. ... Pole vaulting is an athletic event where a person uses a long, flexible pole (usually made either of fiberglass or carbon fiber) as an aid to leap over a bar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Middle distance track events are track races longer than sprints up to (and arguably including) 5000 meters. ...

Origins

The event sprouted from the ancient game pentathlon. Pentathlon is a game that was played at the ancient Greek Olympics. Pentathlons involved five games – long jump, discus throw, javelin, sprint and a wrestling match. Introduced in Olympia during 708 BC, the game was extremely popular for many centuries. By the sixth century BC, pentathlons became part of religious games. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Gorgos, from Elis town near Olympia was a four-time pentathlon winner during the period. Another key player was Lampis, a young Spartan who was the first Olympic winner. Automedes was also a known player of the time. The last recorded game winner was Publius Asklepiades of Corinth in AD 241. Roman Emperor Theodosius I officially put an end to the game in AD 393 by closing down all the sanctuaries including Olympia. Olympia among the principal Greek sanctuaries Olympia (Greek: Olympía or Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Sparta (Doric: Spártā, Attic: Spártē) is a city in southern Greece. ... An engraving depicting what Theodosius may have looked like, ca. ...


From the mid 1700s various versions of the game emerged. The 1948 Olympics endorsed a new implication to the game. Seventeen-year-old Bob Mathias emerged as the then decathlon winner, banishing the myth that decathlon was a game for the old and the experienced. Mathias still remains the youngest decathlon sports champion in Olympic history. Robert Bruce Mathias (November 17, 1930 - September 2, 2006) was an American decathlete, two-time Olympic gold medalist, and United States Congressman. ...


Modern standardization

In 1964 the International Amateur Athletic Federation (IAAF) laid out new scoring tables and brought about some standardization in the game. The 1970s saw the game spreading to the Eastern European nations, mainly the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany. The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) is the international governing body for the sport of athletics (known in the US as track and field). It was founded in 1912 at its first Congress in Stockholm, Sweden by representatives from 17 national athletics federations as the International Amateur Athletics Federation. ...


The first decathlon competition was held on a single day, October 15, 1911, in Gothenburg, Sweden. This was technically not the first decathlon, but one of the first two, as Germany also held a decathlon on the very same day. The Germans contested their events in the same order but with a different scoring table. So, the first decathlon world-record holder was the winner of the first completed meet. Karl Hugo Wieslander, a Swede, and Karl Ritter von Halt, a German, were announced world-record holders. is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Location of Gothenburg in northern Europe Coordinates: Country Sweden County Västra Götaland County Province Västergötland Charter 1621 Government  - Mayor Göran Johansson Area  - City 450 km²  (174 sq mi)  - Water 14. ... Karl Hugo Wieslander (born 11 June 1889; Died 24 May 1976) was a Swedish athlete who competed in combined events. ...


The decathlon was added to the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm. After experience, the following order was chosen: 100 m run, long jump, shot put, high jump, and 400 m run on the first day; 110 m hurdles, discus, pole vault, javelin, and 1500 m run on the 2nd day. The Swedes also developed a set of scoring tables, based on the 1908 Olympic records. After the 1912 Stockholm Games, the tables were updated to include many new Olympic records. The 1912 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the V Olympiad, were held in 1912 in Stockholm, Sweden. ... Nickname: Location of Stockholm in northern Europe Coordinates: , Country Sweden Municipality Stockholm Municipality County Stockholm Province Södermanland and Uppland Charter 13th century Government  - Mayor Kristina Axén Olin (m) Population (March 2007)  - City 786,509  - Density 4,160/km² (10,774. ...


The 1912 Olympic decathlon has become legend because of the presence of Jim Thorpe. Jim had a terrific 1912 spring track season, winning as many as six events per meet. Thorpe made the U.S. Olympic team in four events: decathlon, pentathlon, high jump, and long jump. The Russian czar donated a Viking ship as a prize for the decathlon champion. Thorpe won the decathlon by almost 700 points over his closet opponent, Hugo Wieslander of Sweden. Because of the unexpected large number of entries, the decathlon was held over 3 days. The first day they held the 100 m run, long jump, and shot put. The second day consisted of the high jump, 400 m run, discus, and 110, hurdles. The third and final day consisted of the pole vault, javelin, and 1500 m run. Thorpe’s 8412 points converts to 6564 points on the current tables, still a very respectable score three quarters of a century later. Swedes: Hugo Wieslander, Charles Lomberg, and Gösta Holmér captured the next three spots. For other persons named Jim Thorpe, see Jim Thorpe (disambiguation). ... Karl Hugo Wieslander (born 11 June 1889; Died 24 May 1976) was a Swedish athlete who competed in combined events. ... Charles Lomberg (born December 4, 1886 - died March 5, 1966) is a Swedish athlete who competed mainly in the Decathlon. ... Gustaf Richard Mikael Gösta Holmér (1891 - 1983) was a Swedish decathlete. ...


Thorpe’s score was not beaten for another 15 years. In his absence, there was little decathlon activity for the remainder of the decade. Only in Sweden was the decathlon often contested. The Swedes managed to stay neutral during World War I, which forced the cancellation of the games of Berlin in 1916. Fascinatingly, decathlons were held as part of the Far Eastern Games in 1913, 1915, 1917, and 1919.


The average good decathlete competes at most three or four times a year, the less talented even fewer. Bill Toomey’s nine great efforts back in 1969 were very unusual. The Decathlon is the least common Olympic event. William Anthony Toomey (born January 10, 1939) was the 1968 Olympic Decathlon Champion (United States). ...


The decathlete does not have to be amazing in any event to be a champion in the 10 events. But he must range from adequate in his weak events to good or better in the other skills. Because he must do well in the four runs and six field events, he has little opportunity to perfect any one event. His training is necessarily different as he strives to improve all techniques, gain strength without losing speed, and acquire the stamina to perform through a competition that lasts anywhere from 4 to 12 hours per day during the Olympics. As a reference point, a performance in the (non-decathlon) world record class would give somewhere between 1100 and 1400 points per event, totaling almost 12500 points for a full record-breaking decathlon. When compared to the 6-7000 points that a good decathlete would usually get, or the world record of slightly over 9000 points, this illustrates how much specialization must be sacrificed to become a good all-round athlete.


The decathlon is the only event in which it doesn’t matter if the athlete finishes first, second, or third in an event. The score is the thing, and for the most part decathletes compete against themselves, while watching their opponents. It is also the only event with an arbitrary scoring system and thus the only one in which personal performance and records can be broken as new scoring tables are adopted. Under the original scoring tables adopted in 1912, Akilles Järvinen of Finland finished second in both the 1928 and 1932 Olympics, but the new scoring system introduced in 1934 gave Jarvinen higher converted totals than both the men he lost to. World-record holder C.K. Yang lost 1032 points when his 1963 performance was converted late in 1964 to the new tables first used in the 1964 Olympics. His top rivals lost only 287 and 172 points when their bests were converted, and Yang dropped from the favorite to third on the pre-Games ranking, finishing a disappointing fifth. The scoring tables for the decathlon have undergone continual evolution since their inception about a century ago, with several changes to both the character of the equations and the indices on which the equations are based. ... Akilles Aki Eero Johannes Järvinen (September 19, 1905 - March 15, 1943) was a Finnish athlete and Olympic medallist. ... Yang Chuan-kwang, or C.K. Yang (Chinese: ) (born 10 July 1933 in Taitung, Taiwan, died January 27, 2007 in California, United States) was a former Olympic decathlete from Taiwan. ...


The arbitrary nature of the scoring tables can work in the opposite direction as well. In 1984, at the Los Angeles Olympic Games, Great Britain’s Daley Thompson missed the world record by one point on then-used 1962/77 tables. The tables were changed a year later and Daley’s score in Los Angeles converted to a best-ever mark. The scoring tables for the decathlon have undergone continual evolution since their inception about a century ago, with several changes to both the character of the equations and the indices on which the equations are based. ... Music sample: Olympic Fanfare and Theme ( file info) — composed by John Williams for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Francis Morgan Thompson, CBE (born July 30, 1958 in Worcester Park), known commonly as Daley Thompson, is a former English decathlete and arguably the greatest the world had ever seen. ...


World records

The decathlon world records are:

  • Men's:
  • Women's:

Note: The decathlon point system was last changed in 1985 at an IAAF meeting in Los Angeles. There have been no changes since this time and none are anticipated. Roman Šebrle IPA: (born 26 November 1974 in Lanškroun) is an athlete from the Czech Republic. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Austra Skujytė (born August 12, 1979 in Biržai) is a Lithuanian athlete, competing in both the heptathlon and the decathlon. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) is the international governing body for the sport of athletics (known in the US as track and field). It was founded in 1912 at its first Congress in Stockholm, Sweden by representatives from 17 national athletics federations as the International Amateur Athletics Federation. ...


Other multiple event contests

Several biathletes in the shooting area of a competition Biathlon (not to be confused with duathlon) is a term used to describe any sporting event made up of two disciplines. ... Duathlon is an athletic event (not to be confused with biathlon) that consists of a running leg, followed by a cycling leg and then another running leg in a format bearing some resemblance to triathlons. ... The three components of triathlon: Swimming, Cycling, Running A triathlon is an athletic event consisting of swimming, cycling and running over various distances. ... A quadrathlon is an endurance sports event composed of four individual disciplines. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Competitors in the final round of the Mens Modern Pentathlon pull for the finish line at the Goudi Sports Complex on August 26, 2004. ... A heptathlon is a sportive contest made up of seven events (from the Greek hepta (seven) and athlon (contest)). More specifically, the term heptathlon refers to an athletics event consisting of seven events. ...

Top ten performers

Accurate as of January 1, 2006. is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Mark Athlete Nationality Venue Date
9026 Roman Šebrle Flag of the Czech Republic Czech Republic Götzis May 27, 2001
8994 Tomáš Dvořák Flag of the Czech Republic Czech Republic Prague July 4, 1999
8891 Dan O'Brien Flag of the United States United States Talence September 9, 1992
8847 Daley Thompson Flag of the United Kingdom Great Britain Los Angeles August 9, 1984
8832 Jürgen Hingsen Flag of West Germany West Germany Mannheim June 9, 1984
8820 Bryan Clay Flag of the United States United States Athens August 24, 2004
8815 Erki Nool Flag of Estonia Estonia Edmonton August 7, 2001
8792 Uwe Freimuth Flag of the German Democratic Republic East Germany Potsdam July 21, 1984
8784 Tom Pappas Flag of the United States United States Palo Alto June 22, 2003
8762 Siegfried Wentz Flag of West Germany West Germany Bernhausen June 5, 1983

Roman Å ebrle IPA: (born 26 November 1974 in LanÅ¡kroun) is an athlete from the Czech Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Götzis is a town in the western Austrian province of Vorarlberg. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Tomáš Dvořák (born May 11th, 1972 in Zlín) is an athlete from the Czech Republic. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Nickname: Motto: Praga Caput Rei publicae Location within the Czech Republic Coordinates: , Country Czech Republic Region Capital City of Prague Founded 9th century Government  - Mayor Pavel Bém Area  - City 496 km²  (191. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Daniel Dion (Dan) OBrien (born July 18, 1966 in Portland, Oregon) is an American decathlete. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Talence is a commune in the département of Gironde and the Aquitaine région of France. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Francis Morgan Thompson, CBE (born July 30, 1958 in Worcester Park), known commonly as Daley Thompson, is a former English decathlete and arguably the greatest the world had ever seen. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Jürgen Hingsen (born January 25, 1958 in Duisburg) is a former (West) German decathlete who won several medals at international championships in the 1980s. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Mannheim is a city in Germany. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... This article is about the year. ... Bryan Clay (born January 3, 1980 in Austin, Texas) is an American decathlete. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Athens is the largest and the capital city of Greece, located in the Attica periphery. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Erki Nool (born June 25, 1970 in Võru, Estonia) is an Estonian decathlete and politician. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Estonia. ... For other places with the same name, see Edmonton (disambiguation). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_East_Germany. ... GDR redirects here. ... Potsdam is the capital city of the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Tom Pappas (born September 6, 1976 in Azalea, Oregon) is an American track & field decathlete. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Siegfried Wentz (b. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ...

Other famous decathletes

For other persons named Jim Thorpe, see Jim Thorpe (disambiguation). ... William Bruce Jenner (born October 28, 1949 in Mount Kisco, New York) is a U.S. track athlete. ... Robert Bruce Mathias (November 17, 1930 - September 2, 2006) was an American decathlete, two-time Olympic gold medalist, and United States Congressman. ... Dmitriy Karpov (born July 23, 1981 in Karaganda) is an athlete from Kazakhstan who competes in decathlon and heptathlon (the latter during the winter season). ... Dean Macey (born: December 12, 1977) in Rochford, Essex, England is a decathlete. ... Henrik Dagård (born 7 August 1969 in Halmstad) is a retired Swedish decathlete. ... Austra Skujytė (born August 12, 1979 in Biržai) is a Lithuanian athlete, competing in both the heptathlon and the decathlon. ...

External links

  • Decathlon points calculator
  • Decathlon points formula
  • Hexham International Decathlon Meeting (since 1997)
  • Team Decathlon website
Athletics events

Sprints: 60 m | 100 m | 200 m | 400 m Sprints are short running races in athletics. ... 60 metres is a sprint event in athletics. ... For other uses, see 1 E2 m. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... 400 m is a common track running event. ...


Hurdles: 60 m hurdles | 100 m hurdles | 110 m hurdles | 400 m hurdles Hurdling In track and field athletics there are sprint hurdle races and long hurdle races. ... A hurdling World Champion, Perdita Felicien, Canada. ... Womens 100 m hurdles at the Atlanta Olympic Games The 100 m hurdles are an Olympic track and field athletics discipline run by women. ... The 110m Hurdles are an Olympic track and field athletics discipline run by men. ... Womens 400m Hurdles The 400m Hurdles are an Olympic track and field (athletics) discipline. ...


Middle distance: 800 m | 1500 m | 3000 m | steeplechase Middle distance track events are track races longer than sprints up to (and arguably including) 5000 meters. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The 1,500 metres is a premier middle distance track event. ... A track event where you run 7 and 1/2 times around a 400m track. ... The steeplechase is an obstacle race in athletics (track and field), which derives its name from the steeplechase in horse racing. ...


Long distance: 5,000 m | 10,000 m | half marathon | marathon | ultramarathon | multiday races | Cross country running Long-distance track event races require runners to balance their energy. ... 5000 meters, a popular running distance also known as a 5 km, colloquially five-K (equal to 3. ... ... In athletics, a half marathon is a race over half the distance of a marathon, i. ... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ... An ultramarathon is any running event longer than the traditional marathon length of 42. ... Multiday races are ultramarathon running events which are typically either segmented into daily events of a specified distance or time, or staged so that runners can run as far as they want, at their own discretion, over a set course or over a set number of days. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ...


Relays: 4 × 100 m | 4 × 400 m;       Racewalking During a relay race, members of a team take turns swimming or running (usually with a baton) parts of a circuit or performing a certain action. ... The 4 × 100 metres relay or sprint relay is an athletics track event run in lanes over one lap of the track with four runners completing 100 meters each. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mens 20 km walk during the 2005 World Championships in Athletics in Helsinki, Finland. ...


Throws: Discus | Hammer | Javelin | Shot put Statue of discus thrower in Botanic Garden, Copenhagen, Denmark The Discus throw is an athletic throwing event in track and field competition. ... The modern or Olympic hammer throw is an athletic throwing event where the object to be thrown is a heavy steel ball attached with wire (maximum 4 ft (1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shot put The shot put is an athletics (track and field) event involving putting (throwing in a pushing motion) a heavy metal ball (called the shot) as far as possible. ...


Jumps: High jump | Long jump | Pole vault | Triple jump Gold medal winner Ethel Catherwood of Canada scissors over the bar at the 1928 Summer Olympics. ... Long jumper at the GE Money Grand Prix in Helsinki, July 2005. ... Pole vaulting is an athletic event where a person uses a long, flexible pole (usually made either of fiberglass or carbon fiber) as an aid to leap over a bar. ... The triple jump is an athletics (track and field) event, previously also known as hop, step and jump, whose various names describe the actions a competitor takes. ...


Combination: Pentathlon | Heptathlon | Decathlon The womens pentathlon was contested in the Olympics from 1964 until 1980, and it was replaced in the 1984 games with the heptathlon. ... A heptathlon is a sportive contest made up of seven events (from the Greek hepta (seven) and athlon (contest)). More specifically, the term heptathlon refers to an athletics event consisting of seven events. ...


Highly uncommon: Standing high jump | Standing long jump | Standing triple jump The Standing high jump is an athletic event that was featured in the Olympics from 1900 to 1912. ... The standing long jump is an athletic event that was featured in the Olympics from 1900 to 1912. ... The standing triple jump is an athletic sport. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Nature of the Decathlon - DECA, The Decathlon Association (0 words)
he decathlon is an athletic competition containing ten different track and field (athletics) contests and won by the participant amassing the highest total score.
While one athlete may be faster, another stronger and yet a third a better jumper, the decathlon attempts to determine who, among the three, is the best all-around or general athlete.
So the decathlon is the only event in which it doesn't really matter if the athlete finishes first, third or worse in a particular event.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m