FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Death poem
General Akashi Gidayu preparing to commit seppuku after losing a battle for his master in 1582. He is depicted as having just written his death poem, which is also visible in the upper right corner.
General Akashi Gidayu preparing to commit seppuku after losing a battle for his master in 1582. He is depicted as having just written his death poem, which is also visible in the upper right corner.
Death poem by Kuroki Hiroshi, a Japanese soldier who died in a submarine accident on September 7 1944
Death poem by Kuroki Hiroshi, a Japanese soldier who died in a submarine accident on September 7 1944

A death poem (辞世の句 jisei no ku?) is a poem written near the time of one's own death. It is a tradition for literate persons to write one in a number of different cultures, especially in Japan. Download high resolution version (509x750, 127 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (509x750, 127 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... “hara-kiri” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Death_poem_by_Kuroki_Hiroshi. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ...


Poetry has long been a core part of Japanese tradition, in strong relation to religious practice. The poem should be graceful, natural, and about neutral emotions adhering to the teachings of Buddhism and Shinto (and possibly Christianity). Except the earliest works of this tradition, it has been considered to be rude to mention death explicitly; rather, metaphoric references such as sunsets, autumn or falling sakura (cherry blossom) suggest the transience of life. (See kigo for more on the importance of sakura in Japanese poetry). A silhouette of a Buddha statue at Ayutthaya, Thailand. ... Shinto ) is the native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ... “Cherry Blossom” redirects here. ... “Cherry tree” redirects here. ... Cherry trees from Japan around the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC. Kigo (season word(s), from the Japanese 季語, kigo) are words or phrases that are generally associated with a particular season. ... Grave of the Japanese poet Yosa Buson Waka and Kanshi, Chinese poetry written in Chinese, were the two great pillars of traditional Japanese poetry. ...


As a once-in-a-lifetime event, it was common to converse with respected poets before, and sometimes well in advance of, a death to help finish writing a poem. As the time passes, changes take place in a person's life and the poem could often be rewritten. This rewriting was almost never mentioned to keep from tarnishing the deceased person's legacy. Poets are authors of poems. ...


Writing death poems is done by both Chinese and Japanese Zen monks (writing either Chinese style poetry kanshi, waka or haiku), and by many haiku poets, as well as those who wish to write one. It was also an ancient custom in Japan for literate persons to compose a jisei on their death-bed. One of earliest records of jisei was recited by Prince Ōtsu executed in 686. For examples of death poems, see the articles on the famous haiku poet Bashō, the Japanese Buddhist monk Ryōkan, Ōta Dōkan (builder of Edo Castle), and the Japanese woodblock master Tsukioka Yoshitoshi. Zen is a school of Mahāyāna Buddhism notable for its emphasis on practice and experiential wisdom—particularly as realized in the form of meditation known as zazen—in the attainment of awakening. ... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ... Waka (和歌) or Yamato uta is a genre of Japanese poetry. ... Shut up Nick, youre wrong. ... Shut up Nick, youre wrong. ... Prince ÅŒtsu (大津皇子) (663 - October 28, 686) was a Japanese poet and the son of Emperor Temmu by Princess ÅŒta whose father was Emperor Tenji. ... Events October 21 - Conon becomes Pope, succeeding Pope John V. Empress Jito ascends to the throne of Japan Kingdom of Kent attacked and conquered by West Saxons under Caedwalla Births August 23 - Charles Martel, winner of the Battle of Tours Deaths Emperor Temmu of Japan Korean Buddhist monk Weonhyo See... A statue of Bashō in Hiraizumi, Iwate. ... A statue of Ryōkan. ... ÅŒta Dōkan (太田道灌) (1432-1486) was born as ÅŒta Sukenaga (太田資長) into a daimyo family descending from Minamoto no Yorimasa. ... Edo Castle (江戸城 -jō) was built in 1457 by ÅŒta Dōkan in what is now the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo, but was then known as Edo, Toshima District, Musashi Province. ... Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (Owariya Yonejiro): 1839 - 1892 Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839 - June 9, 1892) (Japanese: 月岡 芳年; also named Taiso Yoshitoshi 大蘇 芳年) was the last great master - and one of the great innovative and creative geniuses - of the Japanese woodblock print, Ukiyo-e. ...


Some people left their jisei in multiple forms. Prince Ōtsu made both waka and kanshi, Sen no Rikyu made both kanshi and kyoka. Sen no Rikyu (千利休; 1522 - 1591) is considered the most profound influence on the Japanese tea ceremony. ...


A death poem sometimes took on an aspect of a will, reconciling differences between persons. In the common law, a will or testament is a document by which a person (the testator) regulates the rights of others over his property or family after death. ...


In a full ceremonial seppuku (Japanese ritual suicide) one of the elements of the ritual is the writing of a death poem. The poem is written in the waka style (five units long which are usually composed of five, seven, five, seven, and seven syllables). Asano Naganori, the daimyo whose suicide the forty-seven ronin avenged, wrote a death poem in which commentators see the immaturity and lack of character that led to him being ordered to commit seppuku in the first place. “hara-kiri” redirects here. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, a making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... Waka (和歌) or Yamato uta is a genre of Japanese poetry. ... Monument at the location of the Corridor of the Pines at the Imperial Palace (formerly Edo Castle) in Tokyo Asano Naganori (浅野長矩 September 28, 1667 – April 21, 1701) was the daimyo of the Ako han in Japan (1675 - 1701). ... Daimyo Matsudaira Katamori visits the residence of a retainer. ... Incense burns at the burial graves of the 47 Ronin at Sengaku-ji. ...


In 1970 writer Yukio Mishima and his disciples composed jisei before their abortive takeover of the Ichigaya garrison in Tokyo, where they killed themselves in this ritual manner.[1] Yukio Mishima ) was the public name of Kimitake Hiraoka , January 14, 1925–November 25, 1970), a Japanese author and playwright, famous for both his highly notable nihilistic post-war writings and the circumstances of his ritual suicide by seppuku. ... Ichigaya (市谷) is a neighborhood in Tokyo, Japan. ...

Contents

Notes

  1. ^ Donald Keene, The Pleasures of Japanese Literature, p.62

Donald Lawrence Keene is a noted Japanologist, scholar, teacher, writer, translator and interpreter of Japanese literature and culture. ... The Pleasures of Japanese Literature is a short nonfiction work by Donald Keene, which deals with Japanese aesthetics and literature; it is intended to be less academic and encyclopedic than his other works dealing with Japanese literature such as Seeds in the Heart, but better as an introduction for students...

References

  • Blackman, Sushila (1997). Graceful Exits: How Great Beings Die: Death Stories of Tibetan, Hindu & Zen Masters. Weatherhill, Inc.: USA, New York, New York. ISBN 0-8348-0391-7
  • Hoffmann, Yoel (1986). Japanese Death Poems: Written by Zen Monks and Haiku Poets on the Verge of Death. Charles E. Tuttle Company: USA, Rutland, Vermont. ISBN 0-8048 1505-4

See also

Elegy was originally used for a type of poetic metre (Elegiac metre), but is also used for a poem of mourning, from the Greek elegos, a reflection on the death of someone or on a sorrow generally. ... An epitaph ( literally: on the gravestone in ancient Greek) is text honoring the deceased, most commonly inscribed on a tombstone or plaque. ... A lament or lamentation is a song or poem expressing grief, regret or mourning. ...

External links

  • Salon: Japanese Death Poems
  • Mishima's Death Poem in Japanese

  Results from FactBites:
 
Japanese Death Poems (419 words)
death poem or jisei, the essential idea was that at one's final moment of life, one's reflection on death (one's own usually but also death in general) could be especially lucid and meaningful and therefore also constituted an important observation about life.
The poems are often full of symbols of death, such as the full moon, the western sky, the song of the cuckoo, and images of the season in which the writer died.
After writing this poem on the morning of his death, he lay down his brush and died sitting upright.
Death poem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (476 words)
The poem should be graceful, natural, and about neutral emotions adhering to the teachings of Buddhism and Shinto (and possibly Christianity).
Writing death poems is done by both Chinese and Japanese Zen monks (writing either Chinese style poetry kanshi, waka or haiku), and by many haiku poets, as well as those who wish to write one.
The poem is written in the waka style (five units long which are usually composed of five, seven, five, seven, and seven syllables).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m