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Encyclopedia > Death deity

Many cultures have incorporated a god of death into their mythology or religion. As death, along with birth, is among the major parts of human life, these deities may often be one of the most important deities of a religion. In some religions with a single powerful deity as the source of worship, the death deity is an antagonistic deity against which the primary deity struggles. The related term death worship has most often been used as a derogatory term to accuse certain groups of morally-abhorrent practices which set no value on human life, or which seem to glorify death as something positive in itself. Look up death, deceased in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Shinto ) is the native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... Shinigami , literally death god) is the Japanese name for personifications of death, in particular the Grim Reaper, which was imported to Japan from Europe during the Meiji period. ... Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Shortcut: WP:NPOVD Articles that have been linked to this page are the subject of an NPOV dispute (NPOV stands for Neutral Point Of View; see below). ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... Parturition redirects here. ...

Contents

Occurrence

In polytheistic religions or mythologies which have a complex system of deities governing various natural phenomena and aspects of human life, it is common to have a deity who is assigned the function of presiding over death. The inclusion of such a "departmental" deity of death in a religion's pantheon is not necessarily the same thing as the glorification of death which is commonly condemned by the use of the term "death-worship" in modern political rhetoric. Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of oral, visual, or written language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ...


In the theology of monotheistic religion, the one god governs both life and death. However in practice this manifests in different rituals and traditions and varies according to a number of factors including geography, politics, traditions and the influence of other religions.


Gods of Death

The Aztec civilization recognized a polytheistic mythology, which contained the many gods and supernatural creatures from their religious beliefs. ... Statuette of Mictlantecuhtli Mictlantecuhtli (lord of Mictlan), in Aztec mythology, was a god of the dead and King of Mictlan (Chicunauhmictlan), the lowest and northernmost section of the underworld. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mesopotamian mythology. ... Introduction In Sumerian and Akkadian (Babylonian and Assyrian) mythology, Ereshkigal, wife of Nergal, was the goddess of Irkalla, the land of the dead. ... The name Nergal (or Nirgal, Nirgali) refers to a deity in Babylonia with the main seat of his cult at Cuthah represented by the mound of Tell-Ibrahim. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... A modern depiction of Yamarajas Court, by Dominique Amendola Tibetan Dharmapala at the Field Museum in Chicago 19th century kagamibuta netsuke depicting Enma This article is about the deity Yama. ... // [[Image:]] Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... In Ugaritic Mot Death (spelled mt) is personified as a god of death. ... Celtic polytheism refers to the religious beliefs and practices of ancient Celts until the Christianization of Celtic-speaking lands. ... The Mórrígan (Morrígan, Morrigu, Mór-Rhioghain) (great queen or phantom queen), is an Irish goddess of war and destruction. ... Tibetan Dharmapala at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois Yama is the name of the Buddhist god and judge of the dead, who presides over the Buddhist Narakas (Pāli: Nirayas), Hells or Purgatories. Although ultimately based on the god Yama of the Hindu Vedas, the Buddhist Yama has developed... Khafres Pyramid and the Great Sphinx of Giza, built about 2550 BC during the Fourth Dynasty of the Old Kingdom,[1] are enduring symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt Ancient Egypt was a civilization in Northeastern Africa concentrated along the middle to lower reaches of the Nile River... For other uses, see Anubis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Osiris (disambiguation). ... In Finnish mythology, Tuoni was the god of the underworld (Tuonela). ... In Greek mythology, Thanatos (in Ancient Greek, θάνατος – Death) was the Daimon personification of Death and Mortality. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... This article is about the deity Yama in Hinduism. ... In the mythology of the Igbo, which is part of their ancient religion, the supreme god is called Chukwu (great spirit); Chukwu created the world and everything in it and is associated with all things on Earth. ... A modern depiction of Yamarajas Court, by Dominique Amendola Tibetan Dharmapala at the Field Museum in Chicago 19th century kagamibuta netsuke depicting Enma This article is about the deity Yama. ... Polynesia is a triangle of islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... The laugh of the fantail woke Hine-nui-te-pō In Māori mythology, Hine-nui-te-pō (Great woman of night) is a goddess of night and death, and the ruler of the underworld. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... In Maya mythology, Ah Puch was the God of Death and King of Mitnal, the underworld, which was the worst of all nine Mexicans and Central Americans believe that an owls screeches signify imminent death. ... A life sized figure of Santa Muerte stands outside a fortune tellers storefront in Mexico Citys Chinatown. ... Norse, Viking or Scandinavian mythology comprises the indigenous pre-Christian religion, beliefs and legends of the Scandinavian peoples, including those who settled on Iceland, where most of the written sources for Norse mythology were assembled. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... Freya, in an illustration to Wagners operas by Arthur Rackham. ... In Norse mythology, Hel (sometimes Anglicized or Latinized as Hela) is the queen of Hel, the Norse underworld. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... A statue of Freyja at DjurgÃ¥rden, Stockholm, Sweden. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... In Roman mythology, Mors is the personification of death and equivalent to the Greek Thanatos. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Pluto, lord of the underworld. ...

India

The Hindu gods Mara, Yama Raj and Kali are Gods of death and deadly forces. In the monotheistic frame-work of Islam, reverence for death also manifests in the 'worship of the dead' or 'saint worship' - a derogatory term used by some (eg the Sunni Wahabi) groups when referring to the Sufi, Shiah and Hindu Islamic practices of revering dead saints and prophets as manifestations of God's word on Earth. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Mara may mean: // Look up Mara in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Sunni Islam (Arabic سنّة) is the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wahhabism (sometimes spelled Wahabbism or Wahabism) is a movement of Islam named after Muhammad ibn Abd al Wahhab (1703–1792). ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Look up dead in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... For other senses of this word, see Prophet (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ...


In the 19th-century, the Thuggees, who blended Islam and Hinduism like many of the living religious variations of the region, were accused of literal death-worship. Recently the term has also been applied by Christian writers to apply to those who support suicide terrorists (who are ironically religiously leaning towards Wahabism themselves). A drawing of Thug Prisoners published by Illustrated London News, C. 1857 Thuggee (or tuggee) (from Hindi ‘thief’, from Sanskrit ‘scoundrel’, from ‘to conceal’) was an Indian network of secret fraternities who were engaged in murdering and robbing travellers, operating from the 17th century (possibly as early as 13th century... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... A suicide bombing is an attack using a bomb in which the individual(s) carrying the explosive materials composing the bomb intend(s) and expect(s) to die upon detonation (see suicide). ...


1984

In the universe of George Orwell's novel 1984, "Death Worship" was the common propagandistic English-language translation of the name of the governing philosophy of Eastasia (more accurately translated as "Obliteration of Self"). This ideology presumably made some allusion to Buddhist cultural concepts, but was functionally indistinguishable from the totalitarian "oligarchical collectivist" ideologies of the other two superpowers (Ingsoc in Oceania and "Neo-Bolshevism" in Eurasia). Nineteen Eighty-Four (sometimes 1984) is a darkly satirical political novel by George Orwell. ... One media interpretation of an Ingsoc insignia In George Orwells dystopic novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, Ingsoc is the ideology of the totalitarian government of Oceania. ...


See also

Grim Reaper redirects here. ... This list of deities aims to give information about deities in the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world. ... An 18th century drawing of Khoikhoi worshipping the moon In mythology, a lunar deity is a god or goddess associated with or symbolizing the moon: see moon (mythology). ... The Trundholm sun chariot pulled by a horse is believed to be a sculpture illustrating an important part of Nordic Bronze Age mythology. ... For other uses, see Afterlife (disambiguation). ...

References

  1. ^ "The counterpart to these deities of sky, air, water, and earth was the underworld, the realm of the dead, originally seen as ruled by the powerful Goddess Ereshkigal." Ruether, Rosemary Radford. 2005:45. Goddesses and the Divine Feminine: A Western Religious History. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-23146-5
  2. ^ "After consulting his mistress Ereshkigal, the queen of the Nether World, he admits Ishtar" Kramer, "Ishtar in the Nether World According to a New Sumerian Text" Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research. 1940. Google scholar results as the JSTOR link is unlikely to be universally available.
  3. ^ a b Kveldulf Gundarsson. (1993, 2005) Our Troth. ISBN 0-9770165-0-1
  4. ^ The dwelling one went to after death varied depending on where one died, at the battlefield or not. If not at the battlefield, one would go to Hel (not to be confused with the Christian Hell). Of the slain at the battlefield, some went to Folkvang, the dwelling of Freyja and some went to Valhalla, the dwelling of Odin (see Grímnismál):
    The ninth hall is Folkvang, where bright Freyja
    Decides where the warriors shall sit:
    Some of the fallen belong to her,
    And some belong to Odin.

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Niflheim. ... For other uses, see Hell (disambiguation). ... In Norse mythology, Fólkvangr (folk-plain or host-plain) was the dwelling of Freya (Freyja) in Asgard (Ásgarðr), the world of the Æsir, where stood Sessrúmnir, her hall. ... A statue of Freyja at Djurgården, Stockholm, Sweden. ... For other uses, see Valhalla (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... Grímnismál (Sayings of Grímnir) is one of the mythological poems of the Poetic Edda. ...

General


  Results from FactBites:
 
Death deity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (111 words)
Many cultures have incorporated a deity of death into their mythology or religion.
As death, along with birth, is among the major parts of human life, these deities may often be one of the most important deities of a religion.
In some religions with a single powerful deity as the source of worship, the death deity is an antagonistic deity against which the primary deity struggles.
Life-death-rebirth deity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (961 words)
Female deities who passed into the kingdom of death and returned include Inanna and Persephone, the central figure of the Eleusinian Mysteries.
From his studies of alchemy and other spiritual systems, the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung argued that archetypal processes such as death and resurrection were part of the transpersonal symbolism of the Collective Unconscious, and could be utilized in the task of psychological integration.
The chief criticism that has been brought against the universal life-death-resurrection deity category is that it is reductionist: in seeking to fit disparate myths into a single box, critics would contend, the hypothesis obscures distinctions that really matter.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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