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Encyclopedia > Death (Discworld)
Characters from
Terry Pratchett's Discworld series
Character details
Full name: Death
Description: The personification of death but with a more elaborate personality
Associations: Azrael
Mort
Albert
Susan Sto Helit
Death of Rats
Location: Death's Domain and everywhere else
Story appearances
First seen: The Colour of Magic
Also in: Every Discworld novel except The Wee Free Men
Other details
Notes: alias Bill Door (Reaper Man), Beau Nidle (Soul Music), and Mr Scrub (Soul Music)

Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchett's Discworld series. Discworld's Death is a parody of several other personifications of death. Like most Grim Reapers, he is a black-robed skeleton carrying a scythe and, for royalty, a sword (It's the rules, he once told Mort). Unlike many of them, he has a personality beyond this. Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Cover of an early edition of The Colour of Magic; art by Josh Kirby Discworld is a comedic fantasy book series by the British author Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld, a flat world balanced on the backs of four elephants which are in turn standing on the back of... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 392 × 340 pixelsFull resolution (392 × 340 pixel, file size: 18 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This work is copyrighted and unlicensed. ... “Grim Reaper” redirects here. ... See also: Discworld magic The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Mort and Ysabell are a young married couple in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Albert is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels, first appearing in Mort. ... Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ... This article details minor Discworld characters; characters from the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett who only appear in the background, or who have only had a brief starring role. ... Cover of the book. ... The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... For The Wee Free, see the Free Church of Scotland. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Cover of an early edition of The Colour of Magic; art by Josh Kirby Discworld is a comedic fantasy book series by the British author Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld, a flat world balanced on the backs of four elephants which are in turn standing on the back of... The Discworld is the fictional setting for all of Terry Pratchetts Discworld fantasy novels. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... “Grim Reaper” redirects here. ... A dragon robe from Qing Dynasty of China A robe is a loose-fitting outer garment. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A traditional wooden scythe A scythe (IPA: , most likely from Old English siðe, sigði) is an agricultural hand tool for mowing and reaping grass or crops. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Mort and Ysabell are a young married couple in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


Death is one of the most popular Discworld characters and makes an appearance in every Discworld book except The Wee Free Men. His steed is a great pale horse called Binky who is very much still alive (in "Reaper Man" it is remarked that he tried riding a steed of flames and a skeletal one, but the former was constantly setting the stable on fire, and he got rid of the latter because he grew tired of "constantly getting off to wire bits back on"). His hollow, peculiar voice is represented in the books by unquoted small caps; it is peculiar because since he is a tall skeleton, he has no vocal cords to speak with, and thus, speaks through other means. In The Colour of Magic (the first Discworld novel), and in Eric, all direct written references to Death are proper nouns, thus, for example, "he" is written as "He". This is usually reserved for the Discworld gods and is not featured in any of the other novels. For The Wee Free, see the Free Church of Scotland. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... The human voice consists of sound made by a human using the vocal folds for talking, singing, laughing, crying and screaming. ... In typography, small caps (short for small capitals) are uppercase (capital) characters that are printed in a smaller size than normal uppercase characters of the same font. ... The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... Eric (commonly abbreviated F^HE – see backspace) is the ninth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... A proper noun is a noun that picks out a unique entity. ... See also: Discworld magic The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... This article is about the literary concept. ...


Death is not invisible. Most people just refuse to acknowledge him for who he is, unless he insists. Under normal circumstances, only those of a magical disposition (e.g. witches and wizards), children and cats can see him, or allow themselves to see him. In Wyrd Sisters Death briefly took the place of an actor playing him in a play and was shocked to discover when he walked onto the stage that all of the audience could see him as they were expecting Death to appear; it was stated that he was quite nervous at this as he is usually seen only by one person at a time and was not comfortable with so many people watching him. Death can of course ignore things like walls or magic spells that stand between him and his object: this is because he's much "realer" than they are. A castle might stand for centuries, but Death has existed for billions of years: to him, the walls of the castle are less substantial than a cobweb. However, he can only go where people can die, as shown in Hogfather, and can only see people who can die, as shown in Thief of Time. An example of how an object could appear to be invisible through the use of mirrors Invisibility is the state of an object which cannot be seen. ... A major subset of the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett involves the witches of Lancre. ... The wizards are major characters in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... This article is about the novel. ... Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Thief of Time is the 26th Discworld novel written by Terry Pratchett. ...


It is also mentioned in The Colour of Magic that wizards, witches, and significant figures (e.g. kings) have the "privilege" of being collected by Death himself upon their death, rather than one of the lesser entities. Indeed, wizards and witches have prior knowledge of the time of their deaths and expect Death to keep to schedule. Most other deaths are collected by another functionary, but with the exception of Mort and Susan (both acting as "authorized" replacements for Death), there has only been one "collection" described in the books by anyone other than Death, attempted of Rincewind by the anthropomophic personification of Scrofula. However, Death himself must collect some souls in order to keep the momentum of death going, worked out by a system described as the 'nodes'. These nodes seem handily to be most of the characters who die in the course of the novels, as Death almost invariably turns up whenever any character dies, sometimes (especially when taking bad characters' lives) replaced by the Death of Rats, mentioned below in this article. As well as wizards and kings, he has shown up for numerous ordinary people, at least two dogs, a swan, and once for an incredibly small sea creature, possibly a tube worm. He was present at the beginning and end of Time in one novel. He has also appeared even in situations where characters might potentially die. These events are usually of importance within the story, so Death's appearance may simply be considered a plot device. Death mentions in Guards! Guards! that he does personally collect the souls of ordinary people Sometimes. On special occasions. This suggests that Death's conception of an important person is not, necessarily, the same as a human conception. Possibly he is able to judge "significant" deaths based on an understanding of the broad sweep of history and chaos theory. The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... This article contains brief biographies for characters from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ... Rincewind the Wizzard is a fictional character appearing in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, several of which feature him as the central character. ... King Henry IV of France touching a number of sufferers of scrofula who are gathered about him in a circle. ... Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Genera Birsteinia Choanophorus Cyclobrachia Lamellibrachia Lamellisabella Osedax Paraescarpia Ridgeia Riftia Siboglinoides Siboglinum Volvobrachia . ... A plot device is a person or an object introduced to a story to affect or advance the plot. ... Guards! Guards! is the 8th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, first published in 1989. ... For other uses, see Chaos Theory (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Personality

Death is efficient but not cruel, and sees his job as a necessary public service. His task is not to kill, but to collect. Look up cruelty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Public services is a term usually used to mean services provided by government to its citizens, either directly (through the public sector) or by financing private provision of services. ...


He is fond of cats (who can see him at all times) and curry (although he doesn't need to eat), which he tells Mort is like sucking on a red-hot ice cube. He lives in an extradimensional realm called Death's Domain. Within the domain, his home looks like a normal upper middle class Victorian house with a garden, is well-tended, but is predominantly black and decorated with a skull and crossbone motif. It is called Mon Repos, and is much, much bigger on the inside, because Death has not quite mastered the art of scale. Similarly, because he does not quite understand real distance compared to perspective, the surrounding terrain is actually relatively close, but blurred to appear farther away. The grounds contain a large golden wheat field after the events of Reaper Man. There is also a swing, created by Death for Susan, which mainly serves to further prove Death's lack of understanding of traditional physics. When he discovered that he had tied the two ropes on branches either side of the trunk, he simply removed the offending trunk as opposed to repositioning the ropes. This has not in the least affected the growth of the tree. This article is about the dish. ... Mort and Ysabell are a young married couple in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... A Realm is a primary synonym for a world usually other than our own. ... Cover of the book. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ...


Death is fascinated by humanity, hence the above attempts at living beyond the role, and why he once adopted an orphaned child named Ysabell (see below). His interest is coupled with bafflement: it's a favorite point of Prachett's that the habits and beliefs are grown into instead of being rationally acquired are an essential part of being human. As Death is an outside observer, his imitations are intricate but marked by a fundamental lack of comprehension. When acting as a stand-in for the Hogfather he starts by greeting the children he meets in the course of his duties with Cower, brief mortals from force of habit, until reminded not to do so by Albert. Mort and Ysabell are a young married couple in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


This fascination with humanity extends to the point of sympathy towards them, and he will often side with humans against greater threats (notably the Auditors of Reality). He has on a number of occasions bent the rules to allow a character extra life. Death has also indicated that he will oblige dying humans by playing a game with them for their lives (much like the personification of Death in The Seventh Seal), the games including chess (though he consistently has trouble remembering how the knights move) and something called "Exclusive Possession" (where someone lost despite having "three streets and all the utilities"). In one case, Granny Weatherwax was able to play cards against Death in a successful bid to save a child's life (Granny's hand had four queens, while he only had four 'ones', which it was obvious Death knew the true value of but was prepared to pretend otherwise for the child's sake). In many ways, he is a character who epitomises the bleakness of human existence – in the book Reaper Man, in which he is rendered temporarily mortal, he becomes frustrated and infuriated with the unfair inevitability of death, a theme that continues through later books. In Soul Music he expresses misery at the fact that he is capable of preventing deaths but is forbidden to do so. Terry Pratchett even says in The Art of Discworld that he has received a number of letters from terminally ill fans in which they hope that Death will resemble the Discworld incarnation (he also says that those particular letters usually cause him to spend some time staring at the wall). The Auditors of Reality are fictional godlike beings in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... The Seventh Seal (Swedish: Det sjunde inseglet) is an existential 1957 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman about the journey of a medieval knight (Max von Sydow) across a plague-ridden landscape. ... Monopoly is the best-selling commercial board game in the world. ... Esmerelda Esme Weatherwax (usually called Granny Weatherwax) is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... The Art of Discworld is a descriptive book of the world of the Discworld as portrayed in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


Death has developed considerably since his first appearance in The Colour of Magic. In this, he was actually quite a malicious character. At one point he deliberately stops a character's heart. By the time of Mort he had gained the sympathetic and humorous personality that would make him so popular. In more recent novels, he has been used to examine recent developments in theoretical physics as, being a supernatural being, he is able to witness such events firsthand (although being a cat lover, he is not fond of Schrödinger's Cat thought experiment). The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... Also a term referring to laying brick. ... Theoretical physics employs mathematical models and abstractions of physics, as opposed to experimental processes, in an attempt to understand nature. ... Look up Supernatural in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Schrödingers Cat: When the nucleus (bottom left) decays, the Geiger counter (bottom centre) may sense it and trigger the release of the gas. ...


Some readers have suggested that Death may have been partially based on the Doctor from Doctor Who. Both are beings who can travel anywhere in time and space, are fascinated with humanity but do not always understand it, live in domiciles that are significantly bigger on the inside than the outside, and have granddaughters named Susan. Pratchett has stated that "As far as I'm aware, the Death/Dr Who 'coincidences' are in the mind of the beholders. Death can move through space and time, yes, but that's built in to the character. I made his house bigger on the inside than the outside so that I could have quiet fun with people's perceptions"[1]. For other uses, see Doctor Who (disambiguation). ...


Death's gender

The initial books did not pronounce themselves about the gender of Death, giving an ambiguous "it". However, in Reaper Man, Death is unambiguously identified as a male. When asked to describe Death, in the second Discworld computer game, the protagonist Rincewind hazards a guess, "Well, I suppose he's a man. You have to look at the pelvis, don't you?". In the comic strip adaptation of Mort, Death is seen in mirrors as a black-bearded human wearing a black cloak, and also seen as this when he needs to be seen by the living. Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Rincewind the Wizzard is a fictional character appearing in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, several of which feature him as the central character. ...


In the Spanish translations of the books, it was not possible to be ambiguous about Death's sex, because Spanish language must provide a grammatical gender to each object (table is female while pencil is male), sometimes even changing the gender of synonyms (computer can be ordenador (male), or computadora (female)). Thus, translator Cristina Macía chose the female gender for Death, as death in Spanish; muerte, is female. It had to be changed when Reaper Man was published, and justified in a footnote. It seems the latest editions of Mort corrected Death's gender. This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... In linguistics, grammatical gender is a morphological category associated with the expression of gender through inflection or agreement. ... Synonyms (in ancient Greek, συν (syn) = plus and όνομα (onoma) = name) are different words with similar or identical meanings. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... A footnote is a note of text placed at the bottom of a page in a book or document. ...


In the French translation, though the noun for death (la mort) is feminine, the actual gender when conjugating is masculine. The translator, Patrick Couton, justified the fact by a pun in a footnote: "La Mort est un mâle, car c'est un mal nécessaire" (Death is male because it is a necessary evil/male). In French: mâle = male and mal = evil are pronounced almost identically. The translator footnote has become a running gag in the French translation, "Death is male because there are horseman and no horsewoman of the apocalypse".


In the Polish translation by Piotr W. Cholewa Death is masculine, despite the noun (Śmierć) being feminine in Polish. As a result Death is definitely male and is addressed exclusively as He (On).


In the Croatian translation Death was female up to Sourcery where it was changed to a male persona. The changing of his gender is addressed at the beginning of the book via a translator's commentary.


In the Russian translation of the Discworld series (different translators, all translations edited by Alexander Zhikarentsev) Death is masculine (despite the noun смерть being feminine in the Russian language and the Russian tradition to depict death as an old woman) and his gender is explicitely stated when he first appears in The Colour of Magic. Russian ( , transliteration: , ) is the most geographically widespread language of Eurasia and the most widely spoken of the Slavic languages. ... The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ...


In the Czech translation by Jan Kantůrek, Death is masculine, although the noun smrt (death) is feminine. Kantůrek used the name Smrť, which is obviously derived from "death", but has no independent meaning.


Relations and associates

Death is both the servant and a part of The Old High One known as Azrael, the Death of Universes and ruler of all deaths. See also: Discworld magic The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... See also: Discworld magic The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ...


Ysabell, Death's adopted daughter, first appears in The Light Fantastic, and has a significant role in Mort. In this novel Mort is given the job of Death's apprentice, and he and Ysabell get married. Their child is Susan (below). Mort and Ysabell are a young married couple in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. ... Also a term referring to laying brick. ... This article contains brief biographies for characters from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


Death's granddaughter Susan is first tapped to fill in for him during the events of Soul Music, and is again called in Hogfather. She also plays an important role in Thief of Time. She would give it all up if it weren't for Binky, below. Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Thief of Time is the 26th Discworld novel written by Terry Pratchett. ... Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ...


Death's domain has a "groundskeeper" named Albert. He is not dead, but instead was brought to Death's domain when he performed the Rite of AshkEnte backwards. He entered the land of Death with around three months left before he was due to die. Subsequent trips to the Disc on errands for his master combined with the unfortunate shattering of his lifetimer in Soul Music have left him with a mere five seconds of life remaining. A groundskeeper is a person who maintains landscaping, gardens or golf courses and their vegetation for appearance and functionality. ... Albert is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels, first appearing in Mort. ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ...


In the earlier books and Thief of Time Death works with War, Pestilence and Famine, the other three Horsemen of the Apocralypse (though, when War, Pestilence and Famine get their horses stolen in Sourcery, they sarcastically rename themselves The One Horseman and The Three Pedestrians of the Apocralypse). Like him they have become more human than their roles require. Death himself explains this; in Thief of Time, he says that "form defines function". In Thief of Time, Kaos, the [Horseman], was introduced, having previously left before they became famous and now works as a milkman under the name Ronnie Soak. With the exception of Thief the other Horsemen do not generally appear in the books focused on Death, even when there is a potential narrative reason for their involvement. Thief of Time is the 26th Discworld novel written by Terry Pratchett. ... An anthropomorphic personification is a natural process endowed with human form and personality. ...


Binky

Binky is Death's steed. He is a real horse; Death tried a skeletal steed, but kept having to stop and wire bits back on.[1] Death also had a fiery steed, but that one repeatedly set his barn — and his robe — on fire. He is called Binky, instead of something more fearsome, because Death thought Binky was "A nice name." Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ...


Binky is more intelligent than most horses and is a pure, milky white (it is noted in some novels that Binky is an exception to the usual equestrian rule of all pale-coloured horses being officially 'grey'). He can fly (though really he just creates his own ground-level), as well as travel through time and across dimensions, sometimes leaving glowing hoofprints in his wake, but is in all other respects a perfectly ordinary horse. He's well-treated, and loyal to his master and Susan when she's filling in for him. His shoes are made by Jason Ogg, the Lancrastian blacksmith of mythical skill, and he is probably immortal. Binky gains a part of his power by sharing one of Death's qualities: he's so much "realer" than ordinary things (for instance, walls, great distances, or time), that he can simply ignore them. When Susan observes Binky apparently walking on air and asks Albert if he's a real horse, she's told, "There's no horse realer than that one, Miss". A truly white horse has pink skin under their white hair coat True white horses, especially those that carry the White or W gene, are rare. ... This article details minor Discworld characters; characters from the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett who only appear in the background, or who have only had a brief starring role. ...


"My Little Binky" (a reference to My Little Pony) was a gift given to Susan Sto Helit, Death's granddaughter, for one of her early birthdays. Her parents returned the gift, fearing that this would make her a less "normal" child. Fizzy and Galaxy, the unicorns from the My Little Pony animated series My Little Pony is a product line of colorful toy ponies marketed primarily to young girls and produced by the toy manufacturer Hasbro. ... Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ...


The Death of Rats

The Death of Rats is not, strictly speaking, a personification in his own right but rather an aspect of Death allowed an independent existence. His purpose is to usher on the souls of dead rodents, and occasionally rodent-like humans, as well as assisting Death in other ways (he drew Death's attention to interference by the Auditors, demonstrating improbable statistics by using a machine that measured how often a piece of toast dropped butter-side-down). He was one of a disparate multitude of Deaths (down to the Death of Microorganisms) created during Death's absence in Reaper Man. Upon Death's resumption of his duties, he reabsorbed the identities of all the millions of Deaths into himself. The Death of Rats, however, refused to be reabsorbed and, even though Death initially said he would not let the Death of Rats remain separate, Death nevertheless kept him around as company. The Death of Rats resembles a rodentine skeleton on its hind legs, wearing a black robe and carrying a tiny scythe. Phillipp Veits Germania (1877), a personification of Germany. ... Aspect is a piece of information about a topic, usually on look and appearance. ... The Auditors of Reality are fictional godlike beings in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Suborders Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents. ...


The Death of Rats more easily finds ways around the Rules than Death does, and has assisted Susan in Soul Music, Hogfather and Thief of Time. He sometimes travels with a talking raven named Quoth (as in 'Quoth the Raven' from the poem "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe. The 'N' word he doesn't like to say is Nevermore, also from the poem) who also acts as his translator (and says he's "in it for the eyeballs"). The Death of Fleas also managed to escape reabsorption, but has not been seen since Reaper Man. Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Thief of Time is the 26th Discworld novel written by Terry Pratchett. ... The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ...


The Death of Rats' jurisdiction also seems to cover certain kinds of 'ratty' humans, such as Mr Clete in Soul Music. In Maskerade the Death of Rats took the soul of the Opera House's ratcatcher, who then got reincarnated as a rodent. The ratcatcher protested that he did not believe in reincarnation, and got the answer "reincarnation believes in you". This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... Maskerade is the eighteenth novel in the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. ...


The Death of Rats, like Death, speaks in small caps, but has a vocabulary consisting of words such as Squeak, Eek, Ik and Snh, the last used when it laughs, although its speech can be interpreted from context much like the Librarian's. In typography, small caps (short for small capitals) are uppercase (capital) characters that are printed in a smaller size than normal uppercase characters of the same font. ... The Librarian of Unseen University is one of the most popular characters in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels, to the extent where pin badges bearing the legend Librarians rule Ook are now available. ...


In the mythology of the Clan (from The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents) the Death of Rats is known as the Bone Rat. He appears in the book for Dangerous Beans, but is stopped by Maurice, who trades one of his many own lives with Death in exchange of Dangerous Beans. The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents is the 28th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2001. ...


Quoth

A talking raven. He hangs around with the Death of Rats. His name derives from the famous line in the poem by the poet Edgar Allan Poe, "The Raven" ("Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore'.") except this raven "doesn't do the N word". He got his name because his previous owner, a wizard, had no sense of humour. At times he acts as steed and interpreter for the Death of Rats and he has a constant craving for eyeballs – a species characteristic (which, he recalls, resulted in an unfortunate end to ravens working under Blind Io, the king of the Discworld Gods, who has innumerable eyeballs floating around his head.). He was originally one of the ravens from the Tower of Art, the magical properties of which gave him his ability to speak. Species See text. ... This article details minor Discworld characters; characters from the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett who only appear in the background, or who have only had a brief starring role. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The Raven as illustrated by Gustave Doré. The Raven is a narrative poem by American writer and poet Edgar Allan Poe. ... This article details minor Discworld characters; characters from the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett who only appear in the background, or who have only had a brief starring role. ... See also: Discworld magic The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... The fictional 800-foot tower of Ankh-Morporks Unseen University, with a total of 8,888 steps up to the top (On the Disc the number 8 is very mystically significant). ...


He was first seen in the Discworld novel Soul Music, and since then has made appearances in all novels involving Susan Sto Helit. In the Sky One adaptation of Hogfather he is voiced by Neil Pearson. This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Terry Pratchetts Hogfather is a two-part television adaptation of the book of the same name by Terry Pratchett, produced by The Mob, and broadcast on Sky One, and in High Definition on Sky One HD, over Christmas 2006. ... Neil Pearson (born London, England, April 27, 1959) is a popular British actor. ...


New Death

The New Death first appears in Reaper Man when he comes to collect the old Death, now known as "Bill Door". The New Death comes from human belief, but he is quite different from the original. Though he has the usual black robe, he is a larger figure than Bill Door and has only smoke underneath his robe, rather than bones. His horse is the classic skeletal steed, as opposed to Binky. In place of a face or skull, the new Death wears a crown (in striking resemblance to the Witch-king of Angmar). He is prideful, dramatic, and cruel, the literal embodiment of humanity's fear of death; he chooses to arrive exactly at midnight and appears in a flash of lightning purely for the dramatic effect; when he corners Bill Door, he mocks him and beats him instead of finishing the job. Binky is Deaths steed in the Discworld series. ... The Witch-king of Angmar, also known as the Lord of the Nazgûl and the Black Captain among other names, is a fictional character from the novel The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, set in the fantasy world of Middle-earth. ...


The new Death is destroyed when Miss Renata Flitworth comes to Bill Door's rescue by giving him some of her life, so that he can briefly escape "death". Bill Door then kills the new Death with the harvest scythe he used on the farm; just a humble garden tool, not the infinitely sharp implement of Death, but sharpened by his own rage. Bill Door was disgusted and horrified by New Death choosing to wear a crown, and his victory is the triumph of the compassionate "reaper man" over the tyrant who has no care for the harvest. Look up Harvest in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A traditional wooden scythe A scythe (IPA: , most likely from Old English siðe, sigði) is an agricultural hand tool for mowing and reaping grass or crops. ...


Rite of AshkEnte

The Rite of AshkEnte is the ancient magic ritual that summons and binds Death to the circle and prevents him from leaving until invited to do so by the summoning wizard. In Eric, Death appears outside the circle, behind the wizards ("Who are we waiting for exactly?"), and in Reaper Man a wizard comments that he believes he only stays in the circle for the look of the thing. Mort, however, was almost forced to respond to the summons, and Susan was summoned and subsequently bound. This does not, however, appear to apply to Death himself. A ritual is a set of actions, performed mainly for their symbolic value, which is prescribed by a religion or by the traditions of a community. ... Eric (commonly abbreviated F^HE – see backspace) is the ninth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ...


Since Death is professionally involved in almost everything that is going on everywhere, the Rite is usually performed so that he can be asked questions. Death hates this because he is always summoned at the worst possible time, like when he is at a party. The senior wizards performing the Rite are not too happy about it either, though, since they don't enjoy drawing Death's attention to them; they are often very senior.


Although the Rite can be performed by a couple of people with three small sticks and 4 cc of mouse blood or even with a fresh egg and two small sticks, wizards prefer to do it the old fashioned way, with heavy equipment consisting of numerous drippy candles, octograms written on the floor, thuribles and similar paraphernalia. They feel it's not proper wizardry if it's not showy enough. There are ten more ways of performing the Rite (bringing the total to thirteen), but nine of them cause instant death and the tenth is very hard to remember. This article is about the animal. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... The wizards are major characters in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Stained glass window depiction of a thurible, St. ...


The founder of Unseen University Alberto Malich disappeared from the world when he tried to perform the Rite backwards. Apparently, he thought that an inverted Rite of AshkEnte would keep Death away from him, allowing him to live forever. Unfortunately, what actually happened was that he was summoned to Death (quite possibly the wizards are trying to work their way around this). He has since elected to stay in Death's domain as Death's manservant (as no time passes there, it might be said that Alberto's ambition of immortality was fulfilled after all). Unseen University (UU) is a school of wizardry in the fictional Discworld city of Ankh-Morpork, staffed by a faculty composed of mostly indolent and inept old wizards. ... Albert is a character from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of novels, first appearing in Mort. ...


In the Discworld books, the Rite has been used a number of times: Cover of an early edition of The Colour of Magic; art by Josh Kirby Discworld is a comedic fantasy book series by the British author Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld, a flat world balanced on the backs of four elephants which are in turn standing on the back of...

  • In The Light Fantastic, Death was summoned to be asked about the imminent destruction of the Disc.
  • In Mort, Albert, briefly returned to the world, summoned Death who was having a vacation to let him know that Mort, his apprentice, was making a terrible job as replacement. While the Rite was being performed, it almost summoned Mort instead.
  • In Eric Death was asked about an occult disturbance that turned out to be Rincewind.
  • In Reaper Man, where Death had been forced to retire by The Auditors of Reality, an Auditor appeared in Death's place to inform the wizards about the situation.
  • In Soul Music, where Death had again taken a break from work, the Rite instead summoned his granddaughter by adoption, Susan Sto Helit.

The Rite is also used in the computer game Discworld II: Missing Presumed...!?. However, the game requires the player to find not only the three small sticks (of equal length) and 4 cc of mouse's blood mentioned above, but also dribbly candles, a vile stench, and some glitter. During the ritual, the wizards perform an off-key version of "Day-O (Banana Boat Song)" and Death appears behind them, fresh from vacation, wearing a cork hat. The Light Fantastic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the second of the Discworld series. ... Also a term referring to laying brick. ... Eric (commonly abbreviated F^HE – see backspace) is the ninth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Rincewind the Wizzard is a fictional character appearing in the Discworld novels of Terry Pratchett, several of which feature him as the central character. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... See also: Discworld magic The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... Susan Sto Helit is a fictional character who features in three of Terry Pratchetts Discworld novels - Soul Music, Hogfather, and Thief of Time. ... Discworld II: Missing Presumed. ... The Banana Boat Song is a traditional Trinidadian Calypso folk song, whose best-known version was sung by Harry Belafonte and is the most well-known calypso. ... A cork hat is a type of headgear with cork strung from the brim, to ward off insects. ...


It would be technically possible to summon the Death of Rats but this would only be useful if the question could be answered by "Squeak". See also: Discworld magic The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ...


Death on screen

Death as portrayed in the Hogfather film. Voice by Ian Richardson.

In the 1996 animated adaptations of Soul Music and Wyrd Sisters, Death was voiced by Christopher Lee. In the 2006 Sky One adaptation of Hogfather he was voiced by Ian Richardson who managed to inject a small verbal joke from an earlier role in the mini-series House of Cards. In this series Richardson played a scheming politician who would often manipulate people by implying certain things and, when the person asks him to confirm the inference maintain deniability by saying "You might very well think that - I couldn't possibly comment". Death speaks a similar line when Albert accuses him of deliberating provoking Susan to become involved with the crisis: You may think I've already thought of that, but I could not possibly comment. The actor who played the physical Death in Hogfather was Marnix Van Den Broeke, a 6 foot 7 inch Dutchman. In the 2007 adaption of The Colour Of Magic, Van Den Broeke reprises the physical role, with Lee returning to the voice. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Terry Pratchetts Hogfather is a two-part television adaptation of the book of the same name by Terry Pratchett, produced by The Mob, and broadcast on Sky One, and in High Definition on Sky One HD, over Christmas 2006. ... Ian William Richardson CBE (7 April 1934 – 9 February 2007) was a Scottish actor best known for playing the Machiavellian politician Francis Urquhart in the House of Cards trilogy for the BBC. // Born in Edinburgh, Richardson was educated at Balgreen Primary School and Tynecastle High School in the city,[1... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the novel Soul Music. ... This article is about the novel. ... Christopher Frank Carandini Lee, CBE (born May 27, 1922) is an English actor known for his professional longevity and his distinctive basso delivery. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Terry Pratchetts Hogfather is a two-part television adaptation of the book of the same name by Terry Pratchett, produced by The Mob, and broadcast on Sky One, and in High Definition on Sky One HD, over Christmas 2006. ... Ian William Richardson CBE (7 April 1934 – 9 February 2007) was a Scottish actor best known for playing the Machiavellian politician Francis Urquhart in the House of Cards trilogy for the BBC. // Born in Edinburgh, Richardson was educated at Balgreen Primary School and Tynecastle High School in the city,[1... House of Cards was a political thriller novel written by Michael Dobbs, a former Chief of Staff at Conservative Party headquarters, which was set at the end of Margaret Thatchers tenure as British Prime Minister. ...


The Death of Rats was not given a specific voice credit in the animations, but in Hogfather was credited as Dorckey Hellmice. Michelle Dockery is a British actress who is known primarily for her role as Susan Sto Helit, in the Sky One adaptation of Hogfather. ...


Quotes

"I said I hope it is a good party," said Galder, loudly. At the moment it is, said Death levelly. I think it might go downhill very quickly at midnight. "Why?" That's when they think I'll be taking my mask off.


I expect, he said, you could murder a bit of cheese? Death speaking to the Death of Rats


there is no justice, there is just me


I am Death, not taxes. I come only once.


Shortly after collecting Mr. Teatime's soul at the end of Hogfather (paraphrasing The Shadow's catchphrase): Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... The Shadow is a fictional character created by Walter B. Gibson in 1931 with the first story title The Living Shadow. The character is one of the most famous of the pulp heroes of the 1930s and 1940s -- made even more famous through a popular radio series originally played by...


Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?


Death of Rats: Squeak.


Well, obviously I do.


See also

See also: Discworld magic The Discworld gods are the fictional deities from Terry Pratchetts Discworld series of fantasy novels. ...

References

  1. ^ Reaper Man

External links

  • Discworld & Pratchett Wiki

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