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Encyclopedia > Death (personification)
A Western depiction of Death as a skeleton carrying a scythe.
A Western depiction of Death as a skeleton carrying a scythe.

Death as a sentient entity is a concept that has existed in many societies since the beginning of history. In English, death is often given the name the "Grim Reaper" and shown as a skeletal figure carrying a large scythe, and wearing a midnight black gown, robe or cloak with a hood, or sometimes a white burial shroud. Usually when portrayed in the black-hooded gown, his face is not to be seen, but is a mere shadow beneath the hood. Image File history File links Mort. ... Image File history File links Mort. ... A traditional wooden scythe A scythe (IPA: , most likely from Old English siðe, sigði) is an agricultural hand tool for mowing and reaping grass or crops. ... Sentience is the capacity for basic consciousness -- the ability to feel or perceive, not necessarily including the faculty of self-awareness. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... A traditional wooden scythe A scythe (IPA: , most likely from Old English siðe, sigði) is an agricultural hand tool for mowing and reaping grass or crops. ... A shroud is typically something, usually a cloth, that covers or protects some other object. ...


In some cases, the Grim Reaper is believed to actually cause the victim's death, leading to tales that he can be bribed, tricked, or outwitted in order to retain one's life. Other beliefs hold that the Spectre of Death is only a psychopomp, serving only to sever the last tie from the soul to the body and guide the deceased to the next world and having no control over the fact of their death. This is an article about the mythology of the Psychopomp. ...

Contents

Hinduism

In the Hindu scriptures , the lord of death is called Yama, or Yamaraj (literally "the lord of death"). Yamaraj rides a black buffalo and carries a rope lasso to carry the soul back to his abode called "Yamalok". There are many forms of reapers, also some say there is only one whom disguses itself as a small child. It is his agents, the Yamaduts, who carry the souls back to Yamalok. Here, all the accounts of the person's good and bad deeds are stored and maintained by Chitragupta, which allow Yamaraj to decide where the soul has to reside in his next life, following the theory of reincarnation. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... This article is about the deity Yama in Hinduism. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... In metaphysics and esoteric cosmology, a plane of existence (sometimes called simply a plane, dimension, vibrating plane, or an inner, invisible, spiritual, or supraphysical world) is a theoretical region of space and/or consciousness beyond the known physical universe, or the region containing the universe itself. ... Shree Chitragupta (Sanskrit: चित्रगुप्त, rich in secrets) is a Hindu god assigned with the task of keeping complete records of actions of human beings on the earth, and upon their death, deciding as regards sending them to the heaven or the hell, depending on their actions on the earth. ... This article is about the theological concept. ...


Yama is also mentioned in the Mahabharata as a great philosopher and devotee of Sri Krishna. For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... This article is about the Hindu deity. ...


Interestingly, Yama is also known as Dharmaraj or king of Dharma or justice. One reasoning is that justice is served equally to all – whether they are alive or dead, based on their karma or fate. This is further strengthened by the fact that Yudhishtra, the eldest of the pandavas and considered as the personification of justice, in Mahabharata was born due to Kunti's prayers to Yamaraj. Yama is the Hindu Lord of death whose first recorded appearance is in the Vedas. ... For other uses, see Dharma (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Karma (disambiguation). ... ... The Pandavas were the five sons of the king Pandu. ... For the film by Peter Brook, see The Mahabharata (1989 film). ... In Hinduism, Princess Kunti is the mother of the Pandavas. ...


In Japan

In Kojiki, after giving birth to the fire-god Hinokagutsuchi, the goddess Izanami dies from wounds of its fire and enters the perpetual night realm called Yominokuni that the gods thereto retire. After Izanagi, her husband, failed in the attempt to reclaim her from the land of Yomi (the underworld, to which he travels and discovers his wife as not-so beautiful anymore), in a brief argument with Izanagi, she claimed to take 1000 lives every day signifying her position as the goddess of death. Kojiki or Furukotofumi (古事記), also known in English as the Records of Ancient Matters, is the oldest surviving historical book recounting events of ancient earth in the Japanese language. ... Kagu-tsuchi, also called Hinokagutsuchi or Ho-Masubi or just Kagutsuchi, is the Japanese god of fire. ... In Japanese mythology, Izanami (Katakana: イザナミ; Kanji: 伊弉冉尊 or 伊邪那美命, meaning She who invites) is a goddess of both creation and death, as well as the former wife of the god Izanagi. ... This article is about the location in japanese mythology. ... 天瓊を以て滄海を探るの図. Painting by Eitaku Kobayashi (Meiji period). ... This article is about the location in japanese mythology. ... For other uses, see Underworld (disambiguation). ... 天瓊を以て滄海を探るの図. Painting by Eitaku Kobayashi (Meiji period). ...


Another popular death personification is Enma (Yama), also known as Enma Ou and Enma Daiou (Enma King, Enma Great King – translations of Yama Rājā). He originated as Yama in Hinduism, later became Yanluo in China, and Enma in Japan. He is from Chinese Buddhism, and before that, from India. Enma rules the underworld, which makes him similar to Hades, and he decides whether someone dead goes to heaven or to hell. A common saying parents use in Japan to scold children is that Enma will cut off their tongue in the afterlife if they lie. Tibetan Dharmapala at the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois Yama is the name of the Buddhist god and judge of the dead, who presides over the Buddhist Narakas (Pāli: Nirayas), Hells or Purgatories. Although ultimately based on the god Yama of the Hindu Vedas, the Buddhist Yama has developed... For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ...


There are also death gods called shinigami, which are closer to the Western tradition of the Grim Reaper. Shinigami (often plural) are common in modern Japanese arts and fiction, and essentially absent from traditional mythology. Shinigami , literally death god) is the Japanese name for personifications of death, in particular the Grim Reaper, which was imported to Japan from Europe during the Meiji period. ...


In Ancient Greek Mythology

The Greek find death to be inevitable, and therefore he is represented as not purely evil. He is often portrayed as a bearded and winged man, but has also been portrayed as a young boy. Death, or Thanatos is the counterpart of life. Death being represented as male, and life as female. He is the twin brother of Hypnos, the god of sleep. He is typically shown with his brother, and is represented as being just as gentle. His job is the escort the deceased to the underworld Hades. He then hands the dead over to Charon, who mans the boat which carries them over the Lethe. The river is the separation of the land of the dead, and the land of the living. It is from Charon that the tradition of putting pennies over the eyes of the dead was born. It was believed that if the ferryman did not receive some sort of payment, the soul would not be delivered to the underworld, and left by the riverside for eternity. Thanatos' sisters, the Keres were the spirits of violent death. They were associated with deaths from battle, disease, accident, and murder. They were portrayed as evil, often feeding on the blood of the body after the soul had been escorted to Hades. They had fangs, talons, and would be dressed in bloody garments. In Greek mythology, Thanatos (in Ancient Greek, θάνατος – Death) was the Daimon personification of Death and Mortality. ... In Greek mythology, Hypnos was the personification of sleep; the Roman equivalent was known as Somnus . ... For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... Charon may refer to: Charon (mythology) - the figure from Greek, and later Christian mythology, who ferried the dead across the river Acheron in the underworld Hades and Hell, respectively. ... In Classical Greek, Lethe (LEE-thee) literally means forgetfulness or concealment. The Greek word for truth is a-lethe-ia, meaning un-forgetfulness or un-concealment. In Greek mythology, Lethe is one of the several rivers of Hades. ... Keres may refer to: Keres (mythology), female death-spirits in Greek mythology Keres people, Pueblo peoples in New Mexico Keresan languages, languages or dialects spoken by Keres peoples Paul Keres - Estonian chess grandmaster Keres (launcher), an Israeli transporter erector launcher for AGM-78 Standard ARM missiles. ...


In Slavic paganism

Old Slavic tribes viewed Death as a woman in white clothes, with a never-fading green sprout in her hand. The touch of the sprout would put a human to an everlasting sleep. This image survived Christianization well into the Middle Ages, only being replaced by the more traditional European image of a walking skeleton as late as in the 15th century. The Slavic peoples are the most numerous ethnic and linguistic body of peoples in Europe. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


In Lithuanian paganism

Lithuanians named Death Giltinė, deriving from word "gelti" (to sting). Giltinė was viewed as an old ugly woman with long blue nose and deadly poisonous tongue. The legend tells that Giltinė was young, pretty and communicative until she was trapped in a coffin for seven years. The goddess of Death was a sister of the goddess of Life and Destiny, Laima, symbolising the relationship between beginning and end. In Latvian mythology and Lithuanian mythology, Laima (luck; also Laime, Laimas māte) was the personification of fate and of luck, both good and bad. ...


Later, Lithuanians adopted Christian Grim Reaper with a scythe and black robe.


In Abrahamic Mythology

In the Holy Bible, the fourth horseman of Revelation 6 is called Death, and is pictured with Hades following him. The "Angel of the Lord" smites 185,000 men in the Assyrian camp (II Kings xix. 35). When the Angel of Death passes through to smite the Egyptian first-born, God prevents "the destroyer" (shâchath) from entering houses with blood on the lintel and side posts (Ex. xii. 23). The "destroying angel" ("mal'ak ha-mashḥit") rages among the people in Jerusalem (II Sam. xxiv. 16). In I Chronicle xxi. 15 the "angel of the Lord" is seen by King David standing "between the earth and the heaven, having a drawn sword in his hand stretched out over Jerusalem." The biblical Book of Job (xxxiii. 22) uses the general term "destroyer" ("memitim"), which tradition has identified with "destroying angels" ("mal'ake Khabbalah") and Prov. xvi. 14 uses the term the "angels of death" ("mal'ake ha-mavet"). Azriel is sometimes referred as the angel of death, as well. The Bible (From Greek βιβλια—biblia, meaning books, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported papyrus) is the sacred scripture of Christianity. ... Death, as a skeleton which carries a scythe, visiting a dying man. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This page is about the Biblical king David. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... Articles about Azriel: Azriel was a medieval author on Jewish mysticism Azrael is the angel of death spoken of in the Quran Azriel is also a boys name Azriel is also a hardcore band from Glasgow, Scotland Category: ...

La mort du fossoyeur (Death of the grave-digger) by Carlos Schwabe is a visual compendium of Symbolist motifs.
La mort du fossoyeur (Death of the grave-digger) by Carlos Schwabe is a visual compendium of Symbolist motifs.

The portrayal of the scythe originates from a Hellenistic etymological misconception relating the god Cronus with time. Cronus was a harvest deity who is often shown with a sickle, which he also uses to castrate his father Uranus. Etymologists from the Hellenistic period erroneously correlated Cronus with time due to the similarity with the prefix chrono-. From this mistake, Cronus was often depicted as Father Time, carrying a scythe, which is a harvesting tool related to the sickle. The characters of Father Time and the Grim Reaper frequently overlap, leading to the common portrayal of the Grim Reaper brandishing a scythe.[citation needed] As well the conception of the 'harvest' and the reaper reaping the weeds and grain in the field in a parable by Jesus, describing Final Judgement. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Categories: 1877 births | 1927 deaths | German painters | Swiss painters | Artist stubs ... La mort du fossoyeur (The death of the gravedigger) by Carlos Schwabe is a visual compendium of Symbolist motifs. ... Not to be confused with Chronos, the personification of time. ... Sickle Sickle A sickle is a curved, hand-held agricultural tool typically used for harvesting grain crop or cutting grass for hay. ... For other uses, see Uranus (disambiguation). ... Look up chrono- in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the personification of time. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


In Judaism

Form and functions

According to the Midrash, the angel of death was created by God on the first day[1]. His dwelling is in Heaven, whence he reaches earth in eight flights, whereas pestilence reaches it in one.[2] He has twelve wings.[3] "Over all people have I surrendered thee the power," said God to the angel of death, "only not over this one which has received freedom from death through the Law".[4] It is said of the angel of death that he is full of eyes. In the hour of death he stands at the head of the departing one with a drawn sword, to which clings a drop of gall. As soon as the dying man sees the angel, he is seized with a convulsion and opens his mouth, whereupon the angel throws the drop into it. This drop causes his death; he turns putrid, and his face becomes yellow.[5] The expression "to taste of death" originated in the idea that death was caused by a drop of gall.[6] Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ...


The soul escapes through the mouth, or, as is stated in another place, through the throat; therefore the angel of death stands at the head of the patient (Adolf Jellinek, l.c. ii. 94, Midr. Teh. to Ps. xi.). When the soul forsakes the body its voice goes from one end of the world to the other, but is not heard (Gen. R. vi. 7; Ex. R. v. 9; Pirḳe R. El. xxxiv.). The drawn sword of the angel of death, mentioned by the Chronicler (I. Chron. xxi. 15; comp. Job xv. 22; Enoch lxii. 11), indicates that the angel of death was figured as a warrior who kills off the children of men. "Man, on the day of his death, falls down before the angel of death like a beast before the slaughterer" (Grünhut, "Liḳḳuṭim", v. 102a). R. Samuel's father (c. 200) said: "The angel of death said to me, 'Only for the sake of the honor of mankind do I not tear off their necks as is done to slaughtered beasts'" ('Ab. Zarah 20b). In later representations the knife sometimes replaces the sword, and reference is also made to the cord of the angel of death, which indicates death by throttling. Moses says to God: "I fear the cord of the angel of death" (Grünhut, l.c. v. 103a et seq.). Of the four Jewish methods of execution three are named in connection with the angel of death: burning (by pouring hot lead down the victim's throat-- similar to the drop of gall), slaughtering (by beheading), and throttling. The angel of death administers the particular punishment which God has ordained for the commission of sin. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


A peculiar mantle ("idra"-according to Levy, "Neuhebr. Wörterb." i. 32, a sword) belongs to the equipment of the angel of death (Eccl. R. iv. 7). The angel of death takes on the particular form which will best serve his purpose; e.g., he appears to a scholar in the form of a beggar imploring pity (M. Ḳ. 28a). "When pestilence rages in the town, walk not in the middle of the street, because the angel of death [i.e., pestilence] strides there; if peace reigns in the town, walk not on the edges of the road. When pestilence rages in the town, go not alone to the synagogue, because there the angel of death stores his tools. If the dogs howl, the angel of death has entered the city; if they make sport, the prophet Elijah has come" (B. Ḳ. 60b). The "destroyer" ("saṭan ha-mashḥit") in the daily prayer is the angel of death (Ber. 16b). Midr. Ma'ase Torah (compare Jellinek, "B. H." ii. 98) says: "There are six angels of death: Gabriel over kings; Ḳapẓiel over youths; Mashbir over animals; Mashḥit over children; Af and Ḥemah over man and beast." To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require restructuring. ... Ecclesiastes Rabbah or Kohelet Rabbah (קהלת רבה) is an haggadic commentary on Ecclesiastes, included in the collection of the Midrash Rabbot. ... This article is about the archangel Gabriel. ...


Death and Satan

Drawing of Death bringing cholera, in Le Petit Journal
Drawing of Death bringing cholera, in Le Petit Journal

The angel of death, who is identified by some with Satan, immediately after his creation had a dispute with God as to the light of the Messiah (Pesiḳ. R. 161b). When Eve touched the tree of knowledge, she perceived the angel of death, and thought "Now I shall die, and God will create another wife for Adam".[7] Adam also had a conversation with the angel of death (Böklen, "Die Verwandtschaft der Jüdisch-Christlichen mit der Parsischen Eschatologie," p. 12). The angel of death sits before the face of the dead (Jellinek, l.c. ii. 94). While Abraham was mourning for Sarah the angel appeared to him, which explains why "Abraham stood up from before his dead".[8] Samael told Sarah that Abraham had sacrificed Isaac in spite of his wailing, and Sarah died of horror and grief.[9] It was Moses who most often had dealings with the angel. At the rebellion of Korah, Moses saw him (Num. R. v. 7; Bacher, l.c. iii. 333; compare Sanh. 82a). It was the angel of death in the form of pestilence which snatched away 15,000 every year during the wandering in the wilderness (ib. 70). When Moses reached heaven, the angel told him something (Jellinek, l.c. i. 61). Image File history File links Cholera. ... Image File history File links Cholera. ... For scale drawings or plans, see Plans (drawings). ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , Aramaic/Syriac: , ; Arabic: ‎, ) Literally, Messiah means The Anointed (One), typically someone anointed with holy anointing oil. ...


When the angel of death came to Moses and said, "Give me thy soul," Moses called to him: "Where I sit thou hast no right to stand." And the angel retired ashamed, and reported the occurrence to God. Again, God commanded him to bring the soul of Moses. The angel went, and, not finding him, inquired of the sea, of the mountains, and of the valleys; but they knew nothing of him.[10] Really, Moses did not die through the angel of death, but through God's kiss ("bi-neshiḳah"); i.e., God drew his soul out of his body (B. B. 17a; compare Abraham in Apocryphal and Rabbinical Literature, and parallel references in Böklen, l.c. p. 11). Legend seizes upon the story of Moses' struggle with the angel of death, and expands it at length (Tan., ed. Stettin, pp. 624 et seq.; Deut. R. ix., xi.; Grünhut, l.c. v. 102b, 169a). As Benaiah bound Ashmedai (Jew. Encyc. ii. 218a), so Moses binds the angel of death that he may bless Israel.[11] Asmodeus (Asmodeus, Asmodaeus, pronounced Ashmed or Ashmedeus in Hebrew, also Chammadai, Sydonai) is a semi-Biblical demon mostly known thanks to the deuterocanonical Book of Tobit; he is also mentioned in some Talmudic legends and in demonology, as he is a leading figure in the construction efforts of the Temple...


Solomon once noticed that the angel of death was grieved. When questioned as to the cause of his sorrow he answered: "I am requested to take your two beautiful scribes." Solomon at once charged the demons to convey his scribes to Luz, where the angel of death could not enter. When they were near the city, however, they both died. The angel laughed on the next day, whereupon Solomon asked the cause of his mirth. "Because," answered the angel, "thou didst send the youths thither, whence I was ordered to fetch them" (Suk. 53a). In the next world God will let the angel of death fight against Pharaoh, Sisera, and Sennacherib.[12] This article is about the Biblical character . ... For other uses, see Luz (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pharaoh (disambiguation). ... Sisera (Egypt. ... Sennacherib during his Babylonian war, relief from his palace in Nineveh Sennacherib (in Akkadian Śïn-ahhe-eriba (The moon god) Śïn has Replaced (Lost) Brothers for Me) was the son of Sargon II, whom he succeeded on the throne of Assyria (705 BC–681 BC). ...


Scholars and the Angel of Death

Talmud teachers of the fourth century associate quite familiarly with him. When he appeared to one on the street, the teacher reproached him with rushing upon him as upon a beast; whereupon the angel called upon him at his house. To another he granted a respite of thirty days, that he might put his knowledge in order before entering the next world. To a third he had no access, because he could not interrupt the study of the Talmud. To a fourth he showed a rod of fire, whereby he is recognized as the angel of death (M. K. 28a). He often entered the house of Bibi and conversed with him (Ḥag. 4b). Often he resorts to strategy in order to interrupt and seize his victim (B. M. 86a; Mak. 10a).


The death of Joshua ben Levi in particular is surrounded with a web of fable. When the time came for him to die and the angel of death appeared to him, he demanded to be shown his place in paradise. When the angel had consented to this, he demanded the angel's knife, that the angel might not frighten him by the way. This request also was granted him, and Joshua sprang with the knife over the wall of paradise; the angel, who is not allowed to enter paradise, caught hold of the end of his garment. Joshua swore that he would not come out, and God declared that he should not leave paradise unless he was absolved from his oath; if not absolved, he was to remain. The angel of death then demanded back his knife, but Joshua refused. At this point a heavenly voice ("bat ḳol") rang out: "Give him back the knife, because the children of men have need of it" (Ket. 77b; Jellinek, l.c. ii. 48-51; Bacher, l.c. i. 192 et seq.).


Rabbinic views

The Rabbis found the angel of death mentioned in Psalms lxxxix. 45 (A. V. 48), where the Targum translates: "There is no man who lives and, seeing the angel of death, can deliver his soul from his hand". Eccl. viii. 4 is thus explained in Midrash Rabbah to the passage: "One may not escape the angel of death, nor say to him, 'Wait until I put my affairs in order,' or 'There is my son, my slave: take him in my stead.'" Where the angel of death appears there is no remedy (Talmud, Ned. 49a; Hul. 7b). If one who has sinned has confessed his fault, the angel of death may not touch him (Midrash Tanhuma, ed. Buber, 139). God protects from the angel of death (Midrash Genesis Rabbah lxviii.). For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Midrash Tanhuma (Hebrew: מדרש תנחומא) is the name given to three different collections of Pentateuch haggadot; two are extant, while the third is known only through citations. ... Genesis Rabba (Bereshith Rabba in Hebrew) is a religious text holy to classical Judaism. ...


By acts of benevolence the anger of the angel of death is overcome; when one fails to perform such acts the angel of death will make his appearance (Derek Ereẓ Zuṭa, viii.). The angel of death receives his order from God (Ber. 62b). As soon as he has received permission to destroy, however, he makes no distinction between good and bad (B. Ḳ. 60a). In the city of Luz the angel of death has no power, and when the aged inhabitants are ready to die they go outside the city (Soṭah 46b; compare Sanh. 97a). A legend to the same effect existed in Ireland in the Middle Ages (Jew. Quart. Rev. vi. 336). The Jewish Quarterly Review (JQR) is the oldest English-language journal of Judaic scholarship, established in 1888 by Israel Abrahams and Claude G. Montefiore as an outgrowth of the Wissenschaft des Judentums movement. ...


In Christianity

The medieval painting of Death playing chess from Täby Church in Sweden
The medieval painting of Death playing chess from Täby Church in Sweden

Death is, either as a personification or an actual being, referenced occasionally in the New Testament. He is equated with the evil angel Samael. One such image is found in Acts 2:24 – "But God raised Him [Jesus] from the dead, freeing Him from the agony of death, because it was impossible for death to keep its hold on Him". Later passages, however, are much more explicit. Romans 5 speaks of Death as having "reigned from the time of Adam to the time of Moses", and various passages in the Epistles speak of Christ's work on the Cross and His Resurrection as a confrontation with Death. Such verses include Rom. 6:9 and 2 Tim. 1:10. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1920x2560, 2321 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Seventh Seal Death (personification) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1920x2560, 2321 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): The Seventh Seal Death (personification) Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Täby Municipality is a Municipality in central Sweden where the town of Täby (pop. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... This article is about the archangel. ... For the literature genre, see Acts of the Apostles (genre). ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the letters of the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... The word epistle is from the Greek word epistolos which means a written letter addressed to a recipient or recipients, perhaps part of exchanged correspondence. ... A reliquary in the form of an ornate Christian Cross Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope... The resurrection of Jesus is an event in the New Testament in which God raised him from the dead[1] after his death by crucifixion. ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the letters of the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... The Second Epistle to Timothy is one of the three Pastoral Epistles, normally attributed to Saint Paul, and is part of the canonical New Testament. ...


Despite Jesus' victory over it, Death is still viewed as enduring in Scripture. 1 Cor. 15:26 asserts, "The last enemy to be destroyed is death", which implies that Death has not been destroyed once and for all. This assertion later proves true in the Book of Revelation. The First Epistle to the Corinthians is a book of the Bible in the New Testament. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ...


The author of the Epistle to the Hebrews declares that Satan "holds the power of Death" (Heb. 2:14). It is written that the Son became human that by his death he might destroy the devil; this is the head of the Beast referred to as, "One of the heads of the beast seemed to have had a fatal wound, but the fatal wound had been healed" (Rev. 13:3). If the head that was fatally wounded but healed refers to Death, this accords with 2 Tim. 1:10, which states that Jesus "has destroyed death", and the implication that death was yet to be destroyed in 1 Cor. 15:26. But it could alternately refer to the Devil separately, who was also said to have been destroyed, and yet has revived. That is, whether Death is the Devil or an agent of Satan is unclear. The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbr. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Son of... In Christian eschatology, the Antichrist or anti-Christ means a person, office, or group recognized as fulfilling the Biblical prophecies about one who will oppose Christ and substitute himself in Christs place. ...


The final destruction of Death is referenced by Paul in the fifteenth chapter of 1 Corinthians; he says that after the general resurrection, the prophecies of Isaiah 25:8 and Hosea 13:14 – "He will swallow up death forever", and "Where, O death, is your sting?" (Septuagint), will be fulfilled. According to Paul, the power of Death lies in sin, which is made possible by the Law, but God "gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ". That victory over Death is prophetically revealed in the Revelation of John, discussed below. Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam all variously describe a resurrection of the dead, usually a resurrection of all people to face God on Judgment Day. ... The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ...


In the visions of John, Death is one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Rev. 6:8 reads, "I looked, and there before me was a pale horse! Its rider was named Death, and Hades was following close behind him. They were given power over a fourth of the earth to kill by sword, famine and plague, and by the wild beasts of the earth". In Rev. 20:13-14, in the vision of Judgment of the dead, it is written, "The sea gave up the dead that were in it, and death and Hades gave up the dead that were in them, and each person was judged according to what he had done. Then death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire. The lake of fire is the second death." This describes the destruction of the last enemy. After this, "He will wipe every tear from their eyes. There will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things has passed away" (Rev. 21:4). Saint John on Patmos by Hans Baldung Grien, 1511 Saint John of Patmos, by Jean Fouquet John of Patmos is the name given to the author of the Book of Revelation (or Book of the Apocalypse) in the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Four Horsemen. ...


In Roman Catholicism, the archangel Michael is viewed as the good Angel of Death (as opposed to Samael, the evil Angel of Death), carrying the souls of the deceased to Heaven. There, he balances them in his scales (one of his symbols). He is said to give the dying souls the chance to redeem themselves before passing as well. In Mexico, a popular folk Catholic "cult"[who?] regards the Angel of Death as a saint, known as Santa Muerte, but this local cultus is not acknowledged by the Church. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Saint Michael redirects here. ... A Western depiction of Death as a skeleton carrying a scythe. ... This article is about the archangel. ... Cult typically refers to a cohesive social group devoted to beliefs or practices that the surrounding culture considers outside the mainstream, with a notably positive or negative popular perception. ... Saints redirects here. ... A life sized figure of Santa Muerte stands outside a fortune tellers storefront in Mexico Citys Chinatown. ...


In Islam

Whilst the preceding Abrahamic religions offered little detail on the passage of souls from one dimension into another, Islam provided detailed information. Previously the lack of scripture tended to categorise Death with the supernatural or evil, a natural consequence of humanity's fear over the unknown. However with the onset of Islam, the concept of death as a celebratory event as opposed to one to be dreaded became manifest. It is the passage of the everlasting soul into a closer dimension to its creator that is seen as a point of joy rather than misery, obvious mortal grief and sadness not withstanding. Indeed the Islamic prophet Muhammad demonstrated that grief was an acceptable form of what makes us human, however prolonged mourning at the expense of the living is inappropriate, especially in the light of the transition from one world to the next. The Quran identifies a number of men as prophets of Islam. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ...


Death is represented by one of Allah's angels in the Quran:


6:93: "If thou couldst see, when the wrong-doers reach the pangs of death and the angels stretch their hands out, saying: Deliver up your souls."


32:11: "Say: The Angel of Death, who hath charge concerning you, will gather you and afterward unto your Lord ye will be returned."


The irony of the Angel of Death refers to his involvement in the creation of life. In these verses the Angel of Death and his assistants are sent to take the soul of those destined to die. Who is the Angel of Death? When God wanted to create Adam, he sent one of the Angels of the Throne to bring some of the earth's clay to fashion Adam from it. When the angel came to earth to take the clay, the earth told him: "I beseech you by the One Who sent you not to take anything from me to make someone who will be punished one day." When the angel returned empty-handed, God asked him why he did not bring back any clay. The angel said: "The earth besought me by Your greatness not to take anything from it." Then God sent another angel, but the same thing happened, and then another, until God decided to send Azra'il, the Angel of Death. The earth spoke to him as it had spoken to the others, but Azra'il said: "Obedience to God is better than obedience to you, even if you beseech me by His greatness." And Azra'il took clay from the earth's east and its west, its north and its south, and brought it back to God. God poured some water of paradise on this clay and it became soft, and from it He created Adam.


He is mistakenly known by the name of "Izrail" (not to be confused with Israel, which is a name in Islam solely for Prophet Ya'qoob/Jacob), since the name Izrael isn't mentioned in the holy Quran nor Hadith, the English form of which is Azra'il. He is charged with the task of separating and returning from the bodies the souls of people who are to be recalled permanently from the physical world back to the primordial spiritual world. This is a process whose aspect varies depending on the nature and past deeds of the individual in question, and it is known that the Angel of death is also accompanied by helpers or associates. This article is about the angel of death. ...


Apart from the characteristics and responsibilities he has in common with other angels in Islam, little else concerning Angel of death can be derived from fundamental Muslim texts. Many references are made in various Muslim legends, however, some of which are included in books authored by Muslim poets and mystics. For instance, the following tale is related in the Naqshbandi order of Sufism on the practicalities of sweeping up human souls from the expanse of the earth: Angels in Islam are light-based creatures, created by Allah to serve and worship him. ...

The Prophet Abraham once asked Azra'il who has two eyes in the front of his head and two eyes in the back: "O Angel of Death! What do you do if one man dies in the east and another in the west, or if a land is stricken by the plague, or if two armies meet in the field?" The angel said: "O Messenger of God! the names of these people are inscribed on the lawh al-mahfuz: It is the 'Preserved Tablet' on which all human destinies are engraved. I gaze at it incessantly. It informs me of the moment when the lifetime of any living being on earth has come to an end, be it one of mankind or one of the beasts. There is also a tree next to me, called the Tree of Life. It is covered with myriads of tiny leaves, smaller than the leaves of the olive-tree and much more numerous. Whenever a person is born on earth, the tree sprouts a new leaf, and on this leaf is written the name of that person. It is by means of this tree that I know who is born and who is to die. When a person is going to die, his leaf begins to wilt and dry, and it falls from the tree onto the tablet. Then this person's name is erased from the Preserved Tablet. This event happens forty days before the actual death of that person. We are informed forty days in advance of his impending death. That person himself may not know it and may continue his life on earth full of hope and plans. However, we here in the heavens know and have that information. That is why God has said: 'Your sustenance has been written in the heavens and decreed for you,' and it includes the life-span. The moment we see in heaven that leaf wilting and dying we mix it into that person's provision, and from the fortieth day before his death he begins to consume his leaf from the Tree of Life without knowing it. Only forty days then remain of his life in this world, and after that there is no provision for him in it. Then I summon the spirits by God's leave, until they are present right before me, and the earth is flattened out and left like a dish before me, from which I partake as I wish, by God's order."

Death in popular fiction

The character of Death has recurred many times in popular fiction. It has made appearances in many stories, from serious dramatic fiction to comedy, including playing roles in science fiction and fantasy stories. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Films

Death as portrayed in Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal
  • In 1957, Swedish director Ingmar Bergman made The Seventh Seal, an influential (and heavily symbolic) movie depicting one of the most famous moments in the fictional portrayal of Death. In the movie, a medieval knight (Max von Sydow) returning from a crusade plays a game of chess with Death, with the knight's life depending upon the outcome of the game. American film critic Roger Ebert remarked that this image "[is] so perfect it has survived countless parodies."[13] The influence of Bergman's depiction has been wide:
  • The final act of Monty Python's The Meaning of Life has Death going into a house to pick up a group of people sitting down to dinner who were killed by the salmon mousse. He then takes them (and their cars) into the afterlife.
  • In the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie Last Action Hero, Bergman's Death is brought into the real world temporarily, played by Sir Ian McKellen.
  • In Peter Jackson's 1996 film The Frighteners, death appears as an invisible Grim Reaper figure wielding a scythe, who murders people. It is later revealed this figure is not the real Death but rather the disguised ghost of an executed serial killer.
  • In Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey, the Grim Reaper is portrayed as a hilarious, unsportsmanlike, mildly sarcastic guy. He wears a black robe, has white skin, no hair, carries a scythe, and will escort anyone to any desired location (Hell, Heaven, and Earth) if he is beaten at a game. During the newsflashes which appear in the ending credits, it was written that the Grim Reaper won the Indy 500. He was quoted as saying, "I didn't know I could run that fast." He even started his own short-lived rock band.
  • In the Adam Sandler movie Click, Sandler portrays Michael Newman that uses a remote to control aspects of his life. Death is represented by Morty (Christopher Walken) who takes Michael's father and afterwards Michael himself as he shows the importance of living life day by day.
  • In the Brad Pitt movie Meet Joe Black, Pitt plays the role of Joe Black, the identity and body assumed by death.
  • The Hogfather, a two part miniseries based on Terry Pratchett's Discworld novel of the same name, aired on Sky One in Christmas 2006. In it, Death has to become the Discworld equivalent of Father Christmas in order to save the world (with the help of his granddaughter, Susan).
  • Death is also a prominent character in Terry Pratchett film The Colour of Magic.
  • In the film The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, a flying, skeletal, screeching Death is constantly chasing Baron Münchhausen in various stages and events throughout the plot, with the intent to take his soul.
  • In the B-movie, Six-String Samurai, Death is portrayed at a heavy metal guitar-playing samurai who has ambitions of taking the vacated throne of Lost Vegas for himself. Death's costume resembles the outfit of Guns 'N Roses and Velvet Revolver guitarist Slash.
  • In the film Dogma, Death is represented by Loki, who quit the job of The Angel Of Death and was banished to Wisconsin until the end of the world.
  • In the film Pale Rider, it is implied that Clint Eastwood's character, the Preacher, is Death. A teenage girl prays for help, and shortly after the Preacher arrives on a pale horse and proceeds to wreak death on the antagonists.
  • In Raiders of the Lost Ark, the Angel of Death appears to the Nazis after they opened the Ark, letting them die gruesome and painful.

Film frame from Det Sjunde Inseglet (The Seventh Seal) This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ...   (IPA: in Swedish; usually IPA: in English) (July 14, 1918 – July 30, 2007) was a Swedish film, stage, and opera director. ... The Seventh Seal (Swedish: Det sjunde inseglet) is an existential 1957 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman about the journey of a medieval knight (Max von Sydow) across a plague-ridden landscape. ...   (IPA: in Swedish; usually IPA: in English) (July 14, 1918 – July 30, 2007) was a Swedish film, stage, and opera director. ... The Seventh Seal (Swedish: Det sjunde inseglet) is an existential 1957 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman about the journey of a medieval knight (Max von Sydow) across a plague-ridden landscape. ...  , (born April 10, 1929) is an Academy-Award nominated Swedish actor, known in particular for his collaboration with filmmaker Ingmar Bergman. ... This article is about the Western board game. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life is a musical film comedy made in 1983 by the Monty Python comedy team. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Last Action Hero is a 1993 action comedy directed by John McTiernan. ... Sir Ian Murray McKellen, CH, CBE (born 25 May 1939) is an English stage and screen actor, the recipient of the Tony Award and two Oscar nominations. ... For the Matt Helm spy novel by Donald Hamilton, see The Frighteners (novel). ... Bill and Teds Bogus Journey is a 1991 American comedy science fiction film, the sequel to Bill & Teds Excellent Adventure. ... A traditional wooden scythe A scythe (IPA: , most likely from Old English siðe, sigði) is an agricultural hand tool for mowing and reaping grass or crops. ... Adam Richard Sandler (born September 9, 1966) is an American comedian, actor, musician, screenwriter, and film producer. ... Click is an Academy Award-nominated 2006 comedy/drama/science fiction/fantasy film directed by Frank Coraci and written by Steve Koren and Mark OKeefe. ... Christopher Walken (born March 31, 1943) is an Academy Award-winning American film and theatre actor. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... Meet Joe Black is a 1998 remake of the 1934 film, Death Takes a Holiday, originally having been remade in 1971 under the same name as the original. ... Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... This article is about the novels. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... The Adventures of Baron Munchausen is a 1988 film directed by Terry Gilliam, starring John Neville (as the Baron), Sarah Polley, Eric Idle, Jonathan Pryce, Oliver Reed, Uma Thurman, and Robin Williams. ... Portrait of young Baron Münchhausen Karl Friedrich Hieronymus, Freiherr von Münchhausen (11 May 1720 – 22 February 1797) was a German baron who in his youth was sent to serve as page to Anthony Ulrich II, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and later joined the Russian military. ... Six-String Samurai is a 1998 post-apocalyptic action/comedy film directed by Lance Mungia. ... Dogma is a 1999 comedy film, written and directed by Kevin Smith, who stars in the film along with Ben Affleck, Matt Damon, Linda Fiorentino, Alan Rickman, Bud Cort, Salma Hayek, Chris Rock, Jason Lee, Jason Mewes, George Carlin, Janeane Garofalo, and Alanis Morissette. ... Pale Rider is a 1985 Western film, directed by and starring Clint Eastwood. ...

Literature

In Book V of Paradise Lost by John Milton, Death, along with Sin, holds the keys to the locked Gates of Hell. After God and His angels defeat Lucifer (now Satan) and banish him and his followers to Hell, God commands Sin and Death to never unlock the gates. Satan, upon hearing that God has created a new world and new beings, Adam and Eve, sets out to cause their downfall. Arriving at the Gates of Hell, Satan converses with Sin and Death and learns of Death's creation. Sin is the daughter of Satan and became pregnant with Satan's child. The birth was extremely painful for Sin; so painful that she cried out "Death!" as the unnamed entity was born. The caves of Hell echoed back "Death" and her son became known as Death. Death then raped his mother who subsequently gave birth to monstrous dogs who bite and gnaw at her and travel to and fro her womb at will causing her immense pain. According to Sin, Death despises everything living and has the power to destroy anything except God. Sin warns that Death can destroy Satan and that the only reason she is spared (yet tortured) is that Death cannot exist without Sin. Satan nevertheless demands that the gates be opened. Death, unafraid of Satan, calls him a "false fugitive,"[14] commands him to retreat, and warns, "with one stroke of this Dart, strange horrors seize thee and pangs unfelt before."[15] By promising Sin and Death a world where they, "shall dwell at ease,"[16] Satan persuades Sin and Death to open the gates to allow him passage through Chaos to Earth. When word reaches Sin and Death that Satan succeeds, they begin to construct a road connecting Hell to Earth. Satan, on his return from Earth, notes of the road being built and instructs Sin and Death to be his ambassadors on Earth. For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sin (disambiguation). ... The Gates of Hell, Musée Rodin. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This article is about the star or fallen angel. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... This article is about the theological or philosophical afterlife. ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ...


Death is described as a, "shape had none distinguishable in member, joint, or limb, or substance...Black it stood as Night..and shook a dreadful Dart; what seemed his head the likeness of a Kingly Crown had on."[17]

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come from Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol is presented as a spectre not unlike the Grim Reaper, warning Ebenezer Scrooge of his impending death. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in 1982 animated version of A Christmas Carol. ... Ebenezer Scrooge encounters Ignorance and Want in Dickenss novel, A Christmas Carol Ebenezer Scrooge is the main character in Charles Dickens 1843 novel, A Christmas Carol. ... Dickens redirects here. ... For other uses, see A Christmas Carol (disambiguation). ... The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in 1982 animated version of A Christmas Carol. ... Dickens redirects here. ... For other uses, see A Christmas Carol (disambiguation). ... Spectre, taken from the Battle for Wesnoth computer game. ... Ebenezer Scrooge encounters Ignorance and Want in Dickenss novel, A Christmas Carol Ebenezer Scrooge is the main character in Charles Dickens 1843 novel, A Christmas Carol. ...


Piers Anthony's Incarnations of Immortality series of fantasy novels features a modernized Grim Reaper, who is the central character of On a Pale Horse, the first book in the series. In this personification, Death is an office held by a mortal. The mortal holding the office of Death is protected from aging, fire, disease and other dangers by the cloak he wears. When not wearing the cloak, the office holder is subject to any and all dangers and consequences just as any other mortal. The person holds the office of Death until they themselves die, usually because they become careless over time, and are themselves killed by someone they have come to collect. This person then takes over the office, and the cycle begins anew. Part way through the book, the character receives a scythe, which is revealed to be another part of his "uniform". Piers Anthony Dillingham Jacob (born August 6, 1934 in Oxford, England) is an American writer in the science fiction and fantasy genres, publishing under the name Piers Anthony. ... Incarnations of Immortality is the name of a seven-book fantasy series by Piers Anthony. ...


Death is the most prominent of the anthropomorphic personifications who figure as characters in Terry Pratchett's Discworld novels. He appears in all but one of the books in the series (see Death (Discworld)). Although to begin with, he was a vaguely malevolent figure (when Rincewind managed to avoid being taken, he gave a man a heart attack and killed a small fly, one of his 'stand-ins') he developed into a being that takes not malice but interest in his job, and indeed believes that he must care for humanity ("What can the harvest hope for, if not the care of the Reaper Man?" —Death, Reaper Man). Notable features include the catch phrase "There is no justice, just me," and the emphasis put on his voice, being like "tombstones rolling" (exaggerated by his text being in all capitals). What makes the inclusion of Death so unique is that he is seen to be likable, if not only very droll. Terry Pratchett also plays on common concepts such as the legendary "game of chess," making them into comic features and providing an interesting take on the subject. This version of Death is also shown in the book Good Omens, where he is one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. An anthropomorphic personification is a natural process endowed with human form and personality. ... Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ... This article is about the novels. ... Death is a fictional character in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series. ... Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990) is a fantasy novel written in collaboration between Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. ... For other uses, see Four Horsemen. ...


In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, there is a children's story about three artifacts created by Death himself to give to three wizard brothers who quite cleverly avoided him by conjuring a bridge across a river he was sure they would die in. The gifts were a ploy to deceive the brothers, in an attempt to kill them as surely as if they had died in the river. The oldest brother asked for a wand that will win any duel for its owner. He received it, only to be killed in his sleep by someone else who wanted it. The second brother was given a stone with the power to recall the dead. He recalled his dead fiancée, who was unhappy because she did not belong in the mortal realm. He eventually killed himself to truly join her. The youngest did not trust Death and asked for a way to avoid Death for as long as he wanted. Death was extremely irritated that he had been cheated out of the same victim twice, but still handed over his own Cloak of Invisibility, which the youngest brother eventually gave to his son. Death then instantly claimed him, and the youngest brother greeted him as one would an old friend, dying quite willingly. HP7 redirects here. ... The Sign of the Deathly Hallows represents all three objects symbolically: the Wand, the Stone, and the Cloak. ... The Sign of the Deathly Hallows represents all three objects symbolically: the Wand, the Stone, and the Cloak. ... The Sign of the Deathly Hallows represents all three objects symbolically: the Wand, the Stone, and the Cloak. ...


In Markus Zusak's The Book Thief, Death himself narrates the story of Liesel, a girl living in Nazi Germany, and how she has avoided him, while others around her have not been so lucky. The Book Thief is a 2005 best-selling teen novel by Markus Zusak, and a finalist for the 2007 Michael L. Printz Award. ...


In Ryan Sherwood's (Hold the Light) three versions of Death exist as the "gift" of claiming souls is passed from one to the other. An unbalanced Revolutionary War soldier, Mural, uses his "gift" to dispatch those he sees as evil, but unburdens himself of his death-duties by passing the "gift" to Randy. Randy begins to unravel and loses the gift to George Gabney, an everyman character who struggles with the burden while trying to stay off of the radar of Mural, who wants his "gift" back.


Comics

Death as a teenage goth girl in The Sandman comics
  • An atypical personification of Death appears in The Sandman, a series of comic books written by Neil Gaiman, in which Death, one of the Endless, is depicted as a woman. The image and attire of The Endless change to match with the human styles of their current periods, and as such she appears in current era in the guise of a Goth girl. Throughout the different periods she is always shown wearing an Ankh around her neck, symbolizing the idea that life and death are two sides of the same reality. This is further emphasized by the fact that this version is present in the first moment of a human's life, as well as its last. Gaiman's Death is cheerful and supportive, perhaps not only as a way of playing with audience expectations, but also to demystify death itself, which is seen as a moment of passage rather than a real ending. This Death takes a 24 hour day each century to walk amongst the living and likewise die just like the living. She takes no joy nor hatred in her job, but merely does because she must. She will live the longest of the Endless: "When the first living thing existed, I was there, waiting. When the last living thing dies, my job is finished. I'll put the chairs on tables, turn out the lights and lock the universe behind me when I leave."
  • Brazilian cartoonist Mauricio de Sousa also created a personification of death for his stories starring the ghost Bug-a-Booo, Lady McDeath (original: Dona Morte)[18] She is a more comedic version of the Grim Reaper, often having trouble bringing people to the afterlife. Mauricio even acknowledged he avoids turning McDeath an assassin, aggressive character.[19]
  • The title character in the webcomic Jack is the personification of wrath whose punishment is to be the Grim Reaper. In Jack, nearly all the characters are anthropomorphic animals. Jack himself is a wizened green rabbit in a brown cloak.
  • In Irregular Webcomic!, there is a different Death for every way of dying. They all work for the Head Death. The Deaths seen most often are Insanely Overpowered Fireballs, Choking on a Giant Frog, Inhaling Hatmaking Chemicals, and Wrestled to Death by Steve, who was ironically wrestled to death by Steve (The character Steve being a parody of Steve Irwin). Once, the Head Death fired Insanely Overpowered Fireballs, who humourously took up a job at the Nigerian Finance Ministry.
  • The character of Death has been used frequently in Gary Larson's The Far Side comic strip. Death is seen doing a comedy routine, in a theater with his girlfriend Judy, and "as a child" (where he is putting mini gravestones into a sandbox).
  • Death appears as "the server" in the webcomic Dr. McNinja[20]. He appears in different outfits suiting the cause of one's death. His Purgatory is a restaurant in which you eat venial sins to cleanse them from your soul.
  • In the Preacher comic series, a character called Saint of Killers is actually the Angel of Death. He becomes the Angel of Death after taking up a deal with the previous Angel of Death to resolve unfinished business when the Saint of Killers died.

Image File history File links death from fan site This image is a book cover. ... Image File history File links death from fan site This image is a book cover. ... Death is a fictional character from the DC comic book series, The Sandman (1988 - 1996). ... This article is about the subculture. ... The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. ... Spoiler warning: Death as illustrated by Chris Bachalo. ... The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... The Endless are a group of beings who embody various aspects of the universe in the DC comic book series The Sandman, by Neil Gaiman. ... This article is about the subculture. ... For other uses, see Ankh (disambiguation). ... Mauricio de Sousa (born October 27, 1935) is a Brazilian cartoonist who has created over 200 characters for his popular series of childrens comic books. ... Nedor Comics was the comic line of publisher Ned Pines, who also published pulp magazines under a variety of company names (Standard or Better or Thrilling), which are also used for the comics. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... The Grim Reaper is a fictional character and a superhero who originally appeared in Wonder Comics #1, published by Better Publications in May, 1944 (Grand Comics Database). ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Grim Reaper is a fictional character, a supervillain in the Marvel Comics universe. ... This article is about the personification of death in the Marvel Universe. ... Jack is a furry webcomic by David Hopkins, began in March of 2001. ... For other uses, see Cardinal sin (disambiguation) and Seven deadly sins (disambiguation). ... Irregular Webcomic! is a webcomic created by David Morgan-Mar, an Australian physicist. ... For the rugby league footballer of the same name, see Steve Irwin (rugby league). ... Gary Larson (b. ... This article is about the comic strip. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Television

Simon Templeman as the Angel of Death on the TV series Charmed.
  • In the Showtime television series, Dead Like Me, Death is depicted as an orange horned frog seen in almost every episode.
  • In Xena: Warrior Princess, Celesta is portrayed as the Goddess of Death. She makes two appearances in the series run. Celesta visits the dead and takes them to the underworld. When she is chained, her candle burns and death will be no more.
  • In the anime and original manga series Sailor Moon, one of the warriors, 13-year old Sailor Saturn, is the warrior of death and destruction. Her powers are based on Saturn, the Roman god of harvest, and she carries a weapon known as the 'Silence Glaive', also referred to as 'the scythe of the goddess of death'. Emphasis is placed on death being necessary for rebirth throughout the Sailor Moon series. In an episode called The Secret of the Luna Sphere, Wiseman sends a monster called the Grim Man (who resembles the Grim Reaper) to invade Rini's dreams. So Sailor Pluto sends the Sailor Scouts into Rini's dream to defeat him.
  • In the show Highlander: The Series, the Immortal Methos was the inspiration for the personification of Death, and was the leader of the original Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.
  • In the anime Gundam Wing and its OVA sequel, Endless Waltz, Duo Maxwell's Gundam mobile suit is known as Deathscythe and uses a scythe with a thermal energy blade to destroy enemy mobile suits.
  • In the TV show Family Guy, Death is a recurring character (originally voiced by Norm Macdonald, later by Adam Corolla) who appears as a skeletal figure in a black cloak who carries a scythe. He is one of the less impressive incarnations, portrayed as a human-like slacker who lives with his mother. He is only trying to do his job and is tired of everyone calling him a villain.
  • In the "Treehouse of Horror XIV" episode of The Simpsons, Homer Simpson becomes Death after killing his predecessor ("Doug") with a bowling ball.
  • In the second season of Earthworm Jim during the Christmas special "For Whom the Jingle Bell Tolls" Jim visits the Personifications of Abstract Concepts Club in search of Santa Claus. There he finds Cupid, The Easter Bunny and Death, who complains how overexposed Santa is, and how underexposed he is. Princess What's-Her-Name points out that he starred in "some Swedish movie".
  • As a main character, Death is known as Grim in the series The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy, in which he is voiced by Greg Eagles.
  • In a 1959 episode of The Twilight Zone titled "One for the Angels", Death comes to take a pitch salesman. When the salesman refuses, Death chooses to take a young girl's life as an alternative. The salesman saves the girl's life by distracting Death with a sales pitch, a "pitch for the angels" (hence the title). After the girl is saved, Death leads the salesman into Heaven.
  • In a 1960 episode of The Twilight Zone titled "The Hitch-Hiker", Death is portrayed as a hitch-hiker who follows a young woman on a cross-country road trip from New York to Los Angeles.
  • In a 1962 episode of The Twilight Zone titled "Nothing in the Dark", Robert Redford plays the Grim Reaper disguised as a police officer, easing an elderly woman into death.[21]
  • In the British sci-fi comedy Red Dwarf, the Grim Reaper comes for Rimmer at the end of the last episode of Series VIII, "Only the Good...". Rimmer, however, escapes by kneeing Death in the groin.
  • In an episode of the 2002 revival of The Twilight Zone titled "One Night at Mercy", Death (played by Jason Alexander) decides to quit because he feels his job is too depressing.[22]
  • In the television series Dead Like Me, death is administered by creatures known as "gravelings", and the souls of the departed are guided to the afterlife by teams of "grim reapers", former humans who act upon foreknowledge of each death and who snatch the souls moments before their appointment with death.
  • The Grim Reaper appears in the sixth episode of South Park, where he kills Kenny McCormick instead of Stan's Grandpa. This incarnation can only seem to communicate in odd mooing sounds.
  • In the Happy Tree Friends Halloween episode, "Out of Sight, Out of Mime", Lumpy dresses as a Death. Lumpy is also seen dressed as Death for the HTF October 2005 and 2007 wallpapers.
  • Death appears three times in the series Supernatural in the form of "reapers". The main characters encounter a reaper in two episodes. In the first, a reaper is controlled by a faith healer's wife. In the second encounter, a reaper disguises herself as a lost soul seeking the help of a dying Dean, whom is experiencing an "out-of-body" experience; in actuality she is trying to convince him to move on to the afterlife.
  • In the TV Show Charmed, the Angel of Death is a recurring character. First appearing in season three to Prue Halliwell, he teaches her the necessity of death, and later in season seven turns Piper Halliwell into a fellow spirit of death when the Charmed Ones accidentally save someone who was supposed to die and thus and cause him to fall behind on his work. Finally appearing in an eighth season episode, Death is to take the soul of Piper's husband Leo Wyatt, and out of fondness for the family gives Piper some forewarning. Death is a neutral being, and as such, sides with neither good beings like the Charmed Ones or the demons they destroy.
  • In the Japanese anime and manga series "Bleach", the characters Ichigo and Rukia are depicted as Soul Reapers who send people to the Soul Society(the series´ Heaven) or to the Underworld.
  • In the Japanese anime "YuYu Hakusho", the grim reaper is portrayed by Botan, who is very atypical of the usual portrayal of death.
  • In the British TV series Torchwood (a spin-off of long-running British sci-fi series Doctor Who), a being described as being "Death" appears in the episode "Dead Man Walking". After cheating Death, a malevolent enitity tries to use undead Owen Harper as a conduit to the world of the living, and later tries to claim 13 souls to attain absolute power. As Owen is undead, however, he can battle death without him taking his soul. He then defeats Death and saves the world.
  • In the 6th season of "Tales From The Crypt" at the beginning of the episode "The Assassin" the Crypt Keeper and "Death"(William Sadler reprising his role from Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey) engage in a contest of "Winner Take All" rock, paper, scissors and Death wins. Death then chops off the Crypt Keeper's hand and they go to start the second round as the episode begins.(This is a parody of the ending of the Season 2 episode "Cutting Cards")
  • The animated series Animaniacs included a segment entitled "Meatballs or Consequences" that featured a parody of Bergman's personification of Death from The Seventh Seal.
  • In an episode of the television show Nip/Tuck the character of Julia McNamara (Joely Richardson) is visited, while under anesthesia by the angel of death who is disguised as her life coach Ava Moore (Famke Janssen)
  • In the television series Reaper, Sam Oliver is forced to be the Devil's bounty hunter (his parents sold his soul to the devil at birth) by bringing escaped souls on earth back to hell. Many of the characters refer to Sam as a "Reaper" for the Devil.
  • In a 5th season episode of Angel titled Hellbound, the Reaper appears to take the non-corporeal Spike's soul. The Reaper here is presented as an 18th century doctor named Matthias Pavayne, who killed his patients using dark arts in order to avoid hell.
  • In a third series episode of BBC comedy Murder Most Horrid, Dawn French herself plays death, who mistakenly believes they have to kill the wrong person.

Image File history File links CharmedAngelOfDeath. ... Image File history File links CharmedAngelOfDeath. ... Simon Templeman is a voice actor known for his role as Kain in the video game series Legacy of Kain. He is also known as Simon Templeton. ... For other uses, see Charm. ... Dead Like Me is an American television comedy-drama starring Ellen Muth and Mandy Patinkin as grim reapers in Seattle, Washington. ... Binomial name Ceratophrys cranwelli (Barrio, 1980) (Ceratophrys cranwelli), also called the Chacoan horned frog, is a terrestrial frog endemic to the dry Gran Chaco region of Argentina. ... Xena. ... For the title character, see Sailor Moon (character) and for the first story arc, see Dark Kingdom arc. ... Sailor Saturn ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Wiseman can refer to: People Adele Wiseman, Canadian writer Clarence Wiseman, the 10th General of The Salvation Army Debbie Wiseman, film and television composer Ernest Wiseman Frederick Wiseman, film director Jay Wiseman, BDSM author Joseph Wiseman Len Wiseman Mac Wiseman Nicholas Cardinal Wiseman, Archbishop of Westminster Scott Wiseman Thomas A... Chibi-Usa Chibi-Usa (ちびうさ, also commonly rendered Chibiusa) is a fictional character from the manga/anime Sailor Moon. ... Setsuna Meioh Setsuna Meioh (冥王 せつな Meiō Setsuna) is a character in the anime Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon. ... The Sailor Team. ... Immortals are a group of fictional characters seen in the movies and series of the Highlander franchise. ... Methos is a fictional character from the Highlander movies, Highlander: The Series, and The Methos Chronicles, portrayed by actor Peter Wingfield. ... For other uses, see Four Horsemen. ... New Mobile Report Gundam W (also known as Mobile Suit Gundam Wing) is a televised Anime series, which ran for 49 episodes beginning in 1995. ... A human ovum An ovum (loosely, egg or egg cell) is a female sex cell or gamete. ... Gundam Wing: Endless Waltz is the sequel to Gundam Wing, which is set in an alternate universe to the original Gundam series in the After Colony timeline. ... Duo Maxwell , derived from Latin duo, lit. ... XXXG-01D Gundam Deathscythe (also referred to as Gundam Zero-Two ) is one of the five fictional Gundam mobile suits appearing in the Mobile Suit Gundam Wing anime series and deriviative works. ... A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... These are characters from the animated TV series Family Guy. ... Norm MacDonald Norman Gene MacDonald (born October 17, 1963) is a bilingual Canadian actor and comedian. ... Adam Carolla (born May 27, 1964) is a comedic television and radio personality. ... Slacking in the park The term slacker was commonly used in the United States in World War I and World War II to describe men who were avoiding the military draft. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Earthworm Jim; for the character, see Earthworm Jim (character). ... A typical depiction of Santa Claus. ... This article is about the Roman god. ... A porcelain Easter Bunny The Easter Bunny (sometimes known controversially as the Spring Bunny in some parts of the United States) is an imaginary or mythical rabbit which leaves gifts for children at Easter (or at springtime). ... Princess Whats-Her-Name Princess Whats-Her-Name is a fictional character from the Earthworm Jim video games and animated series. ... The Seventh Seal (Swedish: Det sjunde inseglet) is an existential 1957 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman about the journey of a medieval knight (Max von Sydow) across a plague-ridden landscape. ... Grim Reaper is a fictional character from the television series The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy. ... The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, created by Maxwell Atoms, is an American animated television series that currently airs on Cartoon Network and Teletoon. ... Greg Eagles is the voice actor for Peter Stillman in Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty and is also the voice actor for the DARPA Chief Donald Anderson and the Ninja under the name George Byrd. ... The Twilight Zone is a television series created by Rod Serling. ... “One for the Angels” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... The Twilight Zone is a television series created by Rod Serling. ... “The Hitch-Hiker” is an episode of the television series The Twilight Zone. ... The Twilight Zone is a television series created by Rod Serling. ... “Nothing in the Dark” is an episode of the American television anthology series The Twilight Zone. ... Robert Redford (born August 18, 1936)[1] is an Academy Award-winning American motion picture director, actor, producer, businessman, model, environmentalist and philanthropist. ... This article is about the British sitcom. ... Arnold Rimmer in Red Dwarf Arnold Judas Rimmer BSc, SSc (Bronze Swimming Certificate, Silver Swimming Certificate), who sometimes goes by Arnold Jonathan Rimmer, is a fictional character in the television series Red Dwarf, played by Chris Barrie. ... The Twilight Zone title. ... Jason Alexander (born Jason Scott Greenspan on September 23, 1959) is a Jewish American television, cinema and musical theatre actor, best known for his role as George Costanza on the hit television series Seinfeld. ... Dead Like Me is an American television comedy-drama starring Ellen Muth and Mandy Patinkin as grim reapers in Seattle, Washington. ... Dead Like Me is an American television comedy-drama starring Ellen Muth and Mandy Patinkin as grim reapers in Seattle, Washington. ... Dead Like Me is an American television comedy-drama starring Ellen Muth and Mandy Patinkin as grim reapers in Seattle, Washington. ... Death is the sixth episode of Comedy Centrals animated series South Park. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Kenny McCormick, voiced by Matt Stone, is one of the five (originally four) central characters of South Park, the four others being Eric Cartman, Stan Marsh, Kyle Broflovski, and in recent seasons, Butters Stotch. ... Stanley Stan Marsh is a fictional character in the animated television series South Park. ... Grampa Marvin Marsh is a fictional character in the animated series South Park. ... Happy Tree Friends is a Flash cartoon series by Mondo Mini Shows, created by Kenn Navarro, Aubrey Ankrum, Rhode Montijo and Warren Graff. ... This article is about the holiday. ... Lumpy is a fictional character in the cartoon series Happy Tree Friends. ... This article is about the US TV series. ... For other uses, see Charm. ... Prudence Prue Halliwell, is a fictional character who appeared in the first three seasons of the WB television series Charmed, and was played by actress Shannen Doherty. ... Piper Halliwell is a fictional character from the American television program Charmed, and one of the four leading characters featured during the series run. ... Leo Wyatt is a fictional character from the WB television series Charmed. ... Animé redirects here. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... BLEACH redirects here. ... For other uses, see Heaven (disambiguation). ... Demographic Shōnen Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1990 – 1994 Volumes 19 TV anime Director Noriyuki Abe Studio Studio Pierrot Network Fuji Television, Animax Original run 10 October 1992 – 7 January 1995 Episodes 112 YuYu Hakusho , or YYH) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Yoshihiro... This article contains information about characters in the manga and anime series YuYu Hakusho. ... For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ... This article is about the television series. ... Dr Owen Harper is a fictional character played by Burn Gorman, and a regular in the BBC television series Torchwood, a spin-off from the long-running series Doctor Who. ... Tales from the Crypt can refer to: the television series Tales from the Crypt the film Tales from the Crypt the comic book Tales from the Crypt, published by EC Comics during the 1950s. ... The Assassin, also known as Point of No Return, is a 1993 film directed by John Badham and starring Bridget Fonda. ... This article is about the television series. ... The Seventh Seal (Swedish: Det sjunde inseglet) is an existential 1957 Swedish film directed by Ingmar Bergman about the journey of a medieval knight (Max von Sydow) across a plague-ridden landscape. ... Nip/Tuck is an Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning American television medical drama series created by Ryan Murphy for FX Networks. ... Joely Kim Richardson (born 9 January 1965) is an English actress. ... Famke Beumer Janssen (born November 5, 1965) is a Dutch actress and former fashion model. ... Reaper is an American supernatural television comedy-drama created by Tara Butters and Michele Fazekas, who also serve as executive producers alongside Mark Gordon, Deborah Spera and Tom Spezialy. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... Hellbound is the first commercially released EP by Australian punkabilly rockers The Living End. ... Look up spike in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Murder Most Horrid was a British television comedy starring comedian Dawn French. ... Dawn Roma French[1] (born 11 October 1957) is an Welsh actress and comedian. ...

Video games

  • In Grim Fandango, grim reapers, such as the protagonist, Manny Calavera, act as 'supernatural travel agents' who help the dead on their journies to the afterlife. The best people get train tickets that take them there in 4 minutes while the worst sinners have to walk there, which takes 4 years.
  • In Second Life an unusual avatar is Ant Nirpaw's Death, who walks with a trail of black smoke.
  • In Tales of Symphonia there are two monsters who are called Death and Grim Reaper. Both monsters have an appearance very similar to that of the Western interpretation of the Grim Reaper.
  • In the MMORPG, Guild Wars, there is a character class called the Dervish which wears a robe and hood and that carries a scythe. This Dervish can also turn into The Avatar of Grenth (Guild Wars God of Death), who is essentially a skeletal figure that looks like the Grim Reaper.
  • The Character "Morrigan" in the Darkstalkers series is a reference to the Celtic representation of death.
  • Often featured in the Castlevania series as right hand man for Dracula. Features as a boss on many occasions. (See Death (Castlevania).)
  • In the Maximo series, he works alongside the titular character, helping to avenge his death.
  • Death appears in The Sims when your Sims are lacking adequate food, comfort, energy, etc., if they are killed by some of the various in-game phenomena, if they die of old age (only in The Sims 2), or if the player chooses to kill them through unsafe commands.
  • A rock version of the Grim Reaper appears as the Grim Ripper, a playable guitarist in the Guitar Hero series which is the personification of Death metal.
  • Death is one of the three Dark Gods of Mardias in Romancing SaGa. In the original SNES version, he does not have the scythe as seen in today's personifications. Instead, he carries a staff, but retains his skeletal appearance. In the remake of the game, Death has a centaur-like appearance, and wields the scythe he is commonly associated with.
  • In the video game MediEvil Resurrection, Death appears as a narrator and character, voiced by British actor Tom Baker.
  • In the Nintendo 64 game Conker's Bad Fur Day and its remake Conker: Live & Reloaded, a short, squeaky-voiced personification of death is known as Gregg the Grim Reaper.
  • In the video game Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 3, The Reaper is an enemy that appears when a player stays on any floor of Tartarus too long. The Reaper is level 99, but possible to defeat.
  • Most, if not all Final Fantasy games feature a "Death" spell which summons a Grim Reaper to instantly kill an enemy (depending on their immunities).
  • Death is a minor recurrent foe in the Gauntlet series of video games. while difficult to defeat, it leaves of its own accord after inflicting a set degree of suffering on the player. In some games, it has two incarnations: "Red Death", which drains health, or "Black Death", who drains experience.
  • Reapers are a mid-to-high level class of monsters in Might & Magic III: Isles of Terra.
  • In the Disciples series of computer games, the goddess Mortis of the Undead Hordes appears as a mildly feminized version of the classic Grim Reaper persona. In addition, the Grim Reaper is available in the first Disciples game as the subject of a powerful summoning spell. In Disciples II, that spell instead summons a uniquely-envisioned and slightly more powerful entity named Thanatos, while the Grim Reaper persona is now potentially available as a powerful magical unit.
  • In MapleStory, Ergoth, who resembles classical depictions of the Grim Reaper serves as the powerful boss of the Guild Quest. There is also a pet called the "Jr. Reaper", which looks like a super deformed Reaper.
  • In the Nintendo Entertainment System game Ghoul School, the "Grim Reaper" haunts the Principal's Office. When killed, he releases his scythe which the player can pick up and use against future enemies.
  • In the Xbox game, "Grabbed by the Ghoulies," the grim reaper sometimes appears if you have run out of time in an event or task. If he touches you with his "hand of death," then you die, and have to redo or retry the task.
  • In the PlayStation Portable game titled Death, Jr. II: Root of Evil, Death makes a physical appearance in the game as the father of the protagonist, Death, Jr.
  • In the Nintendo DS game Death Jr. and the Science Fair of Doom, Death makes a physical appearance as father of protagonist Death Jr.
  • In the PlayStation game series Twisted Metal, the character Mister Grimm is the personification of death, and is depicted as a fusion between a motorcycle racer and the traditional Grim Reaper. In the series, he rides an extremely fast motorcycle and is shown to be addicted to consuming the souls of the dead.
  • In RuneScape, The Grim Reaper appears during most Halloween events.
  • In the RPG Adventure Quest, when the player dies, a person with a scythe will appear.
  • In the Nintendo DS games Pokémon Diamond and Pearl, Darkrai's appearance is similar to that of the Grim Reaper. Additionally, Dusknoir is the "Gripper" Pokémon, and the antenna on it head relays commands from the realm of the dead to bring people there.
  • In the little known PC game Challengo, the Grim Reaper acts as a villain and is a boss at the last level.
  • In the MMO Dofus a Grim Reaper with wings, known as Lord Crow, appears at the end of the Crow dungeon, in Lord Crows' library.

Grim Fandango is a graphical adventure computer game released by LucasArts in 1998. ... Second Life (abbreviated as SL) is an Internet-based virtual world launched in 2003, developed by Linden Research, Inc (commonly referred to as Linden Lab), which came to international attention via mainstream news media in late 2006 and early 2007. ... Tales of Symphonia ) is a video game first released for the Nintendo GameCube and later for the PlayStation 2. ... Darkstalkers, known in Japan and Asia as Vampire ), is a series of 2D fighting games produced by Capcom during the late 1990s for the CPS-2 hardware. ... This article is about the entire video game series. ... This article is about the novel. ... Death in Castlevania: Symphony of the Night Death (ja. ... Maximo: Ghosts to Glory is a PlayStation 2 video game by Capcom released in 2002. ... This article is about a computer game that was released in year 2000. ... This article is about the computer game. ... Guitar Hero redirects here. ... This article is about the musical genre. ... Romancing SaGa is the 4th in a line of Square Enix SaGa games. ... MediEvil Resurrection is a video game for the Sony PSP entertainment system. ... For other persons named Tom Baker, see Tom Baker (disambiguation). ... Conkers Bad Fur Day is a Nintendo 64 video game developed and published by Rare, and distributed by Nintendo. ... <> </>< /><>://.///.</> < />:://.///.< />< />> Conker: Live & Reloaded is a video game for Microsofts Xbox console, expected to be released on March 15, 2005 as a re-make of the Nintendo 64 game Conkers Bad Fur Day. ... This article is about the Final Fantasy franchise. ... Gauntlet is a 1985 arcade game by Atari Games. ... Mortis was a robot who competed in the U.K version of the television show Robot Wars between 1997 and 2000, or the first four seriess. ... A Disciple (from the Latin discipulus, a pupil) is one who receives instruction from another; a scholar; a learner; especially, a follower who has learned to believe in the truth of the doctrine of his teacher; an adherent in doctrine. ... TotalGaming. ... In Greek mythology, Thanatos (in Ancient Greek, θάνατος – Death) was the Daimon personification of Death and Mortality. ... This article is about the original game for Windows. ... Ryu drawn in a super deformed style, from the arcade game Pocket Fighter, known as Super Gem Fighter: Mini Mix in the United States. ... “NES” redirects here. ... Ghoul School is a horror video game released for the Nintendo Entertainment System in 1991 by Imagineering. ... For the Xboxs successor, see Xbox 360. ... Grabbed by the Ghoulies is a video game released in 2003 by Rare for the Microsoft Xbox gaming console. ... The PlayStation Portable (officially abbreviated PSP)[5] is a handheld game console manufactured and marketed by Sony Computer Entertainment. ... Death, Jr. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... Screenshot of Twisted Metal: Black. ... RuneScape is a Java-based MMORPG operated by Jagex Ltd. ... DS, Ds or dS can mean: Nintendo DS, a handheld gaming device made by Nintendo Several games for Nintendo DS whose titles use the abbreviation DS in their title: Advance Wars: Dual Strike Castlevania: Dawn of Sorrow Digimon Story Fullmetal Alchemist: Dual Sympathy Guilty Gear: Dust Strikers Mr. ... For other uses, see Pokémon Diamond and Pearl (disambiguation). ... Darkrai ) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ... Dusknoir , Yonoir in original Japanese language versions) is one of the 493 fictional species of Pokémon creatures from the multi-billion-dollar[1] Pokémon media franchise – a collection of video games, anime, manga, books, trading cards and other media, created by Satoshi Tajiri. ...

Poetry

A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Carl Michael Bellman (February 4, 1740 - February 11, 1795) was a Swedish poet and composer. ... Phillipp Veits Germania (1877), a personification of Germany. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos rendition of Charon. ...

Music

Lots of types of music. Added most popular death music is "emo" music or more popular the gothic era; for instance Ozzy Osbourne. These are the main types of musics that talk about dying or death alot. Ozzy redirects here. ...

Blue Öyster Cult is an American rock band formed in New York in 1967 and still active in 2008. ... (Dont Fear) The Reaper is a song by the hard rock band Blue Öyster Cult from their 1976 album, Agents of Fortune. ... This article is about metallic materials. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Grim Reaper is a British heavy metal band from the NWOBHM style and era. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... Pia Douwes as Elisabeth and Viktor Gernot as Franz Josef in the original 1992 Vienna production Kata Janza as Elisabeth and Szilveszter P. Szabo as Death in Budapest 2002 Stanley Burleson as Death and Pia Douwes as Elisabeth in Scheveningen 1999 Elisabeth is a German-language musical commissioned by the... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... My Chemical Romance are an American rock band formed in 2001. ... Alternate cover Black cover, slipcase, available alongside white cover. ... This article is about the person. ... Holy Wood (In the Shadow of the Valley of Death) is a Rock & Roll album by Marilyn Manson. ... Fahey and Detroit on the cover of the Hormonally Yours album Shakespears Sister (sometimes written with the apostrophe) was a band consisting of Siobhan Fahey and Marcella Detroit. ... Siobhan Fahey (born Siobhan Máire Deirdre Fahey on September 10, 1958) was a founding member of the 1980s British girl group Bananarama, and later founded the musical outfit Shakespears Sister. ... For other uses, see Slayer (disambiguation). ... Thrash metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music, one of the extreme metal subgenres that is characterised by high speed riffing and aggression. ... Josef Mengele, the SS physician whose acts during WWII inspired the lyrics of Angel of Death Angel of Death is the opening track on the American thrash metal band Slayers 1986 album Reign in Blood. ... Josef Mengele (March 16, 1911– February 7, 1979) was a German SS officer and a physician in the German Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau. ... This article is about the rock group. ... Do the Evolution is a song by Pearl Jam, from the album Yield. ... Death Angel is an Filipino-American thrash metal band from Concord, California. ... This article is about metallic materials. ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ...

Commercials

  • A 1987 Australian AIDS prevention commercial featured the Grim Reaper ten-pin bowling.
  • The Grimm Report CD reviews commercial with St. Louis' Ben Grimm, writer for inBox Magazine & DVD. (please note the myspace account has been deleted)

For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...

Theatre

  • Death appears in the French musical Romeo et Juliette in the guise of a woman. She is subsequently taken out of other European productions, possibly because the French word for Death is the feminine La Mort while non-romance languages typically see Death as male. The Belgian production retains Death but portrays him as a man.
  • In Elisabeth (musical), Death has a "love affair" with Elisabeth of Bavaria. He is also seen throughout the play killing people with the Kiss of Death and conducting the events of the world.

Roméo et Juliette is a symphonie dramatique, a large scale work in French for mixed voices and orchestra, by French composer Hector Berlioz. ... Pia Douwes as Elisabeth and Viktor Gernot as Franz Josef in the original 1992 Vienna production Kata Janza as Elisabeth and Szilveszter P. Szabo as Death in Budapest 2002 Stanley Burleson as Death and Pia Douwes as Elisabeth in Scheveningen 1999 Elisabeth is a German-language musical commissioned by the... Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ...

See also

This is an article about the mythology of the Psychopomp. ... Death god and Death worship redirect here. ... Shinigami , literally death god) is the Japanese name for personifications of death, in particular the Grim Reaper, which was imported to Japan from Europe during the Meiji period. ... Phillipp Veits Germania (1877), a personification of Germany. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Midrash Tanhuma on Genesis 39:1
  2. ^ Talmud Berakhot 4b
  3. ^ Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer 13
  4. ^ Midrash Tanhuma on Exodus 31:18
  5. ^ Talmud Avodah Zarah 20b; on putrefaction see also Pesikta de-Rav Kahana 54b; for the eyes compare Ezekiel 1:18 and Revelation 4:6
  6. ^ Jewish Quarterly Review vi. 327
  7. ^ Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer 13, end; compare Targum Jonathan to Genesis 3:6, and Yalkut Shimoni 25)
  8. ^ Genesis 23:3; Genesis Rabba 63:5, misunderstood by the commentators
  9. ^ Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer 32
  10. ^ Sifre Deuteronomy 305
  11. ^ Pesikta de-Rav Kahana 199, where lifne moto(Deuteronomy 33:1) is explained as meaning "before the angel of death")
  12. ^ Yalkut Shimoni 428
  13. ^ Ebert, Roger (2000-4-16). :: rogerebert.com :: Great Movies :: The Seventh Seal. Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved on 2007-07-28.
  14. ^ Milton, Book II, 700
  15. ^ Milton, Book II, 703-704
  16. ^ Milton, Book II, 840-841
  17. ^ Milton, Book II, 667-673
  18. ^ LadyMcDeath profile.
  19. ^ Como a Morte Surgiu (Português). monica.com.br.
  20. ^ Dr.Mc.Ninja (English). drmcninja.com.
  21. ^ Twilight Zone: Nothing in the Dark at the Internet Movie Database
  22. ^ Twilight Zone: One Night At Mercy at the Internet Movie Database

Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Berakhot (Hebrew: ברכות, Benedictions) is the first masekhet (tractate) of Seder Zeraim (Order of Seeds) of the Mishnah, the first major text of Jewish law. ... Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer (Hebrew: פרקי דרבי אליעזר) is a haggadic-midrashic work on Genesis, part of Exodus, and a few sentences of Numbers, ascribed to R. Eliezer ben Hyrcanus, and composed in Italy shortly after 833 CE. It is quoted immediately before the end of the 12th century under the following titles... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... This article is about the second book in the Torah. ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Avodah Zarah (meaning idolatry - lit. ... Visions of John of Patmos, as depicted in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry. ... The Jewish Quarterly Review (JQR) is the oldest English-language journal of Judaic scholarship, established in 1888 by Israel Abrahams and Claude G. Montefiore as an outgrowth of the Wissenschaft des Judentums movement. ... Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer (Hebrew: פרקי דרבי אליעזר) is a haggadic-midrashic work on Genesis, part of Exodus, and a few sentences of Numbers, ascribed to R. Eliezer ben Hyrcanus, and composed in Italy shortly after 833 CE. It is quoted immediately before the end of the 12th century under the following titles... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Targum Pseudo-Jonathan. ... The Yalkut Shimoni (Hebrew: ילקוט שמעוני) or simply Yalkut is a haggadic compilation on the books of the Old Testament. ... Genesis Rabba, (Breshit Rabba in Hebrew), is a religious text holy to classical Judaism. ... Pirke De-Rabbi Eliezer (Hebrew: פרקי דרבי אליעזר) is a haggadic-midrashic work on Genesis, part of Exodus, and a few sentences of Numbers, ascribed to R. Eliezer ben Hyrcanus, and composed in Italy shortly after 833 CE. It is quoted immediately before the end of the 12th century under the following titles... Sifre (סִפְרֵי siphrēy, Sifre, Sifrei) is a Midrash halakhah originated from Devarim and Shmot. ... Pesikta de-Rab Kahana (Hebrew: פסיקתא דרב כהנא) is a collection of Aggadic midrash which exists in only one edition, that of Solomon Buber (Lyck, 1868). ... The Yalkut Shimoni (Hebrew: ילקוט שמעוני) or simply Yalkut is a haggadic compilation on the books of the Old Testament. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ...

Bibliography

This article incorporates text from the 1901–1906 Jewish Encyclopedia, a publication now in the public domain. The Jewish Encyclopedia was an encyclopedia originally published between 1901 and 1906 by Funk and Wagnalls. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

  • Bender, A. P. (January 1894). "Beliefs, Rites, and Customs of the Jews, Connected with Death, Burial, and Mourning". The Jewish Quarterly Review 6 (2): 317–347. doi:10.2307/1450143. 
  • Bender, A. P. (July 1894). "Beliefs, Rites, and Customs of the Jews, Connected with Death, Burial, and Mourning". The Jewish Quarterly Review 6 (4): 664–671. doi:10.2307/1450184. 
  • Böklen, Ernst (1902). Die Verwandtschaft der Jüdisch-Christlichen mit der Parsischen Eschatologie. Göttingen: Vendenhoeck & Ruprecht. 
  • Dillmann, August (1895). Handbuch der alttestamentlichen Theologie. Leipzig: S. Hirzel. 
  • Hamburger, R. B. T. i. 990-992:
  • Joël, David (1881). Der Aberglaube und die Stellung des Judenthums zu Demselben. Breslau: F.W. Jungfer's Buch. 
  • Kohut, Alexander (1866). Ueber die Jüdische Angelologie und Dämonologie in Ihrer Abhängigkeit vom Parsismus. Leipzig: Brockhaus. 
  • Milton, John. Paradise Lost. 
  • Schwab, Moïse (1897). Vocabulaire de l'Angélologie d'Après les Manuscrits Hebreux de la Bibliothèque Nationale. 
  • Stave, Erik (1898). Ueber den Einfluss des Parsismus auf das Judenthum. Haarlem: E. F. Bohn. 
  • Weber, F. W. (1897). Jüdische Theologie auf Grund des Talmud und verwandter Schriften, gemeinfasslich dargestellt. Leipzig: Dörffling & Franke. 
  • Winer, B. R. ii. 383-386;
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Christian Friedrich August Dillmann (April 25, 1823 - 1894), was a German orientalist and biblical scholar. ... Alexander Kohut (April 22, 1842 - May 25, 1894) was a rabbi and scholar who helped found the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ... Moïse Schwab (Paris, September 18, 1839-1918) was a French librarian and author. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Death (personification) (4766 words)
Death, personified is a personification of death as an anthropomorphic figure or a fictional character, who has existed in mythology and popular culture since the earliest days of storytelling.
Because the reality of death has had a substantial influence on the human psyche and the development of civilization as a whole, the personification of Death as a living, sentient entity is a concept that has existed in all known societies since the beginnings of recorded history.
A different personification of Death appears in The Sandman, a series of comic books written by Neil Gaiman, in which Death, one of the Endless, appears in the guise of a cute Goth girl wearing an Ankh around her neck, to symbolize the idea that life and death are two sides of the same reality.
Death (3499 words)
Death is the cessation of physical life in a living organism, or the state of the organism after that event.
Identifying the moment of death is even more important in cases of transplantation, as organs for transplant (which, of course, exclude the brain) must be harvested as quickly as possible after the death of the body.
Death was once defined as the cessation of heartbeat (cardiac arrest) and of breathing, but the development of CPR and prompt defibrillation posed a challenge.
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