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Encyclopedia > Dead pixel
Close-up of an LCD display, showing a dead green subpixel

A dead pixel is a defective pixel that remains unlit on an LCD screen or a CCD or CMOS sensor in a digital camera. The term "dead pixel" is often applied to other defective pixels, but there are also separate terms. A permanently lit (white) pixel is called a hot pixel, and a pixel that stays on a solid color (red, green, or blue) is known as a stuck pixel. Image File history File linksMetadata Lcd_display_dead_pixel. ... A pixel (pix, 1932 abbreviation of pictures, coined by Variety headline writers + element) is one of the many tiny dots that make up the representation of a picture in a computers memory. ... This example shows an image with a portion greatly enlarged, in which the individual pixels are rendered as little squares and can easily be seen. ... LCD redirects here. ... A specially developed CCD used for ultraviolet imaging in a wire bonded package. ... Static CMOS Inverter Complementary-symmetry/metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) (see-moss, IPA:), is a major class of integrated circuits. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A stuck pixel is a common pixel defect on LCD screens. ...


In LCD manufacture, it is common for a display to be manufactured that has a number of sub-pixel defects (each pixel is composed of three primary-colored sub-pixels). The number of faulty pixels tolerated before a screen is rejected is dependent on the "class" which the manufacturer has given the display (although officially described by the ISO 13406-2 standard, not all manufacturers interpret this the same way, or follow it at all). Some manufacturers have a zero-tolerance policy with regard to LCD screens, rejecting all units found to have any number of sub-pixel or pixel defects, meaning the display is a "Class I" display. Others reject them according to the number of total defects, or the number of defects in a given group, or other definitions. Some screens come with a leaflet stating how many dead pixels they are allowed to have before you can send them back to the manufacturer. Dead pixels can also occur in clusters; these are particularly annoying, and in most cases these can be sent back to the manufacturer.


In some cases, the manufacturer sends all screens to sale, and then replaces the screen if the customer reports the unit as faulty and the dead pixels meet their minimum requirements for return.


The majority of dead pixels are only noticeable on a solid color background, for example through the use of the "Dead Pixel Checkers" which consist of 4 or 5 solid-color images.


Manufacturers which offer a Zero-Dead-Pixel Warranty

  • Phillips (might only include pixels stuck in a bright state)
  • ViewEra (certain models. Covers any defective pixel within 6 months of purchase)
  • Toshiba (only high-end notebook models)
  • Sony (VAIO entire line)

As of 2006, most LCD manufacturers do NOT offer such a warranty, and may refuse to fix or replace a monitor with dead pixels (e.g. multiple red pixels), sometimes even if the monitor arrives with the defect. Customers should exercise scrutiny and search for a manufacturer's "pixel policy". Official VAIO logo Vaio PCG-505EX 1998 VAIO, an acronym for Video Audio Integrated Operations, is a sub-brand for many of Sonys computer products. ...


See also

A stuck pixel is a common pixel defect on LCD screens. ...

External links

  • Laptop Showcase's Dead Pixel Buddy utility for testing for dead pixels
  • Tom's Hardware Guide investigates dead pixel policies
  • A test for dead pixels
  • An animated gif that may fix dead pixel
  • Dead Pixel Locator

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dead pixel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (380 words)
A dead pixel is a defective pixel that remains unlit on an LCD screen or a CCD or CMOS sensor in a digital camera.
A permanently lit (white) pixel is called a hot pixel, and a pixel that stays on a solid color (red, green, or blue) is known as a stuck pixel.
The number of faulty pixels tolerated before a screen is rejected is dependent on the "class" which the manufacturer has given the display (although officially described by the ISO 13406-2 standard, not all manufacturers interpret this the same way, or follow it at all).
FileForum | Dead Pixel Tester (333 words)
Dead Pixel Tester - TFT screens have thousands of pixels, on a 1024x768 monitor, there are three cells for each pixel - one each for red, green, and blue - which amounts to nearly 2.4 million cells (1024x768x 3 = 2,359,296).
Stuck pixels (always on) are easier to noticed then pixels that are not on due to their size (normally under.5mm).
You are correct in that you can not do anything (to fix) a dead or stuck pixel, but if you are thinking about buying a particular laptop or LCD monitor you can use this to check it out first.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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