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Encyclopedia > Dead Men of Dunharrow

In J. R. R. Tolkien's high fantasy world of Middle-earth, the Dead Men of Dunharrow (also referred as the Shadow Host, the Grey Host, the oathbreakers, or simply the Dead) were the shades of Men of the White Mountains (Ered Nimrais), who were cursed to remain in Middle-earth, as Maiar spirits, by Isildur after they abandoned their oath to aid him in the War of the Last Alliance. Even though they were indestrictible and the most powerful force in Middle-earth, the curse placed upon them was said to have brought great pain. They were formerly known as the Men of the Mountains, and they were related to the Dunlendings. Tolkien redirects here. ... High fantasy is a subgenre of fantasy fiction that is set in invented or parallel worlds. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... For other uses, see Ghost (disambiguation). ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... The White Mountains, a loose translation of the Sindarin Ered Nimrais Whitehorn Mountains, is a fictional mountain range in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... The Last Alliance of Elves and Men is an episode in J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth. ... Dunland is a fictional land from J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth: the land of the Dunlendings. ...


Their king was known as the King of the Mountains, and later, the King of the Dead. At the end of the Second Age, he pledged allegiance to Isildur at the Stone of Erech (Erech was a hill where the latter had set a black spherical monolith from Númenor, half protruding from the ground). The Second Age is a fictional time period from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth. ... Location of Erech within Gondor in Middle Earth In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Erech was the name of a hill, or hill-top, in Gondor situated in the far north of the province of Lamedon, at the western feet of the White Mountains. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ...


However, these Men refused to aid Isildur in his war against Sauron, for they had worshipped the Dark Lord during the Dark Years. Isildur said that they would not have peace or rest till they fulfilled their oath upon his command or that of his heirs. During the War, they came to the aid of neither side, but hid in the mountains. For other uses, see Sauron (disambiguation). ... The Dark Years is a term used in the fictional world of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings for the time of Saurons great and almost undisputed domination of Middle-earth, during which many peoples were enslaved or corrupted. ...


Their spirits haunted the caverns beneath the Dwimorberg, the Haunted Mountain, and the valley of Harrowdale that lay in its shadow—though they were said to appear in the valley only in times of trouble or death, haunting the hill of the Stone of Erech. Dwimorberg is a fictional mountain, in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, part of J.R.R. Tolkiens fictional universe. ... Harrowdale, in J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, is the name given to the deep north-south valley cut out of the White Mountains by the Snowbourn River. ...


Malbeth the Seer prophesied that a day would come when need and haste would drive one of Isildur's heirs to take the Road under the Mountain and that the Dead would answer to his call. This page is a candidate to be copied to Wikiquote. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, the Paths of the Dead was a haunted pass through the White Mountains. ...


Thousands of years later, the Prophecy was fulfilled. In the War of the Ring in the late Third Age, Isildur's Heir and direct descendant, Aragorn, called upon the Dead to fulfil their oath at last. Summoning them to the stone of Erech, Aragorn commanded them to fulfil their oath and be free. On this occasion, he first uses the royal banner of Gondor, made by Arwen and delivered by the Grey Company (a group of Rangers of the North accompanied by Arwen's brothers). Combatants Free peoples: Gondor, Rohan, Dale, Esgaroth, Erebor, The Shire, Lothlórien, the Woodland Realm and the Fangorn forest Evil forces: Under Sauron: Mordor, Rhûn, Morgul, Harad, Umbar, Khand Under Saruman: Isengard, Dunland Commanders Gandalf (died but later resurrected) Aragorn Théoden† Éomer Denethor† Dáin II† Brand† Galadriel... For other uses, see The Third Age. ... Aragorn II is a fictional character from J. R. R Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium. ... Gondor is a fictional kingdom in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ...


They followed him through Gondor's lands and fiefs south of the Mountains, and at the port of Pelargir they drove away the Corsairs of Umbar, allies of Sauron. Declaring that they had fulfilled their oath, Aragorn granted them their freedom, and they vanished at last from the world. After this, Aragorn gathered the warriors of the region to him. They sailed to Minas Tirith on the Corsairs' own ships, and saved the day at the Battle of the Pelennor Fields. In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Pelargir was a great harbour city in southern Gondor. ... The Corsairs of Umbar were a fleet of Men of Umbar in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, allied to Sauron in his war against Gondor. ... Combatants Gondor, Rohan, Dúnedain of the North Mordor, Harad, Rhûn, Khand, Umbar Participants Gandalf, Éomer, Éowyn, Aragorn, Imrahil, Merry, Denethor†, Théoden† Witch-king of Angmar†, Nazgûl, Gothmog† War of the Ring 1st Fords of Isen - 2nd Fords of Isen - Isengard - Hornburg - Lothlórien - Mirkwood - Osgiliath - Pelennor...


The Men of the Shadow Host appeared to be grey shades; some still rode ghostly horses, but all moved at the same speed. They bore swords and spears and banners, and answered a horn-call with their own horns. However, they did not need weapons (it is left vague whether they and their weapons are "material" at all), for their chief weapon was fear.


In the battle with the Corsairs, as recounted by Legolas and Gimli to Merry and Pippin, the Corsairs abandoned their ships in terror, which Aragorn then commandeered. Those who did not flee drowned in the sea. In fact, they terrified Mordor and Gondor's soldiers alike (as they passed through the land, people hid in terror, and they even disrupted a local battle). Legolas is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ...


The fell riders of the "Furious Host" of the restless dead, the "Wild Hunt" that may burst upon the unwary traveller in lonely places, is the theme from northern European folklore that Tolkien evoked, vividly realized and built upon. Horses, knights, and hounds are among the restless spirits in the inhuman train. Hans Sachs' poem, "Das wutend heer der kleynen dieb" (1539) describes the furious host in gruesome detail, accompanied by ravens who were plucking out the eyes of the roving dead, till at last "there came one behind, who had been hanged the same day, had still his eyes and saw me." [1] It is a measure of Aragorn's heroic nature that he dares summon the dead to account in this manner, and a superhuman sign that the rightful king has indeed returned. The wild hunt: Åsgårdsreien (1872) by Peter Nicolai Arbo The Wild Hunt was a folk myth prevalent in former times across Northern Scandinavia, Germany and Britain. ... Hans Sachs (November 5, 1494 - January 19, 1576) was a German meistersinger (mastersinger), poet, playwright and shoemaker. ...

Contents

Adaptations

The Army of the Dead in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.
The Army of the Dead in Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.

In the 1980 animated version of The Return of the King, the Dead Men of Dunharrow are omitted, and Aragorn just shows up at Minas Tirith with the warriors of southern Gondor, riding the Corsairs' ships. Image File history File links Army_of_the_dead. ... Image File history File links Army_of_the_dead. ... For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... The year 1980 in film involved some significant events. ... DVD cover The Return of the King is an animated adaptation of the novel by J. R. R. Tolkien which was released by Rankin/Bass as a TV special in 1980. ...


In Peter Jackson's live-action adaptation, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, the Dead Men are only referred to as the "Army of the Dead". Aragorn proves his authority to them with Andúril, and only Legolas and Gimli are with him; his fellow Rangers of the North do not appear. Erech is also not featured. For other persons named Peter Jackson, see Peter Jackson (disambiguation). ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Image:Anduril large. ... Legolas is a character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... Gimli is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, featured in The Lord of the Rings. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium, the Rangers of the North, also known as the Dúnedain of the North, were the descendants of the Dúnedain from the lost kingdom of Arnor. ... Location of Erech within Gondor in Middle Earth In the fictional universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Erech was the name of a hill, or hill-top, in Gondor situated in the far north of the province of Lamedon, at the western feet of the White Mountains. ...


In the latter film, the Dead are depicted as green and glowing, and dwell in a Petra-like spectral, similarly coloured underground city, which Aragorn and company go to. In the book, Aragorn summons them above ground to the Stone, and they serve him willingly, almost eagerly; the film has them at the verge of attacking the trio when Aragorn shows the royal sword Andúril to their king, proving his authority. Petra (from petra, rock in Greek; Arabic: البتراء, Al-Butrā) is an archaeological site in Jordan, lying in a basin among the mountains which form the eastern flank of Arabah (Wadi Araba), the large valley running from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba. ...


Their king also recites the followings verses:

The way is shut.
It was made by those who are Dead.
And the Dead keep it.
The way is shut.

In the book, these verses were recited many years before, by a mysterious old man found by the Rohirrim shortly before he dies, soon after Meduseld is built.[2] The film omits the second-to-the-last line of the verses: In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional universe of Middle-earth, Meduseld was the great Golden Hall built in Edoras. ...

Until the time comes.

Rather than terrifying their foes (and mostly everyone else), the Dead appear to suck the life out of them.


The battle with the Corsairs occurs off-screen in the theatrical cut, but is glimpsed in the extended cut. The Army of the Dead also accompany Aragorn to Minas Tirith to decimate Sauron's entire army on the Pelennor Fields. They kill every foe in sight—Orc, Man, and Oliphaunt alike—and move into the occupied area of the city, rescuing the defenders. Minas Tirith (IPA: ), originally named Minas Anor, is a heavily fortified city in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth writings, which was the capital of Gondor in the second half of the Third Age. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth, the Pelennor Fields were the townlands and fields of Minas Tirith, capital of Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy writings, Orcs or Orks are a race of creatures who are used as soldiers and henchmen by both the greater and lesser villains of The Silmarillion and The Lord of the Rings — Morgoth, Sauron and Saruman. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fictional lands of Middle-earth, a mûmak (plural mûmakil) is a pachyderm of the southern land of Harad, similar to but much larger than todays elephant, and said to be its ancestor. ...


Only after a scene of silent vacillation, where Gimli even suggests that they keep them, does Aragorn declare their curse lifted.


According to a magazine article, Peter Jackson hated the Dead Men; he thought it was too unbelievable. He kept it in the script because he did not wish to disappoint diehard fans of the books.[3]


Nevertheless, some readers dislike his expansion of the Dead Men into spirits explicitly able to inflict physical harm; some think that they were turned into a deus ex machina device, and others have jokingly dubbed them "radioactive scrubbing bubbles", after the way they "clean up" the battle in a manner similar to advertisements for Scrubbing Bubbles, while bearing a green glow similar to that associated with radioactivity.[4] For other uses, see Deus ex machina (disambiguation). ... S.C. Johnson Scrubbing Bubbles logo The Scrubbing Bubbles are mascots for Scrubbing Bubbles bathroom cleaner from S. C. Johnson & Son. ...


Adaptations(Games)

The Dead Men of Dunharrow appear in various games:


In Iron Crown Enterprises' Middle-earth Role Playing Game, the King of the Dead is called Morthec Gruan, but this name is non-canonical. Iron Crown Enterprises has produced role playing, board, miniature, and collectible card games for over 20 years. ... MERP uses 2 ten-sided dice Middle-earth Role Playing (MERP) is a now out-of-print role-playing game based on Tolkiens writings and published by Iron Crown Enterprises (I.C.E.). // The setting for MERP is an expanded version of J.R.R. Tolkiens Middle Earth. ...


The Dead are also featured in video and computer games based on the Jackson films, namely the real-time strategy games The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth and its sequel The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II, and the action platformer adaptation of The Return of the King. In the latter, the player actually has to fight them and their King, who is a boss with his own level, before they will fight for Gondor. In The Lord of the Rings: The Third Age, when the player is allowed to play as Aragorn on the Pelennor Fields, an option is to summon Army of the Dead. The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth Categories: Computer and video game stubs | Real-time strategy computer games | 2004 computer and video games | Multiplayer online games | Windows games ... The Lord of the Rings: The Third Age Categories: Computer and video game stubs | 2004 computer and video games | GameCube games | PlayStation 2 games | Xbox games ...


They are also part of Games Workshop's The Lord of the Rings Strategy Battle Game. For the defunct company, see Game Designers Workshop. ... The Lord of the Rings Strategy Battle Game (abbreviated as LotR SBG), often referred to by players as Lord of the Rings, is a tabletop miniature wargame produced by Games Workshop (GW). ...


Notes

  1. ^ Gundarsson, Kveldulf Hagen. The Folklore of the Wild Hunt and the Furious Host. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  2. ^ J. R. R. Tolkien (1987). The Return of the King. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, "The Muster of Rohan". ISBN 0-395-08256-0. 
  3. ^ The Internet Movie Database. "Trivia for The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King". Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  4. ^ oddlots.digitalspace.net. "Promises Kept — ROTK-M At Last" (Review of The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King). Retrieved on 2006-12-21.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Tolkien redirects here. ... The Return of the King is the third and final volume of J. R. R. Tolkiens The Lord of the Rings, following The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, television stars, video games and production crew personnel. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also


 
 

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