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Encyclopedia > De Havilland Tiger Moth
de Havilland Tiger Moth
de Havilland DH 82A Tiger Moth, (N81DH)
Type trainer
Manufacturer de Havilland Aircraft
Designed by Geoffrey de Havilland
Maiden flight 26 October 1931
Retired 1959
Status Retired from military service, still in extensive civil use
Primary users Royal Air Force
Royal Canadian Air Force
RAAF
See other military operators
Produced 1931-1944
Number built 8,868[1]
Developed from de Havilland Gipsy Moth
Variants Thruxton Jackaroo

The de Havilland DH 82 Tiger Moth was a 1930s biplane designed by de Havilland and operated by the Royal Air Force and others as a primary trainer. It remained in service with the RAF until 1952 when many of the surplus aircraft entered civil operation that continues to this day. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 537 pixel Image in higher resolution (1092 × 733 pixel, file size: 215 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): De Havilland Tiger... Trainer may refer to: An aircraft trainer used for training pilots. ... An aerospace manufacturer is a company or individual involved in the various aspects of designing, building, testing, selling, and maintaining aircraft, aircraft parts, missiles, rockets, and/or spacecraft. ... For other uses, see De Havilland (disambiguation). ... Sir Geoffrey de Havilland (July 27, 1882 - May 21, 1965) was one of Englands aviation pioneers. ... The Maiden flight of an aircraft is the first occasion on which an aircraft leaves the ground of its own accord. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... This is a list of aviation-related events from 1931: Events Manufacturer Airspeed Ltd founded in York, England. ... This is a list of aviation-related events from 1959: // Events Unknown The Canadian Golden Hawks aerobatic team is formed. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) was the air force of Canada from 1924 until 1968 when the three branches of the Canadian military were merged into the Canadian Forces. ... The RAAF Roundel is based on that of the British Royal Air Force, with the central circle replaced by a Kangaroo, a symbol of Australia. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The de Havilland DH.60G Gipsy Moth was a variant of the powered by the de Havilland Gipsy I engine. ... The Thruxton Jackaroo was a 1950s British four-seat cabin biplane converted from a De Havilland Tiger Moth by Jackaroo Aircraft Limited at Thruxton Aerodrome and Rollason Aircraft and Engines Limited at Croydon Airport. ... This is a timeline of aviation history. ... Hs123 biplane. ... For other uses, see De Havilland (disambiguation). ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This is a list of aviation-related events from 1952: // Events January January 5 - Pan Am commences trans-atlantic freight services. ...

Contents

Design and development

1933 de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth (G-ACDJ)
1933 de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth (G-ACDJ)

The Tiger Moth trainer prototype is derived from the de Havilland Gipsy Moth (DH 60). The main change to the DH Moth series was necessitated by an effort to improve access to the front cockpit since the training requirement specified that the front seat occupant had to be able to escape easily, even wearing a parachute.[2] Access to the front cockpit of the Moth predecessors was restricted by the proximity of the aircraft's fuel tank directly above the front cockpit and the rear support struts for the upper wing. The solution adopted was to shift the upper wing forward but sweep the wings back to maintain the centre of lift.[3] Other changes included a strengthened structure, fold-down doors on both sides of the cockpit and a revised exhaust.[4] It was powered by a de Havilland Gipsy III 120 hp engine and first flew on 26 October 1931 with de Havilland Chief Test Pilot Hubert Broad at the controls.[5] One distinctive characteristic of the Tiger Moth design is its differential aileron control setup. The ailerons (on the lower wing only) on a Tiger Moth barely travel down at all on the wing on the outside of the turn, while the aileron on the inside travels a large amount upwards... this is one of the ways the problem of adverse yaw can be counteracted in an aircraft's control design. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1437, 541 KB) de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth (UK registration G-ACDJ, year of build 1933) at Kemble Airfield, Gloucestershire, England. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1437, 541 KB) de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth (UK registration G-ACDJ, year of build 1933) at Kemble Airfield, Gloucestershire, England. ... The de Havilland DH.60G Gipsy Moth was a variant of the powered by the de Havilland Gipsy I engine. ... The de Havilland Gipsy was a British air-cooled 4-in-line aircraft engine designed by Frank Halford in 1927 to replace the de Havilland Cirrus in production. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... This is a list of aviation-related events from 1931: Events Manufacturer Airspeed Ltd founded in York, England. ... Adverse yaw (or aileron drag) is a secondary effect of the application of the ailerons in aircraft. ...


From the outset, the Tiger Moth proved to be an ideal trainer, simple and cheap to own and maintain, although control movements required a positive and sure hand as there was a slowness to control inputs. Some instructors preferred these flight characteristics because of the effect of "weeding" out the inept student pilot.[6]

1939 de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth (G-AGHY)
1939 de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth (G-AGHY)

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1024, 404 KB) de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth (UK registration G-AGHY, year of build 1939) at Kemble Airfield, Gloucestershire, England. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1024, 404 KB) de Havilland DH82a Tiger Moth (UK registration G-AGHY, year of build 1939) at Kemble Airfield, Gloucestershire, England. ...

Operational history

The RAF ordered 35 dual-control Tiger Moth Is which were designated the DH 60T. A subsequent order was placed for 50 aircraft powered by the de Havilland Gipsy Major I engine (130hp) which was designated the DH 82A Tiger Moth II. The Tiger Moth entered service at the RAF Central Flying School in February 1932. By the start of the Second World War, the RAF had 500 of the aircraft and large numbers of civilian Tiger Moths were impressed to meet the demand for trainers. The de Havilland Gipsy Major was a 4-cylinder, air-cooled, inline engine used in a variety of light aircraft in the 1930s including the famous Tiger Moth biplane. ... This is a list of aviation-related events from Canadian Siskins aerobatic team is retired. ...


With a British production run of over 7,000 Tiger Moths, a total of 4,005 Tiger Moth IIs were built during the war specifically for the RAF, nearly half being built by the Morris Motor Company. Morris Motor logo, from a UK Royal Mail van 1927 Morris Cowley 1928 Morris Minor Saloon 1946 Morris Ten Series M 1953 Morris Minor Series 2 1971 Morris 1000 Traveller The Morris Motor Company was a former British car manufacturing company. ...


The Tiger Moth became the foremost primary trainer throughout the Commonwealth and elsewhere. It was the principal type used in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan where thousands of military pilots got their first taste of flight in this robust but forgiving little machine. External links The Canadian Contribution (includes newspaper archives) World War II Newspaper Archives — The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. ...

de Havilland Canada DH 82C resplendent in Commonwealth Air Training Plan "trainer yellow" at the Western Canada Aviation Museum; note the skiis.
de Havilland Canada DH 82C resplendent in Commonwealth Air Training Plan "trainer yellow" at the Western Canada Aviation Museum; note the skiis.

Canada manufactured 1523 of the DH 82C, which had a 145 hp D.H. Gypsy Major 1C engine and other modifications including a tail wheel replacing the original tail skid, a stronger undercarriage with wheels set farther forward and and enclosed cockpit with a sliding canopy necessitated by the northern climate.[7]The de Havilland Canada operation also supplied 200 Tiger Moths to the USAAF, which designated them the PT-24. A further 151 were built in Norway, Sweden and Portugal while 2,949 Tiger Moths were built by other countries of the British Commonwealth. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 1. ... de Havilland Canada was an innovative aircraft manufacturer with facilities based in Toronto, Ontario. ... External links The Canadian Contribution (includes newspaper archives) World War II Newspaper Archives — The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. ... The Western Canada Aviation Museum is a museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... de Havilland Canada was an innovative aircraft manufacturer with facilities based in Toronto, Ontario. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was a part of the U.S. Army during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... The Commonwealth of Nations (CN), usually known as The Commonwealth, is a voluntary association of 53 independent sovereign states all of which are former colonies of the United Kingdom, except for Mozambique and the United Kingdom itself. ...


A number of modified Tiger Moths were developed for special roles. A radio-controlled target tug version of the Tiger Moth II called the Queen Bee was built with nearly 300 in service at the start of the Second World War. The Fleet Air Arm operated small numbers of the Tiger Moth II, and the Queen Bee. In the aftermath of Britain's disastrous campaign in France, in August 1940, three proposals involved beach defence systems; 350 Tiger Moths were fitted with bomb racks to serve as light bombers. A more radical conversion involved the "paraslasher," a scythe-like blade fitted to a Tiger Moth and intended to cut parachutist's canopies as they descended to earth. Flight tests proved the idea, but it was not officially adopted. The Tiger Moth was also tested as a "human crop sprayer" intended to dispense "Paris Green" poisonous insecticide from powder dispensers located under the wings.[8] The Fleet Air Arm is the operational group of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ...


Postwar

In postwar use, surplus Tiger Moths were available for flying clubs and individuals. They proved to be inexpensive to operate and found enthusiastic reception in the civil market, taking on a variety of new roles including aerial advertiser, aerial ambulance, aerobatic performer, crop duster and glider tug.

Tiger Moth D-EBKT c.2005
Tiger Moth D-EBKT c.2005

After the invention of aerial topdressing in New Zealand, large numbers of ex-Royal New Zealand Air Force Tiger Moths made in that country were converted into agricultural aircraft. The front seat was replaced with a hopper to hold superphosphate for aerial topdressing. From the mid 1950s, these topdressers were replaced by more modern types such as the PAC Fletcher, and a large number of good flying condition New Zealand Tiger Moths then passed to enthusiasts. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1280 × 853 pixel, file size: 411 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): De Havilland Tiger... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (1280 × 853 pixel, file size: 411 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): De Havilland Tiger... Aerial Topdressing is the spreading of fertilisers such as Superphosphate over farm land. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) is the air force arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... The Antonov An-2 was the first purpose-built agricultural arcraft to be mass-produced. ... Superphosphate is a fertiliser produced by the action of concentrated Sulphuric Acid on ground phosphate rock. ... PAC Fletcher is an Agricultural aircraft, made in New Zealand was, together with the Auster Agricola, the first designed for aerial topdressing. ...


Royal Navy Tiger Moths utilized as target tugs and "air experience" machines became the last military aircraft when the service purchased a batch of refurbished examples in 1956.[9]


Survivors

Although numerous examples of the Tiger Moth are still flying today (an estimated 250[10]), a number of aircraft have been preserved as museum displays at the Mosquito Aircraft Museum in England, the Polish Aviation Museum at the former Kraków-Rakowice-Czyżyny Airport in Poland, the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa and the Western Canada Aviation Museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, amongst others. The Mosquito Aircraft Museum is a small volunteer run aviation museum in the English county of Hertfordshire, just north of Greater London. ... Polish Aviation Museum (Muzeum Polskiego Lotnictwa w Krakowie) is a large museum of old aircraft and aircraft engines in Kraków, Poland. ... Kraków-Rakowice-Czyżyny Airport is a no longer functioning airport in Kraków, Poland, one of the oldest permanent airfields in Europe. ... Te Papa (Our Place), The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa is the national museum of New Zealand. ... The Western Canada Aviation Museum is a museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ...


Variants

  • DH 60T Moth Trainer: Military training version of the De Havilland DH.60 Moth.
  • DH 82 Tiger Moth: Two-seat primary trainer aircraft. Powered by a 120-hp (89-kW) De Havilland Gipsy III piston engine.
    • Tiger Moth Mk I: Two-seat primary training version for the RAF.
  • DH 82A Tiger Moth: Two-seat primary trainer aircraft. Powered by a 130-hp (97-kW) De Havilland Gipsy Major piston engine.
    • Tiger Moth Mk II: Two-seat primary training version for the RAF.
  • DH 82C Tiger Moth: Winterized or cold weather version for the RCAF. Fitted with sliding glass canopies and cockpit heating. Powered by a 108-kW (145-hp) de Havilland Gipsy Major piston engine; 1,523 built.
  • PT-24 : Two-seat primary training version for the USAAF.
  • DH 82B Queen Bee: Unmanned radio-controlled target drone. 380 built.
  • Thruxton Jackaroo: Four-seat cabin biplane

RAF is an three letter acronym for: Royal Air Force -- the Air Force of the United Kingdom (see also Air Ministry) Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion) -- a German terror organisation Rigas Autobusu Fabrika -- a factory making buses in Riga, Latvia Rapid Action Force in India Računarski Fakultet RAF... The RCAF Roundel is based on that of the British Royal Air Force with a maple leaf, a symbol of Canada in the centre. ... USAAF recruitment poster. ... The Thruxton Jackaroo was a 1950s British four-seat cabin biplane converted from a De Havilland Tiger Moth by Jackaroo Aircraft Limited at Thruxton Aerodrome and Rollason Aircraft and Engines Limited at Croydon Airport. ...

Operators

Military operators

Image File history File links Flag_of_Australia. ... The RAAF Roundel is based on that of the British Royal Air Force, with the central circle replaced by a Kangaroo, a symbol of Australia. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Myanmar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Canada_(bordered). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Denmark. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Egypt. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_India. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iraq. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_New_Zealand. ... The Royal New Zealand Air Force or RNZAF is the air operations arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... Ranks Norwegian military ranks Luftforsvaret or the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) is the air force of Norway. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Poland_corrected_(bordered). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Portugal. ... Image File history File links Flag of Rhodesia, 1965–1968. ... Anthem: Rise O Voices of Rhodesia (from 1974) Capital Salisbury Language(s) English Government Republic President¹  - 1970-1975 Clifford Dupont  - 1976-1978 John Wrathall Officer Administering the Government¹  - 1965-1970 Clifford Dupont Prime minister  - 1965-1979 Ian Smith Historical era Cold War  - Independence (UDI) November 11, 1965  - Republic declared March... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Spain_Under_Franco. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa_1928-1994. ... SAAF flag The South African Air Force (SAAF) is the Air Force of South Africa. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sweden. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... RAF is an three letter acronym for: Royal Air Force -- the Air Force of the United Kingdom (see also Air Ministry) Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion) -- a German terror organisation Rigas Autobusu Fabrika -- a factory making buses in Riga, Latvia Rapid Action Force in India Računarski Fakultet RAF... The Fleet Air Arm is the operational group of the Royal Navy responsible for the operation of the aircraft on board their ships. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Uruguay_(bordered). ...

Specifications (DH 82)

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2, student & instructor
  • Length: 23 ft 11 in (7.34 m)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 4 in (8.94 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 9 in (2.68 m)
  • Wing area: 239 ft² (22.2 m²)
  • Empty weight: 1,115 lb (506 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 1,825 lb (828 kg)
  • Powerplant:de Havilland Gipsy Major I inverted 4-cylinder inline , 130 hp (100 kW)

Performance

The distance AB is the wing span of this Aer Lingus Airbus A320. ... The de Havilland Gipsy Major was a 4-cylinder, air-cooled, inline engine used in a variety of light aircraft in the 1930s including the famous Tiger Moth biplane. ... VNO of an aircraft is the V speed which refers to the velocity of normal operation. ... The maximal total range is the distance an aircraft can fly between takeoff and landing as limited by its fuel capacity. ... In aeronautics, the service ceiling is the maximum density altitude where the best rate of climb airspeed will produce a 100 feet per minute climb(twin engine) and 50 feet(single engine) at maximum weight while in a clean configuration with maximum continuous power. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...

References

  1. ^ De Havilland Tiger Moth (D.H.82)
  2. ^ Bain 1992, p. 43.
  3. ^ deHavilland Tiger Moth 82A
  4. ^ Bain 1992, p. 43.
  5. ^ McKay 1988, p. 6
  6. ^ deHavilland D.H. 82 Tiger Moth
  7. ^ Hotson 1983, p. 51.
  8. ^ de Havilland Tiger II
  9. ^ McKay 1998, p. 57.
  10. ^ deHavilland D.H. 82 Tiger Moth
  • Bain, Gordon. De Havilland: A Pictorial Tribute. London: AirLife, 1992. ISBN 1-85648-243-X.
  • Bransom, Alan. The Tiger Moth Story, Fifth Edition. Manchester, UK: Crecy Publishing Ltd., 2005. ISBN 0-859791-03-3.
  • Hotson, Fred. The De Havilland Canada Story. Toronto: CANAV Books, 1983. ISBN 0-9690703-2-2.
  • McKay, Stuart. Tiger Moth. New York: Orion Books, 1998. ISBN 0-517-56864-0.

External links

Related content

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Related development

de Havilland Gipsy Moth Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The de Havilland DH.60G Gipsy Moth was a variant of the powered by the de Havilland Gipsy I engine. ...

Comparable aircraft

Boeing-Stearman Kaydet PT-17 Stearman The Stearman model 75, widely known as the Stearman, Boeing Stearman (Stearman became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934) or Kaydet was a biplane built in the United States during the 1930s as a military trainer aircraft. ...

Designation sequence

DH.77 - DH.80 - DH.81 - DH.82 - DH.83 - DH.84 - DH.85 - DH.87 The De Havilland Puss Moth is a three seater aeroplane designed in 1929 and used by Britain during the second world war mainly for communications. ... The D.H.87 Fox Moth was a succsessful biplane passenger aircraft from the 1930s powered by a Gipsy Major IV inline inverted engine, manufactured by the deHavilland aircraft co. ... The de Havilland Dragon was a commericial aircraft designed and built by the de Havilland company. ... The de Havilland DH.85 Leopard Moth is a three seater aeroplane designed and build by the de Havilland Aircraft Company in 1933. ... Cabin biplane, designed as trainer and touring aircraft. ...

Related lists

See also

  • Thunderbird 6, a film which features the Tiger Moth prominently.

  Results from FactBites:
 
de Havilland Tiger Moth (412 words)
The Tiger Moth was a rugged single bay biplane design with a wooden (Spruce) structure, covered by fabric on the wings and tail surfaces, and ply on the fuselage.
It was powered by a De Havilland Gypsy III, a 130 horse power engine, had a range of 300 miles (483 km), a cruising speed of 85 mph (136 km/h), a top speed of 109 mph (175km/h), and could climb at 700 Ft/Min (213.35 m/Min) to a ceiling of 17000 Ft (5181.30 m) (Sharp, 1960).
The de Havilland DH.82 Tiger Moth was a 1930s biplane designed by de Havilland and operated by the Royal Air Force and others as a primary trainer.
Tiger Moth (0 words)
The early Cirrus Moth was succeeded by several variants: the Genet Moth the Hermes Moth and the Gypsy Moth.
This shortcoming was eliminated in the Tiger Moth by moving the upper wing section forward to clear the front cockpit while sweeping both wings back to keep the aircraft's center of gravity (C.G.) in the desired position.
The Tiger Moth on display was one of 1,384 examples built in Canada during World War II and served as a primary trainer in the Commonwealth Air Training Plan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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