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Encyclopedia > De Havilland Goblin
Cutaway Goblin II
Cutaway Goblin II
A cutaway diagram of the internal workings of the de Havilland Goblin, as fitted to the Vampire.
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A cutaway diagram of the internal workings of the de Havilland Goblin, as fitted to the Vampire.

The Goblin, originally the Halford H-1, was an early turbojet engine designed by Frank Halford and built by de Havilland. It was the second British engine to fly, and the first to pass tests and receive a "Gas Turbine" class type rating. It was the primary engine of the de Havilland Vampire, and was to have been the engine for the F-80 Shooting Star (as the Allis-Chalmers J36) before that design switched engines due to production delays. The Goblin also powered the Saab 21R, Fiat G.80 and de Havilland Swallow. The Goblin was later expanded into the larger de Havilland Ghost, with the model numbers continuing from the last marks of the Goblin. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1195x911, 751 KB) This picture may have usage restriction Rolls Royce Goblin II cutaway Source: own picture File links The following pages link to this file: De Havilland Goblin Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1195x911, 751 KB) This picture may have usage restriction Rolls Royce Goblin II cutaway Source: own picture File links The following pages link to this file: De Havilland Goblin Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x739, 133 KB)de Havilland Goblin turbojet engine cutaway diagram. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x739, 133 KB)de Havilland Goblin turbojet engine cutaway diagram. ... A Royal Canadian Air Force deHavilland Vampire The de Havilland Vampire, or DH.100, was the second jet engined aircraft commissioned by the Royal Air Force during WW II, although it never saw combat. ... Turbojets are the simplest and oldest kind of general purpose jet engine. ... Major Frank Bernard Halford, (1894–1955), was an aircraft engine designer. ... Until 1920, Geoffrey de Havillands de Havilland Aircraft Company had been known as Airco, where he was owner and chief designer. ... A Royal Canadian Air Force deHavilland Vampire The de Havilland Vampire, or DH.100, was the second jet engined aircraft commissioned by the Royal Air Force during WW II, although it never saw combat. ... The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star was the first operational jet fighter used by the United States Army Air Force. ... Saab 21R The Saab 21R was a Swedish fighter/attack aircraft that saw service in the late 1940s. ... The first DH. 108 built - TG283. ... The De Havilland Ghost was a turbojet engine. ...


Design of the engine was carried out by Frank Halford at his London consulting firm starting in April 1941. It was based on the basic layout pioneered by Frank Whittle, using a centrifugal compressor and sixteen individual flame cans. Compared to the Whittle designs it was "cleaned up" in that it used a single-sided compressor with the inlet at the front, and used a "straight through" design with the flame cans exhausting straight onto the turbine. Whittle's designs used a "reverse flow" layout that piped the hot air back to the middle of the engine, in order to "fold" it and reduce its length. Halford's changes made his engine somewhat simpler than Whittle's designs, notably allowing one of the main bearings to be removed. Nevertheless it was a fairly compact design, even without the Whittle-style "folding". Major Frank Bernard Halford, (1894–1955), was an aircraft engine designer. ... Frank Whittle speaking to employees of NASA Glenn Research Center, USA, in 1946 Air Commodore Sir Frank Whittle, OM, KBE (1 June 1907–9 August 1996) was a Royal Air Force officer who invented the jet engine. ... A centrifugal compressor, also called a radial blower, squirrel cage, or squirrel wheel compressor, consists of an axle to which is mounted a cylindrical assembly of compressor blades. ... A ring of can type combustors circles the mid section of this gas turbine. ...


The H-1 first ran on 13 April 1942, and quickly matured to produce its full design thrust within two months. It first flew on 5 March 1943 on the Gloster Meteor, and on 20 September on the de Havilland Vampire. It was around this time that the name was changed to "Goblin". 13 April is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... This article is about the year. ... March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) is a common year starting on Friday. ... The Gloster Meteor was the first jet fighter aircraft of the British Royal Air Force, introduced into service only weeks after the Third Reichs Messerschmitt Me 262, in August 1944 during World War II. It was thus the second fighter jet in history and the first of the WWII... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... A Royal Canadian Air Force deHavilland Vampire The de Havilland Vampire, or DH.100, was the second jet engined aircraft commissioned by the Royal Air Force during WW II, although it never saw combat. ...


In July 1943 an H-1 was sent to the United States, where it was selected to become the primary engine of the F-80. This engine was fitted to the prototype and first flew on 8 January, 1944. The engine was later accidentially destroyed in testing, and replaced by another H-1 from the prototype Vampire. Allis-Chalmers was selected to produce the engine in the US as the J36, but ran into lengthy delays. Instead General Electric was forced to give the I-40, their greatly improved 4,000 lbf version of the Rolls-Royce Derwent to Allison Engine, becoming the Allison J33. The Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Co. ... The General Electric Company, or GE (NYSE: GE) is a multinational technology and services company. ... The Derwent was the second jet engine design to be put into production by Rolls-Royce. ... The Allison Engine Company was a U.S. aircraft engine manufacturer which was acquired by Rolls-Royce plc in 1995 to become a subsidiary, Rolls-Royce Corporation. ... Allison J33-A-35, photo USAF Museum The J33 was a US-produced development of Frank Whittles early Rolls-Royce Derwent, enlarged to produce dramatically more thrust, starting at 4,000 lbf and ending at 4,600 lbf with an additional low-altitude boost to 5,400 lbf with...

Contents


Versions

  • H.1/Goblin I developed about 2,300 lbf (10.2 kN) thrust
  • Goblin II 3,100 lbf (13.8 kN)
  • Goblin 3 3,350 lbf (14.9 kN)
  • Goblin 35 3,500 lbf thrust
  • Goblin 4 3,750 lbf

Usage

The Gloster Meteor was the first jet fighter aircraft of the British Royal Air Force, introduced into service only weeks after the Third Reichs Messerschmitt Me 262, in August 1944 during World War II. It was thus the second fighter jet in history and the first of the WWII... A Royal Canadian Air Force deHavilland Vampire The de Havilland Vampire, or DH.100, was the second jet engined aircraft commissioned by the Royal Air Force during WW II, although it never saw combat. ... The Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star was the first operational jet fighter used by the United States Army Air Force. ... Saab 21R The Saab 21R was a Swedish fighter/attack aircraft that saw service in the late 1940s. ...

References

  • EnginesUK

See also


Lists of Aircraft | Aircraft manufacturers | Aircraft engines | Aircraft engine manufacturers This list of aircraft is sorted alphabetically, beginning with the name of the manufacturer (or, in certain cases, designer). ... This is a list of aircraft manufacturers (in alphabetic order). ... List of aircraft engines: // Piston engines Allison V-1710 Alvis Leonides Armstrong-Siddeley Puma Armstrong-Siddeley Cheetah Armstrong-Siddeley Nimbus Bentley BR1 Rotary BMW 801 Bristol Aquila Bristol Centaurus Bristol Hercules Bristol Jupiter Bristol Pegasus Bristol Perseus Bristol Phoenix Bristol Taurus Bristol Titan Bristol Hydra Bristol Mercury Clerget rotary Continental... This is a list of aircraft engine manufacturers both past and present. ...


Airports | Airlines | Air forces | Aircraft weapons | Missiles | Timeline of aviation This is a list of airlines in operation. ... This is a list of Air Forces, sorted alphabetically by country. ... This is a list of aircraft weapons, past and present. ... Below is a list of (links to pages on) missiles, sorted alphabetically by name. ... This is a timeline of aviation history. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
De Havilland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (875 words)
de Havilland continued to produce high-performance aircraft including the high-speed twin-piston-engine DH.88 Comet mailplane, one of which became famous in its red livery as the winner of the MacRobertson Air Race from England to Australia.
The de Havilland Comet was put into service in 1952 as the eagerly-anticipated first commercial jet airliner, twice as fast as previous alternatives and a source of British national pride.
de Havilland Canada was formed in 1928 to build Moth aircraft for the training of Canadian airmen and continued after the war to build its own designs suited to the harsh Canadian operating environment.
De Havilland Goblin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (501 words)
The Goblin, originally the Halford H-1, was an early turbojet engine designed by Frank Halford and built by de Havilland.
It was the primary engine of the de Havilland Vampire, and was to have been the engine for the F-80 Shooting Star (as the Allis-Chalmers J36) before that design switched engines due to production delays.
The Goblin was later expanded into the larger de Havilland Ghost, with the model numbers continuing from the last marks of the Goblin.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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