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Encyclopedia > Days of the week

The names of the days of the week in various world languages can be classified as either numerical or planetary, both of which may have the names of one or more days changed for religious or secular reasons. As exceptions, Sunday is often named "Lord" (for Lord's Day) while Saturday is often named "Sabbath" or "washing day". Numerically named days may associate day one with Sunday as in Hebrew and Portuguese, or may associate day one with Monday as in Russian and other Slavic languages. Planetary names for the days are derived from the Sun, Moon, and five visible planets (Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn), which in turn were named for Roman gods with the same names. The Germanic languages, including English, substitute Nordic gods with similar characteristics for many of the Roman gods, although the Nordic gods themselves never were associated with the planets. Stone Temple Pilots (abbreviated STP) was a popular Grammy Award-winning American rock band in the 1990s and early 2000s, consisting of Scott Weiland (vocals), brothers Robert (bass guitar, vocals) and Dean DeLeo (guitar), and Eric Kretz (drums, percussion). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Lords Day is one of the traditional Christian names for Sunday, the first day of the Judaeo-Christian seven-day week, observed by most Christians as the memorial of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is said in the four canonical gospels of the New Testament to have... Hebrew redirects here. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... Sol redirects here. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... This article is about the planet. ... For other uses, see Jupiter (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Venus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the planet. ... Proto-Indo-European Indo-European studies The Germanic languages form one of the branches of the Indo-European (IE) language family, spoken by the Germanic peoples who settled in northern Europe along the borders of the Roman Empire. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


The English names for the days of the week derive from the Anglo-Saxon deities stemming from the indigenous pantheon of the Anglo-Saxons. Thursday and Friday come from Scandinavian deities Thor and Freyja. An exception to this is Saturday, which takes its name from the Roman deity Saturn. To varying extents, most regions with dominant Germanic languages practice a similar naming convention, basing most of their week days in recognition of their native Germanic deities. Deities of pre-Christian German and Anglo-Saxon (West Germanic) mythology, or from accounts in High German (Old High German, Old Frankish), Old Low Franconian, Old Saxon, Comparison with Norse deities, as well as what little evidence there remains of East Germanic (Gothic) and Lombardic sources, allows reconstruction of some... Anglo-Saxon polytheism refers to the Migration Period Germanic paganism practiced by the Anglo-Saxons in 5th to 7th century England. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... -1... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... Saturnus, Caravaggio, 16th c. ... The Germanic languages are a group of related languages constituting a branch of the Indo-European (IE) language family. ... The article lists gods and goddesses (*Ansewez, *Wanizaz) that may be reconstructed for Proto-Germanic or Common Germanic Migration period paganism, or which figure in both West and North Germanic mythology; See Norse deities, Anglo-Saxon deities and German deities for deities particular to one of these traditions. ...


Saturday and Sunday are commonly called the weekend and are days of rest and recreation in most western countries. Friday and Saturday are days of rest in some Muslim countries. In Israel, the days of rest are Saturday and either Friday or Sunday, at the option of the individual. The Jewish Sabbath lasts from Friday sunset to Saturday sunset. Week End The weekend is a part of the week lasting one or two days in which most paid workers do not work. ... “Fun” redirects here. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ...


In some countries such as Iran, the weekend is only one day long (Friday) and the week starts on a Saturday. Other Muslim countries have weekends on Thursday and Friday.


As a consequence, all non-weekend days are known as weekdays; compare Feria. Weekdays are the days of the week which are not part of the weekend, i. ... Feria refers to a day on the Liturgical calendar on which no feast is observed. ...


Sunday was the first day of the astrological week, in the Hebrew week, and in the Ecclesiastical Latin week of the first millennium. Sunday still begins the week in the United States and to some extent in other English-speaking countries. An astrological chart (or horoscope) _ Y2K Chart — This particular chart is calculated for January 1, 2000 at 12:01:00 A.M. Eastern Standard Time in New York City, New York, USA. (Longitude: 074W0023 - Latitude: 40N4251) Astrology (from Greek: αστρολογία = άστρον, astron, star + λόγος, logos, word) is... Hebrew redirects here. ... The term Ecclesiastical Latin (sometimes called Church Latin) refers to the Latin language as used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in its Latin liturgies. ... The following is a list of countries where English is an official language, in order of population: India United States (de facto only; the USA has no official language) Nigeria Philippines United Kingdom Hong Kong South Africa Canada Kenya Uganda Ghana Sri Lanka Australia Cameroon Zimbabwe Malawi Zambia Sierra Leone...


In many other countries, including most of Europe, South America, and parts of Asia, Monday is now considered the first day of the week. This agrees with the international standard for date and time representation, ISO 8601, which defines Monday as the first day of the week and Sunday the last. ISO 8601 is an international standard for date and time representations issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... For more details on each day of the week, see days of the week. ...

Contents

Names of the days

Remnants of Germanic deities are reflected in the English language names for days of the week, as (more or less) calques of the Roman names: Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... The article lists gods and goddesses (Ansewez, Wanizaz) that may be reconstructed for Proto-Germanic or Common Germanic Migration period paganism, or which figure in both West and North Germanic mythology; See Norse deities, Anglo-Saxon deities and German deities for deities particular to one of these traditions. ... // In linguistics, a calque (pronounced ) or loan translation is a word or phrase borrowed from another language by literal, word-for-word (Latin: verbum pro verbo) or root-for-root translation. ...

  • Sunday: The name Sunday comes from the Old English Sunnandæg (pronounced [sun.nan.dæg] or [sun.nan.dæj), meaning "Day of the Sun". This is a translation of the Latin phrase Dies Solis. English, like most of the Germanic languages, preserves the original pagan/sun associations of the day. Many other European languages, including all of the Romance languages, have changed its name to the equivalent of "the Lord's day" (based on Ecclesiastical Latin Dies Dominica). Compare Spanish Domingo, French dimanche, Romanian duminca and Italian Domenica.
  • Monday: The name Monday comes from the Old English Mōnandæg (pronounced [mon.nan.dæg] or [mon.nan.dæj'), meaning "Day of the Moon". This is likely based on a translation of the Latin name Dies Lunae (cf. Romance language versions of the name, e.g., French Lundi, Spanish, Lunes, Romanian Luni, Italian Lunedì).
  • Tuesday: The name Tuesday comes from the Old English Tiwesdæg (pronounced [ti.wes.dæg] or [ti.wes.dæj], meaning "Tyr's day." Tyr (in Old English, Tiw, Tew or Tiu) was a god of combat and heroic glory in Germanic paganism. The name of the day is based on Latin Dies Martis, "Day of Mars" (the Roman war god); compare French Mardi, Spanish Martes, Romanian Marti and Italian Martedì.
  • Wednesday: The name Wednesday comes from the Old English Wōdnesdæg (pronounced [woːd.nes.dæg] or [woːd.nes.dæj) meaning the day of the Germanic god Woden (Wodan), more commonly known as Odin, who was the highest god in Norse mythology, and a prominent god of the Anglo-Saxons (and other places) in England until about the seventh century. It is based on Latin Dies Mercurii, "Day of Mercury"; compare French Mercredi, Spanish Miércoles, Romanian Miercuri and Italian Mercoledì. The connection between Mercury and Odin is more strained than the other syncretic connections. The usual explanation is that both Odin and Mercury were considered psychopomps, or leaders of souls, in their respective mythologies. Also, in Old Norse myth, Odin, like Mercury, is associated with poetic and musical inspiration. In German, the day is referred to as Mittwoch (mid week).
  • Thursday: The name Thursday comes from the Old English Þūnresdæg (pronounced [θuːn.res.dæg] or [θuːn.res.dæj]), meaning the day of Þunor, commonly known in Modern English as Thor, the Germanic god of thunder. It is based on the Latin Dies Iovis, "Day of Jupiter"; compare French Jeudi, Spanish Jueves, Romanian Joi and Italian Giovedì. In the Roman pantheon, Jupiter was the chief god, who seized and maintained his power on the basis of his thunderbolt (Fulmen).
  • Friday: The name Friday comes from the Old English Frigedæg (pronounced [fri.je.dæg] or [fri.je.dæj]), meaning the day of Frige, the Germanic goddess of beauty, who is a later incarnation of the Norse goddess Frigg, but also potentially connected to the Goddess Freyja. It is based on the Latin Dies Veneris, "Day of Venus"; compare French Vendredi, Spanish Viernes, Romanian Vineri and Italian Venerdì. Venus was the Roman godess of beauty, love and sex.
  • Saturday: Saturday is the only day of the week to retain its Roman origin in English, named after the Roman god Saturn associated with the Titan Cronos, father of Zeus and many Olympians. Its original Anglo-Saxon rendering was Sæturnesdæg (pronounced [sæ.tur.nes.dæg] or [sæ.tur.nes.dæj]). In Latin it was Dies Saturni, "Day of Saturn"; compare French Samedi, Spanish Sábado, Romanian sambata and Italian Sabato, which come from Sambata Dies (Day of the Sabbath).

What is different is that the gods in question (except Saturn) don't appear to preside over the planets involved. However, as shown above, they correspond to some extent to Roman gods that rule over the respective planets. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Germanic languages are a group of related languages constituting a branch of the Indo-European (IE) language family. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The god Týr, identified with Mars, after whom Tuesday is named. ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and either Jupiter or a magical flower. ... For other uses, see Wednesday (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of Odin and Wotan see Odin (disambiguation) Odin (Old Norse Óðinn, Swedish Oden) is usually considered the supreme god of Germanic and Norse mythology. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is an article about the mythology of the Psychopomp. ... The god Thor, after whom Thursday is named. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thunder (disambiguation). ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Frigg (disambiguation). ... -1... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Saturnus, Caravaggio, 16th c. ... Rhea tricking Cronus with a wrapped stone. ...


First day of the week

In English the days of the week are Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Most business and social calendars in America and Canada mark Sunday as the first day of the week , though in the UK, Australia, South Africa, etc. Monday is considered the first day of the week and Sunday the seventh day. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The god Týr, identified with Mars, after whom Tuesday is named. ... For other uses, see Wednesday (disambiguation). ... The god Thor, after whom Thursday is named. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In Jewish and Christian tradition, the first day of the seven day week is Sunday. According to the Bible, God created the Earth in six days, and rested on the seventh day, the Sabbath, i.e. Saturday. This made Sunday the first day of the week, while Saturdays were sanctified for celebration and rest. After the week was adopted in Early Christian Europe, Sunday remained the first day of the week, but also gradually displaced Saturday as the day of celebration and rest, being considered the Lord's Day. For this reason, in many places Sunday eventually came to be viewed as the last day of the week. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... The Lords Day is one of the traditional Christian names for Sunday, the first day of the Judaeo-Christian seven-day week, observed by most Christians as the memorial of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is said in the four canonical gospels of the New Testament to have...


The variation is evident from names of the days in some languages — in Hebrew, Arabic, Greek, Church Latin and Portuguese, some days are simply called by their number starting from Sunday, e.g. Monday is called "Second day" etc. In other languages, like Slavic languages, days are also called after their ordinal numbers, but starting from Monday, making Tuesday the "Second day". According to another possible explanation, days from Monday to Friday in Slavic languages aren't numbered by their position within the week, but by their distance from Sunday, especially given that Wednesday is named "The Middle day", which makes it a true statement only if Sunday is the first day of the week.  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup...


In most of Europe today, and some other countries, Monday is considered to be the first day of the week and is literally named as such in languages such as Mandarin (xingqiyi) and Lithuanian (pirmadienis). The ISO prescribes Monday as the first day of the week with ISO-8601 for software date formats. Logo of the International Organization for Standardization The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is an international standard-setting body composed of representatives from national standards bodies. ... ISO 8601 is an international standard for date and time representations issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ...


Origins

Various sources point to the seven day week originated in ancient Babylonia or Sumer.[citation needed] It has been suggested that a seven day week might be much older.[citation needed] The seven day planetary week originated in Hellenistic Egypt.[citation needed] Babylonia was a state in southern Mesopotamia, in modern Iraq, combining the territories of Sumer and Akkad. ... Sumer (or Å umer; Sumerian: KI-EN-GIR [1]) was the earliest known civilization of the ancient Near East, located in lower Mesopotamia (modern Iraq), from the time of the earliest records in the mid 4th millennium BC until the rise of Babylonia in the late 3rd millennium BC. The term... The Hellenistic period (4th - 1st c. ...


The earliest recorded reference to the seven day week comes from the Holy Bible, in both the Ten Commandments in Exodus 20:8-11 which verse 11 says "For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested on the seventh day." which refers back to the Creation week in Genesis 1 and 2.


It is suggested that the seven day week was deriving from early human observation that there are seven celestial objects (the five visible planets plus the Sun and the Moon) which move in the night sky relative to the fixed stars.[1] Seven days is also the approximate time between the principal phases of the Moon (new, first half, full, last half). In any event, a seven day week based on heavenly luminaries eventually diffused both East and West, to the Romans via the Greeks, and to the Japanese via Manicheans, Indians and Chinese. Manichean priests, writing at their desk, with panel inscription in Sogdian. ...


Hindu civilization, which used a seven-day week, mentioned in the Ramayana, a sacred epic written in Sanskrit about 500 BC, used names such as Bhanu-vaar meaning Sunday, Soma-vaar meaning Moon-day and so forth. This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The earliest known reference in Chinese writings is attributed to Fan Ning, who lived in the late 4th century, while diffusions via India are documented with the writings of the Chinese Buddhist monk Yi Jing and the Ceylonese or Central Asian Buddhist monk Bu Kong of the 8th century. The Chinese transliteration of the planetary system was soon brought to Japan by the Japanese monk Kobo Daishi; surviving diaries of the Japanese statesman Fujiwara Michinaga show the seven day system in use in Heian Period Japan as early as 1007. In Japan, the seven day system was kept in use (for astrological purposes) until its promotion to a full-fledged (Western-style) calendrical basis during the Meiji era. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... I Ching (monk) or Yi Jing (Yijing, Yiqing, I-Tsing or YiChing) (義淨, 三藏法師義淨 635-713) is Tang Dynasty Buddhist monk, original name was Zhang Wen Ming (张文明). He contributed to the world the information of ancient Srivijaya (written in Chinese), large numbers of Buddhist scriptures, his adventure stories en route to Nalanda... Kūkai (空海) or Kōbō-Daishi (弘法大師) , 774—835 CE: Japanese monk, scholar, and artist, founder of the Shingon or “True Word” school of Buddhism. ... penis ... The following text needs to be harmonized with text in the article History of Japan#Heian Period. ... The Meiji period ), or Meiji era, denotes the 45-year reign of Emperor Meiji, running, in the Gregorian calendar, from 23 October 1868 to 30 July 1912. ...


The seven day week is known to have been unbroken for almost two millennia via the Alexandrian, Julian, and Gregorian calendars. The date of Easter Sunday can be traced back through numerous computistic tables to an Ethiopic copy of an early Alexandrian table beginning with the Easter of 311 as described by Otto Neugebauer in Ethiopic astronomy and computus. Only one Roman date with an associated day of the week exists from the first century and it agrees with the modern sequence, if properly interpreted (see below). Jewish dates with a day of the week do not survive from this early period. The Coptic calendar, also called the Alexandrian Calendar, is used by the Coptic Orthodox Church. ... The Julian calendar was a reform of the Roman calendar which was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). ... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ...


Astrological interpretations

Between the 1st and 3rd centuries the Roman Empire gradually replaced the eight day Roman nundinal cycle with the seven-day week. The astrological order of the days was explained by Vettius Valens and Dio Cassius (and Chaucer gave the same explanation in his Treatise on the Astrolabe). According to these authors, it was a principle of astrology that the heavenly bodies presided, in succession, over the hours of the day. The Ptolemaic system asserts that the order of the heavenly bodies, from the farthest to the closest to the Earth, is: Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Sun, Venus, Mercury, Moon. (This order was first established by the Greek Stoics.) Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For more details on each day of the week, see days of the week. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Roman calendar changed its form several times in the time between the foundation of Rome and the fall of the Roman Empire. ... Vettius Valens (ca. ... Dio Cassius Cocceianus (c. ... Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902 Chanticleer the rooster from an outdoor production of Chanticleer and the Fox at Ashby_de_la_Zouch castle Geoffrey Chaucer (ca. ... A Treatise on the Astrolabe is a medieval essay on the astrolabe by Chaucer. ... Mediaeval drawing of the Ptolemaic system. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 140 kPa Hydrogen >93% Helium >5% Methane 0. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... Sol redirects here. ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... This article is about the planet. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Stoicism is a school of Hellenistic philosophy, founded by Zeno of Citium in Athens in the early third century BC. It proved to be a popular and durable philosophy, with a following throughout Greece and the Roman Empire from its founding until all the schools of philosophy were ordered closed...


In astrological theory, not only the days of the week, but the hours of the day are dominated by the seven luminaries. If the first hour of a day is dominated by Saturn ( Saturn), then the second hour is dominated by Jupiter ( Jupiter), the third by Mars ( Mars), and so on, so that the sequence of planets repeats every seven hours. Therefore, the twenty-fifth hour, which is the first hour of the following day, is dominated by the Sun; the forty-ninth hour, which is the first hour of the next day, by the Moon. Thus, if a day is labelled by the planet which dominates its first hour, then Saturn's day is followed by the Sun's day, which is followed by the Moon's day, and so forth, as shown below. Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ...


According to Vettius Valens, the first hour of the day began at sunset, which follows Greek and Babylonian convention. He also states that the light and dark halves of the day were presided over by the heavenly bodies of the first hour of each half. This is confirmed by a Pompeian graffito which calls 6 February 60 a Sunday, even though by modern reckoning it is a Wednesday. Thus this graffito used the daylight naming convention of Valens whereas the nighttime naming convention of Valens agrees with the modern astrological reckoning, which names the day after the ruler of the first daylight hour. is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Boudicca sacks London (approximate date). ...


These two overlapping weeks continued to be used by Alexandrian Christians during the fourth century, but the days in both were simply numbered 1-7. Although names of gods were not used, the week beginning on Wednesday was named in Greek ton theon ([day] of the gods), as used by the late fourth-century editor of the Easter letters of Bishop Athanasius, and in a table of Easter dates for 311–369 that survives in an Ethiopic copy. These overlapping weeks are still used in the Ethiopic computus. Each of the days of the week beginning on Sunday is called a "Day of John" whereas each of the days of the week beginning on Wednesday is called a "tentyon", a simple transcription of the Greek ton theon. This article is about the city in Egypt. ... (3rd century - 4th century - 5th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 4th century was that century which lasted from 301 to 400. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Athanasius of Alexandria (Greek: Αθανάσιος, Athanásios; c 293 – May 2, 373) was a Christian bishop, the Bishop of Alexandria, in the fourth century. ... The Geez language (or Giiz language) is an ancient language that developed in the Ethiopian Highlands of the Horn of Africa as the language of the peasantry. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ...

Hour: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Luminary → name
Day 1 Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Saturn → Saturday
Day 2 Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Sun → Sunday
Day 3 Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Moon → Monday
Day 4 Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mars → Tuesday
Day 5 Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Mercury → Wednesday
Day 6 Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Jupiter → Thursday
Day 7 Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Saturn Jupiter Mars Sun Venus Mercury Moon Venus → Friday
Weekday heptagram
Weekday heptagram

The same order can be derived "geometrically" from an acute heptagram, the {7/3} star polygon (as 24 mod 7 = 3). The luminaries are arranged in the same Ptolemaic/Stoic order around the points of the heptagram. Tracing the unicursal line from one planet to the next gives the order of the weekdays. Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... A heptagram or septegram is a seven-pointed star drawn with seven straight strokes. ... In geometry, a star polygon is a complex, equilateral equiangular polygon, so named for its starlike appearance, created by connecting one vertex of a simple, regular, n-sided polygon to another, non-adjacent vertex and continuing the process until the original vertex is reached again. ... Modular arithmetic (sometimes called modulo arithmetic, or clock arithmetic because of its use in the 24-hour clock system) is a system of arithmetic for integers, where numbers wrap around after they reach a certain value — the modulus. ...


Aleister Crowley (notwithstanding his mistaken use of the term hexagram) in The Book of Thoth (1944) (Pt. 1, Ch. 1) states that: Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947, pronounced ) was a British occultist, writer, mountaineer, philosopher, poet, and mystic. ...

It is believed that this neat discovery is due to the late G. H. Frater D.D.C.F.

According to some sources, however, the weekday heptagram is considerably older:

It was with the adoption and widespread use of the seven-day week throughout the Hellenistic world of mixed cultures that this heptagram was created. [2]

In other languages

Romance languages

In most Romance languages, such as Italian, Spanish, French and Romanian, the names of the days except Saturday and Sunday come from Roman gods via Latin. Latin itself calqued the names from Greek. The Roman (Latin) names of the days are still used in some English courts such as the House of Lords.[3]. The Romance languages, also called Romanic languages, are a subfamily of the Italic languages, specifically the descendants of the Vulgar Latin dialects spoken by the common people evolving in different areas after the break-up of the Roman Empire. ...


The major exception is Portuguese which uses a numbered system derived from the Catholic Latin week.


Christianization

The early Christian Church was uncomfortable using names based on pagan gods, and introduced a simple numerical nomenclature which persists in some European languages such as Portuguese and Greek, although in Slavic languages the numbering starts on Monday rather than Sunday (anticipating ISO 8601). The Christian names are derived from Hebrew, which numbers all days of the week beginning with "First day" for Sunday but ending with the "Sabbath" for Saturday. Arabic names for Sunday through Thursday are first through fifth days; Friday (the day when Muslims are expected to perform noon prayers as a group) is named the "gathering day" and Saturday is Sabt which means "the End" because the count of the days of the week end with it. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Pagan and heathen redirect here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... ISO 8601 is an international standard for date and time representations issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


It was Saint Martin of Dumio (c. 520580), an archbishop of Braga considered holy by the Catholic Church, who decided that it was unworthy of good Christians to call the days of the week by the Latin names of pagan gods and decided to use the eclesiastic terminology to designate them (Feria secunda, Feria tertia, Feria quarta, Feria quinta, Feria sexta, Sabbatum, Dominica Dies), from which came the present Portuguese numbered system. Martin also tried to replace the names of the planets, but in that he was not successful. Portuguese's sister language Galician uses the old Roman gods system. For that reason, the first day of the week in Portuguese is Sunday (Domingo). In the remaining Romance languages, it is Monday.[citation needed] Saint Martin of Dumio (c. ... Events February 20 - Epiphanius elected Patriarch of Constantinople. ... Ethelbert becomes king of Kent. ... For other uses, see Braga (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Galician (Galician: galego, IPA: ) is a language of the Western Ibero-Romance branch, spoken in Galicia, an autonomous community with the constitutional status of historic nationality, located in northwestern Spain and small bordering zones in neighbouring autonomous communities of Asturias and Castilla y León. ...


Celtic languages

Welsh, the closest living language to that of Roman Britain, faithfully preserves all the Latin names, even though the language itself is not directly descended from Latin. Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ...


In Irish, the Latin names are used for Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday. Three days are named for the traditional Roman Catholic days of fasting and abstinence. Wednesday is "the first fast": An Chéadaoin; Friday "the fast": An Aoine; leaving Thursday as "the day between two fasts", An Dé idir dhá aoin, contracted to An Déardaoin. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Seafood is a popular staple of Catholics during Fridays of Lent. ...


Germanic languages

In English all the days of the week are named after the ruling luminary, with most of the names coming from Germanic deities, such as Wodan (Wednesday) and Thor (Thursday). Sunday and Monday are named directly from the Sun and Moon. For other meanings of Odin and Wotan see Odin (disambiguation) Odin (Old Norse Óðinn, Swedish Oden) is usually considered the supreme god of Germanic and Norse mythology. ... For other uses, see Wednesday (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... The god Thor, after whom Thursday is named. ...


Saturday is the only day named directly after a Roman god, though the Germanic god associated with each day is generally a syncretic calque of the corresponding divinity from the Roman calendar. Other Germanic languages generally follow the same pattern, although the German for Wednesday is Mittwoch (mid-week) and Dutch is the only other with an equivalent to Saturday. A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // In linguistics, a calque (pronounced ) or loan translation is a word or phrase borrowed from another language by literal, word-for-word (Latin: verbum pro verbo) or root-for-root translation. ... The Germanic languages are a group of related languages constituting a branch of the Indo-European (IE) language family. ...


Icelandic is notably divergent, maintaining only the Sun and Moon (sunnudagur and mánudagur respectively), while dispensing with the names of the explicitly heathen gods in favor of a combination of numbered days and days whose names are linked to pious or domestic routine (föstudagur, "Fasting Day" and laugardagur, "Washing Day"). The "washing day" is also used in other North Germanic languages, although the the "pagan" names generally are retained . The North Germanic languages make up one of the three branches of the Germanic languages, a sub-family of the Indo-European languages, along with the West Germanic languages and the East Germanic languages. ...


Indic Languages

In the Hindu Calendar followed in South Asia and South-East Asia the days of the week (named after the planets, starting from Sunday) are called bhaanu vaasara (Sun), indu vaasara (Moon), mangal vaasara (Mars), saumya vaasara (Mercury), guru vaasara (Jupiter) bhrigu vaasara (Venus), sthira vaasara (Saturn). A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ...


Japanese and Korean

In Japanese and Korean, the days of the week are named after the Chinese astrological week, which is based on the Indian luminary week. The Chinese associated the five classical planets with the Five Elements. Notably, the order of the planets follows the Indian week, and not the order of the Chinese elements. (See table below.) For example, the planet Mercury is associated with the element Water, and Wednesday (dies Mercuris) is called "day of water" (suiyoubi, in Sino-Japanese). These names of days of the week were introduced by the end of the first millennium CE to Japan and Korea, but they were not widely used in Japanese or Korean daily life until the late 19th century. Chinese Wood (木) | Fire (火) Earth (土) | Metal (金) | Water (水) Japanese Earth (地) | Water (水) | Fire (火) | Air / Wind (風) | Void / Sky / Heaven (空) Hinduism and Buddhism Vayu / Pavan — Air / Wind Agni / Tejas — Fire Akasha — Aether Prithvi / Bhumi — Earth Ap / Jala — Water In traditional Chinese philosophy, natural phenomena can be classified into the Five Elements (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ): wood, fire...


Chinese

In modern Chinese, days of the week are numbered from one to six, except Sunday. Literally, the Chinese term of Sunday means "week day"(星期日 or 星期天). Monday is named literally "week one" in Chinese, Tuesday is "week two", and so on. However, China adopted the Western calendar, putting Sunday at the beginning of the calendar week, and Saturday (星期六, meaning "week six" in Chinese) at the end.[citation needed] Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngwén) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: Hànyǔ, Huáyǔ, or Zhōngwén) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ...


A second way to refer to weekdays is using the word zhou (周), meaning "cycle." Therefore Sunday is referred to as zhoumo (周末), meaning "cycle's end" and Monday through Saturday is termed accordingly zhouyi (周一) "first of cycle," zhouer (周二 ) "second of cycle," and etc.


Another Chinese numbering system, found sometimes in spoken Chinese of southern languages (i.e. Cantonese/Yue, or Fukinese/Min), refers to Sunday as the "day of worship" (礼拜日 or 礼拜天) and numbers the other days "first [day after] worship" (Monday) through "sixth [day after] worship" (Saturday). The Chinese word used for "worship" is associated with Christian and Muslim worship, and the system's use may be connected with the arrival of Christianity, especially prevalent during in the 18th and 19th centuries in south coastal port cities.


In traditional Chinese calenders, days may still be referred to by their association with the sun, moon, and the Chinese elements of fire, water, wood, metal, and earth.


Cross-linguistic overview

The (suggested) purpose of these tables is to show how far different languages preserve the associations with the associated celestial bodies of ancient times and the Church's numbering of the days. (That is, not to list the names in "every" language: Wiktionary entries for the day names offer such lists – click on the links in the header row.)

Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ...

Planetary

Day Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Celestial Body & Astronomical symbol Sun Sun Moon Moon Mars Mars Mercury Mercury Jupiter Jupiter Venus Venus Saturn Saturn
Latin dies Solis dies Lunae dies Martis dies Mercurĭi dies Jovis dies Venĕris dies Saturni
Italian domenica (1) lunedì martedì mercoledì giovedì venerdì sabato (2)
Spanish domingo (1) lunes martes miércoles jueves viernes sábado (2)
Romanian duminică (1) luni marţi miercuri joi vineri sâmbătă (2)
French dimanche (1) lundi mardi mercredi jeudi vendredi samedi (2)
Galician domingo (1) luns martes mércores xoves venres sábado (2)
Catalan diumenge (1) dilluns dimarts dimecres dijous divendres dissabte (2)
Interlingua Dominica (1) Lunedi Martedi Mercuridi Jovedi Venerdi Sabbato (2)
Ido Sundio Lundio Mardio Merkurdio Jovdio Venerdio Saturdio (2)
Esperanto dimanĉo (1) lundo mardo merkredo ĵaŭdo vendredo sabato (2)
Welsh Dydd Sul Dydd Llun Dydd Mawrth Dydd Mercher Dydd Iau Dydd Gwener Dydd Sadwrn
Cornish Dy Sul Dy Lun Dy Meurth Dy Mergher Dy Yow Dy Gwener Dy Sadorn
Breton Disul Dilun Dimeurzh Dimerc’her Diriaou Digwener Disadorn
Irish An Domhnach (1)
Dé Domhnaigh
An Luan
Dé Luain
An Mháirt
Dé Máirt
An Chéadaoin
Dé Céadaoin
first fast
An Déardaoin
Dé Déardaoin
day between two fasts
An Aoine
Dé hAoine
fast
An Satharn
Dé Sathairn
Scots Gaelic Di-Dòmhnaich (1) Di-Luain Di-Màirt Di-Ciadain Di-Ardaoin Di-Haoine Di-Sàthairne
Manx Jedoonee (1) Jelune Jemayrt Jecrean Jerdrein Jeheiney Jesarn
West Frisian Snein Moandei Tiisdei Woansdei Tongersdei Freed Sneon (8) or
Saterdei
Old English Sunnandæg
sun's day
Mōnandæg Tiwesdæg
Tiw's day
Wodnesdæg
Woden's day
Þunresdæg
Thunor's day
Frigesdæg
Frige's day
Sæternesdæg
Old High German Sunnuntag Mānetag Zeistag
Ziu's day
Wodanstag
Wodan's day
Donerestag
Donar's day
Friatag
Freia's day
Sambaztag (2)
German Sonntag Montag Dienstag Mittwoch (3) Donnerstag Freitag Samstag (2) or
Sonnabend (8)
Dutch zondag
Sun day
maandag
Moon day
dinsdag
Thing day
woensdag
Woden's day
donderdag
Donar's day
vrijdag
Freia day
zaterdag
Old Norse Sunnundagr
Sunna's day
Mánandagr Tysdagr
Tyr's day
Óðensdagr
Odin's day
Þorsdagr
Thor's day
Friádagr
Freyja's day
Laugardagr (4)
Norwegian, Bokmål søndag mandag tirsdag onsdag torsdag fredag lørdag (4)
Norwegian, Nynorsk sundag måndag tysdag onsdag torsdag fredag laurdag (4)
Danish søndag mandag tirsdag onsdag torsdag fredag lørdag (4)
Swedish söndag måndag tisdag onsdag torsdag fredag lördag (4)
Finnish sunnuntai maanantai tiistai keskiviikko (3) torstai perjantai lauantai (4)
Albanian E diel E hënë E martë E mërkurë E enjte E premte E shtunë
Tagalog Linggo (1) Lunes Martes Miyerkules Huwebes Biyernes Sabado (2)
Sanskrit भानुवासरम्
Bhaanu day (Sun)
इन्दुवासरम्
Indu day (Moon)
भौमवासरम्
Bhauma day (Mars)
सौम्यवासरम्
Saumya day (Mercury)
गुरूवासरम
Guru day (Jupiter)
भ्रगुवासरम्
Bhrgu day (Venus)
स्थिरवासरम्
Sthira day (Saturn)
Hindi रविवार
Ravivār (Sun day)
सोमवार
Somavār (Moon day)
मंगलवार
Mangalavār (Mars day)
बुधवार
Budhavār (Mercury day)
गुरूवार
Guruvār (Jupiter day)
शुक्रवार
Shukravār (Venus day)
शनिवार
Shanivār (Saturn day)
Bengali রবিবার
Robibar (Sun day)
সোমবার
Shombar (Moon day)
মঙ্গলবার
Monggolbar (Mars day)
বুধবার
Budhbar (Mercury day)
বৃহস্পতিবার
Brihôshpotibar (Jupiter day)
শুক্রবার
Shukrobar (Venus day)
শনিবার
Shonibar (Saturn day)
Gujarati રવિવાર
Ravivār
સોમવાર
Somavār
મંગળવાર
Mangalavār
બુધવાર
Budhavār
ગુરૂવાર
Guruvār
શુક્રવાર
Shukravār
શનિવાર
Shanivār
Tamil ஞாயிற்று
கிழமை

Nyāyitru day
திங்கட்
கிழமை

Thingat day
செவ்வாய்க
்கிழமை

Sevvāi day
புதன்க்
கிழமை

Budhan day
வியாழக்
கிழமை

Vyāzha day
வெள்ளிக்
கிழமை

Velli day
சனிக்
கிழமை

Shani day
Telugu
Aadi day

Soma day

Mangala day

Budha day

Bestha/Guru/Lakshmi day

Shukra day

Shani day
Thai วันอาทิตย์
(Sun day)
(Colour: Red)
วันจันทร์
(Moon day)
(Colour: Yellow)
วันอังคาร
(Mars (planet) day)
(Colour: Pink)
วันพุธ
(Mercury (planet) day)
(Colour: Green)
วันพฤหัสบดี
(Jupiter (planet) day)
(Colour: Orange)
วันศุกร์
(Venus (planet) day)
(Colour: Blue)
วันเสาร์
(Saturn (planet) day)
(Colour: Purple)
Chinese (5) 日曜日
(Sun's day)
月曜日
(Moon's day)
火曜日
(Fire planet day) (Mars)
水曜日
(Water planet day) (Mercury)
木曜日
(Wood planet day) (Jupiter)
金曜日
(Metal planet day) (Venus)
土曜日
(Earth planet day) (Saturn)
Japanese (5) 日曜日
にちようび
(Sun day)
月曜日
げつようび
(Moon day)
火曜日
かようび
(Fire planet day) (Mars)
水曜日
すいようび
(Water planet day) (Mercury)
木曜日
もくようび
(Wood planet day) (Jupiter)
金曜日
きんようび
(Metal planet day) (Venus)
土曜日
どようび
(Earth planet day) (Saturn)
Korean (5) 일요일
(Sun's day)
월요일
(Moon's day)
화요일
(Fire planet day) (Mars)
수요일
(Water planet day) (Mercury)
목요일
(Wood planet day) (Jupiter)
금요일
(Metal planet day) (Venus)
토요일
(Earth planet day) (Saturn)
Tibetan gza' nyi ma
(Sun's day)
gza' zla ba
(Moon's day)
gza' mig mar
(Fire planet day) (Mars)
gza' lhag pa
(Water planet day) (Mercury)
gza' phur bu
(Wood planet day) (Jupiter)
gza' pa sangs
(Metal planet day) (Venus)
gza' spen pa
(Earth planet day) (Saturn)
Mongolian (arga) ням
nyam
(planet Sun)
даваа
davaa
(planet Moon)
мягмар
myagmar
(planet Mars)
лхагва
lkhagva
(planet Mercury)
пүрэв
pürev
(planet Jupiter)
баасан
baasan
(planet Venus)
бямба
byamba
(planet Saturn)
Mongolian (bilig) адъяа
adiya
(planet Sun)
сумъяа
sumiya
(planet Moon)
ангараг
angarag
(planet Mars)
буд
bud
(planet Mercury)
бархабадь
barhasbadi
(planet Jupiter)
сугар
sugar
(planet Venus)
санчир
sanchir
(planet Saturn)
Day Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

Chinese Celestial symbols on an antique bronze mirror Astronomical symbols are symbols used to represent various celestial objects, theoretical constructs and observational events in astronomy. ... Sol redirects here. ... Image File history File links Sun_symbol. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... Image File history File links Moon_symbol_crescent. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... Image File history File links Mars_symbol. ... This article is about the planet. ... Image File history File links Mercury_symbol. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 70 kPa Hydrogen ~86% Helium ~14% Methane 0. ... Image File history File links Jupiter_symbol. ... (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... Image File history File links Venus_symbol. ... Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 140 kPa Hydrogen >93% Helium >5% Methane 0. ... Image File history File links Saturn_symbol. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Galician (Galician: galego, IPA: ) is a language of the Western Ibero-Romance branch, spoken in Galicia, an autonomous community with the constitutional status of historic nationality, located in northwestern Spain and small bordering zones in neighbouring autonomous communities of Asturias and Castilla y León. ... Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia, and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of Sardinia. ... This article is about the auxiliary language created by the International Auxiliary Language Association. ... Ido (pronounced ) is a constructed language created with the goal of becoming a universal second language for speakers of different linguistic backgrounds as a language easier to learn than ethnic languages. ... Esperanto flag Esperanto is a constructed international auxiliary language. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... Breton (Brezhoneg) is a Celtic language spoken by some of the inhabitants of Brittany (Breizh) in France. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... The West Frisian language (Frysk) is a language spoken mostly in the province of Fryslân in the north of the Netherlands. ... Old English redirects here. ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... Frige (Anglo-Saxon, Friia (Germany) or Frea (Langobard)) was the love goddess of Germanic mythology, and the wife of Wotan (Odin). ... The (Late Old High) German speaking area of the Holy Roman Empire around 950. ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... This is the article about the belief in Odin among West Germanic peoples, for other uses see Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... Freya, in an illustration to Wagners operas by Arthur Rackham. ... Sol redirects here. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... A thing or ting (Old Norse and Icelandic: þing; other modern Scandinavian: ting) was the governing assembly in Germanic societies, made up of the free men of the community and presided by lawspeakers. ... This is the article about the belief in Odin among West Germanic peoples, for other uses see Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... This article is about Thor, the god of Norse mythology. ... Freya, in an illustration to Wagners operas by Arthur Rackham. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... Sunna can refer to: Sunna, a female Viking name[]. A number of English place names are derived from this name including Sonning (historically spelled Sunning), Sonning Eye, Sunbury, Sunningdale, Sunninghill and Sunningwell, many close to the River Thames. ... Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, is identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th century Icelandic manuscript. ... For other meanings of Odin, Woden or Wotan see Odin (disambiguation), Woden (disambiguation), Wotan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... -1... BokmÃ¥l (lit. ... Nynorsk (literally New Norwegian) is one of the two officially sanctioned orthographic standards of the Norwegian language, the other being BokmÃ¥l. ... Tagalog (pronunciation: ) is one of the major languages of the Republic of the Philippines. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... According to Hinduism, Ravi is Surya, the Sun. ... This article is about the Vedic plant and ritual. ... In Jyotish astrology, Mangala is the name for Mars, the red planet. ... In Hindu mythology, Budha (not to be confused with Buddha) is the name for the planet Mercury, a son of Chandra (the moon) with either Tara or Rohini. ... For other uses, see Guru (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Shani (also spelled Åšani)(Sanskrit: शनि) is one of the Navagraha which are the nine primary celestial beings in Hindu astrology (that is, Vedic astrology), Shani is embodied in the planet Saturn. ... Hindi (हिन्दी) is a language spoken mainly in North and Central India. ... According to Hinduism, Ravi is Surya, the Sun. ... This article is about the Vedic plant and ritual. ... In Jyotish astrology, Mangala is the name for Mars, the red planet. ... In Hindu mythology, Budha (not to be confused with Buddha) is the name for the planet Mercury, a son of Chandra (the moon) with either Tara or Rohini. ... For other uses, see Guru (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Shani (also spelled Åšani)(Sanskrit: शनि) is one of the Navagraha which are the nine primary celestial beings in Hindu astrology (that is, Vedic astrology), Shani is embodied in the planet Saturn. ... Bangla redirects here. ... Gujarati (ગુજરાતી GujÇŽrātÄ«; also known as Gujerati, Gujarathi, Guzratee, and Guujaratee[3]) is an Indo-Aryan language descending from Sanskrit, and part of the greater Indo-European language family. ... Tamil ( ; IPA ) is a Dravidian language spoken predominantly by Tamils in India and Sri Lanka, with smaller communities of speakers in many other countries. ... “Telugu” redirects here. ... Chinese (written) language (pinyin: zhōngw n) written in Chinese characters The Chinese language (汉语/漢語, 华语/華語, or 中文; Pinyin: H nyǔ, Hu yǔ, or Zhōngw n) is a member of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. ... The Tibetan language is spoken primarily by the Tibetan people who live across a wide area of eastern Central Asia bordering South Asia, as well as by large number of Tibetan refugees all over the world. ...

Numerical

with Sunday as first day
Day Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
Arabic يوم الأحد
yaum al-ahad
(First day)
يوم الإثنين
yaum al-ithnayn
(Second day)
يوم الثُّلَاثاء
yaum ath-thulatha
(Third day)
يوم الأَرْبعاء
yaum al-arbiaa
(Fourth day)
يوم الخَمِيس
yaum al-khamees
(Fifth day)
يوم الجُمْعَة
yaum al-jumuah
(Meeting day)
يوم السَّبْت
yaum as-sabt (2)
(End day)
Georgian კვირა
Kvira
(Lord)
ორშაბათი
Oršabat'i
(two days
after Sabbath)
სამშაბათი
Samšabat'i
(three days
after Sabbath)
ოთხშაბათი
Ot'xšabat'i
(four days
after Sabbath)
ხუთშაბათი
Xut'šabat'i
(five days
after Sabbath)
პარასკები
Paraskevi (Preparation)
შაბათი
Šabat'i (2)
(Sabbath)
Greek Κυριακή (1)
Kyriakí
(Lord's day)
Δευτέρα
Dheftéra
(Second)
Τρίτη
Tríti
(Third)
Τετάρτη
Tetárti
(Fourth)
Πέμπτη
Pémpti
(Fifth)
Παρασκευή
Paraskeví
(Preparation)
Σάββατο (2)
Sávato
(Sabbath)
Hebrew יום ראשון
(First day)
יום שני
(Second day)
יום שלישי
(Third day)
יום רביעי
(Fourth day)
יום חמישי
(Fifth day)
יום שישי
(Sixth day)
שבת
(Sabbath) (2)
Icelandic sunnudagur (6)
(Sun day)
mánudagur (6)
(Moon day)
þriðjudagur
(Third day)
miðvikudagur (3)
(Mid week day)
fimmtudagur
(Fifth day)
föstudagur
(Fast day)
laugardagur (4)
(Washing day)
Kazakh жексенбi
zheksenbe
(first day)
дүйсенбi
Düysenbi
(second day)
сейсенбi
Seysenbi
(third day)
сәрсенбі
Särsenbi
(fourth day)
бейсенбі
Beysenbi
(fifth day)
жұма
Juma
(week)
сенбі
Senbi
(Night and Day) shabAneh rooz
Ecclesiastical Latin Dominica (1)
(Lord's [Day])
feria secunda
(Second weekday)
feria tertia
(Third weekday)
feria quarta
(Fourth weekday)
feria quinta
(Fifth weekday)
feria sexta
(Sixth weekday)
sabbatum (2)
(Sabbath)
Persian یکشنبه
yekshanbeh
(first day)
دوشنبه
doshanbeh
(second day)
سه شنبه
seshanbeh
(third day)
چهارشنبه
chaharshanbeh
(fourth day)
پنجشنبه
panjshanbeh
(fifth day)
آدینه, alt. جمه
Adineh, alt. Jomeh
(day of faith, alt. gathering day)
شنبه
shanbeh
(night and day) shabAneh rooz
Portuguese domingo (1)
(Lord's day)
segunda-feira
(Second weekday)
terça-feira
(Third weekday)
quarta-feira
(Fourth weekday)
quinta-feira
(Fifth weekday)
sexta-feira
(Sixth weekday)
sábado (2)
(Sabbath)
Turkish pazar
(bazaar day)
pazartesi
(after the bazaar)
salı
(third day)
çarşamba
(fourth day)
perşembe
(fifth day)
cuma
(gathering day)
cumartesi
(after the gathering)
Old Turkic birinç kün
(first day)
ikinç kün
(second day)
üçünç kün
(third day)
törtinç kün
(fourth day)
beşinç kün
(fifth day)
altınç kün
(sixth day)
yetinç kün
(seventh day)
Vietnamese chủ nhật (Master's day) or
chúa nhật (1) (Lord's day)
(ngày) thứ hai
(Second day)
(ngày) thứ ba
(Third day)
(ngày) thứ tư
(Fourth day)
(ngày) thứ năm
(Fifth day)
(ngày) thứ sáu
(Sixth day)
(ngày) thứ bảy
(Seventh day)
with Monday as first day
Estonian Pühapäev
(Holy day)
Esmaspäev Teisipäev Kolmapäev (Third) or Kesknädal (3) Neljapäev (Fourth) Reede
(ON Friádagr)
Laupäev (4)
Polish Niedziela
(No work)
Poniedziałek
(After no-work)
Wtorek
(Second)
Środa (3)
(Middle)
Czwartek
(Fourth)
Piątek
(Fifth)
Sobota (2)
Czech Neděle
(No work)
Pondělí (also Pondělek)
(After no-work)
Úterý (also Úterek)
(Second)
Středa (3)
(Middle)
Čtvrtek
(Fourth)
Pátek
(Fifth)
Sobota (2)
Serbian Недеља
(No work)
Понедељак
(After no-work)
Уторак
(Second)
(archaic root)
Среда
(Middle)
Четвртак
(Fourth)
Петак
(Fifth)
Субота
Croatian Nedjelja
(No work)
Ponedjeljak
(After no-work)
Utorak
(Second)
<archaic
Srijeda (3)
(Middle)
Četvrtak
(Fourth)
Petak
(Fifth)
Subota (2)
Slovenian Nedelja
(No work)
Ponedeljek
(After no-work)
Torek
(Second) <archaic
Sreda (3)
(Middle)
Četrtek
(Fourth)
Petek
(Fifth)
Sobota (2)
Bulgarian неделя
(No work)
понеделник
(After no-work)
вторник
(Second)
сряда (3)
(Middle)
четвъртък
(Fourth)
петък
(Fifth)
събота (2)
(Sabbath)
Macedonian недела
(No work)
понеделник
(After no-work)
вторник
(Second)
среда (3)
(Middle)
четврток
(Fourth)
петок
(Fifth)
сабота (2)
(Sabbath)
Hungarian Vasárnap
(Market day)
Hétfő
(Head of the week)
Kedd
(Second)
Szerda (3)
(Middle)
< Slavic
Csütörtök
(Fourth)
< Slavic
Péntek
(Fifth)
< Slavic
Szombat (2)
Lithuanian (7) Sekmadienis
(Seventh day)
Pirmadienis
(First day)
Antradienis
(Second day)
Trečiadienis
(Third day)
Ketvirtadienis
(Fourth day)
Penktadienis
(Fifth day)
Šeštadienis
(Sixth day)
Russian воскресенье
voskresen'ye
(resurrection)
понедельник
ponedel'nik
(after no-work)
вторник
vtornik
(second)
среда (3)
sreda
(middle)
четверг
chetverk
(fourth)
пятница
pyatnitsa
(fifth)
суббота
subbota
(sabbath) (2)
Ukrainian недiля
nedilya
(no-work)
понедiлок
ponedilok
(after no-work)
вiвторок
vivtorok
(second)
середа (3)
sereda
(middle)
четвер
chetver
(fourth)
п'ятниця
p'yatnitsya
(fifth)
субота
subota
(sabbath) (2)
Chinese
(Standard Mandarin transcription in Hanyu Pinyin)
星期日
xīngqī rì
(week: day)
or 星期天
xīngqí tiān
(week: day)
星期一
xīngqī yī
(week: 1)
星期二
xīngqī èr
(week: 2)
星期三
xīngqī sān
(week: 3)
星期四
xīngqī sì
(week: 4)
星期五
xīngqī wǔ
(week: 5)
星期六
xīngqī liù
(week: 6)
Mongolian (numerical) бүтэн сайн өдөр
buten sain odor
(full weekend)
нэг дэх өдөр
neg deh odor
(first day)
хоёр дахь өдөр
hoyor dahi odor
(second day)
гурав дахь өдөр
gurav dahi odor
(third day)
дөрөв дэх өдөр
dorov deh odor
(fourth day)
тав дахь өдөр
tav dahi odor
(fifth day)
хагас сайн өдөр
hagas sain odor
(half weekend)
ISO 8601 # 7 1 2 3 4 5 6
with Saturday as first day
Swahili[4] jumapili
(second [day
of the] week)
jumatatu
(third [day
of the] week)
jumanne
(fourth [day
of the] week)
jumatano
(fifth [day
of the] week)
alhamisi
(five)
Arabic
ijumaa
(assembly)
Arabic
jumamosi
(first [day
of the] week)
Day Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

Arabic redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Kazakh (also Qazaq and variants[2], natively , , ‎; pronounced ) is a Turkic language closely related to Nogai and Karakalpak. ... The term Ecclesiastical Latin (sometimes called Church Latin) refers to the Latin language as used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in its Latin liturgies. ... The Lords Day is one of the traditional Christian names for Sunday, the first day of the Judaeo-Christian seven-day week, observed by most Christians as the memorial of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is said in the four canonical gospels of the New Testament to have... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... Farsi redirects here. ... The Turkic language spoken by the Gokturks and used on the Orkhon inscriptions. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Slovenian or Slovene (slovenski jezik or slovenščina) is an Indo-European language that belongs to the family of South Slavic languages. ... Map of eastern China and Taiwan, showing the historic distribution of Mandarin Chinese in light brown. ... Pinyin (拼音, Pīnyīn) literally means join (together) sounds (a less literal translation being phoneticize, spell or transcription) in Chinese and usually refers to Hànyǔ Pīnyīn (汉语拼音, literal meaning: Han language pinyin), which is a system of romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration to roman script) for Standard Mandarin used in the... ISO 8601 is an international standard for date and time representations issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... This article is about the language. ...

Notes

  1. In Ecclesiastical Latin, the Romance languages, Greek, and the Gaelic languages, Sunday is named after the "Lord", because it is the day of the Resurrection of Jesus.
  2. The Romance languages, Old High German and German, and the Slavic languages have words for Saturday that are derived from the Hebrew Sabbath, via late Greek Sabbaton. German also has a second, Christianised name meaning "Eve of Sunday" (parallel to "Christmas Eve", for example).
  3. German and Finnish call Wednesday, prosaically, "mid-week"; Estonian Kesknädal is equivalent, with "Third day" (kolmapäev) also used; Icelandic and Faroese uses "Mid-week day"; Polish, Russian, etc. have "Middle".
  4. Old Norse, Swedish (and other North Germanic languages), and Finnish and Estonian (Finnic languages) call Saturday "Washday" or "Bathday", as it was the traditional day for washing and bathing.
  5. The Japanese names are the same as the traditional way days of week were named in Chinese. The Korean names are also the same but written in Hangul.
  6. Icelandic sunnudagur and mánudagur are astronomical, persisting presumably because they make no explicit reference to pagan gods.
  7. See Lithuanian calendar.
  8. An alternative naming for Saturday, used in the northern parts of Germany and the Netherlands, is derived from Sun-eve, the day before the day of the sun. Northern dialects of German use Sonnabend. In Frisian Sneon (sinnejûn) is used.

The term Ecclesiastical Latin (sometimes called Church Latin) refers to the Latin language as used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in its Latin liturgies. ... The Goidelic languages (also sometimes called, particularly in colloquial situations, the Gaelic languages or collectively Gaelic) have historically been part of a dialect continuum stretching from the south of Ireland, the Isle of Man, to the north of Scotland. ... The Resurrection—Tischbein, 1778. ... The North Germanic languages (also Scandinavian languages or Nordic languages) is a branch of the Germanic languages spoken in Scandinavia, parts of Finland and on the Faroe Islands and Iceland. ... Geographical distribution of Finno-Ugric (Finno-Permic in blue, Ugric in green). ... Jamo redirects here. ... The Lithuanian calendar is unusual among Western countries in that neither the names of the months nor the names of the weekdays are derived from Greek or Norse mythology. ...

See also

The Akan people frequently name their children after the day of the week they were born and the order in which they were born. ... This article details various mathematical algorithms to calculate the day of the week for any particular date in the past or future. ...

References

  1. ^ The Nine Planets: Planetary Linguistics: Days of the Week
  2. ^ Symbol 29:16
  3. ^ United Kingdom House of Lords Decisions
  4. ^ Swahili days, months, dates
  • Falk, Michael (1999). "Astronomical Names for the Days of the Week", Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, 93:122-133.
  • Cecil H. Brown, Naming the days of the week: A cross-language study of lexical acculturation, Current Anthropology 30 (1989) 536-550.
  • Neugebauer, Otto (1979). Ethiopic astronomy and computus, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, philosophisch-historische klasse, sitzungsberichte, 347 (Vienna)
  • Days of the Week in Chinese, Japanese & Vietnamese

The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada is the Canadian equivalent of the British Royal Astronomical Society, which began informally in the 1800s, but received a royal charter in 1903 from King Edward VII. The society incorporated nationally in 1968, prior to which its incorporation was limited to Ontario. ...

External links

  • Planetary Linguistics and the Days of the Week -- The Definitive Site
  • Days of the week and months of the year in many different languages
  • Names of Weekdays at TheScian.com Science Wiki
  • Days of the Week in Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese (much history of Western systems too)
  • The Days of the Week
  • The days of the week in various languages
Kan-laon means he who is king of the ancient of days which means the supreme God in Visayan. ... Hinduism is a religious tradition[1] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... Kali (Sanskrit ) is a goddess with a long and complex history in Hinduism. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Kali. ... For other uses, see Shiva (disambiguation). ... is the Sanskrit for time (from a root to enumerate; unrelated to black whence ). It denotes a fixed or right point in time (compare rtu, kairos). ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Wheel of time may refer to: The Wheel of time or history, a religious concept predominant in Buddhism and Hinduism The Wheel of Time, a fantasy book series by author Robert Jordan The Wheel of Time (computer game), an action first-person shooter based on the series The Timewheel, a... Kālacakra (Sanskrit कालचक्र; Tibetan དུས་ཀྱི་འཁོར་ལོ་ dus kyi khor lo) is a term used in Tantric Buddhism that means time-wheel or time-cycles. It refers both to a Tantric deity (Tib. ... This article is about the Buddhist bodhisattva Maitreya. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Ancient of Days is a name for God in Aramaic (Atik Yomin); in the Greek Septuagint: (Palaios Hemeron); and in the Vulgate: (Antiquus Dierum). ... Ein Sof (Hebrew: without end denoting boundlessness), also known as Divine Being, is the name for God, within the Kabbalah of Judaism, as he is unknown, or the mysterious and ultimate source of all existence. ... The Hebrew calendar (‎) or Jewish calendar is the calendar used by Jews for religious purposes. ... The missing years in the Hebrew calendar refer to a discrepancy of some 165 years between the traditional Hebrew dating for the destruction of the First Temple (3338 AM) and the modern secular dating for it (586 BCE) that results if the traditional date is interpreted according to the standard... A Jewish holiday or Jewish Festival is a day or series of days observed by Jews as holy or secular commemorations of important events in Jewish history. ... This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... For the calendar of religious holidays and periods, see liturgical year. ... The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... Computus (Latin for computation) is the calculation of the date of Easter in the Christian calendar. ... For the book by Ernest Hemingway, see A Moveable Feast. ... The Easter controversy is a series of controversies about the proper date to celebrate Easter. ... Quartodecimanism (derived from the Vulgate Latin: quarta decima[1], meaning fourteen) refers to the custom of Christians celebrating Passover on the 14th day of Nisan in the Old Testaments Hebrew Calendar (Lev 23:5). ... The current system for determining the date of Easter has two problems: (1) its date varies from year to year (not considered a problem by many Christians), and (2) Eastern and Western churches use different methods of determining its date, and hence in most years it is celebrated on a... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Islamic calendar or Muslim calendar (Arabic: التقويم الهجري; at-taqwÄ«m al-hijrÄ«; Persian: تقویم هجري قمری ‎ taqwÄ«m-e hejri-ye qamari; also called the Hijri calendar) is the calendar used to date events in many predominantly Muslim countries, and used by Muslims everywhere to determine the proper day on which to celebrate... Muslim holidays generally celebrate the events of the life of Islams main prophet, Muhammad, especially the events surrounding the first hearing of the Kuran. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... opens chapter nine of The Dreaming Universe (1994) entitled The Dreamtime with a quote from The Last Wave, a film by Peter Weir: Aboriginals believe in two forms of time. ... This article is about Australian Aboriginal cosmogony, cosmology and spirituality. ... Replica of an oracle bone -- turtle shell Replica of an oracle bone -- ox scapula Oracle bones (甲骨片 pinyin: jiÇŽgÇ”piàn) are pieces of bone or turtle shell used in royal divination in the mid Shang to early Zhou dynasties in ancient China, and often bearing written inscriptions in what... The Maya calendar is a system of distinct calendars and almanacs used by the Maya civilization of pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, and by some modern Maya communities in highland Guatemala. ...

 
 

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