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Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Water, Rabbit, and Deer: three of the 20 day symbols in the Aztec calendar, from the Aztec Sun Stone.

A day (symbol: d) is a unit of time equivalent to 24 hours. It is not an SI unit but it is accepted for use with SI.[1] The SI unit of time is the second. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Water,Rabbit,Deer. ... Image File history File links Water,Rabbit,Deer. ... The Aztec calendar was the calendar of the Aztec people of Pre-Columbian Mexico. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ... Original stone on display in the Mexican National Museum of Anthropology and History. ... The former Weights and Measures office in Middlesex, England. ... A pocket watch, a device used to tell time Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ... Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The term comes from the Old English dæg, with similar terms common in all other Indo-European languages, such as dies in Latin and dive in Sanskrit. Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon[1], Old English: ) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... The Indo-European languages comprise a family of several hundred related languages and dialects [1], including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many spoken in the Indian subcontinent (South Asia), the Iranian plateau (Southwest Asia), and Central Asia. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ...

Contents

Definitions

The day has several definitions.


International System of Units (SI)

A day is defined as 86,400 seconds. Each second is currently defined as

… the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium-133 atom.

This makes the SI day last exactly 794,243,384,928,000 of those periods.


In the 19th century it had also been suggested to make a decimal fraction (110,000 or 1100,000) of an astronomic day the base unit of time. This was an afterglow of decimal time and calendar, which had been given up already. French decimal clock from the time of the French Revolution Decimal time is the representation of the time of day using units which are decimally related. ... A French Revolutionary Calendar in the Historical Museum of Lausanne. ...


Astronomy

A day of exactly 86,400 SI seconds is the fundamental unit of time in astronomy.


For a given planet, there are two types of day defined in astronomy: A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy is the science of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as auroras and cosmic background radiation). ...

1 apparent sidereal day 
= a single rotation of a planet with respect to the distant stars
(for Earth it is 23.934 solar hours)
1 solar day 
= a single rotation of a planet with respect to its Sun.

On a prograde planet like the Earth, the sidereal day is shorter than the solar day. ... Adjectives: Terrestrial, Terran, Telluric, Tellurian, Earthly Atmosphere Surface pressure: 101. ... Solar time is based on the idea that, when the sun reaches its highest point in the sky, it is noon. ... The Sun (Latin: Sol) is the star at the center of the Solar System. ...

Colloquial

The word refers to various relatedly defined ideas, including the following:

  • the period of light when the Sun is above the local horizon (i.e., the time period from sunrise to sunset).
  • the full day covering a dark and a light period, beginning from the beginning of the dark period or from a point near the middle of the dark period.
  • A full dark and light period, sometimes called a nychthemeron in English, from the Greek for night-day.
  • The time period from 6:00 AM to 6:00 PM or 9:00 PM or some other fixed clock period overlapping or set off from other time periods such as "morning", "evening", or "night".
Dagr, the Norse god of the day, rides his horse in this 19th century painting by Peter Nicolai Arbo.
Dagr, the Norse god of the day, rides his horse in this 19th century painting by Peter Nicolai Arbo.

Horizon. ... Nychthemeron, or Nycthemeron ( from Greek nykt- night, (h)emera day ) is a period of 24 consecutive hours. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (958x1200, 227 KB)Dagr riding Skinfaxi. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (958x1200, 227 KB)Dagr riding Skinfaxi. ... Dagr rides his horse in this 19th century painting by Peter Nicolai Arbo. ... Norse gods Divided between the Æsir and the Vanir, and sometimes including Jotun, the dividing line between these groups is less than clear. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Peter Nicolai Arbo (1831–1892) was a Norwegian painter, who specialized in painting historical motifs and images from Norse mythology. ...

Introduction

The word day is used for several different units of time based on the rotation of the Earth around its axis. The most important one follows the apparent motion of the Sun across the sky (solar day; see solar time). The reason for this apparent motion is the rotation of the Earth around its axis, as well as the revolution of the Earth in its orbit around the Sun. Solar time is based on the idea that when the sun reaches its highest point in the sky, it is noon. ... A sphere rotating around its axis. ... m. ...


A day, as opposed to night, is commonly defined as the period during which sunlight directly reaches the ground, assuming that there are no local obstacles. Two effects make days on average longer than nights. The Sun is not a point, but has an apparent size of about 32 minutes of arc. Additionally, the atmosphere refracts sunlight in such a way that some of it reaches the ground even when the Sun is below the horizon by about 34 minutes of arc. So the first light reaches the ground when the centre of the Sun is still below the horizon by about 50 minutes of arc. The difference in time depends on the angle at which the Sun rises and sets (itself a function of latitude), but amounts to almost seven minutes at least. Melbourne skyline at night Night or nighttime is the period in which the sun is below the horizon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Layers of Atmosphere - not to scale (NOAA)[3] Earths atmosphere is a layer of gases surrounding the planet Earth and retained by the Earths gravity. ... The straw seems to be broken, due to refraction of light as it emerges into the air. ... Horizon. ... Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ...


Ancient custom has a new day start at either the rising or setting of the Sun on the local horizon (Italian reckoning, for example) The exact moment of, and the interval between, two sunrises or two sunsets depends on the geographical position (longitude as well as latitude), and the time of year. This is the time as indicated by ancient hemispherical sundials. The Rayleigh effect, seconds before sunrise in New Zealand Sunrise, also called sunup in some American English dialects, is the time at which the first part of the Sun appears above the horizon in the east. ... A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ... Longitude, sometimes denoted by the Greek letter λ (lambda),[1][2] describes the location of a place on Earth east or west of a north-south line called the Prime Meridian. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... Wall sundial-a vertical direct south dial Wall sundial in Warsaws Old Town- a vertical south west decliner dial A sundial is a device that measures time by the position of the Sun. ...


A more constant day can be defined by the Sun passing through the local meridian, which happens at local noon (upper culmination) or midnight (lower culmination). The exact moment is dependent on the geographical longitude, and to a lesser extent on the time of the year. The length of such a day is nearly constant (24 hours ± 30 seconds). This is the time as indicated by modern sundials. On the earth, a meridian is a north-south line between the North Pole and the South Pole. ... Noon is the time exactly halfway through the day, written 12:00 in the 24-hour clock and 12:00 noon in the 12-hour clock. ... In astronomy, the culmination, at a given point, of a planet, star, constellation, etc. ... For other uses, see Midnight (disambiguation) Midnight, literally the middle of the night, is a time arbitrarily designated to determine the end of a day and the beginning of the next in some, mainly Western, cultures. ...


A further improvement defines a fictitious mean Sun that moves with constant speed along the celestial equator; the speed is the same as the average speed of the real Sun, but this removes the variation over a year as the Earth moves along its orbit around the Sun (due to both its velocity and its axial tilt). The celestial equator is a great circle on the imaginary celestial sphere, which could be constructed by inflating the Earths equator until it intersects with said sphere. ...


The Earth's day has increased in length over time. The original length of one day, when the Earth was new about 4.5 billion years ago, was about six hours as determined by computer simulation. It was 21.9 hours 620 million years ago as recorded by rhythmites (alternating layers in sandstone). This phenomenon is due to tides raised by the Moon which slow Earth's rotation. Because of the way the second is defined, the mean length of a day is now about 86,400.002 seconds, and is increasing by about 1.7 milliseconds per century (an average over the last 2700 years). See tidal acceleration for details. It has been suggested that Theory of tides be merged into this article or section. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that Tidal friction be merged into this article or section. ...


Civil day

For civil purposes a common clock time has been defined for an entire region based on the mean local solar time at some central meridian. Such time zones began to be adopted about the middle of the 19th century when railroads with regular schedules came into use, with most major countries having adopted them by 1929. For the whole world, 39 such time zones are now in use. The main one is "world time" or UTC (Coordinated Universal Time). A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... ...


The present common convention has the civil day starting at midnight, which is near the time of the lower culmination of the mean Sun on the central meridian of the time zone. A day is commonly divided into 24 hours of 60 minutes of 60 seconds each. The culmination of an astronomical object is its passage across the meridian as seen by an observer on earth. ...


Leap seconds

In order to keep the civil day aligned with the apparent movement of the Sun, positive or negative leap seconds may be inserted. A leap second is a one-second adjustment to civil time in order to keep it close to the mean solar time. ...


A civil clock day is typically 86,400 SI seconds long, but will be 86,401 s or 86,399 s long in the event of a leap second. Look up si, Si, SI in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Leap seconds are announced in advance by the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service which measures the Earth's rotation and determines whether a leap second is necessary. Leap seconds occur only at the end of a UTC month, and have only ever been inserted at the end of June 30 or December 31. The International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service is the body responsible for maintaining global time and reference frame standards, notably through its Earth Orientation Parameter (EOP) and International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) groups. ... June 30 is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 184 days remaining. ... December 31 is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Astronomy

In astronomy, the sidereal day is also used; it is about 3 minutes 56 seconds shorter than the solar day, and close to the actual rotation period of the Earth, as opposed to the Sun's apparent motion. In fact, the Earth spins 366 times about its axis during a 365-day year, because the Earth's revolution about the Sun removes one apparent turn of the Sun about the Earth. A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy is the science of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as auroras and cosmic background radiation). ... On a prograde planet like the Earth, the sidereal day is shorter than the solar day. ...


Boundaries of the day

For most diurnal animals, including Homo sapiens, the day naturally begins at dawn and ends at sunset. Humans, with our cultural norms and scientific knowledge, have supplanted Nature with several different conceptions of the day's boundaries. The Jewish day begins at either sunset or at nightfall (when three second-magnitude stars appear). Medieval Europe followed this tradition, known as Florentine reckoning: in this system, a reference like "two hours into the day" meant two hours after sunset and thus times during the evening need to be shifted back one calendar day in modern reckoning. Days such as Christmas Eve, Halloween, and the Eve of Saint Agnes are the remnants of the older pattern when holidays began the evening before. Present common convention is for the civil day to begin at midnight, that is 00:00 (inclusive), and last a full twenty-four hours until 24:00 (exclusive). This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A composite image showing the terminator dividing night from day, running across Europe and Africa. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ... Halloween, or Halloween, is a tradition celebrated on the night of October 31, most notably by children dressing in costumes and going door-to-door collecting sweets, fruit, and other gifts. ... For other uses, see Saint Agnes (disambiguation). ... Bold text This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... For other uses, see Midnight (disambiguation) Midnight, literally the middle of the night, is a time arbitrarily designated to determine the end of a day and the beginning of the next in some, mainly Western, cultures. ... The hour (symbol: h) is a unit of time. ...


In ancient Egypt, the day was reckoned from sunrise to sunrise. Muslims fast from daybreak to sunset each day of the month of Ramadan. The "Damascus Document", copies of which were also found among the Dead Sea Scrolls, states regarding Sabbath observance that "No one is to do any work on Friday from the moment that the sun's disk stands distant from the horizon by the length of its own diameter," presumably indicating that the monastic community responsible for producing this work counted the day as ending shortly before the sun had begun to set. Khafres Pyramid (4th dynasty) and Great Sphinx of Giza (c. ... The Rayleigh effect, seconds before sunrise in New Zealand Sunrise, also called sunup in some American English dialects, is the time at which the first part of the Sun appears above the horizon in the east. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The fourth pillar of Islam, which is fasting, is practiced during the month of Ramadan. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Fragments of the scrolls on display at the Archeological Museum, Amman The Dead Sea scrolls (Hebrew: מגילות ים המלח) comprise roughly 825-872 documents, including texts from the Hebrew Bible, discovered between 1947 and 1956 in eleven caves in and around the Wadi Qumran (near the ruins of the ancient settlement of Khirbet... This article concerns the Sabbath in Christianity. ...


In the United States, nights are named after the previous day, e.g. "Friday night" usually means the entire night between Friday and Saturday. This is the opposite of the Jewish pattern. This difference from the civil day often leads to confusion. Events starting at midnight are often announced as occurring the day before. TV-guides tend to list nightly programs at the previous day, although programming a VCR requires the strict logic of starting the new day at 00:00 (to further confuse the issue, VCRs set to the 12-hour clock notation will label this "12:00 AM"). Expressions like "today", "yesterday" and "tomorrow" become ambiguous during the night. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The videocassette recorder (or VCR, more commonly known in the British Isles as the video recorder), is a type of video tape recorder that uses removable videotape cassettes containing magnetic tape to record audio and video from a television broadcast so it can be played back later. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Validity of tickets, passes, etc., for a day or a number of days may end at midnight, or closing time, when that is earlier. However, if a service (e.g. public transport) operates from e.g. 6:00 to 1:00 the next day (which may be noted as 25:00), the last hour may well count as being part of the previous day (also for the arrangement of the timetable). For services depending on the day ("closed on Sundays", "does not run on Fridays", etc.) there is a risk of ambiguity. As an example, for the Dutch Railways, a day ticket is valid 28 hours, from 0:00 to 28:00 (i.e. 4:00 the next day). To give another example, the validity of a pass on London Regional Transport services is until the end of the "transport day" -- that is to say, until 4:30 am on the day after the "expiry" date stamped on the pass. Ticket (unseparated) of the Kurkino in Berchtesgaden CeBIT Home 1998 student day ticket with barcode A Parisians transport ticket A ticket to the 2003 Rugby World Cup sporting event. ... Skytrain Bangkok. ... A timetable is an organized list or schedule, usually set out in tabular form, providing information about a series of arranged events: in particular, the time at which it is planned these events will take place. ... Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS) is the main public transport railway company in the Netherlands. ...


Metaphorical days

In the Bible, as a way to describe that time is immaterial to God, one day is described as being like one thousand years (Psalm 90:4, 2 Peter 3:8) to him. Also in 2 Peter 3:8, one thousand years is described as being like one day. However, some Bible experts interpret this more literally as a way to understand some prophecies like those in Book of Daniel and others (like the Book of Revelation) where are mentioned days in form of weeks and years. This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


References

  1. ^ http://physics.nist.gov/Pubs/SP811/sec05.html

See also

To help compare orders of magnitude of different times this page lists times between 104 seconds and 105 seconds (2. ... Melbourne skyline at night Night or nighttime is the period in which the sun is below the horizon. ... Look up daylight in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article details various mathematical algorithms to calculate the day of the week for any particular date in the past or future. ... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Dagr rides his horse in this 19th century painting by Peter Nicolai Arbo. ... A page from the Hindu calendar 1871-72. ...

External links

  • Show where it is daytime at the moment
  • Sunrise and sunset, all year long, anywhere
  • Definitions of day, night, twilight (USA navy site)
  • Formulas to calculate the length of day and night

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