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Encyclopedia > David Rice Atchison
David Rice Atchison
David Rice Atchison

In office
December 04, 1844 – March 03, 1855
Preceded by Lewis Linn
Succeeded by James Green

Born August 11, 1807(1807-08-11)
Frogtown, Kentucky, U.S.
Died January 26, 1886 (aged 78)
Gower, Missouri, U.S.
Political party DP
Profession Politician, Lawyer
Portrait by George Caleb Bingham
Statue at Clinton County Courthouse in Missouri
Statue at Clinton County Courthouse in Missouri

David Rice Atchison (11 August 180726 January 1886) was a mid-19th century Democratic United States Senator from Missouri. He served as President pro tempore of the United States Senate for six years. He is probably best known for the common belief that for one day (March 4, 1849) he was de jure President of the United States. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1097x1333, 319 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): David Rice Atchison ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... December 4 is the 338th day (339th on leap years) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Source Linn in the Bioguide of the U. S. Congress Categories: Stub | 1795 births | 1843 deaths | United States Senators ... James Stephen Green (February 28, 1817 – January 19, 1870) was a United States Representative and Senator from Missouri. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Gower is a city located in Buchanan and Clinton County, Missouri. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 486 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (672 × 828 pixels, file size: 150 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) David Rice Atchison painting by George Caleb Bingham (which was at Atchisons home in Clinton County, Missouri). ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 486 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (672 × 828 pixels, file size: 150 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) David Rice Atchison painting by George Caleb Bingham (which was at Atchisons home in Clinton County, Missouri). ... Fur traders on Missouri River, c. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 231 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (983 × 2553 pixels, file size: 324 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Statue of David Rice Atchison at Clinton County, Missouri Courthouse. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 231 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (983 × 2553 pixels, file size: 324 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Statue of David Rice Atchison at Clinton County, Missouri Courthouse. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1807 (MDCCCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Atchison was born to William Atchison in Frogtown (later Kirklevington), which is now part of Lexington, Kentucky. He was educated at Transylvania University in Lexington, where his classmates included five future Democratic Senators (Solomon Downs of Louisiana, Jesse Bright of Indiana, George W. Jones of Iowa, Edward Hannegan of Indiana, and Jefferson Davis of Mississippi). Atchison was admitted to the Kentucky bar in 1829. Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Solomon Weathersbee Downs (1801 – August 14, 1854) was a United States Senator from Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Jesse David Bright (December 18, 1812 – May 20, 1875) was a Lieutenant Governor of Indiana and U.S. Senator from Indiana who served as President pro tempore on three separate occasions. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... George Wallace Jones (April 12, 1804 - July 22, 1896) was one of the first two United States Senators to represent the state of Iowa after it was admitted to the Union as a state in 1846. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Edward Allen Hannegan (June 25, 1807 - February 25, 1859) was a United States Representative and Senator from Indiana. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Missouri lawyer and politician

In 1830 he moved to Liberty in Clay County in western Missouri, and set up practice there. He also farmed. Atchison's law practice flourished, and his best-known client was Mormon leader Joseph Smith, Jr.. Atchison represented Smith in land disputes with non-Mormon settlers in Caldwell County and Daviess County Liberty is a city in Clay County, Missouri. ... Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... Joseph Smith redirects here. ... Caldwell County is a county located in the state of Missouri. ... Daviess County is a county located in the state of Missouri. ...


Atchison was elected to the Missouri General Assembly in 1834. He worked hard for the Platte Purchase, which extended the northwestern boundary of Missouri to the Missouri River in 1837. The Missouri General Assembly is the state legislature of Missouri. ... The Platte Purchase, a historic region of the United States was the territory included the land between the Missouri River and the original state line. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ...


When the earlier disputes broke out into the so-called Mormon War of 1838, Atchison was appointed a general in the state militia and took part in suppression of the violence by both sides. The Mormon War is a name sometimes given to the 1838 conflict which occurred between Latter-day Saints (Mormons) and their neighbors in the northwestern region of the U.S. state of Missouri. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ...


In 1838 he was re-elected to the Assembly. Three years later, he appointed a circuit court judge for the six-county area of the Platte Purchase. In 1843 he was named a county commissioner in Platte County, where he now lived. Circuit courts previously were United States federal courts established in each federal judicial district. ... In local government in the United States, a county commission is a group of elected officials charged with administering the county government. ... Platte County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ...


Senate career

In October 1843, Atchison was appointed to the U.S. Senate to fill the vacancy left by the death of Lewis F. Linn. He thus became the first senator from western Missouri. At age 36, he was the youngest senator from Missouri up to that time. Later in 1843, Atchison was elected to serve the remainder of Linn's term, and was re-elected in 1849. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Source Linn in the Bioguide of the U. S. Congress Categories: Stub | 1795 births | 1843 deaths | United States Senators ...


Atchison was very popular with his fellow Senate Democrats. When the Democrats took control of the Senate in December 1845, they chose Atchison as President pro tempore, placing him third in succession for the Presidency, and also giving him the duty of presiding over the Senate when the Vice President was absent. He was then only 38 years old and had served in the Senate just two years. In 1849 Atchison stepped down as President pro tempore in favor of William R. King. King in turn yielded the office back to Atchison in December 1852, since King had been elected Vice President of the United States. Atchison continued as President pro tempore till December 1854. The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ...


As a Senator, Atchison was a fervent advocate of slavery and territorial expansion. He supported the annexation of Texas and the U.S.-Mexican War. Atchison and Missouri's other Senator, the venerable Thomas Hart Benton, became rivals and finally enemies, though both were Democrats. Benton declared himself to be against slavery in 1849, and in 1851 Atchison allied with the Whigs to defeat Benton for re-election. For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 78,789 soldiers 18,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government estimate... Thomas Hart Benton nicknamed Old Bullion (March 14, 1782 – April 10, 1858), was an U.S. Senator from Missouri and a staunch advocate of westward expansion of the United States. ... The Whig Party was a political party of the United States during the era of Jacksonian democracy. ...


Benton, intending to challenge Atchison in 1854, began to agitate for territorial organization of the area west of Missouri (now the states of Kansas and Nebraska) so it could be opened to settlement. To counter this, Atchison proposed that the area be organized and that the section of the Missouri Compromise banning slavery there be repealed in favor of popular sovereignty, under which the settlers in each territory would decide themselves whether slavery would be allowed. In the history of the United States, an organized territory is a territory for which the United States Congress has enacted an Organic Act. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Nebraska (disambiguation). ... The United States in 1820. ... Popular sovereignty or the sovereignty of the people is the belief that the legitimacy of the state is created by the will or consent of its people, who are the source of all political power. ...


At Atchison's request, Senator Stephen Douglas of Illinois introduced the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which embodied this idea, in November 1853. The Act became law on in May 1854, establishing the Territories of Kansas and Nebraska. Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This 1856 map shows slave states (grey), free states (red), and US territories (green) with Kansas in center (white). ...


Border Ruffians

Douglas (and Atchison) had assumed that Nebraska would be settled by Free-State men from Iowa and Illinois, and Kansas by pro-slavery Missourians and other Southerners, thus preserving the numerical balance between free states and slave states. In 1854 Atchison helped found the town of Atchison, Kansas as a pro-slavery settlement. The town (and county) were named for him.[1] Free Stater[1] is an Irish blog set up (amongst other reasons) as a response to the censorship policies in place at the so-called Freedom Institute, a young think-tank effort by a coterie of (current and former) Irish third-level students of a right-wing bent. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the...


In fact, while Southerners welcomed the opportunity to settle Kansas, very few actually chose to do so. Instead, most free-soilers preferred Kansas. Furthermore, anti-slavery activists throughout the North came to view Kansas as a battleground and formed societies to encourage free-soil settlers to go to Kansas and ensure that both Kansas and Nebraska would become free states.[2]


It appeared as if the Kansas Territorial legislature to be elected in March 1855 would be controlled by free-soilers and ban slavery. This was viewed as a breach of faith by Atchison and his supporters. An angry Atchison called on pro-slavery Missourians to uphold slavery by force and "to kill every God-damned abolitionist in the district" if necessary.[3] He recruited an immense mob of heavily armed Missourians, the infamous "Border Ruffians". On the election day, March 30, 1855, Atchison led 5,000 Border Ruffians into Kansas. They seized control of all polling places at gunpoint, cast tens of thousands of fraudulent votes for pro-slavery candidates, and "elected" a pro-slavery legislature.[2] This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The outrage was nonetheless accepted by the Federal government. When Territorial Governor Andrew Reeder objected, he was fired by President Pierce, a Doughface. Andrew Horatio Reeder (July 12, 1807 - July 5, 1864) was the first governor of the Territorial Kansas. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ... Originally an actual mask made of dough, doughface is now a term used in a disparaging context for someone, especially a politician, who is pliable, moldable like dough. ...


Despite this show of force, far more free-soilers than pro-slavery settlers migrated to Kansas. There were continual raids and ambushes by both sides in "Bleeding Kansas". But in spite of the best efforts of Atchison and the Ruffians, Kansas did reject slavery and finally became a free state in 1861. Bleeding Kansas, sometimes referred to in history as Bloody Kansas or the Border War, was a series of violent events, involving Free-Staters (anti-slavery) and pro-slavery Border Ruffian elements, that took place in the Kansas Territory and the western frontier towns of the U.S. state of Missouri...


Defeated for re-election

Atchison's Senate term expired March 3, 1855. He sought election to another term, but the Democrats in the Missouri legislature were split between him and Benton, while the Whig minority put forward their own man. No Senator was elected till January 1857, when James S. Green was chosen. is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... James Stephen Green (February 28, 1817 – January 19, 1870) was a United States Representative and Senator from Missouri. ...


Railroad proposal

When the First Transcontinental Railroad was proposed in the 1850s, Atchison called for it to be built along the "central route" (from St. Louis through Missouri, Kansas, and Utah), rather the "southern route" (from New Orleans through Texas and New Mexico). Naturally, his suggested route went through Atchison. This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ... St. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... NOLA redirects here. ... For other uses, see New Mexico (disambiguation). ...


Civil War soldier

During the secession crisis in Missouri at the beginning of the American Civil War, Atchison sided with Missouri's pro-Confederate governor, Claiborne Jackson. He accepted an appointment as a general in the Missouri State Guard. Atchison actively recruited State Guardsmen in northern Missouri and served with Missouri State Guard commander General Sterling Price in the summer campaign of 1861. In September 1861, Atchison led 3,500 State Guard recruits across the Missouri River to reinforce Price, and defeated Union troops that tried to block his force in the Battle of Liberty. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Claiborne Fox Jackson (April 4, 1806 – December 6, 1862) was a lawyer, soldier, politician, and Governor of Missouri in 1861, then governor-in-exile for the Confederacy during the American Civil War. ... The Missouri State Guard (MSG) was a state militia unit organized in the state of Missouri during the early days of the American Civil War. ... General Price Sterling Old Pap Price (September 20, 1809 – September 29, 1867) was an antebellum politician from the U.S. state of Missouri and a Confederate major general during the American Civil War. ... The Missouri River is a tributary of the Mississippi River in the United States. ... Animated map of secession, Civil War and re-admission:  States of the Union  Territories of the Union (including occupied territory)  States of the Confederacy  Territories claimed by Confederacy During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the twenty-three states of the United States... The Battle of Liberty was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on September 17, 1861 in Clay County, Missouri. ...


Atchison continued to serve through the end of 1861. In March 1862, Union forces in the Trans-Mississippi theater won a decisive victory at Pea Ridge in Arkansas and secured Union control of Missouri. Atchison then resigned from the army and retired to his farm near Plattsburg, Missouri. The Trans-Mississippi was the geographic area west of the Mississippi River during the 19th century, containing the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri and Texas, and the Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Samuel R. Curtis Earl Van Dorn Strength Army of the Southwest,≈10,500 men Army of the West, ≈16,000 men Casualties 1,349 (mostly killed and wounded) 4,600 (mostly captured) The Battle of Pea Ridge (also known as... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Plattsburg is a city in Clinton County, Missouri, along the Little Platte River. ...


President for One Day

Some claim that Atchison technically was President of the United States for one day—Sunday, March 4, 1849. Outgoing President James Polk's term expired on March 4, and his successor, Zachary Taylor, refused to be sworn into office on the sabbath (Sunday). Taylor's Vice Presidential running mate, Millard Fillmore, likewise was not inaugurated. As President pro tempore, and therefore Acting Vice President, under the presidential succession law in place at the time, Atchison was believed by some to be Acting President. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the twelfth President of the United States. ... An inauguration is a ceremony of formal investiture whereby an individual assumes an office or position of authority or power. ... For other uses, see Sabbath. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... An Acting president is a person who temporarily fills the role of an organizations president, either when the real president is unavailable (for example ill or on vacation) or when the post is vacant (for example because of death, injury, resignation, or dismissal). ...


However, while it is alleged that the offices of President and Vice President were vacant, Atchison in fact was not next in line. While the terms of James K. Polk and Vice President George Mifflin Dallas expired at noon, March 4, Atchison's tenure as President pro tempore had already expired when the Thirtieth Congress adjourned sine die on March 3. He also never took the oath of office, although at that time the Constitution did not require it, Article 2 of the Constitution requires an Acting President to do so. No disability or lack of qualification prevented Taylor and Fillmore from taking office, and as they had been duly certified to take office that day as President-elect and Vice President-elect, if Taylor was not President because he had not been sworn in as such, then Atchison, who hadn't been sworn in either, certainly wasn't, some argue. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Atchison was sworn in for his new term as President pro tempore minutes before both Fillmore and Taylor, which might theoretically make him Acting President for at least that length of time; however, this also implies that any time the Vice President is sworn in before the President, the Vice President is the de facto Acting President. Since this is a common occurrence, if Atchison is considered President, so must every Vice President whose inauguration preceded that of the President. Therefore, while one could argue that Atchison was legally President for a few minutes (though even this much is highly debatable), claims that he should be considered an "official" President are surely disputable. He is not included in any official U.S. government list of Presidents. The highest-ranking official whose term unquestionably continued during the interim was Polk's Secretary of State, James Buchanan (later elected President himself in 1856), whose term did not formally expire until his successor, John M. Clayton, took office on March 7. The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... For other persons named James Buchanan, see James Buchanan (disambiguation). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... John Middleton Clayton (July 24, 1796–November 9, 1856) was an American statesman from Delaware who served as a U.S. Senator and as the U.S. Secretary of State from 1849 to 1850. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Atchison discussed the claim in a September 1872 issue of the Plattsburg Lever:

It was in this way: Polk went out of office on the 3d of March 1849, on Saturday at 12 noon. The next day, the 4th, occurring on Sunday, Gen. Taylor was not inaugurated. He was not inaugurated till Monday, the 5th, at 12 noon. It was then canvassed among Senators whether there was an interregnum (a time during which a country lacks a government). It was plain that there was either an interregnum or I was the President of the United States being chairman of the Senate, having succeeded Judge Mangum of North Carolina. The judge waked me up at 3 o'clock in the morning and said jocularly that as I was President of the United States he wanted me to appoint him as secretary of state. I made no pretense to the office, but if I was entitled in it I had one boast to make, that not a woman or a child shed a tear on account of my removing any one from office during my incumbency of the place. A great many such questions are liable to arise under our form of government.[4] Willie Person Mangum (May 10, 1792–September 7, 1861) was a U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1831 and 1836 and between 1840 and 1853. ...

As it happened, Atchison was preceded as President pro tempore by Ambrose Hundley Sevier who had served only one day on December 27, 1845 (and not being formally elected). Mangum had preceded Sevier. Ambrose Hundley Sevier Ambrose Hundley Sevier (4 November 1801 - 31 December 1848) was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from Arkansas. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


Despite this, a museum exhibit in his honor (claiming to be the country's smallest Presidential Library) opened in February 2006 at the Atchison County Historical Museum in Atchison, Kansas. Atchison County Historical Museum is a museum dedicated to preserving the history of Atchison, Kansas. ... Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the...


Atchison was 41 years and 6 months old at the time of his One Day Presidency, which, since it is disputed to this day , would still make him the youngest President in American history. Theodore Roosevelt, the youngest to serve, was 42 years and 11 months old when he was sworn in following the death of William McKinley in 1901, and John F. Kennedy, the youngest to be elected, was 43 years and 7 months old when he was inaugurated in 1961. For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 25th President of the United States; for other people named William McKinley, see William McKinley (disambiguation). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ...

David Rice Atchison's tombstone.
David Rice Atchison's tombstone.

File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Memorials

Atchison died on January 26, 1886 at the age of 78. He was buried at his home in Plattsburg, Missouri, where a statue honors him in front of the Clinton County Courthouse. His grave marker reads "President of the United States for One Day", although it does not have a Presidential Seal. is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Plattsburg is a city in Clinton County, Missouri, along the Little Platte River. ... Clinton County is a county located in the state of Missouri. ...


Atchison, Kansas is named for him. The town subsequently gave its name to the famous Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad. Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the... Categories: Rail stubs | Defunct railroad companies of the United States | Arizona railroads | California railroads | Colorado railroads | Illinois railroads | Iowa railroads | Kansas railroads | Louisiana railroads | Missouri railroads | Nebraska railroads | New Mexico railroads | Oklahoma railroads | Texas railroads ...


See also

Places named for David Atchison

Two views of a pedestrian mall on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Commercial Street in downtown Atchison A statue of Amelia Earhart on Commercial Street in downtown Atchison Atchison is a city situated along the Missouri River in the eastern part of Atchison County, located in northeast Kansas, in the... Atchison County (standard abbreviation: AT) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ... Atchison County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. ... The USS Atchison County (LST-60) was one of 390 LST-1-class tank landing ships (LSTs) built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for counties in Kansas and Missouri established in honor of David Rice Atchison, a mid-19th century Democratic United States Senator from...

References

  1. ^ History of the State of Kansas by William G. Cutler - 1883 - Reprinted on kancoll.org
  2. ^ a b Billings, R. A. [1949]. Westward Expansion. New York NY: Macmillan, 599-601. 
  3. ^ David M. Potter, Don E. Fehrenbacher, The Impending Crisis 1848-1861 at 203 (Harper, 1976)
  4. ^ Clinton Co. MO Historical Society

External links

Preceded by
Lewis F. Linn
United States Senator (Class 3) from Missouri
December 4, 1844March 3, 1855
Served alongside: Thomas Hart Benton and Henry S. Geyer
Succeeded by
James S. Green
Preceded by
Ambrose Hundley Sevier
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
August 8, 1846December 2, 1849
Succeeded by
William R. King
Preceded by
William R. King
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
December 20, 1852December 4, 1854
Succeeded by
Lewis Cass
The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Source Linn in the Bioguide of the U. S. Congress Categories: Stub | 1795 births | 1843 deaths | United States Senators ... Missouri was admitted to the Union on August 10, 1821. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Hart Benton nicknamed Old Bullion (March 14, 1782 – April 10, 1858), was an U.S. Senator from Missouri and a staunch advocate of westward expansion of the United States. ... Henry Sheffie Geyer (December 9, 1790 - March 5, 1859) was a politician, lawyer, and soldier from Missouri. ... James Stephen Green (February 28, 1817 – January 19, 1870) was a United States Representative and Senator from Missouri. ... Ambrose Hundley Sevier Ambrose Hundley Sevier (4 November 1801 - 31 December 1848) was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from Arkansas. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1849 (MDCCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the board game, see 1854 (board game). ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was an American who served as the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... John Langdon (June 26, 1741—September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. ... Ralph Izard Ralph Izard (January 23, 1741 or 1742–May 30, 1804) was a U.S. politician. ... Categories: People stubs | United States Senators | 1753 births | 1799 deaths ... Samuel Livermore This article is about the New Hampshire lawyer and politician; for the New Orleans lawyer and legal scholar, see Samuel Livermore (legal writer). ... William Bingham (1752–1804) was an American statesman from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... William Bradford (November 4, 1729 - July 6, 1808) was a physician, lawyer, and United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... Jacob Read (1752–July 17, 1816) was an American lawyer from Charleston, South Carolina. ... Theodore Sedgwick (May 9, 1746-January 24, 1813), a Delegate, a Representative, and a Senator from Massachusetts and the fifth Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. ... John Laurance (1750 – November 11, 1810) was an American lawyer, statesman, and speculator from New York. ... James Ross (July 12, 1762 – November 27, 1847) was a nerish noi and monkey whisperer from Pennsylvania from 1794 to 1803. ... Samuel Livermore This article is about the New Hampshire lawyer and politician; for the New Orleans lawyer and legal scholar, see Samuel Livermore (legal writer). ... Categories: Stub ... John Eager Howard (June 4, 1752 - October 12, 1827) was a American politician from Maryland. ... James Hillhouse (October 20, 1754 - December 29, 1832), of New Haven, Connecticut, was a real estate developer responsible for much of the current look of New Haven, a politician, and a treasurer of Yale University. ... Abraham Baldwin Abraham Baldwin (November 23, 1754—March 4, 1807) was an American politician, Patriot, and Founding Father from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Stephen Row Bradley (February 20, 1754 December 9, 1830) was an American politician. ... For other people with the same name, see John Brown. ... Jesse Franklin (March 24, 1760 -- August 31, 1823) was the Democratic-Republican U.S. senator from the U.S. state of North Carolina between 1799 and 1805 and between 1807 and 1813. ... Joseph Anderson (November 5, 1757–April 17, 1837) was a U.S. political figure who served as a United States Senator from Tennessee and later as the first Comptroller of the United States Treasury. ... Samuel Smith Samuel Smith (July 27, 1752 - April 22, 1839) was a United States Senator and Representative from Maryland, as well as a former mayor of Baltimore, Maryland, and a general in the Maryland Militia. ... Stephen Row Bradley (February 20, 1754 December 9, 1830) was an American politician. ... John Milledge (1757–February 9, 1818) was an American politician. ... Andrew Gregg (June 10, 1755 - May 20, 1835) was a U.S. political figure. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... John Pope (1770–July 12, 1845) was a United States Senator from Kentucky, a member of the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky, Secretary of State of Kentucky, and Governor of Arkansas Territory. ... William Harris Crawfordlalalalalalala (February 24, 1772 – September 15, 1834) was an important American politician, as well as a judge, during the early 19th century. ... Joseph Bradley Varnum Joseph Bradley Varnum (January 29, 1751–September 21, 1821) was a U.S. politician of the Democratic-Republican Party from the state of Massachusetts. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... James Barbour (June 10, 1775-June 7, 1842) was an American lawyer, a member and speaker of the Virginia house of delegates, the 19th Governor of Virginia, and United States Secretary of War from 1825-1828. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Nathaniel Macon (December 17, 1758 – June 29, 1837) was a spokesman for the Old Republican faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that wanted to strictly limit the federal government. ... Samuel Smith Samuel Smith (July 27, 1752 - April 22, 1839) was a United States Senator and Representative from Maryland, as well as a former mayor of Baltimore, Maryland, and a general in the Maryland Militia. ... Littleton Waller Tazewell (December 17, 1774–May 6, 1860) was a U.S. Senator from and governor of Virginia. ... This is about the 19th century Tennessee politician; for the 20th century Mississippi politician, see Hugh L. White. ... George Poindexter (1779–September 5, 1853) was a American politician. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... U.S. Navy collection portrait of Samuel Southard Samuel Lewis Southard (1787-1842) (son of Henry Southard and brother of Isaac Southard) was a prominent U.S. statesman of the early 1800s, serving as a U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Navy, and Governor of New Jersey. ... Willie Person Mangum (May 10, 1792–September 7, 1861) was a U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1831 and 1836 and between 1840 and 1853. ... Ambrose Hundley Sevier Ambrose Hundley Sevier (4 November 1801 - 31 December 1848) was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from Arkansas. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Lewis Cass (October 9, 1782 – June 17, 1866) was an American military officer and politician. ... Jesse D. Bright Jesse D. Bright (December 18, 1812–May 20, 1875) was a Democratic Senator from Indiana during the period of March 4, 1845 to February 5, 1862. ... Charles Edward Stuart (November 25, 1810 – May 19, 1887) was a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from the state of Michigan. ... Jesse D. Bright Jesse D. Bright (December 18, 1812–May 20, 1875) was a Democratic Senator from Indiana during the period of March 4, 1845 to February 5, 1862. ... James M. Mason James Murray Mason (November 3, 1798 - April 28, 1871) was a United States Representative and United States Senator from Virginia. ... Thomas Jefferson Rusk Thomas Jefferson Rusk December 5,1803 - July 29,1857; was a U.S. political figure and a Senator from Texas from 1846 until his suicide. ... Benjamin Fitzpatrick (June 30, 1802 - November 21, 1869) was an American politician, who served as Governor of Alabama and as United States Senator from Alabama as a Democrat. ... Jesse D. Bright Jesse D. Bright (December 18, 1812–May 20, 1875) was a Democratic Senator from Indiana during the period of March 4, 1845 to February 5, 1862. ... Benjamin Fitzpatrick (June 30, 1802 - November 21, 1869) was an American politician, who served as Governor of Alabama and as United States Senator from Alabama as a Democrat. ... Solomon Foot Solomon Foot (born on November 19, 1802 in Cornwall, Vermont - died on March 28, 1866 in Washington, D.C.) was Vermont lawyer, state representative and later senator who spent more than 25 years in elected office. ... Daniel Clark Daniel Clark (October 24, 1809 - January 2, 1891) was an American politician who served in the New Hampshire legislature and the United States Senate. ... Lafayette S. Foster Born in Franklin, New London County, Connecticut, November 22, 1806. ... Benjamin Franklin Bluff Wade (October 27, 1800 – March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer and United States Senator. ... Categories: Stub | 1815 births | 1884 deaths | Governors of Rhode Island | United States Senators ... Senator Matthew Carpenter Matthew Hale Carpenter, born Decatur Merritt Hammond Carpenter, (December 22, 1824 - February 24, 1881) was a member of the Republican Party who served in the United States Senate for the state of Wisconsin from 1869 - 1875 and again from 1879 - 1881. ... Categories: Stub | 1815 births | 1884 deaths | Governors of Rhode Island | United States Senators ... Thomas White Ferry (June 10, 1827–October 13, 1896) was a U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from the state of Michigan. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Thomas Francis Bayard, Sr. ... For other persons of the same name, see David Davis. ... Categories: Stub | 1828 births | 1919 deaths | United States Senators ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... John James Ingalls John James Ingalls (December 29, 1833 – August 16, 1900) was an American politician. ... Charles Frederick Manderson (February 9, 1837 - September 28, 1911) was a United States Senator from Nebraska from 1883 to 1895. ... Isham Green Harris (February 10, 1818 – July 8, 1897) was an American politician. ... Categories: Stub | 1826 births | 1904 deaths | United States Senators ... Isham Green Harris (February 10, 1818 – July 8, 1897) was an American politician. ... William Pierce Frye William Pierce Frye (September 2, 1830 – August 8, 1911) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... From April 4, 1911 to March 3, 1913, the office of President pro tempore of the United States Senate for the 62nd Congress rotated among five individuals. ... Augustus Octavius Bacon Augustus Octavius Bacon (October 20, 1839–February 14, 1914) was a U.S. political figure, a Democratic Party senator from Georgia. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Jacob Harold Gallinger (March 28, 1837 - August 17, 1918), was a United States Senator from New Hampshire who served as president pro tempore of the Senate in 1912 and 1913. ... Frank Bosworth Brandegee (July 8, 1864 - 1924) was a United States Representative and Senator from Connecticut, born in New London. ... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... Statue of James Paul Clarke, marble by Pompeo Coppini. ... Willard Saulsbury, Jr. ... Albert B. Cummins Albert Baird Cummins (February 15, 1850 - July 30, 1926) was a U.S. political figure. ... Categories: Stub | 1869 births | 1944 deaths | United States Senators ... Key Pittman (September 19, 1872 - November 10, 1940) was a Senator from Nevada. ... William Henry King (June 3, 1863 - November 27, 1949) was a American lawyer, jurist, and statesman from Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Bryon Patton Pat Harrison (August 29, 1881 - June 22, 1941) was a Mississippi politician who served as a Democrat in the United States House of Representatives from 1911 to 1919 and in the United States Senate from 1919 until his death. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... Another Kenneth McKellar was a famous Scottish singer. ... Arthur Hendrick Vandenberg (March 22, 1884–April 18, 1951) was a Republican Senator from the state of Michigan who participated in the creation of the United Nations. ... Another Kenneth McKellar was a famous Scottish singer. ... Henry Styles Bridges Henry Styles Bridges (September 9, 1898–November 26, 1961) was an American teacher, editor, and Republican Party politician from Concord, New Hampshire. ... Walter Franklin George (January 29, 1878 – August 24, 1957) was an American politician from the state of Georgia. ... Carl Trumbull Hayden (February 10, 1877 – January 25, 1972) was an American politician and the first United States Senator to serve seven terms. ... Richard Brevard Russell, Jr. ... Allen Joseph Ellender (September 24, 1890 - July 27, 1972) was a U.S. political figure from Houma, Louisiana who served as a Democratic United States Senator from Louisiana from 1937 until his death in 1972. ... For other uses, see James Eastland (disambiguation). ... Warren G. Magnuson Warren Grant Maggie Magnuson (April 12, 1905–May 20, 1989) was a United States Senator of the Democratic Party from Washington from 1944 until 1981. ... Milton Ruben Young (December 6, 1897–May 31, 1983) was a United States politician, he served in the U.S. Senate from 1945 until 1981 as senator for North Dakota. ... Warren G. Magnuson Warren Grant Maggie Magnuson (April 12, 1905–May 20, 1989) was a United States Senator of the Democratic Party from Washington from 1944 until 1981. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the senator. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The seal for the President pro Tempore of the United States Senate. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... This article is about the senator. ... Image File history File links President_Pro_Tempore_seal. ... Missouri was admitted to the Union on August 10, 1821. ... Thomas Hart Benton nicknamed Old Bullion (March 14, 1782 – April 10, 1858), was an U.S. Senator from Missouri and a staunch advocate of westward expansion of the United States. ... Henry Sheffie Geyer (December 9, 1790 - March 5, 1859) was a politician, lawyer, and soldier from Missouri. ... Trusten Polk was a short-termed Democratic Governor of Missouri. ... John B. Henderson John Brooks Henderson (November 16, 1826 – April 12, 1913) was a United States Senator from Missouri and a co-author of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... Carl Schurz (March 2, 1829 – May 14, 1906) was a German revolutionary, American statesman and reformer, and Union Army general in the American Civil War. ... Francis Marion Cockrell (October 1, 1834 December 13, 1915) was a Confederate military commander and American politician from the state of Missouri. ... William Warner (June 11, 1840–October 4, 1916) was an American lawyer and politician from Kansas City, Missouri. ... James Alexander Reed (November 9, 1861 September 9, 1944) was an American politician. ... For the U.S. Senator from New York whom this person was named after, see Roscoe Conkling. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Frank Parks Briggs (February 25, 1894 - September 23, 1992) was a United States Senator from Missouri. ... James Kem James Preston Kem (April 2, 1890 - February 24, 1965) represented Missouri in the United States Senate from 1947 to 1953. ... William Stuart Symington William Stuart Symington (June 26, 1901–December 14, 1988) was a businessman and political figure from Missouri. ... John Danforth John Claggett Danforth (born September 5, 1936), also referred to as Jack Danforth, is a former United States Ambassador to the United Nations and former Republican United States Senator from Missouri. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) is an American politician who was the 79th United States Attorney General. ... Jean Carpenter Carnahan (born December 20, 1933) is an American politician and writer who served in the United States Senate from 2001 to 2002. ... James Matthes Jim Talent (born October 18, 1956) is an American politician and former Senator from Missouri. ... Claire McCaskill (born July 24, 1953) is an American Democratic politician, currently the junior United States Senator from the state of Missouri and former State Auditor of Missouri. ... David Barton (1783-1837), one of the first U. S. senators from Missouri, serving 1820-1830. ... Alexander Buckner (1785 - June 6, 1833) was a United States Senator from Missouri. ... Source Linn in the Bioguide of the U. S. Congress Categories: Stub | 1795 births | 1843 deaths | United States Senators ... James Stephen Green (February 28, 1817 – January 19, 1870) was a United States Representative and Senator from Missouri. ... Waldo Porter Johnson (September 16, 1817 – August 14, 1885) was a United States Senator from Missouri, and later a member of the Confederate Congress during the American Civil War. ... Robert Wilson (November 1803 – May 10, 1870) was a United States Senator from Missouri. ... Charles D. Drake Charles Daniel Drake (April 11, 1811 - April 1, 1892) was a United States Senator from Missouri. ... Daniel Tarbox Jewett (September 14, 1807 - October 7, 1906) was a United States Senator from Missouri in 1870 and 1871. ... Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... Lewis Vital Bogy (April 9, 1813 - September 20, 1877) was a United States Senator from Missouri. ... David Hartley Armstrong (October 21, 1812 - March 18, 1893) was a United States Senator from Missouri. ... James Shields (May 10, 1810 – June 1, 1879) was an American politician and U.S. Army officer who was born in Altmore, County Tyrone, Ireland. ... George Graham Vest (1830–1904) was a man born in Kentucky, but who moved to Missouri to begin a career in law. ... William Joel Stone (1848-1918) was a Democratic politician from Missouri who represented his state in the United States House of Representatives from 1885 to 1891, and in the U.S. Senate from 1903 until his death; he also served as the governor of Missouri from 1893 to 1897. ... Xenophon Pierce Wilfley (1871-1931) was a Democratic politician who represented the state of Missouri in the U.S. Senate for five months in 1918. ... Selden Palmer Spencer (September 16, 1862 - May 16, 1925) was a United States Senator from Missouri. ... George Howard Williams (December 1, 1871–November 25, 1963) was a U.S. senator from Missouri from 1925 to 1926. ... Harry B. Hawes Harry Bartow Hawes (November 15, 1869-July 31, 1947) was an American politician who served as a Democratic member of the U.S. House and Senate from Missouri. ... Joel Bennett Clark (January 8, 1890–July 13, 1954), better known as Bennett Champ Clark, was a United States Senator from Missouri from 1932 to 1945. ... Forrest C. Donnell (August 20, 1884–March 3, 1980) was a United States Senator and a Governor of Missouri. ... Thomas Carey Hennings, Jr. ... Edward Vaughn Long (July 18, 1908 - November 6, 1972) was a Democratic Senator from Missouri. ... Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ... Christopher Samuel Kit Bond (born March 6, 1939 in St. ... Image File history File links Senate_Seal. ...

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David Rice Atchison - FREE David Rice Atchison Biography | Encyclopedia.com: Facts, Pictures, Information! (786 words)
Atchison, however, neither took the oath of office constitutionally required of the president nor was recognized at the time as temporarily serving as president.
David Atchison was born in Frogtown, near Lexington...
Atchison was founded (1854) near a military post, established (1818-19) on Cow Island in the Missouri, and named for David Rice Atchison.
Atchison - LoveToKnow 1911 (269 words)
Atchison is served by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe, the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy, the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific, and the Missouri Pacific railways.
Atchison's situation and transportation facilities make it an important supply-centre, its trade in grains and live-stock being particularly large; it has large railway machine shops, and its principal manufactures are flour, furniture, lumber, hardware and drugs.
Atchison was founded in 1854 by pro-slavery partisans, and was named in honour of their leader, David Rice Atchison, a United States senator.
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