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Encyclopedia > David Orchard

David Orchard (born June 28, 1950, in Borden, Saskatchewan) is a Canadian political figure and a member of the Liberal Party of Canada. He was a member of the now defunct Progressive Conservative Party of Canada, and was against the party's eventual merger with the Canadian Alliance to form the Conservative Party of Canada. June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English (but legally required to provide some services in French) Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) (In French: Parti progressiste-conservateur du Canada) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...


Orchard has never held political office in Canada, but has been involved in leadership conventions and other political areas. He is perhaps best known for his campaign to oppose the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, and has since become a prominent activist against free trade of all sorts, campaigning against the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas and the World Trade Organization. In Canadian politics, a leadership convention is held by a political party when the party needs to hold an election for leader due to a vacancy or a serious challenge to the incumbent leader. ... The Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was a trade agreement reached by Canada and the United States in October of 1987. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section needs to be updated. ... WTO Logo The World Trade Organization (WTO) is an international, multilateral organization, which sets the rules for the global trading system and resolves disputes between its member states, all of whom are signatories to its approximately 30 agreements. ...


Orchard is a 4th-generation organic grain farmer, and also the author of the book The Fight for Canada: Four Centuries of Resistance to American Expansionism. He is also a co-founder of CCAFT (Citizens Concerned About Free Trade) in 1985. Organic cultivation of mixed vegetables in Capay, California. ... This article is about grains in general. ...

Contents


Early life

Educated in Borden, Orchard went on to study arts and science and then law at the University of Saskatchewan in nearby Saskatoon, although he did not graduate. He later studied French at Quebec City's Université Laval. Orchard lives on his family farm and is in the organic agriculture business. The University of Saskatchewan (U of S) is the largest education institution in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ... Saskatoon is a city located in central Saskatchewan, Canada, on the South Saskatchewan River. ... Motto: « Don de Dieu feray valoir Â» (I shall put Gods gift to good use) Site in the province of Quebec Official logo Provincial region Province Country Capitale-Nationale Quebec Canada Gentilé Québécois, Québécoise Mayor Term Andrée P. Boucher 2005-2009 Federal Members of Parliament... Université Laval (Laval University) is the oldest centre of scholarship in Canada, and it was the first institution in North America to offer higher education in French. ...


Positions

Orchard sees himself as a "Red" or moderate Tory and claims to be ideologically inspired by his political idols former prime ministers John Diefenbaker, R.B. Bennett, Robert Borden and Sir John A. Macdonald. He is passionately opposed to Canadian economic integration with the U.S., including the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he says impedes Canada's economic and cultural sovereignty. He has repeatedly criticized many aspects of the United States, including its politicians, business leaders, and social culture. Red Tory is an appellation given to a political tradition in Canadas conservative political parties. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stephen Harper is the current Prime Minister of Canada. ... John George Diefenbaker, CH , PC , QC , BA , MA , LL.B , LL.D , DCL , FRSC , FRSA , D.Litt , DSL (September 18, 1895 – August 16, 1979) was the thirteenth Prime Minister of Canada (1957 – 1963). ... For the British composer named Richard Bennett, see Richard Rodney Bennett. ... Sir Robert Laird Borden, PC , KC , GCMG , DCL , LL.D (June 26, 1854 – June 10, 1937) was the eighth Prime Minister of Canada from October 10, 1911, to July 10, 1920, and the third Nova Scotian to hold this office. ... Sir John Alexander Macdonald, KCMG, GCB, QC, PC, DCL, LL.D (January 11, 1815 – June 6, 1891) was the first Prime Minister of Canada from July 1, 1867 – November 5, 1873 and October 17, 1878 – June 6, 1891. ...


Orchard supports government social programs, and is a strong supporter of the environment. Orchard is a devoted monarchist, and supports an increase in federal powers at the expense of the provinces. He also supported the campaign against the Meech Lake and Charlottetown Accords, calling them "The mortal weakening of the central government". He also advocates that 3 to 5 % of the Gross Domestic Product go to military spending. He is opposed to gun control. He is a social conservative, and believes in the traditional definition of marriage. Monarchism is the advocacy of the establishment, preservation, or restoration of a monarchy. ... The Meech Lake Accord was a set of failed constitutional amendments to the Constitution of Canada negotiated in 1987 by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the provincial premiers, including Robert Bourassa, premier of Quebec. ... The Charlottetown Accord was a package of constitutional amendments, proposed by the Canadian federal and provincial governments in 1992. ... A regions gross domestic product, or GDP, is one of several measures of the size of its economy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... Marriage is a relationship between individuals which often forms the foundation of a family. ...


Orchard describes his own views as being conservative in the "historical mainstream" and "centrist" of the PC party, and claimed they would appeal to moderate Canadians. Orchard's beliefs are perhaps best likened to that of the traditional, British Tory, which although historically common in Canada, lost much of their relevance since the rise of the so-called neoconservative faction. He has been shunned by many conservatives, who often accuse him of being out of step with modern conservatism and too far to the left. Such claims were common during his bids for PC leader, when he was accused being an opportunist who tried to practice entryism and take over the Progressive Conservative Party and steer it sharply to the left and away from modern conservatism. Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Neoconservatism and neoliberalism are labels given to a strains of political thought in Canadian politics, that began in the 1980s and rose to prominence in the 1990s, especially in Ontario, Western Canada and the federal government. ... Entryism (or entrism or enterism) is a political tactic by which an organisation encourages members to infiltrate another organisation in an attempt to gain recruits, or take over entirely. ...


He has never been elected to the Canadian House of Commons or to any public office. He sought election in the federal riding of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in the 2000 federal election. He placed a distant fourth, although with the highest percentage vote received by a Progressive Conservative candidate in Saskatchewan since 1993. The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... In the British Isles since Anglo-Saxon times, a riding is traditionally a sub-division (especially in three) of a county, in Australia analogous. ... Prince Albert is a federal electoral district represented in the Canadian House of Commons, and located in the province of Saskatchewan. ... The 2000 Canadian federal election was held on November 27, 2000, to elect 301 Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of Canada. ...


1998 leadership campaign

Orchard ran twice in PC leadership elections: in 1998 and in 2003. In his first attempt, he finished a distant second to Joe Clark on the final ballot but attracted a very different group of supporters to the Tory party in doing so. Many of Orchard's supporters were former members of the other political parties in Canada and two of Orchard's most prominent endorsers in the leadership bid were the leaders of the Green Parties of BC and Ontario. During the relatively quiet race, Clark famously referred to Orchard as a "tourist" in the Tory party because of his left-leaning economic platform and opposition to the free trade agreements brokered by the Mulroney government. In one debate, opponent Brian Pallister quipped that "Mr. Orchard is so left-wing, he thinks Svend Robinson is a right-wing maniac." The first Progressive Conservative Party of Canada leadership convention was held in 1927, when the party was called the Conservative Party. ... Charles Joseph Joe Clark (born June 5, 1939 in High River, Alberta) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... The Green Party of British Columbia is a political party in British Columbia, Canada. ... The Green Party of Ontario (GPO) contests provincial elections in Ontario, Canada. ... Martin Brian Mulroney (born March 20, 1939), known as Brian Mulroney, was the eighteenth Prime Minister of Canada from September 17, 1984, to June 25, 1993. ... Svend Robinson Svend Johannes Robinson (born March 4, 1952) is a Canadian politician and prominent activist for gay rights. ...


However, Orchard did gain respect from PC circles when he chose to stick with the Tories after Clark's victory. Orchard and his political advisor Marjaleena Repo worked hard after his failed leadership bid to rebuild several Saskatchewan PC constituency associations and improve PC membership sales across Canada. Orchard was one of Clark's staunchest defenders during the lead-up to the August 2002 convention that saw Clark resign as Tory leader after the disintegration of the parliamentary PC-Democratic Representative Caucus coalition in May 2002. Democratic Reform Association logo The Democratic Representative Caucus was a group of Canadian Members of Parliament who left the Canadian Alliance in 2001 in protest against the leadership of Stockwell Day. ...


2003 leadership campaign

Respect for Orchard grew in the Red Tory wing of the PC Party: roughly one-quarter of the party membership supported him during the 2003 PC leadership campaign, including Joe Clark's wife, Maureen McTeer. Orchard ultimately came in third on the third ballot in the 2003 PC convention, behind Nova Scotia Member of Parliament (MP) Peter MacKay and Calgary lawyer Jim Prentice. Orchard decided to support Peter MacKay over Jim Prentice due to the latter's implicit support for a United Alternative (merger of the party with the Canadian Alliance (CA) party). However, Orchard's support, which helped Peter MacKay win the leadership, came at price. MacKay had to agree to a backroom deal or "gentleman's agreement" to seal support from Orchard's largely loyal delegates on the final ballot. Maureen Anne McTeer (born February 27, 1952 in Ottawa) is an author and a lawyer, and the wife of Joe Clark, the 16th Prime Minister of Canada. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Hon. ... Jim Prentice, MP (born July 20, 1956, in South Porcupine, Timmins, Ontario) is a Canadian lawyer and politician. ... Unite the Right, also referred to as the United Alternative, was a Canadian political movement from 1997 until 2003. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ...


Many in the party, including Joe Clark, desperatly tried to get Prentice to meet with Orchard to prevent MacKay from winning the convention.


The MacKay-Orchard Deal

The deal promised a review of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement, no joint candidates with the Canadian Alliance, and a promise to redouble efforts to rebuild the national status of the Progressive Conservative Party. The agreement also included reexamining the PC Party's policies on government subsidies for national railways and preserving the environment. This agreement was controversial, and some time passed before it was released to the public. Many in the PC Party approved of the deal, including leadership candidate Scott Brison. The Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was a trade agreement reached by Canada and the United States in October of 1987. ... Scott A. Brison, PC, MP, BComm (born May 10, 1967, Windsor, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian politician. ...


At first MacKay had seemed to be willing to adhere to the deal. In July, MacKay struck up a "Blue Ribbon PC Policy Review Panel", chaired by Tory MP Bill Casey, in order to reexamine the party's policies on NAFTA. But MacKay soon violated the deal by encouraging talks between high-profile members of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservatives. In October 2003, the talks culminated in federal conservative leaders Peter MacKay and Stephen Harper signing an agreement in principle to merge the Progressive Conservatives and the Canadian Alliance to form the new Conservative Party of Canada. William D. Casey (born February 19, 1945 in Amherst, Nova Scotia) is a Canadian politician. ... Stephen Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd and current Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ...


Anti-merger activist

Orchard unsuccessfully attempted to prevent the merger. In a high-profile news conference in early November he suggested that the new Conservative Party of Canada was "an abomination, sired in betrayal and born out of deception." He urged PC Party members to vote "no" on any referendum and also encouraged "loyal members" to express their frustrations with Peter MacKay. Orchard argued that his efforts were not based on self-promotion but rather on preserving one of Canada's founding parties and preventing a take-over over of the moderate values and membership of the PCs by the neoconservative values of the Alliance membership. Neoconservatism and neoliberalism are labels given to a strains of political thought in Canadian politics, that began in the 1980s and rose to prominence in the 1990s, especially in Ontario, Western Canada and the federal government. ...


Orchard was convinced that a merger with an "upstart prairie populist protest movement" was unnecessary. Orchard argued that before the merger was announced, the Canadian Alliance and its leader, Stephen Harper, were highly unpopular and a moment was fast approaching for the PCs to reemerge as the national alternative to the governing Liberals. Orchard suggested that MacKay's "traitorous" actions put the above scenario in jeopardy. Some other notable Tories such as Joe Clark, Flora MacDonald, Brian Peckford and Sinclair Stevens also opposed the merger. Flora MacDonald (1722 – March 5, 1790), Jacobite heroine, was the daughter of Ranald MacDonald of Milton in the island of South Uist in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland, and his wife Marion, the daughter of Angus MacDonald. ... Alfred Brian Peckford (born August 27, 1942) is a former teacher, politician and premier of Newfoundland. ... The Honourable Sinclair McKnight Stevens, PC (born February 11, 1927) is a Canadian parliamentarian. ...


In a last-ditch attempt to stop the merger, Orchard went to court, seeking an injunction against the merger vote. The case was thrown out of court on the grounds that a merger through a "national convention" did not violate the PC Party constitution. The merger was ratified with 96% support by members of the Canadian Alliance in a one-member-one-vote process on December 5. The PC Party opted for a "virtual convention" in which delegates were selected in ridings and then attended local provincial urban centres in which they voted for or against the merger. An injunction is an equitable remedy in the form of a court order that either prohibits or compels (restrains or enjoins) a party from continuing a particular activity. ...


Orchard described the process as fraudulent and undemocratic, as the convention delegates never actually voted together in any fixed location. The convention produced a result in which 90.5% of the Progressive Conservative Party delgates voted in favour of the merger. However, Orchard and other opponents claimed the result was not representative of the true PC membership, pointing out that new memberships in the party were sold almost up to the day of the vote, and the number of members nearly doubled.


A lost battle

Many analysts have suggested that Orchard's battle to preserve the PC Party may have been vigorous but ultimately pointless. By the time the agreement in principle was formalized in October, the fate of the PC Party may have been practically sealed. Orchard himself had commented as early as September that the party's preparations for a widely expected 2004 federal election were in disarray. Since becoming leader, MacKay and the party's ruling council had done little to facilitate election readiness and preparation which may have been an early signal of MacKay's intentions to not run a full slate of 308 PC candidates in the expected election. The Canadian federal election, 2004 (more formally, the 38th general election), was held on June 28, 2004 to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


Orchard also faced speculation from some opponents and journalists in regard to his motivations to preserve the Progressive Conservative political name brand. Some critics suggested that he was really attempting to undermine Peter MacKay's merger stance in order to force a resignation and prompt another leadership race, allowing for a "takeover" by Orchard and his supporters.


Aftermath

At first, Orchard refused to join or work with the new party. In February 2004, he was asked to take over the leadership of the struggling Canadian Action Party after the resignation of its leader, Paul Hellyer, but Orchard declined. There were also rumours that Orchard was in discussions over a future Saskatchewan rural riding candidacy for the Saskatchewan Party and Orchard's name was frequently touted as a possible future leadership contender for the Green Party of Canada. The Canadian Action Party (CAP) is a Canadian federal political party founded in 1997. ... The Honourable Paul Theodore Hellyer, PC (born August 6, 1923 in Waterford, Ontario) is a Canadian politician and commentator who has had a long and varied career. ... The Saskatchewan Party is a centre-right political party in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. ... The Green Party of Canada is a federal political party in Canada. ...


Shortly before the Conservative Party's March 2005 policy convention, Orchard had his membership revoked by the party and was denied access to the event. "The council decided that it was in the interests of the party that they didn't want him to be a member of the party any longer," said Ian Brodie, the executive director of the Conservative Party.


Orchard continues to write for major newspapers, presents lectures in Canada's universities on foreign policy and environmental issues, and continues working in the organic farming business.


On November 19, 2005, CBC Radio News reported that the Liberals were trying to recruit Orchard as a candidate in the 2006 federal election. According to the report, Orchard would be a Liberal candidate in either Saskatchewan or rural Ontario. Orchard did not run as a Liberal in the 2006 federal election but he announced his support for the Liberals and camapigned for Chris Axworthy. ("Orchard offers support to Grits - Former leadership hopeful says Conservative gov't would work with Bloc", Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, January 11, 2006) Orchard officially became a member of the Liberal Party of Canada during the 2006 Canadian federal election. November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Template:Diffgggtgerent calendars 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... CBC Radio is the English language radio division of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Motto: Multis E Gentibus Vires (Latin: From many peoples, strength) Official languages English (but legally required to provide some services in French) Capital Regina Largest city Saskatoon Lieutenant-Governor Gordon Barnhart Premier Lorne Calvert (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 106 24 Area Total  â€¢ Land  â€¢ Water    (% of total)  Ranked 4th 1,076,395 km... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Chris Axworthy (born March 10, 1947, Plymouth, England) is a Canadian politician. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ...


On January 31, 2006, a Toronto judge ordered the Conservative Party of Canada to pay Orchard $70,000, the funds from his 2003 leadership campaign which he had been owed since then. The CPC had previously insisted on Orchard's signing a pledge not to sue Peter MacKay over issues resulting from the agreement signed at the 2003 PC Leadership Convention in order to settle the affair, which Orchard refused to do. [1] January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There is speculation that Orchard may run in the upcoming Liberal Party of Canada leadership race. He has encouraged supporters of his to join the Liberal Party of Canada However, another school of thought persists that Orchard, instead of seeking the leadership himself, is planning to leverage his support to ensure the election of a Liberal leader more amenable to his views on NAFTA, the war in Afganistan, and other issues that Orchard has stated are pressing concerns for Canada. The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Following the defeat of his Liberal government in the 2006 federal election, Paul Martin announced that he would not lead the party into another election, prompting a Liberal leadership convention to replace him. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ...


References

CBC redirects here, as this is the most common use of the abbreviation. ... January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External link


  Results from FactBites:
 
David Orchard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2021 words)
David Orchard (born June 28, 1950, in Borden, Saskatchewan) is a Canadian political figure and a member of the Liberal Party of Canada.
Orchard was one of Clark's staunchest defenders during the lead-up to the August 2002 convention that saw Clark resign as Tory leader after the disintegration of the parliamentary PC-Democratic Representative Caucus coalition in May 2002.
Orchard argued that his efforts were not based on self-promotion but rather on preserving one of Canada's founding parties and preventing a take-over over of the moderate values and membership of the PCs by the neoconservative values of the Alliance membership.
David Orchard - definition of David Orchard in Encyclopedia (648 words)
David Orchard is a Canadian political figure and a member of the former Progressive Conservative Party.
Orchard was born on June 28, 1950, in Borden, Saskatchewan.
Orchard is seen by some as a "Red" or moderate Tory and claims to be ideologically inspired by his political idols former prime ministers John Diefenbaker, Robert Borden and John A. Macdonald.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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