FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > David Munrow

David Munrow (August 12, 1942May 15, 1976) was a musician and early music historian. August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Early music is European classical music before the classical music era and after Ancient music. ...

Contents

Biography, career and legacy

Born in Birmingham, he was the son of Albert Munrow, a Birmingham University lecturer and physical education instructor who wrote a book on the subject, and was so highly respected that a sports centre was named after him. David Munrow himself attended King Edward's School, Birmingham, until 1960. He excelled academically. See also Birmingham, USA, and other places called Birmingham. ... The University of Birmingham is the oldest of three universities in the English city of Birmingham. ... King Edwards School King Edwards School (KES) (grid reference SP052836) is an independent secondary school in Birmingham, England, founded by King Edward VI in 1552. ...


In 1960 David Munrow went to Peru, teaching English under the British Council Overseas Voluntary Scheme. He returned with Bolivian flutes and other obscure instruments. Studying English at Pembroke College, Cambridge, he noticed a crumhorn on a friend's wall and threw himself into independent study that climaxed in his book Instruments of the Middle Age and Renaissance (1976). From his starting position as a pianist, singer and bassoonist he taught himself many old instruments. He joined the Royal Shakespeare Company as a bassoonist but soon played instruments of Shakespeare's time. Although he displayed talent on a wide variety of instruments he had a particular lasting influence as a recorder player - his 'English' style of discreet, controlled expression being in marked contrast to the greater tonal flexibility displayed by the 'continental' style espoused by the likes of Frans Brüggen. 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Logo of the British Council British Council building in London The British Council is a non-departmental public body and registered charity for cultural relations in the United Kingdom. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics... Full name Pembroke College Motto - Named after Countess of Pembroke, Mary de St Pol Previous names Marie Valence Hall (1347), Pembroke Hall (?), Pembroke College (1856) Established 1347 Sister College(s) Queens College Master Sir Richard Dearlove Location Trumpington Street Undergraduates ~420 Postgraduates ~240 Homepage Boatclub Pembroke College is a... The University of Cambridge (usually abbreviated as Cantab. ... Various Crumhorns The crumhorn is a musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... The bassoon is a woodwind instrument in the double reed family that plays in the tenor range and below. ... Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon The Royal Shakespeare Company is a British theatre company. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes—whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... Frans Brüggen (born October 30, 1934) is a Dutch recorder soloist and conductor. ...


By 1967 he was a lecturer at the University of Leicester and married to Gillian Reid. He teamed up with Christopher Hogwood to form the Early Music Consort, each of whose core members was an expert in his or her own right. Sometimes other professional musicians were employed when necessary, such as Nigel North and the late Robert Spencer, both highly regarded lutenists. Beginning in 1968 he toured the world, unearthing obscure instruments in every country he visited. He commissioned reconstructions of instruments related to the cornett and rackett from, amongst others, Otto Steinkopf. In 1970 two television programmes made him a household name - The Six Wives of Henry VIII and Elizabeth R. 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... University of Leicester seen from Victoria Park - Left to right: the Department of Engineering, the Attenborough tower, the Charles Wilson building. ... Christopher Jarvis Haley Hogwood (born 10 September 1941) is a well-known British conductor, harpsichordist, writer and scholar. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Three different cornetts: mute cornett, curved cornett and tenor cornett The cornett, cornet, cornetto or zink is an early wind instrument, dating from the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. ... The Renaissance Rackett is a double-reed Wind instrument related to the Bassoon. ... The Six Wives of Henry VIII was a series of six teleplays produced by the BBC and first transmitted between 1 January and 5 February 1970. ... Background - Elizabeth R was a BBC TV drama serial broadcast in six parts on terrestrial channel BBC Two during February to March 1971. ...


He was a man of manic energy. In his short life he released over 50 albums, some of them becoming available again through CD reissues. As well as his recordings with the Early Music Consort, he recorded with Michael Morrow's Musica Reservata, Alfred Deller and the King's Singers. He recorded Bach and Monteverdi many times but his widest influence was in the backwaters of the Gothic and Renaissance period. On BBC Radio 3 he presented "Pied Piper", a multi-ethnic, centuries-spanning spread of music from Monteverdi to ELO. Munrow also had dealings notably with The Young Tradition and Shirley and Dolly Collins. Alfred Deller (31 May 1912 – 16 July 1979) was an English singer, one of the main figures in popularising the use of the countertenor voice in renaissance and baroque music. ... The Kings Singers is an a cappella group. ... Places in which Bach resided throughout his life Johann Sebastian Bach (pronounced ) (21 March 1685 O.S. – 28 July 1750 N.S.) was a prolific German composer and organist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought... Portrait of Claudio Monteverdi in Venice, 1640, by Bernardo Strozzi. ... Renaissance music is European classical music written during the Renaissance, approximately 1400 to 1600. ... BBC Radio 3 is a domestic UK BBC radio station, which devotes most of its schedule to classical music. ... Portrait of Claudio Monteverdi in Venice, 1640, by Bernardo Strozzi. ... ELO redirects here. ... The Young Tradition Sampler, released in 1969. ... Shirley and Dolly Collinss 1974 album Love, Death and the Lady Shirley Elizabeth Collins MBE (born 5 July 1935, Hastings, Sussex, England) was a significant contributor to the English folk revival of the 1950s and 1960s. ...


His personal interests were travel, sailing, jazz and antiques. He was also something of a linguist. He also wrote a few articles on music, especially for his own recordings. Look up travel in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the songs, see Sailing (song). ... Jazz is a style of music which originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century. ... Antiques (Latin antiquus, old) are objects which have reached an age which makes them a witness of a previous era in human society. ... The following is a list of linguists, those who study linguistics. ...


Munrow hanged himself in 1976; the deaths of his father and father-in-law, to whom he dedicated his last book, are thought to have contributed to his suicide. Hanging to Music. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... It has been suggested that The Pros of suicide be merged into this article or section. ...


Arguably, David Munrow did more than anyone else in the second half last century to popularize early music in Great Britain, despite a career lasting barely ten years. Indeed, this is underlined by the fact that the committee which chose the music for the Voyager Golden Record selected one of his recordings to be sent on the Voyager space probes on an interstellar journey. The Voyager Golden Record. ... Look up voyager in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The interstellar medium (or ISM) is a term used in astronomy to describe the rarefied gas and dust that exists between the stars (or their immediate circumstellar environment) within a galaxy. ...


Apart from his regular radio slot and other programmes he also appeared on television, most notably a series entitled Ancestral Voices (BBC2) in a London studio, and Early Musical Instruments (ITV) filmed on location at Ordsall Hall, Salford. By such means, he introduced many people to a whole new world of audio experience. Sadly, these specific programmes were transmitted posthumously.


David Munrow left behind him not only his recordings, but also his huge collection of musical instruments. The Royal Academy of Music has a very large archival collection of his letters, programmes, notes, corrected TV scripts, scores, musical compositions, books etc. which are all accessible to the public. The online catalogue of the National Sound Archives (part of the British Museum) reveals his many recording entries, and those of many other noted people. The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) is a constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the leading music institutions in the world. ... The centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2000 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room. ...


Information about the life, and work of David Munrow can be found in obituaries about him in 1976 (particularly the OUP journal Early Music), and in the following sources: a detailed piece in the National Biography by Christopher Hogwood; The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians; The Art of David Munrow, a record set with a biography by Arthur Johnson, the producer of Pied Piper, and on the old vinyl sleeve of the Renaissance Suite. An obituary is a notice of the death of a person, usually published in a newspaper and usually including a short biography. ... Christopher Jarvis Haley Hogwood (born 10 September 1941) is a well-known British conductor, harpsichordist, writer and scholar. ... The Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians is a dictionary of music and musicians, generally considered to be one of the best general reference sources on the subject. ...


Selected discography

  • Recordings with Musica Reservata
    • French Court Music of the Thirteenth Century (1967)
    • Music from the 100 Years War (1968)
    • Music from the Decameron (1969)
    • 16th Century Italian Dance Music (1970)
    • Music from the Court of Burgundy (1971)
  • Recordings with The Early Music Consort, directed by David Munrow
    • Ecco la primavera - Florentine Music of the 14th Cent (1969)
    • Music of the Crusades (1970)
    • The Triumphs of Maximilian I (1970)
    • Music for Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain (1972)
    • The Art of Courtly Love (1973)
    • Praetorius - Dances and Motets (1973)
    • Instruments of the Middle Ages and Renaissance (1976)
    • Monteverdi's Contemporaries (1976)
    • Greensleeves to a Ground (1976)
    • Festival of Early Music - Music from 14th Century Florence, Music of the Crusades & The Triumphs of Maximilian (1976)
    • Henry Purcell: Birthday Odes for Queen Mary (1976)
  • The Young Tradition and Early Music Consort
    • Galleries (1968)
  • The Round Table & David Munrow
    • Spinning Wheel (1969)
    • "Saturday Gigue/Scarborough Fair" (single) (1969)
  • Shirley and Dolly Collins & the Early Music Consort of London
    • Anthems in Eden (1969)
  • Royal Shakespeare Wind Band, directed by Guy Wolfenden
    • Music From Shakespeare's Time (1969)
  • David Munrow, Gillian Reid, Christopher Hogwood
    • Pleasures of the court - Festival dance music by Susato & Morley (1971)
  • David Munrow, Oliver Brookes, Robert Spencer, Christopher Hogwood
    • The amorous flute (1973)
  • David Munrow solo or in various combinations
    • Telemann: Suite for Recorder and Orchestra, Concerti for Recorder and Orchestra by Sammartini and Handel
    • The Art of the Recorder (1975)
    • The Art of David Munrow (1971 - 1976)
  • Music for radio, television and cinema

Michael Praetorius. ... Henry Purcell Henry Purcell (IPA: [1]; September 10 (?) [2], 1659–November 21, 1695), a Baroque composer, is generally considered to be one of Englands greatest composers—indeed, he has often been called Englands finest native composer. ... Shirley and Dolly Collinss 1974 album Love, Death and the Lady Shirley Elizabeth Collins MBE (born 5 July 1935, Hastings, Sussex, England) was a significant contributor to the English folk revival of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Tielman Susato (also Tylman) (c. ... Thomas Morley (1557 or 1558 – October 1602) was an English composer, theorist, editor and organist of the Renaissance, and the foremost member of the English Madrigal School. ... The Six Wives of Henry VIII was a series of six teleplays produced by the BBC and first transmitted between 1 January and 5 February 1970. ... Background - Elizabeth R was a BBC TV drama serial broadcast in six parts on terrestrial channel BBC Two during February to March 1971. ... Zardoz is a 1974 science fiction film directed by John Boorman and starring Sean Connery in one of his first post-James Bond roles. ... John Boorman (born January 18, 1933 in Shepperton, Surrey, United Kingdom), is a British filmmaker, currently based in Ireland, best known for his feature films such as Point Blank, Deliverance, Excalibur, and The General. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (January 3, 1892 – September 2, 1973) was an English philologist, writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. ... The Hobbit is a 1968 BBC Radio adaptation of J. R. R. Tolkiens 1937 childrens fantasy novel The Hobbit. ...

Awards and Recognitions

Grammy Award for Best Chamber Music Performance: The Grammy Award for Best Chamber Music Performance has been awarded since 1959. ...

  • David Munrow (conductor) & the Early Music Consort of London for The Art of Courtly Love (1977)

The 19th Grammy Awards were held in 1977, and were broadcast live on American television. ...

See also

Jordi Savall; Philip Pickett: similar early music performers with an interest in renaissance and medieval music. Jordi Savall i Bernadet (born 1941, in Igualada, Catalonia) is a Spanish viol player and composer. ... Philip Pickett (born November 19, 1950) is an English musician and leader of Early Music ensembles. ...


External links

  • Discography

  Results from FactBites:
 
David Munrow: The Times Obituary - Sidebar - MSN Encarta (52 words)
David Munrow: The Times Obituary - Sidebar - MSN Encarta
This obituary for David Munrow appeared in The Times on May 17, 1976.
A crumhorn is a wind instrument that dates from the Renaissance.
Encyclopedia: David Munrow (1301 words)
David Munrow (August 12, 1942 - May 15, 1976) was a musician and early music historian.
In 1960 David Munrow went to Peru, teaching English under the British Council Overseas Voluntary Scheme.
Munrow committed suicide in 1976, while suffering from depression.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m