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Encyclopedia > David Halberstam
David Halberstam

Born April 10, 1934 (1934-04-10)
New York City
Died April 23, 2007 (aged 73)
Menlo Park, California, USA
Occupation Journalist, Author
Nationality American
Genres Non-fiction

David Halberstam (April 10, 1934April 23, 2007) was an American Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author known for his early work on the Vietnam War, his work on politics, history, business, media, American culture, and his later sports journalism. David J. Halberstam (b. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 501 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1253 × 1500 pixel, file size: 270 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Promotional photo of David Halberstam. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Menlo Park is a city in San Mateo County, California in the United States of America, in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Sports journalism is a form of journalism that reports on sports topics and events. ...

Contents

Life and career

Halberstam was of Eastern EuropeanJewish ancestry and, after the family relocated numerous times, was raised in the Bronx, New York. Prior to that, the family had lived in Winsted, Connecticut (where he was a classmate of Ralph Nader).[1] He graduated from Harvard University with a bachelor of arts in 1955, and also served as managing editor of the University's daily newspaper, The Harvard Crimson. He started his career writing for the Daily Times Leader in West Point, Mississippi. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, writing for The Tennessean in Nashville, Tennessee, he covered the beginnings of the American Civil Rights Movement. Eastern Europe is, by convention, a region defined geographically as that part of Europe covering the eastern part of the continent. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... For other uses, see Bronx (disambiguation). ... Winsted is a census-designated place and an incorporated city in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney, author, lecturer, political activist, and candidate for President of the United States in five elections. ... Harvard redirects here. ... The Harvard Crimson, the breakfast daily of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. ... West Point is a city in Clay County, Mississippi, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The Tennessean is a dominant daily newspaper in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Nashville redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom This article is about the civil rights movement following the Brown v. ...


In the mid-1960s, Halberstam covered the Civil Rights Movement for The New York Times. In the spring of 1967, he traveled with Martin Luther King from New York City to Cleveland and then to Berkeley for a Harper's article "The Second Coming of Martin Luther King." While at the Times, he gathered material for his book The Making of a Quagmire: America and Vietnam during the Kennedy Era. In 1963, he received a George Polk Award for his reporting at The New York Times, including his eyewitness account of the self-immolation of Vietnamese Buddhist monk Thích Quảng Ðức.[2] At the age of 30, he won a Pulitzer Prize for his reporting on the war. He is interviewed in the 1968 documentary film on the Vietnam War entitled In the Year of the Pig. The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The George Polk Awards is an American journalism award. ... Eyewitness may refer to the following: For the court system type of eye witness, witness For the TV show, Eyewitness (TV) For the movie, Eyewitness (film) For the nonfiction book series, Eyewitness (books) For Royal Hunts album, Eyewitness (album) For the WW1 writer pseudonym, see Ernest Dunlop Swinton For... Thích Quảng Đức pictured during his self-immolation. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... For other uses, see Monk (disambiguation). ... Thích Quảng Ðức, born in 1897, was a Vietnamese Buddhist monk who burnt himself to death at a busy Saigon intersection on June 11, 1963. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Edited still from In the Year of the Pig, used as the cover for The Smiths album Meat Is Murder In the Year of the Pig is a 1968 documentary film about the origins of the Vietnam War, directed by Emile de Antonio. ...


Halberstam next wrote about President John F. Kennedy's foreign policy decisions about the Vietnam War in The Best and the Brightest. Synthesizing material from dozens of books and many dozens of interviews, Halberstam's thesis was that those who crafted the U.S. war effort in Vietnam were some of the most intelligent, well-connected and self-confident men in America—"the best and the brightest"—and yet those same men were unable to imagine and promote anything but a bloody and disastrous course in the Vietnam War. John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... The Best and the Brightest (1972) is an account by journalist David Halberstam on the origins of the Vietnam War. ...


After publication of The Best and the Brightest in 1972, Halberstam went to work on his next book, which became 1979's The Powers That Be, a book featuring profiles of media titans like William S. Paley of CBS, Henry Luce of Time magazine and Phil Graham of The Washington Post. William S. Paley (1901-1990) This article is about the broadcast executive. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Luce with wife Clare Boothe Luce (1954) Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 – February 28, 1967) was an influential American publisher. ... TIME redirects here. ... For the Canberra Raiders rugby league player, see Phil Graham (rugby league). ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


In 1980 his brother, cardiologist Michael J. Halberstam, was murdered during a burglary.[3] Halberstam never commented publicly on his brother's murder. ... Michael J. Mike Halberstam (9 August 1932 – December 5, 1980) was an American cardiologist and author. ...


In 1991, Halberstam wrote The Next Century, in which he argued that, after the end of the Cold War, the United States was likely to fall behind economically to other countries such as Japan and Germany.[4] For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


Later in his career, Halberstam turned to the subjects of sports, publishing The Breaks of the Game, an inside look at Bill Walton and the 1979-80 Portland Trail Blazers basketball team; an ambitious book on Michael Jordan in 1999 called Playing for Keeps; and on the baseball pennant race battle between the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox, called Summer of '49. William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952), is a retired American basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... The Portland Trail Blazers are a professional basketball team based in Portland, Oregon. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... See also: 1998 in literature, other events of 1999, 2000 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds...


In 1997, Halberstam received the Elijah Parish Lovejoy Award as well as an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Colby College. For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Elijah Parish Lovejoy (November 9, 1802 – November 7, 1837) was an American Presbyterian minister, journalist and newspaper editor who was murdered by a mob in Alton, Illinois for his abolitionist views. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ...


After publishing four books in the 1960s, including the novel "The Noblest Roman" as well as ""The Making of a Quagmire" and "The Unfinished Odyssey of Robert Kennedy," Halberstam published three books in the 1970s, four books in the 1980s, and six books in the 1990s. He published four books in the 2000s and was en route to completing at least two others before his death. In the wake of the 9/11, Halberstam wrote a book about the attacks, Firehouse, which describes in detail Engine 40, Ladder 35 of the New York City Fire Department. The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... The New York City Fire Department or the Fire Department of New York (FDNY) has the responsibility for protecting the citizens and property of New York Citys five boroughs from fires and fire hazards, providing emergency medical services, technical rescue as well as providing first response to biological, chemical...


The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, Halberstam's last book, was published posthumously in September 2007.


Death

Halberstam died on April 23, 2007 in a traffic accident in Menlo Park, California near the Dumbarton Bridge.[5] He was in the area to give a talk at an event at UC Berkeley[6][7] and was on his way to Mountain View to interview Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback Y.A. Tittle for a book about the 1958 NFL Championship. Halberstam's driver Kevin Jones, a UC Berkeley Journalism School graduate student asked by the department to drive Halberstam to the interview, pleaded no contest to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter charges.[8][9][10] He was sentenced to 5 days in jail and 200 hours of community service. is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Menlo Park is a city in San Mateo County, California in the United States of America, in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... The Dumbarton Bridge is the southernmost of the highway bridges that span the San Francisco Bay in California. ... Mountain View is a city in Santa Clara County, in the U.S. state of California. ... Yelberton Abraham Tittle (October 24, 1926, Marshall, Texas) is a former American Football quarterback who played for the Baltimore Colts, San Francisco 49ers, and the New York Giants. ... The 1958 NFL season was the 39th regular season of the National Football League. ... The UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is a graduate professional school on the campus of University of California at Berkeley. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... No contest can be: In law, a plea; see nolo contendere. ... A misdemeanor, or misdemeanour, in many common law legal systems, is a lesser criminal act. ... Manslaughter, sometimes called criminally negligent homicide, is a kind of homicide wherein a person causes the death of another through negligence or recklessness (not recognized in Australia) or where a person intentionally kills another but is not liable for murder because he is able to avail himself of a defense...


After Halberstam's death the book project was taken over by Frank Gifford and will be published by HarperCollins in October 2008 with an introduction dedicated to Halberstam. [11][12][13]


Criticism

The Pulitzer Prize-winning Korean War correspondent Marguerite Higgins was the most pro-Diem journalist in the Saigon press corps and she frequently clashed with her younger male colleagues such as Neil Sheehan, Peter Arnett and Halberstam. She derided them as "typewriter strategists" who were "seldom at the scenes of battle". She alleged that they had ulterior motives, claiming "Reporters here would like to see us lose the war to prove they're right."[14] The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... Marguerite Higgins (September 3, 1920 - January 3, 1966), American reporter and war correspondent. ... Cornelius Mahoney Neil Sheehan (born October 27, 1936) is an American journalist. ... Peter Arnett (born November 13, 1934 in Riverton, New Zealand) is a New Zealand-American journalist. ...


Mark Moyar, an associate professor at the U.S. Marine Corps University and author of two histories of Vietnam,[15] claimed in a National Review opinion piece that Halberstam, along with fellow Vietnam journalists Neil Sheehan and Stanley Karnow, helped to bring about the 1963 coup of South Vietnamese president Ngo Dinh Diem by sending negative information on Diem to the U.S. government, in news articles and in private, because they decided Diem was unhelpful in the war effort. Moyar claims that much of this information was false or misleading.[16] Historian Jeremy Kuzmarov disagrees, writing that Moyar's analysis underplays the fact that Diem was a corrupt, brutal and unpopular dictator, who tortured and executed opponents without trial. Kuzmarov says that while Moyar raises some valid criticisms about the methodologies of Halberstam and Sheehan, responsibility for the coup ultimately lies with Washington policymakers.[17] National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... Cornelius Mahoney Neil Sheehan (born October 27, 1936) is an American journalist. ... Stanley Karnow is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author who covered Asia from 1959 as chief correspondent for Time and Life. ...   «ngoh dihn zih-ehm» (January 3, 1901 – November 2, 1963) was the first President of South Vietnam (1955–1963). ...


Newspaper editor Michael Young says Halberstam saw Vietnam as a moralistic tragedy, with America's pride deterministically bringing about its downfall. Young writes that Halberstam reduced everything to human will, turning his subjects into agents of broader historical forces and coming off like a Hollywood movie with a fated and formulaic climax. Young considers such portrayals of personalities to be both a gift and a flaw.[18] // For the racing driver, see Will Power. ...


List of books

  • (1965) The Making of a Quagmire: America and Vietnam during the Kennedy Era. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-555092-X. 
  • (1968) The Unfinished Odyssey of Robert Kennedy. Random House. ISBN 0-394-45025-6. 
  • (1971) Ho. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-554223-4. 
  • (1985) The Amateurs: The Story of Four Young Men and Their Quest for an Olympic Gold Medal. Ballantine Books. ISBN 0-449-91003-2. 
  • (1989) Summer of '49. Harper Perennial Modern Classics. ISBN 0-06-088426-6. 
  • (1999) Playing for Keeps: Michael Jordan and the World He Made. Broadway Books. ISBN 0-7679-0444-3. 
  • (2001) War in a Time of Peace: Bush, Clinton, and the Generals. Scribner. ISBN 0-7432-2323-3. 
  • (2002) Firehouse. ISBN 0-7868-8851-2. 
  • (2003) The Teammates: A Portrait of a Friendship. Hyperion. ISBN 0-7868-8867-9. 
  • (2005) The Education of a Coach. Hyperion. ISBN 1-4013-0879-1. 
  • (2007) The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War. Hyperion. ISBN 1401300529. 

See also: 1960 in literature, other events of 1961, 1962 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... See also: 1964 in literature, other events of 1965, 1966 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. ... See also: 1966 in literature, other events of 1967, 1968 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Houghton Mifflin Company is a leading educational publisher in the United States. ... See also: 1967 in literature, other events of 1968, 1969 in literature, list of years in literature. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... See also: 1970 in literature, other events of 1971, 1972 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. ... See also: 1971 in literature, other events of 1972, 1973 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Best and the Brightest (1972) is an account by journalist David Halberstam on the origins of the Vietnam War. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... See also: 1978 in literature, other events of 1979, 1980 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The University of Illinois Press is a major American university press. ... See also: 1980 in literature, other events of 1981, 1982 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... See also: 1984 in literature, other events of 1985, 1986 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... The year 1986 in literature involved some significant events and new books. ... Avon is a paperback imprint of HarperCollins. ... See also: 1988 in literature, other events of 1989, 1990 in literature, list of years in literature. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... See also: 1990 in literature, other events of 1991, 1992 in literature, list of years in literature. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... See also: 1992 in literature, other events of 1993, 1994 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... See also: 1993 in literature, other events of 1994, 1995 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... See also: 1998 in literature, other events of 1999, 2000 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Ballantine Books, founded in 1952 by Ian Ballantine, is a major book publisher and is currently owned by Random House. ... See also: 1998 in literature, other events of 1999, 2000 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2000 in literature, other events of 2001, 2002 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Scribner is a city located in Dodge County, Nebraska. ... See also: 2001 in literature, other events of 2002, 2003 in literature, list of years in literature. ... See also: 2002 in literature, other events of 2003, 2004 in literature, list of years in literature. ... Hyperion is a general-interest book publishing division of The Walt Disney Company, established in 1991. ... // Events February 25 - Canada Reads selects Rockbound by Frank Parker Day as the novel to be read across the nation. ... Hyperion is a general-interest book publishing division of The Walt Disney Company, established in 1991. ... The year 2007 in literature involves some significant new books. ... Hyperion is a general-interest book publishing division of The Walt Disney Company, established in 1991. ... // None at present None at present Duma Key by Stephen King Young Bond Book 5 by Charlie Higson None at present None at present See 2008 in poetry None at present None at present None at present None at present Literature List of literary awards List of years in poetry...

See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...   (born Lâm Văn Tức in 1897 – June 11, 1963) was a Vietnamese Buddhist monk who burned himself to death at a busy Saigon intersection on June 11, 1963. ... Harrison Salisbury, American journalist, was the first regular New York Times correspondent in Moscow after World War II. Vietnam War Opposition During the Vietnam War, Harrison was the first mainstream, well known and respected journalist to oppose the war after visiting Saigon in 1966 (as opposed to the constantly criticized...

References

  1. ^ Packer, George. "Postscript: David Halberstam." The New Yorker, May 7, 2007, online at http://www.newyorker.com/talk/2007/05/07/070507ta_talk_packer
  2. ^ monk
  3. ^ Lyons, Richard D. (December 8, 1980). Slaying Suspect A Puzzle to Neighbors; House Was Toured Periods Away From Home Control of Handguns Sought. The New York Times
  4. ^ "The Next Century", Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times, February 11, 1991
  5. ^ Coté, John. "Author David Halberstam killed in Menlo Park", San Francisco Chronicle, 2007-04-23. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  6. ^ Leff, Lisa. "Author David Halberstam dies in crash", Yahoo! News, 2007-04-23. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  7. ^ "UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism event page". Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  8. ^ Coté, John. "Lawyer for Halberstam's widow calls student driver negligent", San Francisco Chronicle, 2007-05-12. Retrieved on 2007-05-12. 
  9. ^ "David Halberstam: 1934-2007", San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved on 2007-11-20. 
  10. ^ "Driver recalls Halberstam's last conversation before fatal accident", San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved on 2007-11-20. 
  11. ^ In Memory of David Halberstam - CommonDreams.org
  12. ^ Laura Smith (2007-06-25). Student Charged in Death of Pulitzer Winner. Blogger News Network. Blogger News Network. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  13. ^ John Cotédate=November 20, 2007. "Halberstam's widow to motorist in fatal crash: Learn how to drive", San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved on 2007-11-20. 
  14. ^ Prochnau, p. 350.
  15. ^ Triumph Forsaken
  16. ^ "Halberstam’s History", Mark Moyar, National Review, July 5, 2007
  17. ^ "Review of Mark Moyar's Triumph Forsaken", Jeremy Kuzmarov, History News Network, March 5, 2007
  18. ^ Young, M. (April 26, 2007) "A Man of Sharp Angles and Firm Truths" Reason Online

For other uses, see New Yorker. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Christopher Lehmann-Haupt was, for many years, the senior daily book reviewer for the New York Times. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo! News is an Internet-based news aggregator provided by Yahoo!. It features Top Stories, U.S. National, World, Business, Entertainment, Science, Health, Weather, Most Popular, News Photos, Op/Ed, and Local news. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... History News Network is a project of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. ...

External links

  • The Coldest Winter: A Tribute to David Halberstam on Nantucket
  • Remembering David Halberstam
  • "The History Boys" Halberstam's final essay, "debunks the Bush administration's wild distortion of history"; Vanity Fair, August 2007
  • "Turning Journalism Into History" Audio and transcript of Halberstam's last public event
  • "Letter to My Daughter" by David Halberstam
  • The Economist: Obituary
  • Blast Magazine: Obituary
  • Writing on Air Salon.com interview
  • David Halberstam's Hit Streak Continues Powells.com interview
  • David Halberstam at the Internet Movie Database
  • On C-Span's American Writers series in 2002
  • Spring 2000 Commencement Address at the University of Michigan
  • Spring 2003 Commencement Address at Tulane University
  • Obituary, New York Times
  • Appreciations: Halberstam on Journalism, New York Times
  • A speech on his early years in Vietnam and creation of "The Lying Machine".
  • "Nashville Was My Graduate School" -- A 2001 reminiscence by Halberstam of his early career at The Tennessean
  • Shafer, Jack. "David Halberstam (1934-2007)", Slate, April 24 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-26. 
  • Packer, George (May 7, 2007 (print edition date)). Postscript:David Halberstam. The New Yorker. Retrieved on 2007-04-30.
  • Three-time Pulitzer winner to address 2007 Brandeis graduates. Brandeis News. Brandeis University (April 26, 2007). Halberstam was scheduled to be the commencement speaker at Brandeis' 2007 commencement. He was replaced by Thomas L. Friedman.
  • Book Review of Everything They Had at Letters On Pages
Persondata
NAME Halberstam, David
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Journalist, author
DATE OF BIRTH 1934-4-10
PLACE OF BIRTH  New York City, USA
DATE OF DEATH 2007-4-23
PLACE OF DEATH Menlo Park, California, USA
Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... Salon. ... Powells NW 10th & Burnside entrance Powells City of Books is a bookstore in Portland, Oregon, and the largest independent bookstore in the United States. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... A war correspondent is a journalist who covers stories firsthand from a war zone. ... // Journalism is the discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Raymond Walter Apple, Jr. ... Peter Arnett (born November 13, 1934 in Riverton, New Zealand) is a New Zealand-American journalist. ... Malcolm W. Browne (1933) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist and photographer. ... Wilfred Graham Burchett (September 16, 1911, Melbourne, Australia — September 27, 1983, Sofia, Bulgaria) was a war correspondent and alleged KGB agent. ... Chapelle at the Don Phuc command post on the Vietnam-Cambodia border, 1964. ... Robert Sampson Elegant is a British/American author and journalist born in New York City on March 7, 1928. ... Gloria Emerson (b. ... Bernard B. Fall (November 19, 1926-February 21, 1967) was a prominent war correspondent, historian, political scientist, and expert on Indochina during the 1950s and 1960s. ... See also Frances Fitzgerald (Irish politician) Frances FitzGerald (born 1940) is an American journalist best known for her work Fire in the Lake: The Vietnamese and the Americans in Vietnam (1972). ... Joseph Lee Joe Galloway (born November 13, 1941), an American newspaper corresondent and columnist. ... Martha Gellhorn Martha Gellhorn (8 November 1908 - 15 February 1998) was an American novelist and journalist considered one of the greatest war correspondents of the 20th century. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Michael Herr (born in 1940, Syracuse, New York) is a writer and former war correspondent, best known as the author of Dispatches (1977), a memoir of his time as a correspondent for Esquire magazine (1967-1969) during the Vietnam War. ... Seymour Myron Sy Hersh (born April 8, 1937 Chicago) is an American Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist and author based in Washington, DC. He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker magazine on military and security matters. ... Marguerite Higgins (September 3, 1920 - January 3, 1966), American reporter and war correspondent. ... The Honourable Peter Jay (born 7 February 1937) is a British economist, broadcaster and diplomat. ... This is a Japanese name; the family name is Kaikō Takeshi Kaikō , 30 December 1930 – 9 December 1989) was a prominent post-World War II Japanese novelist, short-story writer, essayist, literary critic, and television documentary writer. ... Stanley Karnow is a Pulitzer Prize-winning author who covered Asia from 1959 as chief correspondent for Time and Life. ... Steve Kroft is an American journalist. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Jonathan Schell is a progressive author and professor. ... Sydney H. Schanberg (born January 17, 1934 in Clinton, Massachusetts) is an American journalist who is best known for his coverage of the war in Cambodia. ... Cornelius Mahoney Neil Sheehan (born October 27, 1936) is an American journalist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Stereoview of the field at Antietam, American Civil War. ... General Nguyen Ngoc Loan executing Viet Cong Captain Nguyen Van Lem: Eddie Adams Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph Eddie Adams (June 12, 1933 – September 19, 2004) was an American photographer noted for portraits of celebrities and politicians and as a photojournalist having covered 13 wars. ... Larry Burrows (May 29, 1926 to February 10, 1971) was a photographer best known for his pictures of the American involvement in the Vietnam War. ... Robert Capa (Budapest, October 22, 1913 – May 25, 1954) was a famous war photographer during the 20th century. ... Charles Chellapah (born 1939, died February 14, 1966) was a Singaporian photojournalist of Indian origin who was killed on-assignment during the vietnam War. ... David Douglas Duncan (1916 - ) is an American photojournalist and among the most influential photographers of the 20th Century. ... Charles Richard Eggleston (November 1945 – May 6, 1968) was a photographer with United Press International who was killed in combat in Vietnam where he was covering the on-going war. ... Horst Faas (born 27 April 1933 in Berlin, Germany) is a photo-journalist and winner of two Pulitzer Prizes for photography who is best-known for his images of the Vietnam War. ... Philip Jones Griffiths (b. ... Dirck Halstead (b. ... Henri Huet covering the Vietnam War. ... David Hume Kennerly is a interationally respected photographer whose work has appeared in many of the most influential magazines and newspapers in the US. His career began in Roseburg, Oregon, where he published his first picture in the Roseburg High School newspaper. ... Catherine Leroy (b. ... I am a pink monkey and I have bladder problems!! I know Im god ... For details of Tim Page - the Australian based actor, please see Tim Page (actor) For details of Tim Page - the American music critic, editor, producer and biographer, please see Tim Page (music critic) Tim Page (born May 25, 1944) in Tonbridge Wells, Kent is an award-winning British photographer who... Toshio Sakai (酒井淑夫, 1940 – 1999), from Meiji University, a photographer for United Press International, won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography in 1968, for a photograph depicting the Vietnam War. ... Kyoichi Sawada ) (February 22, 1936-October 28, 1970) was a Japanese photographer with United Press International who received the 1966 Pulitzer Prize for Photography for his combat photography of the Vietnam War during 1965. ... Dana Stone (born 1939 in North Pomfret, Vermont; believed killed 1971, Bei Met, Cambodia) was a U.S. photo-journalist best known for his work for CBS during the Vietnam War. ... For a younger photographer of the same name, see Akihide Tamura. ... Huỳnh Công Út, also known as Nick Ut (born March 29, 1951) is a photographer for the Associated Press (AP) who works out of Los Angeles. ... Broadcast journalism refers to television news and radio news, as well as the online news outlets of broadcast affiliates. ... For the British skier of the same name, please see Martin Bell (skier). ... Edward Rudolph Bradley, Jr. ... Charles Collingwood (June 4, 1917 - October 3, 1985) was a CBS television newscaster. ... Walter Leland Cronkite, Jr. ... Murray Fromson (born 1929 in The Bronx, New York) is a former CBS correspondent and professor emeritus at University of Southern Californias School of Journalism, and Center on Public Diplomacy. ... Bernard Kalb is a veteran journalist, media critic and author. ... Douglas Kiker ( 1930- August 14, 1991) was a TV journalist for NBC News. ... Steve Kroft is an American journalist. ... Charles Kuralt (10 September 1934 – 4 July 1997) was an award-winning American journalist. ... John Pilger at the Humber Mouth Hull literature festival 2006 John Pilger (born October 9, 1939) is an Australian journalist and documentary filmmaker from Sydney, primarily based in London, England. ... Daniel Irvin Rather, Jr. ... Clete Roberts (February 1, 1912 – September 30, 1984) was a pioneer in Los Angeles local broadcast journalism. ... Morley Safer (born November 8, 1931 in Toronto, Canada) is a reporter and correspondent for CBS News. ... Bob Simon is a CBS News correspondent. ... Thich Tri Quang, leader of the Buddhist protests. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...   (IPA: ; (born Lâm Văn Tức in 1897 – died June 11, 1963) was a Vietnamese Mahayana Buddhist monk who burned himself to death at a busy Saigon road intersection on June 11, 1963. ... The Double Seven Day scuffle refers to a fight on July 7, 1963 in Saigon, South Vietnam. ... The Xa Loi Pagoda raids were a series of synchronised attacks on the Buddhist pagodas in South Vietnam shortly after midnight on August 21, 1963. ... On November 1, 1963, President Ngo Dinh Diem of South Vietnam was deposed in a CIA-backed coup detat led by Duong Van Minh. ... For the coup itself, see 1963 South Vietnamese coup. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Vietnam. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Buddhism. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... DEPTEL 243, also known as Department Telegram or Telegram 243 or the August 24 cable or more commonly as the Cable 243, was a high profile message sent on August 24, 1963, by the US Department of State to Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ...   «ngoh dihn zih-ehm» (January 3, 1901 – November 2, 1963) was the first President of South Vietnam (1955–1963). ... Ngô Ðình Nhu Ngô Ðình Nhu  , born in Vietnam, was the younger brother and chief political advisor of South Vietnams first President, Ngô Ðình Diệm. ... Trần Lệ Xuân (born 1924 in Hanoi, Vietnam), popularly known as Madame Nhu but more properly Madame Ngô Đình Nhu, was considered the First Lady of South Vietnam from 1955 to 1963. ... This is a Vietnamese name; the family name is Ngô Cẩn Ngô Đình Cẩn (1911–1964) was a younger brother, confidant and subordinate of South Vietnams first president Ngô Đình Diệm and an important member of his government. ... Archbishop Peter Martin Ngô Đình Thuc Archbishop Pierre Martin Ngô Đình Thuc (Chu Nom: 吴廷俶October 6, 1897–December 13, 1984), Roman Catholic Archbishop of Hué, Vietnam, was born in Hué, on October 6, 1897, of Catholic parents. ... US Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson (centre) and Nguyen Ngoc Tho (far right) review ARVN marines at Tan Son Nhut Air Base. ... Nguyen Dinh Thuan was the Secretary of State under President Ngo Dinh Diem of South Vietnam. ... Vu Van Mau was the last Prime Minister of South Vietnam and served under President Duong Van Minh. ... Tran Van Chuong was born in Vietnam. ... Thich Tri Quang in 1963. ...   (IPA: ; (born Lâm Văn Tức in 1897 – died June 11, 1963) was a Vietnamese Mahayana Buddhist monk who burned himself to death at a busy Saigon road intersection on June 11, 1963. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... General Maxwell Davenport Taylor (August 26, 1901 – April 19, 1987) was an American soldier and diplomat of the mid-20th century. ... For the figure skater, see Robert McNamara (figure skater). ... Victor H. Krulak (born January 7, 1913 in Denver, Colorado) was a decorated United States Marine Corps officer who saw action in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. ... William Trueheart is a former United States diplomat. ... Roger Hilsman in an author and political scientist. ... William Averell Harriman William Averell Harriman (November 15, 1891 – July 26, 1986) was a Governor of New York. ... Michael V. Forrestal was one of the leading aides to McGeorge Bundy, the National Security Advisor of President John F. Kennedy. ... DÆ°Æ¡ng Văn Minh (February 16, 1916 – August 6, 2001), known popularly as Big Minh, led the South Vietnamese army under Prime Minister Ngo Dinh Diem. ... Tran Van Don (born 1917 in Bordeaux, France) was a general in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, and one of the principal figures in the coup which deposed Ngo Dinh Diem from the presidency of South Vietnam. ... Tôn Thất Đính (born 1926) was a general in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, who was one of the key figures in the coup which deposed Ngo Dinh Diem, the nations first president, in 1963. ... General Le Van Kim (born 1918) is a former general of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam. ... President Nguyen Van Thieu Nguyen Van Thieu, (April 5, 1923 – September 29, 2001) was a former General and President of South Vietnam. ... Colonel Pham Ngoc Thao (died 1965) was a communist agent of the Vietminh who infiltrated the Army of the Republic of Vietnam and was a major provincial leader in South Vietnam. ... Dr. Tran Kim Tuyen was the chief of intelligence of South Vietnam under its first President Ngo Dinh Diem from 1955 to 1963. ... Tran Thien Khiem was a prominent ARVN general during the Vietnam War. ... General Nguyá»…n Hữu Có was a general of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam and a participant in the 1963 South Vietnamese coup that deposed President Ngo Dinh Diem and ended in his assassination. ... Major General Huynh Van Cao was the commander of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam 7th Division. ... Lieutenant General Do Cao Tri questions a North Vietnamese prisoner in Cambodia during the incursion of 1970 Do Cao Tri (20 November]] 1929 - 23 February 1970 was a general in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN). ... Nguyen Khanh Nguyen Khanh (1927-) was a former Chief of State and Prime minister of South Vietnam. ... Captain Nguyen Van Nhung was an officer in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam. ... Colonel Le Quang Tung (1923-1963) was the head of the Army of the Republic of Vietnams Special Forces under the command of Ngo Dinh Nhu, the brother of South Vietnams president Ngo Dinh Diem. ... The Army of the Republic of Vietnam Special Forces (Vietnamese:Lá»±c Lượng Đặc Biệt or LLDB) were the elite military units of the Republic of Vietnam, commonly known as South Vietnam. ... Lt. ... Malcolm W. Browne (1933) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist and photographer. ... Peter Arnett (born November 13, 1934 in Riverton, New Zealand) is a New Zealand-American journalist. ... Cornelius Mahoney Neil Sheehan (born October 27, 1936) is an American journalist. ... Marguerite Higgins (September 3, 1920 - January 3, 1966), American reporter and war correspondent. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Menlo Park is a city in San Mateo County, California in the United States of America, in the San Francisco Bay Area. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Author David Halberstam dies at 73 - Boston.com (611 words)
David Halberstam, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author who chronicled the Washington press corps, the Vietnam War generation and baseball, was killed in a car crash early Monday, a coroner said.
Halberstam, of New York, was a passenger in a car that was broadsided by another vehicle in Menlo Park, south of San Francisco, San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault said.
Halberstam spoke Saturday at a UC Berkeley-sponsored event on the craft of journalism and what it means to turn reporting into a work of history.
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