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Encyclopedia > David Gerrold

David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), in Chicago, Illinois, is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek. He was invited to submit several premises, and the one chosen by Star Trek was filmed as "The Trouble with Tribbles". is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... The Trouble With Tribbles is a second-season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, first broadcast on December 29, 1967 and repeated June 21, 1968. ...

Contents

Early works

After his early success with "The Trouble with Tribbles" Gerrold continued writing television scripts (mostly for science fiction series such as Land of the Lost, Babylon 5, Sliders, and The Twilight Zone) and science fiction novels, of which the most well-known are The Man Who Folded Himself (1973), about a man whose experiments with a time machine distorts the details of his life and reality, and When HARLIE Was One (1972), the story of an artificial intelligence's relationship with his creators. When HARLIE Was One was nominated for best novel for both the Hugo Award and the Nebula Award. A revised edition, entitled When HARLIE Was One, Release 2.0, was published in 1988, incorporating new insights and reflecting new developments in computer science. Land of the Lost (1974–1976) is one in a variety of popular, uniquely produced childrens television series created and produced by Sid and Marty Krofft. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... Sliders is a science fiction television series that ran for five seasons from 1995 to 2000. ... The Twilight Zone title. ... The Man Who Folded Himself is a 1973 science fiction novel by David Gerrold. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... When HARLIE Was One is a 1972 science fiction novel by David Gerrold. ... Bold text[[Link title]] “AI” redirects here. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ...


Star Trek

Star Trek: The Original Series

Within days of seeing the Star Trek series premiere "The Man Trap" on 8 September 1966, Gerrold wrote a sixty-page outline for a two-part episode called "Tomorrow Was Yesterday", about the Enterprise discovering a generation ship launched from Earth centuries earlier. Although Star Trek producer Gene L. Coon rejected the outline, he realized Gerrold was talented and expressed interest in him submitting some story premises. Bearing preliminary titles and, in some cases, preliminary character names, Gerrold submitted five premises. The Man Trap was the first episode of Star Trek: The Original Series to air on NBC. It is episode #6, and was broadcast on Thursday, September 8, 1966 at 8:30pm. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Gene L. Coon (7 January 1924-8 July 1973) was an American screenwriter and television producer. ...


Two that he had little recollection of involved a spaceship-destroying machine, eerily similar to Norman Spinrad's "The Doomsday Machine", and a situation in which Kirk had to play a chess game with an advanced intelligence using his crew as chess pieces. There has been some speculation by Trek and comic book historians that the chess game was inspired by an early issue of Justice League of America, published by DC Comics. The issue in question had the evil alien conqueror, Despero, playing a game of chess with one of the Leaguers, with the pieces depicting the other heroes. Gerrold has denied this, but the speculation persists. The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Despero is a fictional character, a supervillain in comic books published by DC Comics. ...


A third premise, "Bandi", involved a small being running about the Enterprise as someone's pet, and which empathically sways the crew's feelings and emotions to comfort Bandi, and if necessary at someone else's expense. Gerrold noted, in retrospect, that it would not be like the Enterprise crew to have such attitudes against Kirk as Bandi induced, and that he might instead set the episode on another ship where laxity has been reported.


A fourth premise, "The Protracted Man", applied science fiction to use an effect seen in West Side Story, when Maria twirls in her dancing dress and the colours separate. Gerrold's story involved a man transported from a shuttlecraft trying out a new space warp technology. The man is no longer unified, separating into three visible forms when he moves, separated by a fraction of a second. As efforts are undertaken to correct the condition and move the Enterprise to where corrective action can be taken, the protraction worsens. West Side Story is a 1961 film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. ...


The fifth premise, "The Fuzzies," was also initially rejected by Coon, but a while later he changed his mind and called Gerrold's agent to accept it. Gerrold then expanded the story to a full television story outline entitled "A Fuzzy Thing Happened To Me. . .," and it eventually became "The Trouble With Tribbles." The name "Fuzzy" was changed because H. Beam Piper had written novels about a fictional alien species of the same name (see Little Fuzzy). The script went through numerous rewrites, including, at the insistence of Gerrold's agent, being re-set in a stock frontier town instead of an "expensive" space station. Gerrold later wrote a book, The Trouble With Tribbles, telling the whole story about producing the episode and his earlier premises. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Little Fuzzy is the name of a novel by H. Beam Piper. ...


This was one of two books Gerrold wrote about Star Trek in the early 1970s after the original series had been canceled. His other was a comprehensive analysis of the series entitled The World of Star Trek. He discussed them at various conventions where he was a frequent speaker and guest. In The World of Star Trek, he criticized some of the elements of the show, particularly Kirk's habit of placing himself in dangerous situations and leading landing parties from the ship himself, and suggested some things he would change about the show if it were to air again. Among these were a Klingon as a member of the crew, a counselor to look after crewmembers' inner lives, and crewmembers allowed to bring their families and children along. Metro Toronto Convention Centre, late 2004. ... This article is about the fictional race. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: Wikipedia is not a repository of links If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ...


Star Trek: The Next Generation

All of the above noted changes were incorporated into Star Trek: The Next Generation when it debuted in 1987. In particular, Gerrold can be credited for reshaping the position of "first officer" as the ship's executive officer and commander of "away teams" (to overcome the unrealism of the ship's captain routinely beaming into dangerous situations). He parted company with the producers at the beginning of the first season, after a dispute before the Writers' Guild in which the Guild required that Gerrold be paid additional wages for the work he did helping to create the series, because he had largely written the show's bible rather than the ailing Gene Roddenberry. He was awarded cash but chose to forego additional credit. The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... While Executive officer literally refers to a person responsible for the performance of duties involved in running an organization, the exact meaning of the role is highly variable, depending on the organization. ... The Writers Guild of America (WGA) is the collective bargaining representative, or labor union, for writers in the motion picture and television industries in the United States. ... The bible of a television series, sometimes more prosaically referred to as the writers guide, is the standard reference used by writers for information on that shows characters, settings and other elements. ... Eugene Wesley Roddenberry (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American scriptwriter and producer. ...


Roddenberry's partisans struck back after his death in 1991, with a lengthy passage in David Alexander's authorized biography, Star Trek Creator, suggesting that Gerrold had plagiarized the Martian-flatcat chapter in Robert A. Heinlein's novel The Rolling Stones for "The Trouble With Tribbles," (something that Gerrold had categorically denied in his book on the episode, saying he thought he was writing the "rabbits in Australia" story) and that only Heinlein's age and old-school graciousness had prevented him from bringing a lawsuit. For other uses, see Plagiarism (disambiguation). ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... In Robert Heinleins science fiction novel The Rolling Stones, flatcats are a species of emotional symbiotes native to Mars, with very adaptive metabolisms. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... The Rolling Stones (also published under the name Space Family Stone in the United Kingdom) is a 1952 science fiction novel by Robert Heinlein June 1, 1952, Atheneum, library binding, ISBN 0684923033 June 13, 1985, Del Rey, paperback reissue edition, 256 pages, ISBN 034532451X May 12, 1977, Del Rey, paperback...


In fact, Heinlein and Gerrold became friends in the late 1970s, when Gerrold was an active blood donor in support of Heinlein's blood drives. They remained friends for many years, and Gerrold even dedicated one of his books (A Matter For Men) to Robert and Virginia Heinlein. After Heinlein's death, Ginny Heinlein gave up her California home, and Gerrold adopted Heinlein's cat, Pixel.


Another point of contention between Gerrold and the Star Trek: The Next Generation executive leadership was Gerrold's writing of an unproduced script that would have had an allegory to the AIDS pandemic along with some brief scenes with two Star Fleet crewmembers that would have subtly been identified as being a gay couple. Gerrold wrote this script in response to being with Roddenberry at a convention in 1987 where he had promised that the upcoming Next Generation series would deal with the issue of sexual orientation in the egalitarian future. The script was rewritten to remove the gay couple, and even then certain people seemed to be worried about airing an episode that made a plea for compassion for those people infected with AIDS. For more information see LGBT characters in the Star Trek universe. For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ... Intendant Kira Nerys and Ezri Tigan kiss in the episode The Emperors New Cloak. ...


Post-Trek involvement

Gerrold wrote a script for Star Trek: The Next Generation entitled Blood and Fire, which included an AIDS metaphor and an incidentally gay couple in the ship's crew. The script was purchased by the TNG producers, but eventually shelved. Gerrold eventually reworked it as a novel, Blood and Fire, the third book in the Star Wolf series (see below). He later reworked the script again, placing the story in the time frame of Star Trek: The Original Series in order for it to be filmed as an episode of Star Trek: New Voyages. Blood and Fire was an episode written by David Gerrold for possible use on Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Star Wolf fighting Star Fox Star Wolf is a fictional villain team of mercenaries in the Star Fox series of video games. ...


Gerrold had always wanted to appear onscreen in an episode of Star Trek, particularly "The Trouble with Tribbles." The character of Ensign Freeman, who appears in the famous bar scene with the Klingons, was originally intended by Gerrold to be a walk-on part for himself, although another actor eventually took the role. While Gerrold appeared as a crewman extra with other Trek fandom notables in Star Trek: The Motion Picture, he did not get the chance to appear in a Trek series until Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, when he appeared as a security guard in "Trials and Tribble-ations", set during the very same time frame as his original episode. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... Trials and Tribble-ations is a fifth season episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine that was written as a tribute to the original series of Star Trek. ...


Gerrold also published a novelization of the Star Trek: The Next Generation series premiere "Encounter at Farpoint" (1987) and an original Star Trek novel entitled The Galactic Whirlpool (1980) based on the story outline "Tomorrow Was Yesterday". (It has been suggested that the "Specs" character in that novel was Gerrold himself.) In 2006, for the 40th anniversary of Star Trek, he co-edited with Robert J. Sawyer an essay collection entitled Boarding the Enterprise. Encounter at Farpoint was the first episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Robert J. Sawyer is a Canadian science fiction writer, dubbed the dean of Canadian science fiction by the Ottawa Citizen in 1999. ...


The War Against the Chtorr

Gerrold is the author of the War Against the Chtorr series of books, about an invasion of Earth by mysterious aliens: A Matter for Men (1983), A Day for Damnation (1985), A Rage for Revenge (1989), and A Season for Slaughter (1993). As of 2006, he was still writing the fifth book (A Method For Madness), and has contracted to write a sixth (A Time For Treason). The ending chapters of the series have been set aside for the seventh and final book, which will be A Case For Courage. As of 2007, he says he is only four sequences away from completing book five. Long time fans of the series note that Gerrold has been promising on his website to complete book five for more than a decade. The War Against the Chtorr is a series of novels written by David Gerrold. ... The War Against the Chtorr is a series of novels written by David Gerrold. ...


(Gerrold recently took time off to direct "Blood And Fire", a feature-length episode of Star Trek New Voyages. He rewrote the script, compiled the shooting schedule, and worked for two weeks of 14 hour days without a break. Under Gerrold's direction, the production team completed all 95 pages in 12 days, thus putting the lie to persistent rumors that Gerrold's age and health might be limiting factors in his writing.) Therefore, fans of the Chtorr series have concluded that Gerrold's inability to complete this seminal work reflects a lack of desire or dedication and may go down as the ultimate literary 'screw you fans' in the sci-fi genre's history.


In an original twist, the invasion is an ecological one. Instead of armies, the unseen aggressors gradually unleash plants and animals from their older, more evolved planet. These outcompete and displace their terrestrial counterparts and Earth becomes more and more Chtorr-like as the "war" progresses.


Star Wolf

Gerrold is also the author of the Star Wolf series of books, centered on the star ship Star Wolf and its crew: Voyage of the Star Wolf (1990), The Middle of Nowhere (1995), Blood and Fire (2004), and Yesterday's Children (1972) which is actually an earlier novel that features the same main character republished as Starhunt and tacked into the main continuity as a prequel. The books were based on a concept Gerrold had originally planned for a TV series. The Star Wolf series reflects Gerrold's contention that, due to the distances involved, space battles would be more like submarine hunts than the dogfights usually portrayed—in most cases the ships doing battle wouldn't even be able to see each other. The Star Wolf is a Liberty Ship, officially designated the LS-1187, in the Star Wolf novels by David Gerrold. ... The Star Wolf is a Liberty Ship, officially designated the LS-1187, in the Star Wolf novels by David Gerrold. ...


Other works

He also wrote the non-fiction book Worlds of Wonder: How to Write Science Fiction & Fantasy, published in 2001.


The Martian Child is a semi-autobiographical novel, based on the author's own experiences as a single adoptive parent, with most of the key moments drawn from actual events. The novel won both the Hugo and Nebula awards, and a movie version is currently in production for release sometime in 2007. The Martian Child is a novelette by David Gerrold. ...


In 2000, his long-time admiration of the works of Robert A. Heinlein led him to create a new series, called The Dingilliad. It follows a resourceful teenager and his family as they try to begin a new life. Although not necessarily canon, there are hints that it ties into the War Against the Chtorr universe, with everything from the plagues to the rumored appearance of a giant purple worm. The trilogy consists of Jumping Off The Planet (2000), Bouncing Off the Moon (2001), and Leaping to The Stars (2002). Jumping off the Planet received the 2002 Hal Clement (Young Adult Award) for Excellence in Children's Science Fiction Literature [1] Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... The War Against the Chtorr is a series of novels written by David Gerrold. ...


In 2005, Gerrald was awarded the Telluride Tech Festival Award of Technology in Telluride, Colorado.


Bibliography

Series

The War Against the Chtorr

  • A Matter for Men (1983)
  • A Day for Damnation (1984)
  • A Rage for Revenge (1989)
  • A Season for Slaughter (1992)
  • A Method for Madness (projected)
  • A Time for Treason (projected)
  • A Case for Courage (projected)

The War Against the Chtorr is a series of novels written by David Gerrold. ...

Star Wolf

  • Yesterday's Children (aka Starhunt) (1972, rv.1980)
  • Voyage of the Star Wolf (1990)
  • The Middle of Nowhere (1995)
  • Blood and Fire (2004)

The Star Wolf is a Liberty Ship, officially designated the LS-1187, in the Star Wolf novels by David Gerrold. ...

The Dingilliad

  • Jumping Off the Planet (2000)
  • Bouncing Off the Moon (2001)
  • Leaping to the Stars (2002)

Trackers

  • Under the Eye of God (1993)
  • A Covenant of Justice (1994)

Star Trek novels

  • The Galactic Whirlpool (1980)
  • The Trouble With Tribbles (photonovel) (1977)
  • Encounter at Farpoint (1987)

Other novels

The Flying Sorcerers is a humorous 1971 science fiction novel by David Gerrold and Larry Niven. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... When HARLIE Was One is a 1972 science fiction novel by David Gerrold. ... The Man Who Folded Himself is a 1973 science fiction novel by David Gerrold. ... The Martian Child is a novelette by David Gerrold. ...

Collections

  • With a Finger in My I (1972)
  • Alternate Gerrolds (2005)

Anthologies (editor)

  • Protostars (1971) (with Stephen Goldin)
  • Generation (1972)
  • Science Fiction Emphasis 1 (1974)
  • Alternities (1974)
  • Ascents of Wonder (1977)

Protostars is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by David Gerrold and Stephen Goldin. ... The Last Ghost and Other Stories by Stephen Goldin, 1999 Stephen Charles Goldin, born February 28, 1947 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ...

Nonfiction

  • The Trouble With Tribbles (1973)
  • The World of Star Trek (1973, rv.1984)
  • Worlds of Wonder: How to Write Science Fiction & Fantasy (2001)
  • Taking the Red Pill: Science, Philosophy and Religion in The Matrix (2003) (with Glenn Yeffeth)
  • Boarding the Enterprise: Transporters, Tribbles, and the Vulcan Death Grip in Gene Rodenberry's Star Trek (2006) (with Robert J. Sawyer)

Robert J. Sawyer is a Canadian science fiction writer, dubbed the dean of Canadian science fiction by the Ottawa Citizen in 1999. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
David Gerrold - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1418 words)
David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek.
Gerrold wrote this script in response to being with Roddenberry at a convention in 1987 where he had promised that the upcoming "Next Generation" series would deal with the issue of sexual orientation in the egalitarian future.
Gerrold had always wanted to appear onscreen in an episode of Star Trek, particularly "The Trouble with Tribbles." The character of Lieutenant Freeman, who appears in the infamous bar scene with the Klingons, was originally intended by Gerrold to be a walk-on part for himself, although another actor eventually took the role.
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: David Gerrold (3375 words)
The Flying Sorcerers was a humorous 1971 science fiction novel by Larry Niven and David Gerrold Spoiler warning: The plot concerns the efforts of an astronaut and anthropologist, Purple (his translating device calls him As a color, shade of purple gray--he eventually realizes that it is a corruption of...
David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), is a science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek.
Gerrold wrote a book about Star Trek (The World of Star Trek), and was hired to help create the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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