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Encyclopedia > David Farragut
David Glasgow Farragut
July 5, 1801August 14, 1870

Place of birth Campbell's Station, Tennessee
Place of death Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Navy
Years of service 1810–70
Rank Admiral
Commands European Squadron
Western Gulf Blockading Squadron
Battles/wars War of 1812
American Civil War

David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801August 14, 1870) was the first senior officer of the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. He was the first rear admiral, vice admiral, and full admiral of the Navy. He is remembered in popular culture for his possibly apocryphal order at the Battle of Mobile Bay, usually paraphrased: "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!".[1] is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Farragut is a town in Knox County, Tennessee, United States and is a suburb of nearby Knoxville. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... USN redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The European Squadron, also known as the European Station, was a part of the United States Navy in the late 1800s to the early 1900s. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Officer David G. Farragut and Maj. ... Combatants United States of America (U.S. Navy) Confederate States of America (Confederate States Navy) Commanders David Farragut (navy) Gordon Granger (army) Franklin Buchanan (navy) Dabney H. Maury (army) Strength 14 wooden ships (including 2 gunboats) 4 ironclad monitors 5,500 Land Force Troops Three gunboats, One ironclad, 2,000... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Nathaniel P. Banks Franklin Gardner Strength XIX Army Corps, Army of the Gulf Confederate forces, 3rd District, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Port Hudson Casualties 5,000 7,208 The Siege of Port Hudson occurred in the summer of... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants United States of America (U.S. Navy) Confederate States of America (Confederate States Navy) Commanders David Farragut (navy) Gordon Granger (army) Franklin Buchanan (navy) Dabney H. Maury (army) Strength 14 wooden ships (including 2 gunboats) 4 ironclad monitors 5,500 Land Force Troops Three gunboats, One ironclad, 2,000...

Contents

Early life and naval career

Farragut was born to Jorge and Elizabeth Farragut at Lowe's Ferry on the Holston (now Tennessee) River a few miles south east of Campbell's Station, near Knoxville, Tennessee, where his family lived. His father operated the ferry and was a cavalry officer in the Tennessee militia. Jorge Farragut (1755 – 1817), a Spanish merchant captain from Minorca, son of Antonio Farragut and Juana Mesquida, had previously joined the American Revolutionary cause after arriving in America in 1776. Jorge Farragut married Elizabeth Shine (b.1765) from North Carolina and moved West to Tennessee after serving in the American Revolution. David's birth name was James, but it was changed in 1812, following his adoption by future naval Captain David Porter in 1808 (which made him the foster brother of future Civil War Admiral David Dixon Porter). Knoxville redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ... Capital Maó Official languages Catalan & Spanish Area  -  Total 694. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... David Porter (February 1, 1780 – March 3, 1843) was an officer in the United States Navy and later the commander-in-chief of the Mexican Navy. ... Portrait of David Dixon Porter during the Civil War David Dixon Porter (June 8, 1813 – February 13, 1891) was a United States admiral who became one of the most noted naval heroes of the Civil War. ...


David Farragut entered the Navy as a midshipman on December 17, 1810. In the War of 1812, when only 12 years old, he was given command of a prize ship taken by USS Essex and brought her safely to port. He was wounded and captured during the cruise of the Essex by HMS Phoebe in Valparaiso Bay, Chile, on March 28, 1814, but was exchanged in April 1815. Through the years that followed, in one assignment after another, he showed the high ability and devotion to duty that would allow him to make a great contribution to the Union victory in the Civil War and to write a famous page in the history of the United States Navy. A midshipman is a subordinate officer, or alternatively a commissioned officer of the lowest rank, in the navies of several English-speaking countries. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... The first USS Essex of the United States Navy was a sailing frigate that participated in the Quasi-War with France and in the War of 1812, wherein she was captured by the British (1814). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union...


Headline text

Civil War

Adm. David G. Farragut, c.1863
Adm. David G. Farragut, c.1863

In command of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, with his flag on the USS Hartford, in April 1862 he ran past Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip and the Chalmette, Louisiana, batteries to take the city and port of New Orleans, Louisiana, on April 29 that year, a decisive event in the war. His country honored its great sailor after New Orleans by creating for him the rank of rear admiral on July 16, 1862, a rank never before used in the U.S. Navy. (Before this time, the American Navy had resisted the rank of admiral, preferring the term "flag officer", to separate it from the traditions of the European navies.) Later that year he passed the batteries defending Vicksburg, Mississippi. Farragut had no real success at Vicksburg, except where one makeshift Confederate ironclad forced his flotilla of 38 ships to withdraw in July 1862. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2172x2999, 914 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): David Farragut Talk:David Farragut ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2172x2999, 914 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): David Farragut Talk:David Farragut ... The West Gulf Blockading Squadron was a squadron of the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... USS Hartford, a sloop-of-war, was the first ship of the United States Navy named for Hartford, the capital of Connecticut. ... Fort Jackson, Drawn in 1817 Fort Jackson is a masonry fort located near the mouth of the Mississippi River in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. ... Fort St. ... The unincorporated community of Chalmette is the parish seat of St. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Officer David G. Farragut and Maj. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Rear Admiral originated from the days of Naval Sailing Squadrons, and can trace its origins to the British Royal Navy. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... The historic Mississippi River Commission Building in Vicksburg, constructed in 1894 Vicksburg is a city in Warren County, Mississippi. ... Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were ships sheathed with thick iron plates for protection. ... A flotilla (from Spanish, meaning a flota of small ships, and this from French flotte), or naval flotilla, is a formation of small warships that may be part of a larger fleet. ...


He was a very aggressive commander but not always cooperative. At the Siege of Port Hudson the plan was Farragut's flotilla would pass by the guns of the Confederate stronghold with the help of a diversionary land attack by the Army of the Gulf, commanded by General Nathaniel Banks, to commence at 8:00 am March 15, 1863. Farragut unilaterally decided to move the timetable up to 9:00 pm, March 14, and initiate his run past the guns before Union ground forces were in position. By doing so the uncoordinated attack allowed the Confederates to concentrate on Farragut's flotilla and inflict heavy damage on his warships Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Nathaniel P. Banks Franklin Gardner Strength XIX Army Corps, Army of the Gulf Confederate forces, 3rd District, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Port Hudson Casualties 5,000 7,208 The Siege of Port Hudson occurred in the summer of... The Army of the Gulf was a Union army that served in the general area of the gulf states controlled by Union forces. ... Nathaniel Prentiss Banks (January 30, 1816–September 1, 1894), American politician and soldier, was born at Waltham, Massachusetts. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Farragut's battle group was forced to retreat with only two ships able to pass the heavy cannon of the Confederate bastion. After surviving the gauntlet Farragut played no further part in the battle for Port Hudson and General Banks was left to continue the siege without advantage of naval support. The Union Army made two major attacks on the fort and both were repulsed with heavy losses. Farragut's flotilla was splintered yet was able to blockade the mouth of the Red River with the two remaining warships, but not efficiently patrol the section of the Mississippi between Port Hudson and Vicksburg. Farragut's decision thus proved costly to the Union Navy and the Union Army which suffered the highest casualty rate of the Civil War at the Battle of Port Hudson. Port Hudson, is a small town in Louisiana located about 20 mile northeast of Baton Rouge. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... The Red River is one of several rivers with that name, and of two rivers with that name in the United States. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Battle of Port Hudson Conflict American Civil War Date May 21-July 9, 1863 Place East Baton Rouge Parish and East Feliciana Parish, Louisiana Result Union victory The Siege of Port Hudson occurred in 1863 when 30,000 Union Army troops surrounded the Mississippi River town of Port Hudson, Louisiana. ...


Vicksburg surrendered on July 4, 1863, leaving Port Hudson as the last remaining Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River. General Banks accepted the surrender of the Confederate garrison at Port Hudson on July 9, 1863, ending the longest siege in US military history. Control of the Mississippi River was the centerpiece of Union strategy to win the war and with the surrender of Port Hudson the Confederacy was now severed in two. is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


On August 5, 1864, Farragut won a great victory in the Battle of Mobile Bay. Mobile was then the Confederacy's last major port open on the Gulf of Mexico. The bay was heavily mined (tethered naval mines were known as torpedoes at the time). Farragut ordered his fleet to charge the bay. When the monitor USS Tecumseh struck a mine and sank, the others began to pull back. is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America (U.S. Navy) Confederate States of America (Confederate States Navy) Commanders David Farragut (navy) Gordon Granger (army) Franklin Buchanan (navy) Dabney H. Maury (army) Strength 14 wooden ships (including 2 gunboats) 4 ironclad monitors 5,500 Land Force Troops Three gunboats, One ironclad, 2,000... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country State County Mobile Founded 1702 Incorporated 1814 Government  - Mayor Sam Jones Area  - City 412. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Government... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... Polish wz. ... The first USS Tecumseh was an iron-hulled, single-turret monitor in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ...


Farragut could see the ships pulling back from his high perch, lashed to the rigging of his flagship the USS Hartford. "What's the trouble?" was shouted through a trumpet from the flagship to the USS Brooklyn. "Torpedoes!" was shouted back in reply. "Damn the torpedoes!" said Farragut, "Four bells. Captain Drayton, go ahead! Jouett, full speed!"[2][3] The bulk of the fleet succeeded in entering the bay. Farragut then triumphed over the opposition of heavy batteries in Fort Morgan and Fort Gaines to defeat the squadron of Admiral Franklin Buchanan. USS Hartford, a sloop-of-war, was the first ship of the United States Navy named for Hartford, the capital of Connecticut. ... The first USS Brooklyn was a wooden screw sloop in the United States Navy. ... Percival Drayton (25 August 1812 - 4 August 1865) was an officer in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... Rear Admiral James Edward Jouett (7 February 1826 – 30 September 1902) was an officer in the United States Navy during the Mexican-American War and the American Civil War. ... Franklin Buchanan Franklin Buchanan (September 13, 1800—May 11, 1874) was an officer in the U.S. Navy who became an admiral in the Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. ...


He was promoted to vice admiral on December 21, 1864, and to full admiral on July 25, 1866, after the war. Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


Death

Admiral Farragut's last active service was in command of the European Squadron, with the screw frigate Franklin as his flagship, and he died at the age of 69 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, New York. The European Squadron, also known as the European Station, was a part of the United States Navy in the late 1800s to the early 1900s. ... A screw frigate is a naval steam-powered frigate using a screw propeller for locomotion. ... The fourth USS Franklin of the United States Navy was a screw frigate. ... This article is about the lead ship, store, or product of a group. ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ...

A statue of Farragut, crafted in 1881 from the propeller of his flagship, stands in Farragut Square in downtown Washington, D.C.. The National Park Service interpretive plaque in the foreground prominently quotes his most famous line.
A statue of Farragut, crafted in 1881 from the propeller of his flagship, stands in Farragut Square in downtown Washington, D.C.. The National Park Service interpretive plaque in the foreground prominently quotes his most famous line.
World War I poster with Admiral Farragut at Mobile Bay shouting out: "Damn the torpedoes, go ahead!"
World War I poster with Admiral Farragut at Mobile Bay shouting out: "Damn the torpedoes, go ahead!"

Download high resolution version (1500x2000, 545 KB)1881 statue of Admiral David Farragut at Farragut Square in downtown Washington, D.C. Taken by User:Erifnam in February 2005. ... Download high resolution version (1500x2000, 545 KB)1881 statue of Admiral David Farragut at Farragut Square in downtown Washington, D.C. Taken by User:Erifnam in February 2005. ... Farragut Square as seen from its southeast corner, with Connecticut Avenues office-block canyon stretching to the northwest behind the statue. ... ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ...

In memoriam

Numerous places and things are named in remembrance of Admiral Farragut:

  • Admiral Farragut Academy is a college preparatory school with Naval training founded in 1933 by Navy Admirals in Pine Beach, New Jersey designated by congress in 1934 as a Naval Honor School.
  • Farragut Field is a sports field at the United States Naval Academy.
  • Farragut, Tennessee, Admiral Farragut's hometown of Campbell's Station (see Battle of Campbell's Station), Tennessee was renamed Farragut when it became incorporated in 1982. Admiral Farragut was actually born at Lowe's Ferry on the Holston (now Tennessee) River a few miles south east of the town but at that time Campbell's Station was the nearest settlement.
  • Farragut High School, was built at Admiral Farragut's home town of Campbell's Station (now Farragut) TN in 1904. Today Farragut High Shool, boasting nearly 2500 students, is one of the largest schools in Tennessee. The school's colors are blue and white and its sporting teams are known as "The Admirals."
  • Farragut Career Academy in Chicago, IL is a high school in Chicago Public Schools that was founded in 1894. The school displays an oil painting of the Admiral presented to the school by the Farragut Post of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1896.
  • Farragut, Iowa, a small farming town in southwestern Iowa. Admiral Farragut's famous slogan greets visitors from a billboard on the edge of town. The local school, Farragut Community High School, fields varsity "Admiral" and JV "Sailor" teams. The school also houses memorabilia from the ships that have borne the Farragut name.
  • Five US Navy destroyers have been named USS Farragut, including two class leaders.
  • In World War II the United States liberty ship SS David G. Farragut was named in his honor.
Farragut Monument at Madison Square in New York City
Farragut Monument at Madison Square in New York City

Admiral Farragut was on the confederate side and he was born at some time and he died at the age of 69// by. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Pine Beach is a Borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland . ... Farragut is a town in Knox County, Tennessee, United States and is a suburb of nearby Knoxville. ... The Battle of Campbells Station was a battle of the American Civil War, occurring on November 16, 1863 in Knox County, Tennessee. ... The Main Building of Farragut High School. ... Farragut Career Academy, part of the Chicago Public School system, serves the Little Village and North Lawndale communities on west side of Chicago, Illinois. ... USS McFaul underway in the Atlantic Ocean. ... Five destroyers of the United States Navy have been named USS Farragut in honor of David Farragut, an admiral of the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... In the United States Navy, the first ship built to a particular design is known as the class leader, and that design of ship is named after it. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Liberty ships were cargo ships built in the United States during World War II. They were cheap and quick to build, and came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 721 KB) Sculpture and monument to David Farragut in Madison Square, New York City. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 721 KB) Sculpture and monument to David Farragut in Madison Square, New York City. ... Madison Square, 1908. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Farragut Square as seen from its southeast corner, with Connecticut Avenues office-block canyon stretching to the northwest behind the statue. ... ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rota is a town of approximately 26,000 people in the Andalusia region of Spain, located in Cadiz province, across the Bay of Cadiz from the city of the same name. ... Farragut Career Academy, part of the Chicago Public School system, serves the Little Village and North Lawndale communities on west side of Chicago, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... NBA redirects here. ... Kevin Garnett (born May 19, 1976) is an American professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... Hastings-on-Hudson is a village in Westchester County, New York, United States. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Gentilic: Mayagüezanos Location Location of Mayagüez, Puerto Rico within Puerto Rico Coordinates , , Government Founded July 19 1760 Mayor José Guillermo Rodríguez Rodríguez Political party PPD Senatorial district Mayagüez Representative district 18 and 19 Geographical characteristics Area Total 709. ... For other uses, see The Bronx (disambiguation). ... Farragut State Park is a state park in the state of Idaho. ... For other uses, see Idaho (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Capital Maó Official languages Catalan & Spanish Area  -  Total 694. ... The Tennessee State Capitol, located in Nashville, Tennessee, is the home of the Tennessee legislature, and the location of the governors office. ... Nickname: Location in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country State County Miami-Dade Government  - Mayor Don Slesnick Area  - City 96. ... ... The Washington Metro, or simply Metro, is the rapid transit system of Washington, D.C., and neighboring suburban communities in Maryland and Virginia, both inside and outside the Capital Beltway. ... Farragut North is a Washington Metro station in Washington, DC on the Red Line. ... Farragut West is a Washington Metro station in Washington, DC on the Blue and Orange Lines. ...

Monuments

Muskegon, Michigan
Muskegon, Michigan

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (428x653, 197 KB) photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran aka Carptrash 18:02, 16 November 2006 (UTC) statue of David Farragut by Charles Niehaus in Muskegon, Michigan I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (428x653, 197 KB) photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran aka Carptrash 18:02, 16 November 2006 (UTC) statue of David Farragut by Charles Niehaus in Muskegon, Michigan I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or... Madison Square, 1908. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Augustus Saint Gaudens, 1905 Augustus Saint-Gaudens (Dublin, March 1, 1848 - Cornish, New Hampshire, August 3, 1907), was the Irish-born American sculptor of the Beaux Arts generation who most embodied the ideals of the American Renaissance. ... Cornish is a town located in Sullivan County, New Hampshire. ... Farragut Square as seen from its southeast corner, with Connecticut Avenues office-block canyon stretching to the northwest behind the statue. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Vinnie Ream is the sculptor of the statue of Abraham Lincoln in the U.S. Capitol rotunda. ... Category: ... Henry Hudson Kitson, often known as H. H. Kitson, American sculptor, born in Huddersfield, England on April 9, 1865 and died at Tyringham, Massachusetts, on June 26, 1947. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Charles Henry Niehaus (1855-1935), American sculptor of German parentage, was born at Cincinnati, Ohio on the 24th of January 1855. ...

In popular culture

1903 postage stamp issued by the U.S. Post Office to commemorate David Farragut.
1903 postage stamp issued by the U.S. Post Office to commemorate David Farragut.

This article is about the French author. ... Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea is a classic science fiction novel by French writer Jules Verne (1828–1905), published in 1870 under the title Vingt mille lieues sous les mers. ... It has been suggested that List of Starfleet ship classes be merged into this article or section. ... Damn the Torpedoes is an album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers released in 1979 (see 1979 in music). ... Tom Petty Thomas Earl Petty (born October 20, 1953 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American musician. ... MDFMK was formed by two members of KMFDM, Sascha Konietzko and Tim Skold, following a brief break-up of KMFDM. Lucia Cifarelli of Drill rounded out the trio. ... MDFMK was formed by two members of KMFDM, Sascha Konietzko and Tim Skold, following a brief break-up of KMFDM. Lucia Cifarelli of Drill rounded out the trio. ... Galaxy Quest is a 1999 comedy film written by Robert Gordon and David Howard and directed by Dean Parisot, starring Tim Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Alan Rickman, Sam Rockwell, Daryl Mitchell and Tony Shalhoub. ... Tim Allen (born Timothy Allen Dick on June 13, 1953) is an American comedian, character actor, voice-over artist, and entertainer perhaps best known for his role in the sitcom Home Improvement and his roles in Disney films, such as The Santa Clause and Toy Story. ... This article is about resonance in physics. ... The More the Merrier is a 1943 comedy film which makes fun of the World War II time housing shortage, especially in Washington, D.C.. A young woman sublets half of her tiny apartment to a middle aged man, who promptly sublets half of his half to a young man. ... Charles Douville Coburn (June 19, 1877 – August 30, 1961) was an Oscar-winning American film and theater actor. ... The Post Office Department was the former name of the United States Postal Service when it was a Cabinet department. ...

Command history

  • 1812, assigned to the Essex.
  • 1815 – 1817, served in the Mediterranean Sea aboard the Independence and the Macedonian.
  • 1818, studied ashore for nine months at Tunis.
  • 1819, served as a lieutenant on the Shark.
  • 1823, placed in command of the Ferret.
  • 1825, served as a lieutenant on the Brandywine.
  • 1826 – 1838, served in subordinate capacities on various vessels.
  • 1838, placed in command of the sloop Erie.
  • 1841, attained the rank of commander.
  • Mexican-American War, commanded the sloop of war, Saratoga.
  • 1848 – 1850, duty at Norfolk, Navy Yard in Virginia.
  • 1850 – 1854, duty at Washington, D.C..
  • 1855, attained the rank of Captain.
  • 1854 – 1858, duty establishing Mare Island Navy Yard at San Francisco Bay.
  • 1858 – 1859, commander of the sloop of war, Brooklyn.
  • 1860 – 1861, stationed at Norfolk Navy Yard.
  • January 1862, commanded USS Hartford and the West Gulf blockading squadron of 17 vessels.
  • April 1862, took command of New Orleans.
  • July 16, 1862, promoted to rear admiral.
  • June 23, 1862, wounded near Vicksburg, Mississippi.
  • May 1863, commanded USS Monongahela.
  • May 1863, commanded the USS Pensacola.
  • July 1863, commanded USS Tennessee.
  • September 5, 1864, offered command of the North Atlantic Blocking Squadron, but he declined.
  • December 21, 1864, promoted to vice admiral.
  • April 1865, Pallbearer for the Abraham Lincoln funeral.
  • July 25, 1866, promoted to admiral.
  • June 1867, commanded USS Franklin.
  • 1867 – 1868, commanded European Squadron.

Mediterranean redirects here. ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... NS Norfolk logo Naval Station Norfolk, in Norfolk, Virginia, is a base of the United States Navy, supporting naval forces operating in the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, and Indian Ocean. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... ... The Mare Island Naval Shipyard (MINS) was the first United States Navy shipyard established on the Pacific Coast. ... San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about 1862 . ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

References

  • Barnes, James. David G. Farragut (Boston: Small, Maynard & Company), 1899.
  • Brockett, L. P. Our Great Captains: Grant, Sherman, Thomas, Sheridan, and Farragut (New York: C. B. Richardson), 1866.
  • Davis, Michael S., "David Glasgow Farragut" in Encyclopedia of the American Civil War: A Political, Social, and Military History, Heidler, David S., and Heidler, Jeanne T., eds., W. W. Norton & Company, 2000, ISBN 0-393-04758-X.
  • Duffy, James P. Lincoln's Admiral: The Civil War Campaigns of David Farragut (New York: Wiley), 1997. ISBN 0-471-04208-0
  • Eicher, John H. and David J. Eicher. Civil War High Commands (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press), 2001. ISBN 0-8047-3641-3
  • Farragut, Loyall. The Life of David Glasgow Farragut, First Admiral of the United States Navy, Embodying His Journal and Letters (New York: D. Appleton and Company), 1879.
  • Lewis, Charles Lee. David Glasgow Farragut (Annapolis, MD: United States Naval Institute), 1941-43.
  • Mahan, Alfred Thayer. Admiral Farragut (New York: D. Appleton & Co.), 1892.
  • Spears, John Randolph. David G. Farragut (Philadelphia: G. W. Jacobs & Co.), 1905.

Notes

  1. ^ Davis, p. 682. The Reuters
  2. ^ Shippen, Edward (1883). Naval Battles, Ancient and Modern. J.C. McCurdy & co., 638. 
  3. ^ Loyall Farragut, pp. 416–17.

External links

  • National Park Service biography and Vicksburg battle info
  • Farragut biography on navy.mil
  • Idaho's Farragut State Park
  • Admiral Farragut Academy Alumni Site

  Results from FactBites:
 
David Farragut (7265 words)
Farragut had no faith in the efficacy of these mortars, but, as a great deal of time and money had been spent in their preparation, he accepted the fleet as he found it.
Farragut was impatient with this operation, as it only served to give the enemy warning, and he found the greatest difficulty in preventing collisions in his fleet.
Farragut was planning to attack the ram as soon as it should be dark enough to prevent the garrison of the fort from seeing which was friend and which foe; but the ram anticipated him, steaming directly for the flagship in the midst of the fleet.
Military.com Content (429 words)
Farragut, who became a midshipman at age 9, was the son of a Spaniard who fought in the Revolutionary War.
Farragut's rise to the post of admiral in 1866 was the crowning moment in a career that began before he was a teenager and lasted for more than five decades.
A Southerner by birth, Farragut nonetheless pledged his allegiance to the Union cause and was given command of a heavy fleet.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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