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Encyclopedia > David Davis (senator)

David Davis III (March 9, 1815 - June 26, 1886) was a United States Senator from Illinois and associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. See http://bioguide. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Official languages English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich (D) Senators Richard Durbin (D) Barack Obama (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 4. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States of America. ...


Davis, a cousin of Henry Winter Davis, was born to a wealthy family in Cecil County, Maryland, where he attended the public schools. After graduating from Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, in 1832 he went on to study law at Yale University, and upon his graduation from Yale in 1835, moved to Bloomington, Illinois, to practice law. From 1848-1862, Davis presided over the local judicial circuit, the same circuit where attorney Abraham Lincoln was practicing. Davis assisted Lincoln in Lincoln's presidential campaign in 1860. Henry Winter Davis (August 16, 1817 – 30 December 1865) was an American politician, well known as one of the Radical Republicans during the Civil War. ... Cecil County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. ... Kenyon College is a private liberal arts college in Gambier, Ohio, founded in 1824 by Bishop Philander Chase of the The Episcopal Church. ... Gambier is a village located in Knox County, Ohio. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Bloomington is a city located in McLean County, Illinois. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


In 1862, President Lincoln appointed Davis to the U.S. Supreme Court, where he became famous for writing one of the most profound decisions in the Supreme Court history, Ex Parte Milligan (1866). In that decision, the court set aside the death sentence imposed during the Civil War by a military commission upon a civilian, Lambdin P. Milligan. Milligan had been found guilty of inciting insurrection. The Supreme Court held that since the civil courts were operative, the trial of a civilian by a military tribunal was unconstitutional. The opinion denounced arbitrary military power, effectively becoming one of the bulwarks of held notions of American civil liberty. Holding Suspension of habeas corpus is unconstitutional when civilian courts are still operating; the Constitution only provided for suspension of habeas corpus if civilian courts are actually forced closed. ... The American Civil War (1861–1865) was fought in North America within the United States of America, between twenty-four mostly northern states of the Union and the Confederate States of America, a coalition of eleven southern states that declared their independence and claimed the right of secession from the...


After refusing calls to become Chief Justice, Davis, a registered independent, was nominated for President by the Labor Reform Convention in 1872, but withdrew when he failed to receive the Liberal Republican Party nomination. The Party supported Horace Greeley of the Democratic Party. Greeley, however, died after the popular election and before the return of the electoral vote. His electoral votes were divided between four apparent Presidential candidates: The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... The Liberal Republican Party of the United States was a political party formed in 1872 to oppose the administration of then-President Ulysses S. Grant. ... Horace Greeley (1811-1872) Photographic portrait of Greeley Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811–November 29, 1872) was an American newspaper editor and politician. ... The Democratic Party, founded in 1792, is one of the two longest-standing political parties in the world. ...

The 1872 election was won by incumbent President of the United States Ulysses Simpson Grant of the Republican Party. Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819–November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 - December 13, 1885) was a Liberal Republican Senator, Governor of Missouri, and the Vice presidential candidate in the election of 1872. ... Charles Jones Jenkins (January 6, 1805 - June 14, 1883) was a politician from Georgia. ... The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... Ulysses Simpson Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American Civil War General and the 18th (1869–1877) President of the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Democratic Party. ...


Disputed election of 1876

In 1877, Davis narrowly avoided the opportunity to be the only person to ever single-handedly elect the President of the United States. In the disputed Presidential election of 1876, between the Republican Rutherford Hayes and the Democrat Samuel Tilden, Congress created a special Electoral Commission to decide to whom to award a total of 20 electoral votes which were disputed from the states of Florida, Louisiana, South Carolina and Oregon. The Commission was to be composed of 15 members: five drawn from the U.S. House of Representatives, five from the U.S. Senate, and five from the U.S. Supreme Court. The majority party in each legislative chamber would get three seats on the Comission, and the minority party would get two. Both parties agreed to this arrangement because it was understood that the Commssion would have seven Republicans, seven Democrats, and Davis, who was arguably the most trusted independent in the nation. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 - January 17, 1893) was the 19th (1877-1881) President of the United States. ... Samuel Jones Tilden (February 9, 1814 - August 4, 1886) was the Democratic candidate for the US presidency in the disputed election of 1876, the most controversial American election of the 19th century. ... The Electorial Commission is an independent body with powers in the United Kingdom, which was created by an Act of Parliament, the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 22nd 170,451 km² 260 km 800 km 17. ... State nickname: Pelican State Official languages English and French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans at last official government census, but probably Baton Rouge since Hurricane Katrina Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Senators Mary Landrieu (D) David Vitter (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 31st 134,382 km² 16 Population  - Total... State nickname: Palmetto State Official languages English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Senators Lindsey Graham (R) Jim DeMint (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 40th 82,965 km² 6 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 26th 4,012,012 51. ... State nickname: Beaver State Official languages None Capital Salem Largest city Portland Governor Ted Kulongoski (D) Senators Ron Wyden (D) Gordon Smith (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 9th 255,026 km² 2. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ...


However, before the Electoral Commission could take up its business, the Illinois legislature elected Davis to the U.S. Senate. Because of this, Davis was unable to assume the spot, always intended for him, as one of the Supreme Court's members of the Commission. His replacement on the Commission was Joe Bradley, a Republican, thus the Commission ended up with an 8-7 Republican majority. Each of the 20 disputed electoral votes was eventually awarded to Hayes, the Republican, by that same 8-7 majority; Hayes won the election, 185 electoral votes to 184. Had Davis been on the Commission, his would have been the deciding vote, and Tilden would have been elected president had Davis and the commission awarded him even a single electoral vote.


Davis served a single term as U.S. Senator from Illinois, and was elected President pro tempore of the Senate in October 1881. He was succeeded by Republican Shelby Moore Cullom. Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska is the current President pro tempore of the Senate. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Shelby Moore Cullom (1829 - 1914) was a U.S. political figure. ...


Upon his death in 1886, he was interred at Evergreen Cemetery in Bloomington, Illinois. 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Evergreen Cemetery, in Bloomington, Illinois, is also known as Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. ... Bloomington is a city located in McLean County, Illinois. ...

Preceded by:
John Archibald Campbell
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
December 10, 1862March 4, 1877
Succeeded by:
John Marshall Harlan
Preceded by:
John A. Logan
Class 2 U.S. Senator from Illinois
18771883
Succeeded by:
Shelby M. Cullom
Preceded by:
Thomas F. Bayard, Sr.
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
October 13, 1881March 3, 1883
Succeeded by:
George F. Edmunds
The Taney Court Seal of the U.S. Supreme Court
1862–1863: J. M. Wayne | J. Catron | S. Nelson | R. C. Grier | N. Clifford | N. H. Swayne | S. F. Miller | D. Davis
1863–1864: J. M. Wayne | J. Catron | S. Nelson | R. C. Grier | N. Clifford | N. H. Swayne | S. F. Miller | D. Davis | S. J. Field
The Chase Court
1864–1865: J. M. Wayne | J. Catron | S. Nelson | R. C. Grier | N. Clifford | N. H. Swayne | S. F. Miller | D. Davis | S. J. Field
1865–1867: J. M. Wayne | S. Nelson | R. C. Grier | N. Clifford | N. H. Swayne | S. F. Miller | D. Davis | S. J. Field
1867–1870: S. Nelson | R. C. Grier | N. Clifford | N. H. Swayne | S. F. Miller | D. Davis | S. J. Field
1870–1872: S. Nelson | N. Clifford | N. H. Swayne | S. F. Miller | D. Davis | S. J. Field | Wm. Strong | J.P. Bradley
1873: N. Clifford | N. H. Swayne | S. F. Miller | D. Davis | S. J. Field | Wm. Strong | J.P. Bradley | W. Hunt
The Waite Court
1874–1877: N. Clifford | N. H. Swayne | S. F. Miller | D. Davis | S. J. Field | Wm. Strong | J.P. Bradley | W. Hunt
Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate Seal of the United States Senate President Pro Tempore
Langdon | Lee | Langdon | Izard | H Tazewell | Livermore | Bingham | Bradford | Read | Sedgwick | Laurance | Ross | Livermore | Tracy | Howard | Hillhouse | Baldwin | Bradley | Brown | Franklin | Anderson | Smith | Bradley | Milledge | Gregg | Gaillard | Pope | Crawford | Varnum | Gaillard | Barbour | Gaillard | Macon | Smith | L Tazewell | White | Poindexter | Tyler | W R King | Southard | Mangum | Sevier | Atchison | W R King | Atchison | Cass | Bright | Stuart | Bright | Mason | Rusk | Fitzpatrick | Bright | Fitzpatrick | Foot | Clark | Foster | Wade | Anthony | Carpenter | Anthony | Ferry | Thurman | Bayard | Davis | Edmunds | Sherman | Ingalls | Manderson | Ransom | Harris | Frye | (Special: Bacon, Curtis, Gallinger, Brandegee, Lodge) | Clarke | Saulsbury | Cummins | Moses | Pittman | W H King | Harrison | Glass | McKellar | Vandenberg | McKellar | Bridges | George | Hayden | Russell | Ellender | Eastland | Magnuson | Young | Magnuson | Thurmond | Stennis | Byrd | Thurmond | Byrd | Thurmond | Byrd | Stevens

 
 

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