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Encyclopedia > David Bowie
David Bowie
David Bowie, 2006.
David Bowie, 2006.
Background information
Birth name David Jones
Also known as "Ziggy Stardust"
"The Thin White Duke"
Born 8 January 1947 (1947-01-08) (age 61)
Brixton, England
Genre(s) Rock, glam rock, art rock, pop rock, blue-eyed soul, experimental
Instrument(s) Vocals, multi-instrumentalist
Years active 1964—present
Associated acts The Konrads, The King Bees, The Manish Boys, The Lower Third, The Riot Squad, Tin Machine
Website www.davidbowie.com

David Bowie (pronounced /ˈboʊiː/) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. Active in five decades of rock music and frequently reinventing his music and image, Bowie is regarded as an influential innovator, particularly for his work through the 1970s.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brixton is an area of South London, England, part of the London Borough of Lambeth. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the genre. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... Art rock is a term used to describe a subgenre of rock music with experimental or avant-garde influences that emphasizes novel sonic texture. ... For other uses, see Pop rock (disambiguation). ... Blue-eyed soul (also known as white soul) is a term used to describe R&B or soul music performed by white artists. ... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A multi-instrumentalist is a musician who plays a number of different instruments. ... The Riot Squad (front: Mitch Mitchell) The Riot Squad were a pop group from London, initially managed and produced by Larry Page and later, for their reunion, by Joe Meek. ... Tin Machine was a band, formed in 1989 and fronted by David Bowie. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ... An Audio Engineer is a person recording, editing, manipulating, mixing and mastering sound by technical means. ... This article is about the genre. ...


Although he released an album and numerous singles earlier, David Bowie first caught the eye and ear of the public in the autumn of 1969, when his space-age mini-melodrama "Space Oddity" reached the top five of the UK singles chart. After a three-year period of experimentation he re-emerged in 1972 during the glam rock era as a flamboyant, androgynous alter ego Ziggy Stardust, spearheaded by the hit single "Starman" and the album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. The relatively short-lived Ziggy persona epitomised a career often marked by musical innovation, reinvention and striking visual presentation. Poster for The Perils of Pauline (1914). ... Space Oddity is a song written and performed by David Bowie and released as a single in 1969. ... “British Hit Singles” redirects here. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... If referring to a flower, see disambiguation under bisexual Androgyny is the state of indeterminate gender, or characteristics of gender. ... The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars track listing Side one Five Years Soul Love Moonage Daydream Starman It Aint Easy Side two Lady Stardust Star Hang on to Yourself Ziggy Stardust Suffragette City Rock n Roll Suicide Starman is a single by David... Ziggy Stardust redirects here. ...


In 1975, Bowie achieved his first major American crossover success with the number-one single "Fame" and the hit album Young Americans, which the singer identified as "plastic soul". The sound constituted a radical shift in style that initially alienated many of his UK devotees.[2] He then confounded the expectations of both his record label and his American audiences by recording the minimalist album Low – the first of three collaborations with Brian Eno. His most experimental works to date, the so-called "Berlin Trilogy" nevertheless produced three UK top-five albums. Fame was a single by David Bowie. ... Young Americans is an album by David Bowie released in 1975. ... This article is about minimalism in art and design. ... Low is a 1977 album by British musician David Bowie. ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... The so-called Berlin Trilogy is a series of David Bowie albums recorded in collaboration with Brian Eno. ...


After uneven commercial success in the late 1970s, Bowie had UK number ones with the 1980 single "Ashes to Ashes" and its parent album, Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps). He paired with Queen for the 1981 UK chart-topper "Under Pressure", but consolidated his commercial – and, until then, most profitable – sound in 1983 with the album Let's Dance, which yielded the hit singles "China Girl", "Modern Love", and most famously, the title track. Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) track listing Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) (3) Ashes to Ashes (4) Fashion (5) Ashes to Ashes is a single by David Bowie, released in 1980. ... Original LP back cover Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) is an album by David Bowie, released in September 1980 by RCA Records. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lets Dance is an album by David Bowie, released in 1983. ... China Girl is a 1983 hit single by David Bowie, written by Bowie and Iggy Pop and taken from the album Lets Dance. ... Modern Love is the first track on David Bowies album Lets Dance. ... Let’s Dance is the title album track on David Bowies album Lets Dance. ...


In the BBC's 2002 poll of the 100 Greatest Britons, Bowie ranked 29. Throughout his career he has sold an estimated 196 million albums[citation needed], and ranks among the ten best-selling acts in UK pop history. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked him 39th on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[3] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... // Not to be confused with the later ITV Greatest Britons show. ... This article is about the magazine. ...

Contents

Biography

1947 to 1967: Early years

David Robert Jones was born in Brixton, London, to a father from Tadcaster in Yorkshire and a mother from an Irish family;[4] Bowie's parents were married shortly after his birth.[5] When he was six years old, his family moved from Brixton to Bromley in Kent, where he attended the Bromley Technical High School.[6][7] Brixton is an area of South London, England, part of the London Borough of Lambeth. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Map sources for Tadcaster at grid reference SE4843 Tadcaster is a town in North Yorkshire, England, lying on the River Wharfe and the Great North Road. ... Yorkshire is a historic county of northern England. ... For other uses, see Bromley (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ...


When Bowie was fifteen years old, his friend George Underwood, wearing a ring on his finger, punched him in the left eye during a fight over a girl. Bowie was forced to stay out of school for eight months so that doctors could conduct operations to repair his potentially-blinded eye.[8][9] Doctors could not fully repair the damage, leaving his pupil permanently dilated. As a result of the injury, Bowie has faulty depth perception. Bowie has stated that although he can see with his injured eye, his colour vision was mostly lost and a brownish tone is constantly present. The colour of the irises is still the same blue, but since the pupil of the injured eye is wide open, the colour of that eye is commonly mistaken to be different.[9] Despite the fight, Underwood and Bowie remained good friends, and Underwood went on to do the artwork for Bowie's earlier albums.[10] Mydriasis is an excessive dilation of the pupil due to disease or drugs. ... Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions. ...


Bowie's interest in music was sparked at the age of nine when his father brought home a collection of American 45s, including Fats Domino, Chuck Berry and, most particularly, Little Richard. Upon listening to "Tutti Frutti", Bowie would later say, "I had heard God".[11] His half-brother Terry introduced him to modern jazz and Bowie's enthusiasm for players like Charles Mingus and John Coltrane led his mother to give him a plastic saxophone for Christmas in 1959. Graduating to a real instrument, he formed his first band in 1962, the Konrads. He then played with various blues/beat groups, such as The King Bees, The Manish Boys, The Lower Third and The Riot Squad in the mid-1960s, releasing his first record, the single "Liza Jane", with the King Bees in 1964. His early work shifted through the blues and Elvis-inspired music while working with many British pop styles. A 12-inch record (left), a 7-inch record (right), and a CD (above) Two 7 singles (left), two colored 7 singles (middle), and two 7 singles with large spindle holes (right). ... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928) is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Tutti Frutti was Little Richards first hit record, released in 1955. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Charles Mingus (April 22, 1922 – January 5, 1979) was an American jazz bassist, composer, bandleader, and occasional pianist. ... Coltrane redirects here. ... The saxophone (colloquially referred to as sax) is a conical-bored musical instrument usually considered a member of the woodwind family. ... I Pity the Fool is a song written by Deadric Malone. ... The Riot Squad (front: Mitch Mitchell) The Riot Squad were a pop group from London, initially managed and produced by Larry Page and later, for their reunion, by Joe Meek. ... Liza Jane was the first recording to be released as a single by David Bowie, but under the name Davie Jones and the King Bees. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known as The King of Rock and Roll, or as just simply The King, was an American singer who had an immeasurable effect on world culture. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ...


During the early 1960s, Bowie was performing either under his own name or the stage name "Davie Jones", and briefly even as "Davy Jones", creating confusion with Davy Jones of The Monkees. To avoid this, in 1966 he chose "Bowie" for his stage name, after the Alamo hero Jim Bowie and his famous Bowie knife.[12] During this time, he recorded singles for Parlophone under the name of The Manish Boys and Davy Jones and for Pye under the name David Bowie (and The Lower Third), all without success. For other persons of the same name, see Davy Jones. ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... Combatants Republic of Mexico Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas Commanders Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón William Travis† Jim Bowie† Davy Crockett† Strength 6,000 in attack (1,800 in assault-see below) 183 to 250 Casualties 650 killed 974 injured 180 killed The... James Bowie James Bowie (probably April 10, 1796 - March 6, 1836), aka Jim Bowie, was a nineteenth century pioneer and soldier who took a prominent part in the Texas Revolution and was killed at the Battle of the Alamo. ... A typical bowie knife, with its hallmark large blade and unique shape. ... Parlophone is a record label which was founded in Germany prior to World War I by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... I Pity the Fool is a song written by Deadric Malone. ... Pye Records was a British record label. ...


Bowie released his first album in 1967 for the Decca Records offshoot Deram, simply called David Bowie, an amalgam of pop, psychedelia, and music hall. Around the same time he issued a novelty single utilising sped-up Chipmunk-style vocals, "The Laughing Gnome", with the B-side "The Gospel According to Tony Day". None of these managed to chart, and he would not cut another record for two years. His Deram material from the album and various singles was later recycled in a multitude of compilations. It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... Deram Records was setup by Decca Records (UK) as a label for alternative artists. ... David Bowie is the eponymously-titled debut album by rock musician David Bowie, released in 1967 by Deram Records, a Decca offshoot. ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Psychedelic rock is a style of rock music that attempts to replicate the mind-altering experiences of hallucinogenic drugs. ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ... For the upcoming live-action/computer-generated film, see Alvin and the Chipmunks (film). ... The Laughing Gnome was a single by David Bowie. ...


Influenced by the dramatic arts, he studied with Lindsay Kemp — from avant-garde theatre and mime to Commedia dell'arte — and much of his work would involve the creation of characters or personae to present to the world. During 1967, Bowie sold his first song to another artist, "Oscar" (an early stage name of actor-musician Paul Nicholas). Bowie wrote Oscar's third single, "Over the Wall We Go", which satirised life in a British prison.[13] In late 1968, his then-manager, Kenneth Pitt, produced a half-hour promotional film called Love You Till Tuesday featuring Bowie performing a number of songs, but it went unreleased until 1984. Lindsay Kemp is a British dancer, actor, teacher, mime artist and choreographer. ... A work similar to Marcel Duchamps Fountain Avant garde (written avant-garde) is a French phrase, one of many French phrases used by English speakers. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article is about the theatrical medium and those who practice it. ... Introduction Antoine Watteaus commedia dellarte player of Pierrot, ca 1718-19, traditionally identified as Gilles (Louvre) Commedia dellarte, (Italian, meaning comedy of professional artists) was a form of improvisational theater which began in the 16th century and was popular until the 18th century, although it is still... Official Biography Paul Nicholas became a household favourite with his role as Vince in the BAFTA Award-winning BBC television series Just Good Friends and for LWT’s major drama series Bust for which he was nominated Best Actor. ...


1969 to 1973: Psychedelic folk to glam rock

Bowie's first flirtation with fame came in 1969 with his single "Space Oddity," written the previous year but recorded and released to coincide with the first moon landing.[14] This ballad told the story of Major Tom, an astronaut who becomes lost in space, though it has also been interpreted as an allegory for taking drugs.[15] It became a Top 5 UK hit. The corresponding album, his second, was originally titled David Bowie, which caused some confusion as both of Bowie's first and second albums were released with that name in the UK (in the U.S. the second album bore the title Man of Words, Man of Music). In 1972, this album was re-released by RCA Records as Space Oddity. Space Oddity is a song written and performed by David Bowie and released as a single in 1969. ... Still frame from the video transmission of Neil Armstrong stepping onto the surface of the Moon on 20 July 1969. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ... Major Tom is an astronaut created by David Bowie. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... Allegory of Music by Filippino Lippi. ... RCA Records is one of the flagship labels of Sony BMG Music Entertainment. ... Space Oddity is an album by rock musician David Bowie, released 1969. ...


Bowie put the finishing touches to "Space Oddity" (the track) while living with Mary Finnigan as her lodger. Finnigan and Bowie joined forces with Christina Ostrom and the late Barrie Jackson to run a Folk Club on Sunday nights at The Three Tuns pub in Beckenham High Street, south London.[16] This soon morphed into the Beckenham Arts Lab and became extremely popular. In August 1969, The Arts Lab hosted a Free Festival in a local park, later immortalised by Bowie in his song "Memory of a Free Festival".[17] Pub redirects here. ... Beckenham is a town in the London Borough of Bromley, England. ... Space Oddity track listing Memory of a Free Festival is a 1970 single by David Bowie. ...


In 1970 Bowie released his third album, The Man Who Sold the World, rejecting the acoustic guitar sound of the previous album and replacing it with the heavy rock backing provided by Mick Ronson, who would be a major collaborator through to 1973. Much of the album resembles British heavy metal music of the period, but the album provided some unusual musical detours, such as the title track's use of Latin sounds and rhythms. The original UK cover of the album showed Bowie in a dress, an early example of his androgynous appearance. In the U.S. the album was originally released in a cartoonish cover that did not feature Bowie. A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Mick Ronson (May 26, 1946 – April 29, 1993) born in Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire was an English guitarist, composer, multi-instrumentalist, arranger and producer. ... Heavy metal redirects here. ... The Man Who Sold the World is a song by David Bowie. ... Latin American music, is sometimes called Latin music. ... For other uses, see Androgyny (disambiguation). ...


His next record, Hunky Dory in 1971, saw the partial return of the fey pop singer of "Space Oddity", with light fare such as the droll "Kooks". Elsewhere, the album explored more serious themes on tracks such as "Oh! You Pretty Things" (a song taken to UK #12 by Herman's Hermits' Peter Noone in 1971), the semi-autobiographical "The Bewlay Brothers", and the Buddhist-influenced "Quicksand". Lyrically, the young songwriter also paid unusually direct homage to his influences with "Song for Bob Dylan", "Andy Warhol", and "Queen Bitch", which Bowie's somewhat cryptic liner notes indicate as a Velvet Underground pastiche. As with the single "Changes", Hunky Dory was not a big hit but it laid the groundwork for the move that would shortly lift Bowie into the first rank of stars, giving him four top-ten albums and eight top ten singles in the UK in eighteen months between 1972 and 1973. Hunky Dory is the fourth album by English singer-songwriter David Bowie, released by RCA Records in 1971. ... Kooks is a song written by David Bowie from 1971 on the album Hunky Dory. ... Oh! You Pretty Things is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ... Hermans Hermits were an English rock band in the 1960s, formed in Manchester in 1963. ... Peter Noone (born Peter Blair Dennis Bernard Noone, 5 November 1947, in Davyhulme, Manchester) is an English singer, songwriter, Guitarist, Pianist, and actor. ... The Bewlay Brothers is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ... Buddhism is a variety of teachings, sometimes described as a religion[1] or way of life that attempts to identify the causes of human suffering and offer various ways that are claimed to end, or ease suffering. ... Quicksand is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ... Song for Bob Dylan is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ... Andy Warhol is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ... Queen Bitch is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ... The Velvet Underground and Nico (from left to right: John Cale, Nico, Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison, and Maureen Tucker) The Velvet Underground (Affectionately known as The Velvets, or V.U. for short) was an American rock and roll band of the late 1960s. ... Changes was a single by David Bowie, taken from the album Hunky Dory. ...


Bowie's androgynous persona was further explored in June 1972 with the seminal concept album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, which presents a world destined to end in five years and tells the story of the ultimate rock star, Ziggy Stardust. The album's sound combined the hard rock elements of The Man Who Sold the World with the lighter experimental rock of Hunky Dory and the fast-paced glam rock pioneered by Marc Bolan's T.Rex. Many of the album's songs have become rock classics, including "Ziggy Stardust," "Moonage Daydream," "Hang on to Yourself," and "Suffragette City." In popular music, a concept album is an album which is unified by a theme, which can be instrumental, compositional, narrative, or lyrical (Shuker 2002, p. ... Ziggy Stardust redirects here. ... Hard Rock redirects here. ... Glam rock (also known as glitter rock), is a rock music style that developed in the UK in the post-hippie early 1970s which was performed by singers and musicians wearing outrageous clothes, makeup, hairstyles, and platform-soled boots. ... Marc Bolan (born Mark Feld; 30 September 1947 - 16 September 1977), was an English singer, songwriter and guitarist whose hit singles, fashion sensibilities and stage presence with T Rex in the early 1970s helped cultivate the glam rock era and made him one of the most recognisable stars in British... T.Rex (originally known as Tyrannosaurus Rex, also occasionally spelt T Rex or T-Rex), were an English rock band fronted by Marc Bolan. ... Ziggy Stardust is a song written by David Bowie in 1972 for the album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. ... Moonage Daydream is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 and first released as a single under the name Arnold Corns. ... Hang on to Yourself is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 and released on single under the name Arnold Corns. ... The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars track listing Side one Five Years Soul Love Moonage Daydream Starman It Aint Easy Side two Lady Stardust Star Hang on to Yourself Ziggy Stardust Suffragette City Rock n Roll Suicide Suffragette City is a single by...


The Ziggy Stardust character became the basis for Bowie's first large-scale tour beginning in 1972, where he donned his famous flaming red hair and wild outfits. The tour featured a three-piece band representing the "Spiders from Mars": Ronson on guitar, Trevor Bolder on bass, and Mick Woodmansey on drums. The album made #5 in the UK on the strength of the #10 placing of the single "Starman". Their success made Bowie a star, and soon the six-month-old Hunky Dory eclipsed Ziggy Stardust, when it peaked at #3 on the UK chart. At the same time the non-album single "John, I’m Only Dancing" (not released in the U.S. until 1979) peaked at UK #12, and "All the Young Dudes", a song he had given to, and produced for, Mott the Hoople, made UK #3. Trevor Bolder (born June 9, 1950) is an English rock bass guitarist. ... Mick Woody Woodmansey (born c. ... The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars track listing Side one Five Years Soul Love Moonage Daydream Starman It Aint Easy Side two Lady Stardust Star Hang on to Yourself Ziggy Stardust Suffragette City Rock n Roll Suicide Starman is a single by David... John, I’m Only Dancing was a single by David Bowie. ... All the Young Dudes is a song written by David Bowie, originally recorded and released as a single by Mott the Hoople in 1972. ... Mott the Hoople were a 1970s English rock and roll and glam rock band with strong R&B roots. ...


Around the same time Bowie began promoting and producing his rock and roll heroes. Former Velvet Underground singer Lou Reed's solo breakthrough Transformer was produced by Bowie and Ronson. Iggy Pop and his band The Stooges signed with Bowie's management, MainMan Productions, and recorded their third album, Raw Power, in London. Though he was not present for the tracking of the album, Bowie later performed its much-debated mix.[18] Lou Reed (born March 2, 1942) is an influential American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Transformer is Lou Reeds breakthrough second solo album, released in December 1972. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Raw Power is a 1973 album by American rock music group The Stooges. ... Audio mixing is used in sound recording, audio editing and sound systems to balance the relative volume and frequency content of a number of sound sources. ...


The Spiders From Mars came together again on Aladdin Sane, released in April 1973 and his first #1 album in the UK. Described by Bowie as "Ziggy goes to America",[19] all the new songs were written on ship, bus or trains during the first leg of his US Ziggy Stardust tour. The album's cover, featuring Bowie shirtless with Ziggy hair and a red, black, and blue lightning bolt across his face, has been labeled as "startling as rock covers ever got."[20] Aladdin Sane included the UK #2 hit "The Jean Genie", the UK #3 hit "Drive-In Saturday", and a rendition of The Rolling Stones' "Let's Spend the Night Together". Mike Garson joined Bowie to play piano on this album, and his solo on the title track has been cited as one of the album's highlights.[20][21] Aladdin Sane (i. ... The Jean Genie was a single by David Bowie. ... Drive-In Saturday was a single by David Bowie. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Lets Spend the Night Together was a 1967 song by the Rolling Stones. ... Mike Garson is a professional pianist, most notable for his work with Nine Inch Nails, David Bowie, Billy Corgan and The Smashing Pumpkins. ... Aladdin Sane (1913-1938-197?) is the title track from the album Aladdin Sane, by David Bowie. ...


Bowie's later Ziggy shows, which included songs from both Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane, as well as a few earlier tracks like "Changes" and "The Width of a Circle", were ultra-theatrical affairs filled with shocking stage moments, such as Bowie stripping down to a sumo wrestling loincloth or simulating oral sex with Ronson's guitar.[22] Bowie toured and gave press conferences as Ziggy before a dramatic and abrupt on-stage "retirement" at London's Hammersmith Odeon on 3 July 1973. His announcement—"Of all the shows on this tour, this particular show will remain with us the longest, because not only is it the last show of the tour, but it's the last show that we'll ever do. Thank you."—has been preserved in a live recording of the show, belatedly released under the title Ziggy Stardust - The Motion Picture in 1983 after many years circulating as a bootleg.[23] The Width of a Circle is a song written by David Bowie in 1970 for the album The Man Who Sold the World, released later that year in the U.S. and in April 1971 in the UK. It is the opening track to the album, a hard rocker with... For other uses, see Sumo (disambiguation). ... Oral sex consists of all sexual activities that involve the use of the mouth, which may include use of the tongue, teeth, and throat, to stimulate genitalia. ... A joint press conference by U.S. President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair at the White House. ... The Apollo, Hammersmith, London has been a rock venue for decades, and was originally known as the Hammersmith Odeon. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Ziggy Stardust - The Motion Picture is a live album by David Bowie, corresponding to the film of the same name. ...


Pin Ups, a collection of covers of his 1960s favourites, was released in October 1973, spawning a UK #3 hit in "Sorrow" and itself peaking at #1, making David Bowie the best-selling act of 1973 in the UK.[24] By this time, Bowie had broken up the Spiders from Mars and was attempting to move on from his Ziggy persona. Bowie's own back catalogue was now highly sought: The Man Who Sold the World had been re-released in 1972 along with the second David Bowie album (Space Oddity). Hunky Dory's "Life on Mars?" was released as a single in 1973 and made #3 in the UK, the same year Bowie's novelty record from 1967, "The Laughing Gnome", hit #6. Pin Ups is a 1973 covers album by David Bowie. ... Sorrow was a single by David Bowie. ... For information on the possiblity of life on the planet Mars, see Life on Mars. ... The Laughing Gnome was a single by David Bowie. ...


1974 to 1976: Soul, R&B, and The Thin White Duke

1974 saw the release of another ambitious album, Diamond Dogs, with a spoken word introduction and a multi-part song suite ("Sweet Thing/Candidate/Sweet Thing (reprise)"). Diamond Dogs was the product of two distinct ideas: a musical based on a wild future in a post-apocalyptic city, and setting George Orwell's 1984 to music. Bowie also made plans to develop a Diamond Dogs movie, but didn't get very far. Bowie had originally planned on writing a musical to 1984, but his interest waned after encountering difficulties in licensing the novel. He used some of the songs he had written for the project on Diamond Dogs. The album—and an NBC television special, The 1980 Floor Show, broadcast at around the same time—demonstrated Bowie headed toward the genre of soul/funk music, the track "1984" being a prime example. The album spawned the hits "Rebel Rebel" (UK #5) and "Diamond Dogs" (UK #21), and itself went to #1 in the UK, making him the best-selling act of that country for the second year in a row. In the US, Bowie achieved his first major commercial success as the album went to #5. Diamond Dogs is a concept album by David Bowie, originally released by RCA in 1974. ... Spoken word is a form of music or artistic performance in which lyrics, poetry, or stories are spoken rather than sung. ... In music, a suite is an organized set of instrumental or orchestral pieces normally performed at a single sitting, as a separate musical performance, not accompanying an opera, ballet, or theater-piece. ... Candidate is a song written by David Bowie in 1973 and intended for his 1984 musical. ... St. ... George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... This article is about the Orwell novel. ... This article is about the television network. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ... A song from David Bowies 1974 album Diamond Dogs. ... Rebel Rebel is a song by David Bowie, released in 1974 as a single and on the album Diamond Dogs. ... Diamond Dogs is a song by David Bowie. ...


To follow on the release of the album, Bowie launched a massive Diamond Dogs tour in North America from June to December 1974. Choreographed by Toni Basil, and lavishly produced with theatrical special effects, the high-budget stage production broke with contemporary standard practice for rock concerts by featuring no encores. It was filmed by Alan Yentob for the documentary Cracked Actor. The documentary seemed to confirm the rumours of his cocaine abuse, featuring a pasty and emaciated Bowie nervously sniffing in the backseat of a car and claiming that there was a fly in his milk. Bowie commented that the resulting live album, David Live, ought to have been called "David Bowie Is Alive and Well and Living Only In Theory," presumably in reference to his addled and frenetic psychological state during this period. Nevertheless the album solidified his status as a superstar, going #2 in the UK and #8 in the US. It also spawned a UK #10 hit in a cover of "Knock on Wood". After the opening leg of the tour, Bowie mostly jettisoned the elaborate sets. Then, when the tour resumed after a summer break in Philadelphia for recording new material, the Diamond Dogs sound no longer seemed apt. Bowie cancelled seven dates and made changes to the band, which returned to the road in October as the Philly Dogs tour. Toni Basil (born Antonia Christina Basilotta on September 22, 1943 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a musician, video artist, actress, and choreographer. ... Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ... Alan Yentob (born March 11, 1947) is a British television executive. ... Cracked Actor is a 53 minute long documentary filmed by the BBC in 1974 about David Bowie during his drug using days. ... David Live is David Bowie’s first official live album, originally released by RCA in 1974. ... Knock on Wood was a live single by David Bowie. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


For Ziggy Stardust fans who had not discerned the soul and funk strains already apparent in Bowie's recent work, the "new" sound was considered a sudden and jolting step. 1975's Young Americans was Bowie's definitive exploration of Philly soul—though he himself referred to the sound ironically as "plastic soul." It contained his first #1 hit in the US, "Fame", co-written with Carlos Alomar and John Lennon (who also contributed backing vocals). It was based on a riff Alomar had developed while covering The Flares' 1961 doo-wop classic "Footstompin'," which Bowie's band had taken to playing live during the Philly Dogs period. One of the backing vocalists on the album is a young Luther Vandross, who also co-wrote some of the material for Young Americans. The song Win featured a hypnotic guitar riff later taken by Beck for the track/live staple "Debra" off his Midnite Vultures album. Despite Bowie's unashamed recognition of the shallowness of his "plastic soul," he did earn the bona fide distinction of being one of the few white artists to be invited to appear on the popular "Soul Train." Another violently paranoid appearance on ABC's The Dick Cavett Show (1974 December 5) seemed to confirm rumours of Bowie's heavy cocaine use at this time. [25] Young Americans was the album that cemented Bowie's stardom in the U.S.; though only peaking there at #9, as opposed to the #5 placing of Diamond Dogs, the album stayed on the charts almost twice as long. At the same time, the album achieved #2 in the UK while a re-issue of his old single "Space Oddity" became his first #1 hit in the UK, only a few months after "Fame" had achieved the same in the US. Young Americans is an album by David Bowie released in 1975. ... For the American indoor football team, see Philadelphia Soul. ... Fame was a single by David Bowie. ... Carlos Alomar is a guitarist who has played with David Bowie more than anyone else including the Serious Moonlight album and tour which featured Stevie Ray Vaughan as special guest for his Dallas, Texas show. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Doo-wop is a style of vocal-based rhythm and blues music popular in the mid-1950s to the early 1960s in America. ... Luther Ronzoni Vandross, Jr. ... This article is about the musician. ... Soul Train is a long-running music-related syndicated television program. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... The Dick Cavett Show has been the title of many talk shows hosted by Dick Cavett on several television networks, including: ABC daytime (March 4, 1968–January 24, 1969) (originally titled This Morning) ABC prime time (May 26–September 19, 1969) ABC late night (December 29, 1969–January 1, 1975... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Cocaine (disambiguation). ...


Station to Station (1976) featured a darker version of this soul persona, called "The Thin White Duke". Visually the figure was an extension of Thomas Jerome Newton, the character Bowie portrayed in The Man Who Fell to Earth. Station to Station was a transitional album, prefiguring the Krautrock and synthesizer music of his next releases, while further developing the funk and soul music of Young Americans. By this time Bowie had become heavily dependent on drugs, particularly cocaine; many critics have attributed the chopped rhythms and emotional detachment of the record to the influence of the drug, to which Bowie claimed to have been introduced in America. His emotional disturbance and megalomania at this time reached such a fever pitch[citation needed] that Bowie refused to relinquish control of a satellite, booked for a world-wide broadcast of a live appearance preceding the release of Station to Station, at the request of the Spanish Government, who wished to put out a live feed regarding the death of Spanish Dictator Francisco Franco. His sanity—by his own later admission—became twisted from cocaine: he overdosed several times during the year. Additionally, Bowie was withering physically after having lost an alarming amount of weight. For the David Bowie album, click here. ... The Man Who Fell to Earth is a 1976 science fiction film directed by Nicolas Roeg about an extraterrestrial who crash lands on Earth seeking a way to ship water to his planet, which is suffering from a severe drought. ... Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... For the David Bowie album, click here. ... Francisco Paulino Hermenegildo Teódulo Franco y Bahamonde (December 4, 1892 - November 20, 1975), commonly known as Francisco Franco (pronounced ) or Francisco Franco y Bahamonde was leader of Spain from October 1936, as regent of Kingdom of Spain from 1947 until his death in 1975. ...


Nonetheless, there was another large tour, The 1976 World Tour, which featured a starkly lit set and highlighted new songs such as the dramatic and lengthy title track, the ballads "Wild Is the Wind" and "Word on a Wing", and the funkier "TVC 15" and "Stay". The core band that coalesced around this album and tour—rhythm guitarist Alomar, bassist George Murray, and drummer Dennis Davis—would remain a stable unit through the 1970s. The tour was highly successful but also entrenched in controversy, as the media claimed that Bowie was advocating fascism. The accusation was false and had resulted from a misinterpretation of Bowie's essentially anti-Fascist message.[26] Station to Station is a song written by David Bowie in 1976. ... This article is about the film. ... Word on a Wing is a song written by David Bowie in 1976 for the Station to Station album. ... TVC15 was a single by David Bowie. ... Stay is a song written by David Bowie for the 1976 album Station to Station. ... George Murray is a studio bass guitarist who worked closely with David Bowie as a part of his regular ensemble, on a number of Bowies albums released in the 1970s. ... Dennis Davis is a studio musician who worked closely with David Bowie as a part of his regular ensemble, on a number of Bowies albums released in the 70s. ... Fascism is a term used to describe authoritarian nationalist political ideologies or mass movements that are concerned with notions of cultural decline or decadence. ...


1976 to 1980: The Berlin era

Bowie's interest in the growing German music scene, as well as his drug addiction, prompted him to move to West Berlin to dry out and rejuvenate his career. Sharing an apartment in Schöneberg with his friend Iggy Pop, he co-produced three more of his own classic albums with Tony Visconti, while aiding Pop with his career. With Bowie as a co-writer and musician, Pop completed his first two solo albums, The Idiot and Lust for Life. This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Schöneberg is a district of Berlin. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... The Idiot is a 1977 album by Iggy Pop, his debut as a solo artist. ... Lust for Life is a 1977 album by Iggy Pop, his second collaboration with David Bowie following The Idiot, released earlier in the year. ...


Bowie joined Pop's touring band in the spring, simply playing keyboard and singing backing vocals. The group performed in the UK, Europe, and the US from March to April 1977.[27]


The brittle sound of Station to Station proved a precursor to Low, the first of three albums that became known as the "Berlin Trilogy." Low was recorded with Brian Eno as an integral collaborator but, despite widespread belief, not the album's producer. Journalists often mistakenly give Eno production credits on the trilogy but, in fact, Bowie and Tony Visconti co-produced, with Eno co-writing some of the music, playing keyboards, and developing strategies. Bowie stressed in 2000: "Over the years not enough credit has gone to Tony Visconti on those particular albums. The actual sound and texture, the feel of everything from the drums to the way that my voice is recorded is Tony Visconti."[citation needed] Low is a 1977 album by British musician David Bowie. ... The so-called Berlin Trilogy is a series of David Bowie albums recorded in collaboration with Brian Eno. ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... For other uses, see Tony Visconti (disambiguation). ...


Visconti said at the time, "Bowie wanted to make an album of music that was uncompromising and reflected the way he felt. He said he did not care whether or not he had another hit record, and that the recording would be so out of the ordinary that it might never get released".[citation needed]


Partly influenced by the Krautrock sound of Kraftwerk and Neu! and the minimalist work of Steve Reich, Bowie journeyed to Neunkirchen near Cologne to meet the famed German producer Conny Plank. Plank was considered a revolutionary producer in German rock in the era, but had no interest in working with Bowie and refused him entry to the studio.[citation needed] Bowie and his team persevered, however, and recorded new songs that were relatively simple, repetitive and stripped-down, a perverse reaction to punk rock, with the second side almost wholly instrumental. (By way of tribute, proto-punk Nick Lowe recorded an EP entitled "Bowi".) The album provided him with a surprise #3 hit in the UK when the BBC picked up the first single, "Sound and Vision", as its 'coming attractions' theme music. Low is renowned for being far ahead of its time, and Bowie himself has said "cut me and I bleed Low".[citation needed] The album was produced in 1976 and released in early 1977. Krautrock, also known as Kosmische Musik, is a generic name for the experimental music scene that appeared in Germany in the late 1960s and gained popularity throughout the 1970s. ... Kraftwerk (pronounced , German for power station) is a Grammy award nominated, electronic music band from Düsseldorf, Germany. ... Neu! (the German word for new, pronounced noy) were a German band, probably the archetypal example of what the UK music press at the time dubbed Krautrock. ... Stephen Michael Reich (born October 3, 1936) is an American composer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... Konrad Conny Plank (frequently spelled Planck) (born about 1943 in Austria, died December 18, 1987 in Cologne) was a record producer. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Bowi EP sleeve (1977). ... Sound and Vision was a single by David Bowie. ...


The Low sessions also formalised Bowie's three-phase approach to making albums that he still favours today. Much of the band were present for the first five days only, after which Eno, Alomar and Gardiner remained to play overdubs. By the time Bowie wrote and recorded the lyrics everybody but Visconti and studio engineers had departed.


The next record, "Heroes", was similar in sound to Low, though slightly more accessible. The mood of these records fit the zeitgeist of the Cold War, symbolised by the divided city that provided its inspiration. The title track, a story of two lovers who met at the Berlin Wall, is one of Bowie's most-covered songs.[28] Heroes (the quotation marks are part of the title, for reasons of irony)[1] is an album by David Bowie, released in 1977. ... This article is about the German word. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... ”Heroes” is a song written by David Bowie together with Brian Eno in 1977. ... View in 1986 from the west side of graffiti art on the walls infamous death strip Walls poster in memory of the fall. ...


Also in 1977, Bowie appeared on the Granada music show Marc, hosted by his friend and fellow glam pioneer Marc Bolan of T.Rex, with whom he had regularly socialised and jammed before either achieved fame. He turned out to be the show's final guest, as Bolan was killed in a car crash shortly afterward.[29] Bowie was one of many superstars who attended the funeral.[30] Marc Bolan (born Mark Feld; 30 September 1947 - 16 September 1977), was an English singer, songwriter and guitarist whose hit singles, fashion sensibilities and stage presence with T Rex in the early 1970s helped cultivate the glam rock era and made him one of the most recognisable stars in British... T.Rex (originally known as Tyrannosaurus Rex, also occasionally spelt T Rex or T-Rex), were an English rock band fronted by Marc Bolan. ...


For Christmas 1977, Bowie joined Bing Crosby, of whom he was an ardent admirer, in a recording studio to do "Peace on Earth/Little Drummer Boy", a version of "Little Drummer Boy" with a new lyric.[31] The two singers had originally met on Crosby's Christmas television special two years earlier (on the recommendation of Crosby's children — he had not heard of Bowie) and performed the song. One month after the record was completed, Crosby died.[32] Five years later, the song would prove a worldwide festive hit, charting in the UK at #3 on Christmas Day 1982.[33]Bowie later remarked jokingly that he was afraid of being a guest artist, because "everyone I was going on with was kicking it", referring to Bolan and Crosby.[34] For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... Peace on Earth/Little Drummer Boy is a medley of two Christmas songs performed by David Bowie and Bing Crosby. ... The Little Drummer Boy is a popular Christmas song, with words and music by Katherine K. Davis. ...


Bowie and his band embarked on an extensive world tour in 1978 (including his first concerts in Australia and New Zealand) which featured music from both Low and Heroes. A live album from the tour was released as Stage the same year. Songs from both Low and Heroes were later converted to symphonies by minimalist composer Phillip Glass. 1978 was also the year that saw Bowie narrating Sergei Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf. Stage is an underrated live album released in 1978 which opens with five consecutive songs from Ziggy Stardust, but most notably features material from Low and Heroes, Bowies most recent studio albums at the time. ... Philip Glass looks upon sheet music in a portrait taken by Annie Leibovitz. ... Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev (Russian: , Sergej Sergejevič Prokofijev; April 27 (April 151 O.S.), 1891–March 5, 1953) was a Russian and Soviet composer who mastered numerous musical genres and came to be admired as one of the greatest composers of the 20th century. ... 1947 coloring book cover. ...


1979's Lodger was the final album in Bowie's so-called "Berlin Trilogy", or "triptych" as Bowie calls it.[35] It featured the singles "Boys Keep Swinging", "DJ" and "Look Back in Anger" and, unlike the two previous LPs, did not contain any instrumentals. The style was a mix of New Wave and world music, including pieces such as "African Night Flight" and "Yassassin". A number of tracks were composed using the non-traditional Bowie/Eno composition techniques: "Boys Keep Swinging" was developed with the band members swapping their instruments while "Move On" contains the chords for an early Bowie composition, "All The Young Dudes", played backwards.[36] This was Bowie's last album with Eno until Outside in 1995. Lodger is a 1979 album by David Bowie. ... The so-called Berlin Trilogy is a series of David Bowie albums recorded in collaboration with Brian Eno. ... ”Boys Keep Swinging” was a single by David Bowie. ... ”DJ” was a single by David Bowie. ... Look Back in Anger is a song written by David Bowie and Brian Eno in 1979 for the album Lodger. ... An LP Long playing (LP), either 10 or 12-inch diameter, 33 rpm (actually 33. ... The New Wave was a movement in American, Australian and British popular music, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, growing out of the New York City musical scene centered around the club CBGB. The term itself is a source of much confusion. ... World music is, most generally, all the music in the world. ... African Night Flight is a song written by David Bowie and Brian Eno in 1979 for the album Lodger. ... Yassassin (Turkish for Long Live) is a song written by David Bowie in 1979 for the album Lodger. ... Outside is an album first released September 26, 1995 by David Bowie on Virgin Records. ...


In 1980, Bowie did an about-face, integrating the lessons learnt on Low, Heroes, and Lodger while expanding upon them with chart success.[37] Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) included the #1 hit "Ashes to Ashes", featuring the textural work of guitar-synthesist Chuck Hammer, and revisiting the character of Major Tom from "Space Oddity". The imagery Bowie used in the song's music video gave international exposure to the underground New Romantic movement and, with many of the followers of this phase being devotees, Bowie visited the London club "Blitz" — the main New Romantic hangout — to recruit several of the regulars (including Steve Strange of the band Visage) to act in the video, renowned as being one of the most innovative of all time.[38] Original LP back cover Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) is an album by David Bowie, released in September 1980 by RCA Records. ... Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) track listing Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) (3) Ashes to Ashes (4) Fashion (5) Ashes to Ashes is a single by David Bowie, released in 1980. ... Chuck Hammer, a guitarist, guitar synthesist, and digital film composer recorded work with Lou Reed and David Bowie. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Steve Strange (born Steven John Harrington on May 28, 1959) is a British singer and pop icon, best remembered as an influential party promoter and as the frontman and lead singer for Visage. ... Visage was a New Romantic band that began life in 1978, mainly to provide some danceable music to be played on Steve Stranges and Rusty Egans Billys London nightclub. ...


While Scary Monsters utilised principles that Bowie had learned in the Berlin era, it was considered by critics to be far more direct musically and lyrically, reflecting the transformation Bowie had gone through during his time in Germany and Europe. By 1980 Bowie had divorced his wife Angie, curbed the drug abuse of the "Thin White Duke" era, and radically changed his conception of how music should be written. The album had a hard rock edge that included conspicuous guitar contributions from King Crimson's Robert Fripp, The Who's Pete Townshend, and Television's Tom Verlaine.[37] As "Ashes to Ashes" hit #1 on the UK charts, Bowie opened a three-month run on Broadway starring as The Elephant Man on 1980 September 23.[39] This article is about the musical group. ... Robert Fripp (born 16 May 1946 in Wimborne Minster, Dorset, England) is a guitarist, record producer and a composer, perhaps best known for being the guitarist for, and only constant member of, the progressive rock band King Crimson. ... The Who are an English rock band that formed in 1964. ... Pete Townshend (born Peter Dennis Blandford Townshend on 19 May 1945 in Chiswick, London), is an award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and writer. ... Tom Verlaine (born Thomas Miller, December 13, 1949, in Morristown, New Jersey)[1] is a singer, songwriter and guitarist, best-known as the frontman for the New York rock band, Television. ... Joseph Merrick, sometimes called John Merrick, known as The Elephant Man. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


1980 to 1989: Bowie the superstar

In 1981, Queen released "Under Pressure", co-written and performed with Bowie. The song was a hit and became Bowie's third UK #1 single. In the same year Bowie made a cameo appearance in the German movie Christiane F. Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo, the real-life story of a 13 year-old girl in Berlin who becomes addicted to heroin and ends up prostituting herself. Bowie is credited with "special cooperation" in the credits and his music features prominently in the movie. The soundtrack was released in 1982 and contained a version of "Heroes" sung partially in German that had previously been included on the German pressing of its parent album. The same year Bowie appeared in the BBC's adaptation of Bertolt Brecht's play Baal. Coinciding with transmission of the film, a five-track EP of songs from the play was released as David Bowie in Bertolt Brecht's Baal, recorded at Hansa by the Wall the previous September. It would mark Bowie’s final new release on RCA, as 1983 saw him change record labels from RCA to EMI America. Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bahnhof Zoo in the film Christiane F. - Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo is a 1981 German film directed by Uli Edel, based on the book about the life of Christiane F.. The soundtrack album Christiane F. by David Bowie, was released in 1981. ... For other uses, see Heroin (disambiguation). ... Redirect page ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Baal is Bertolt Brechts first full-length play. ... // Extended play (EP) is the name typically given to vinyl records or CDs which contain more than one single but are too short to qualify as albums. ... Baal was a four-track EP by David Bowie, comprising recordings of songs written for Bertold Brecht’s play Baal. ... The EMI Group is a major record label, based in the United Kingdom and with operations in over 25 other countries. ...


Bowie scored his first truly commercial blockbuster with Let's Dance in 1983, a slick dance album co-produced by Chic's Nile Rodgers. The title track went to #1 in the United States and United Kingdom and many now consider it a standard. Lets Dance is an album by David Bowie, released in 1983. ... For other uses, see Chic. ... Nile Gregory Rodgers (born September 19, 1952 in New York City) is a prolific and influential musician, composer, arranger, guitarist and music producer, and co-founding member of the seminal multi-platinum hit R&B band Chic, with influential bassist, the late Bernard Edwards. ... Let’s Dance is the title album track on David Bowies album Lets Dance. ... The term pop standards refers to an American songwriting, arranging, and singing style that is widely considered as the high point of Western vocal popular music. ...


The album also featured the singles "Modern Love" and "China Girl", the latter causing something of a stir due to its suggestive promotional video. "China Girl" was a remake of a song which Bowie co-wrote several years earlier with Iggy Pop, who recorded it for The Idiot. In an interview by Kurt Loder, Bowie revealed that the motivation for recording "China Girl" was to help out his friend Iggy Pop financially, contributing to Bowie's history of support for musicians he admired. Let's Dance was also notable as a stepping stone for the career of the late Texan guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan, who played on the album and was to have supported Bowie on the consequent Serious Moonlight Tour. Vaughan, however, never joined the tour after various disputes with Bowie. Vaughan was replaced by the Bowie tour veteran Earl Slick. Frank and George Simms from The Simms Brothers Band appeared as backing vocalists for the tour. The Serious Moonlight Tour was a huge success, and a single performance at the US Festival actually earned Bowie a million dollars on its own.[citation needed] Modern Love is the first track on David Bowies album Lets Dance. ... China Girl is a 1983 hit single by David Bowie, written by Bowie and Iggy Pop and taken from the album Lets Dance. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... Promotional photo of Kurt Loder Kurt Loder (born May 5, 1945) is a film critic, author, and television personality. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... Stephen Stevie Ray Vaughan (October 3, 1954 – August 27, 1990), born in Dallas, Texas, was an American blues guitarist. ... Earl Slick is a guitarist born in 1952 and best known for his collaborations with David Bowie, though he has also worked with other artists (John Lennon : Double Fantasy, Milk and Honey, Anthology, Wonsaponatime, Yoko Ono, ...) and even released some solo recordings. ... // Early Years The Simms Brothers Band is a rock/jazz/R&B group formed in early 1974 in southwestern Connecticut. ...


Bowie's next album was originally planned to be a live album recorded on the Serious Moonlight Tour, but EMI demanded another studio album instead. The resulting album, 1984's Tonight, was also dance-oriented, featuring collaborations with Tina Turner (and Iggy Pop), as well as various covers, including one of The Beach Boys' "God Only Knows". Critics labeled it a lazy effort, dashed off by Bowie simply to recapture Let's Dance's chart success, partially due to the fact most of the tracks were either covers or rerecordings of earlier material. Yet the album bore the transatlantic Top Ten hit "Blue Jean" whose complete video - the 21-minute short film "Jazzin' for Blue Jean" - reflected Bowie's long-standing interest in combining music with drama. This video would win Bowie his only Grammy to date, for Best Short Form Music Video. It also featured "Loving the Alien", a remix of which was a minor hit in 1985. The album also has a pair of dance rewrites of "Neighborhood Threat" and "Tonight", old songs Bowie wrote with Iggy Pop which had originally appeared on Lust for Life. Tonight, released September 1984, is a David Bowie album. ... Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock) November 26, 1939) is an 11 time Grammy Award-winning (sharing three), American Singer, Dancer, Record Producer, Executive Producer, Film Producer, Actress, Writer, Performer, Songwriter, Author and occasional Painter whose career has spanned from 1956 to present. ... The Beach Boys is an American rock and roll band. ... God Only Knows is the eighth track on the Pet Sounds album and one of the most widely recognized songs performed by American pop band The Beach Boys. ... Blue Jean is a song written by David Bowie released as a single in September 1984 and in the album Tonight the same year. ... Jazzin for Blue Jean was a 21-minute short film featuring David Bowie and directed by Julien Temple. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video has been awarded since 1984. ... Loving the Alien is a track from the album Tonight by David Bowie. ... Neighborhood Threat is a song written by Iggy Pop, David Bowie and Ricky Gardiner in 1977 for Iggy Pops album Lust for Life. ... Tonight is the title track from the album Tonight by David Bowie. ... Lust for Life is a 1977 album by Iggy Pop, his second collaboration with David Bowie following The Idiot, released earlier in the year. ...


In 1985, Bowie performed several of his greatest hits at Wembley for Live Aid. At the end of his set, which comprised "Rebel Rebel", "TVC 15", "Modern Love" and 'Heroes', he introduced a film of the Ethiopian famine, for which the event was raising funds, which was set to the song "Drive" by the Cars. At the event, the video to a fundraising single was premièred – Bowie performing a duet with Mick Jagger on a version of "Dancing in the Street", which quickly went to #1 on release. In the same year Bowie worked with the Pat Metheny Group on the song "This Is Not America", which was featured in the film The Falcon and the Snowman. This song was the centrepiece of the album, a collaboration intended to underline the espionage thriller's central themes of alienation and disaffection. For the new stadium, see Wembley Stadium. ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985). ... <nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereBold text</nowiki>A famine is a social and economic crisis that is commonly accompanied by widespread malnutrition, starvation, epidemic and increased mortality. ... The Cars were an American rock band, fronted by Ric Ocasek, that emerged from the early punk scene in the late 1970s. ... Fundraising is the process of soliciting and gathering money or other gifts in-kind, by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is a English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Dancing in the Street was a Martha and the Vandellas song covered by David Bowie and Rolling Stones singer Mick Jagger as part of the Live Aid charity movement in 1985. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This is Not America is song from the soundtrack to the film The Falcon and the Snowman , and is a result of a collaboration between rock singer David Bowie and the jazz fusion Pat Metheny Group. ... The Falcon and the Snowman is a 1985 film about two young American men who sold U.S. security secrets to the Soviet Union. ...

Bowie performing in 1987
Bowie performing in 1987

In 1986, Bowie contributed several songs to as well as acted in the film Absolute Beginners. The movie was not well reviewed but Bowie's theme song rose to #2 in the UK charts. He also took a role in the 1986 Jim Henson film Labyrinth, as Jareth, the Goblin King who steals the baby brother of a girl named Sarah (played by Jennifer Connelly), in order to turn him into a goblin. Bowie wrote five songs for the film, the script of which was partially written by Monty Python's Terry Jones. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 483 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (761 × 945 pixel, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): David Bowie ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 483 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (761 × 945 pixel, file size: 292 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): David Bowie ... Absolute Beginners is a 1986 slick mod-stylish rock musical movie adapted from Colin MacInnes book about life in late 1950s London. ... James Maury Jim Henson (September 24, 1936 – May 16, 1990), was the most widely known puppeteer in American television history. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Labyrinth is a 1986 fantasy film, directed by Jim Henson, produced by George Lucas, and designed through the art of Brian Froud. ... Jennifer Lynn Connelly (born December 12, 1970) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former child model. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... Terence Graham Parry Jones (born in Colwyn Bay, Wales, on February 1, 1942) is a British comedian, screenwriter and actor, film director, childrens author, popular historian, political commentator and TV documentary host. ...


Bowie's final solo album of the 80s was 1987's Never Let Me Down, where he ditched the light sound of his two earlier albums, instead offering harder rock with an industrial/techno dance edge. The album, which peaked at #6 in the UK, contained hit singles "Day In, Day Out", "Time Will Crawl", and "Never Let Me Down". Although a commercial success, it drew some of the harshest criticism of Bowie's career, condemned by some critics as a "faceless" piece of product.[citation needed] Bowie himself later described it as "my nadir" and "an awful album".[40] See also: Musical groups established in 1987 Record labels established in 1987 // January 3 - Aretha Franklin becomes the first woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ... Never Let Me Down is an album by David Bowie, released April 1987. ... For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ... For other uses, see Nadir (disambiguation). ...


Bowie decided to tour again in 1987, supporting the Never Let Me Down album. The Glass Spider Tour was preceded by nine promotional press shows before the 86-concert tour actually started on 30 May 1987. In addition to the actual band, that included Peter Frampton on lead guitar, five dancers appeared on stage for almost the entire duration of each concert. Taped pieces of dialogue were also performed by Bowie and the dancers in the middle of songs, creating an overtly theatrical effect. Several visual gimmicks were also recreated from Bowie's earlier tours. Critics of the tour described it as overproduced and claimed it pandered to then-current stadium rock trends in its special effects and dancing.[41] However, fans that saw the shows from the Glass Spider Tour were treated to many of Bowie's classics and rarities, in addition to the newer material. is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Peter Kenneth Frampton (born April 22, 1950 in Beckenham, Kent) is an English musician, best known today for his solo work in the mid-1970s and as one of the original members of the band Humble Pie. ... Stadium Rock was a term that referred to a large concert usually held in stadiums. ...


In August of 1988, Bowie portrayed Pontius Pilate in the Martin Scorsese film The Last Temptation of Christ.[39] Pilate redirects here. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


1989 to 1991: Tin Machine

In 1989, for the first time since the early 1970s, Bowie formed a regular band, Tin Machine, a hard-rocking quartet, along with Reeves Gabrels, Tony Sales, and Hunt Sales. Tin Machine released two studio albums and a live record. The band received mixed reviews and a somewhat lukewarm reception from the public, but Tin Machine heralded the beginning of a long-lasting collaboration between Bowie and Gabrels. Tin Machine was a band, formed in 1989 and fronted by David Bowie. ... Reeves Gabrels is an American guitarist, best known for his 11-year partnership with David Bowie. ... Tony Sales is a rock and roll bass guitarist who, with his brother Hunt Sales, has played with Todd Rundgren, Iggy Pop and Tin Machine. ... Hunt Sales is a rock and roll drummer who has played with Todd Rundgren, his brother Tony Sales, Iggy Pop and David Bowie. ...


The original album, Tin Machine (1989), was a success, holding the number three spot on the charts of the UK. Tin Machine launched its first world tour, featuring a now unshaven David Bowie and additional guitarist Eric Schermerhorn, that year. Despite the success of the Tin Machine venture, Bowie was mildly frustrated that many of his ideas were either rejected or changed by the band. Track listing Heavens In Here Tin Machine Prisoner Of Love Crack City I Cant Read Under The God Amazing Working Class Hero Bus Stop Pretty Thing Video Crime Run Sacrifice Yourself Baby Can Dance ...

David Bowie performing at Rock In Chile Festival, September 27, 1990
David Bowie performing at Rock In Chile Festival, September 27, 1990

Bowie began the 1990s with a stadium tour, in which he played mostly his biggest hits. The Sound + Vision Tour (named after the Low single) was conceived and directed by choreographer Edouard Lock of the Quebec contemporary dance troupe La La La Human Steps, with whom Bowie collaborated and performed on stage and in his videos. Bowie vowed during the tour that he would never play his early hits again. is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Categories: Stub | 1954 births ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... La La La Human Steps is a leading Québécois contemporary dance group known for its energetic, acrobatic style that often involves fast-paced and athletic physical contact. ...


Though he surprised no one when he later reneged on that promise and also on the promise that his set in each country would be focused on the favourite hits voted by phone poll in that country - an idea quickly jettisoned when a campaign by the British magazine NME resulted in a landslide in favour of The Laughing Gnome, it is true that his later tours generally featured few of those hits, and when they appeared, they were often radically reworked in their arrangement and delivery. For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... The Laughing Gnome was a single by David Bowie. ...


Bowie's negative press-image continued when the cover of Tin Machine's second album became unusually controversial, due to the presence of naked statues as its cover art. The coverage only seemed to invite unrelated negative commentary about Bowie to further permeate the public discourse.


After the less successful second album Tin Machine II and the complete failure of live album Tin Machine Live: Oy Vey, Baby, Bowie tired of having to work in a group setting where his creativity was limited, and finally disbanded Tin Machine to work on his own. But the Tin Machine venture did show that Bowie had learned some harsh lessons from the previous decade, and was determined to get serious about concentrating on music more than commercial success. Tin Machine II is the second album by rock group Tin Machine, lead by David Bowie. ...


1992 to 1999: Electronica

In 1992 he performed his hits "Heroes" and "Under Pressure" (with Annie Lennox) at the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert. 1993 saw the release of the soul, jazz and hip-hop influenced Black Tie White Noise, which reunited Bowie with Let's Dance producer Nile Rodgers. The album hit the number one spot on the UK charts with singles such as "Jump They Say" (a top 10 hit) and "Miracle Goodnight". Annie Lennox (born 25 December 1954) is a Scottish musician, vocalist, and Academy Award-winning songwriter. ... An open air concert on Easter Monday, April 20th 1992 at Londons Wembley Stadium, televised live to over one billion people. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Black Tie White Noise is an album by David Bowie. ... Nile Gregory Rodgers (born September 19, 1952 in New York City) is a prolific and influential musician, composer, arranger, guitarist and music producer, and co-founding member of the seminal multi-platinum hit R&B band Chic, with influential bassist, the late Bernard Edwards. ...


Bowie explored new directions on The Buddha of Suburbia (1993), based on incidental music composed for a TV series. It contained some of the new elements introduced in Black Tie White Noise, and also signalled a move towards alternative rock. The album was critical success but received a low-key release and only made number 87 in the UK charts.[42] The Buddha of Suburbia is a David Bowie soundtrack to the 1993 BBC series The Buddha of Suburbia based on the book of the same name by Hanif Kureishi, though most of the music (except the title track) was never used in the series. ... Alternative music redirects here. ...


The ambitious, quasi-industrial release Outside (1995), conceived as the first volume in a subsequently abandoned non-linear narrative of art and murder, reunited him with Brian Eno. The album introduced the characters of one of Bowie's short stories, and achieved chart success in both the UK and US.[43] The album and its singles put Bowie back into the mainstream of rock music. In September 1995, Bowie began the Outside Tour with Gabrels returning as guitarist. In a move that was equally lauded and ridiculed by Bowie fans and critics, Bowie chose Nine Inch Nails as the tour partner;[44] Trent Reznor also contributed a remix of the Outside song "The Hearts Filthy Lesson" for its single release. On January 17, 1996, Bowie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at the eleventh annual induction ceremony.[45] Outside is an album first released September 26, 1995 by David Bowie on Virgin Records. ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... NIN redirects here. ... Michael Trent Reznor (born May 17, 1965) is an American musician, singer, producer, and multi-instrumentalist. ... A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ... The Hearts Filthy Lesson (the omission of the apostrophe is deliberate) was the first single released from David Bowies 1995 album 1. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ...


Receiving some of the strongest critical response since Let's Dance was Earthling (1997),[46] which incorporated experiments in British jungle and drum 'n' bass and included a single released over the Internet, called "Telling Lies"; other singles included "Little Wonder" and "Dead Man Walking". There was a corresponding world tour, which was fairly successful. Bowie's track in the Paul Verhoeven film Showgirls, "I'm Afraid of Americans" was remixed by Trent Reznor for a single release. The video's heavy rotation (also featuring Reznor) contributed to the song's 16-week stay in the US Billboard Hot 100.[46] Earthling is a 1997 album by David Bowie. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to d&b, DnB, dnb, dnb, drum n bass and drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle. ... Little Wonder is song and single by David Bowie, Reeves Gabrels and Mark Plati from the 1997 album Earthling. ... Dead Man Walking is song and single by David Bowie and Reeves Gabrels from the 1997 album Earthling. ... This article is about the film Showgirls. For a dancer/performer, see Showgirl. ... Im Afraid of Americans is song and single by David Bowie from the 1997 album Earthling. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ...


1999 to present: Neoclassicist Bowie

In 1998, David Bowie had reunited with Tony Visconti to record a song for The Rugrats Movie called "(Safe in This) Sky Life". Although the track was edited out of the final cut, and did not feature on the film's soundtrack album, the reunion led to the pair pursuing a new collaborative effort. "(Safe In This) Sky Life" was later re-recorded and released as a single b-side in 2002 where it was retitled "Safe".[47] Amongst their earliest work together in this period, was a reworking of Placebo's track "Without You I'm Nothing", from the album of the same name - Visconti overseeing the additional production required when Bowie's harmonised vocal was added to the original version for a strictly limited edition single release. For other uses, see Tony Visconti (disambiguation). ... A rugrat may also be a pejorative term for a toddler. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... Placebo are an alternative rock band currently consisting of Brian Molko and Stefan Olsdal. ... Without You Im Nothing was a single by British alternative rock band Placebo. ...


1999 found Bowie composing the soundtrack for a computer game called "Omikron: The Nomad Soul". Bowie and his wife, Iman, made appearances as characters in the game. That same year, re-recorded tracks from the game and new music was released in the album 'hours...' featured "What's Really Happening", the lyrics for which were written by Alex Grant, the winner of Bowie's "Cyber Song Contest" Internet competition. This album presented Bowie's exit from heavy electronica, with an emphasis on more live instruments, and, through songs like "Thursday's Child" and "Survive", a thematic move into Bowie's sense of his own aging and sentimentality. After this album, Bowie's guitarist, Reeves Gabrels, quit working with Bowie, feeling that the music was becoming "too soft".[citation needed] Iman (born July 25, 1955 in Mogadishu, Somalia as Iman Abdulmajid, Somali: Iimaan Cabdimajiid) is a supermodel based in the United States. ... is a 1999 album by British musician David Bowie. ... Thursdays Child is a song written by David Bowie and Reeves Gabrels for the album hours. ... Survive is a song and single written by David Bowie and Reeves Gabrels for the album hours. ...


Plans surfaced after the release of 'hours...' for an album titled Toy, which would feature new versions of some of Bowie's earliest pieces as well as three new songs. Sessions for the album commenced in 2000, but the album was never released, leaving a number of tracks, some as yet unheard, on the editing floor.[48] Bowie and Visconti continued collaboration with the production of a new album of completely original songs instead. The result of the sessions was the 2002 album Heathen, which had a dark atmospheric sound, and was Bowie's biggest chart success in recent years. 2002 also saw Bowie curate the annual Meltdown festival in London. Amongst the acts selected by Bowie to perform were Phillip Glass, Television and The Polyphonic Spree. Bowie himself played a show at the Royal Festival Hall which notably included a rare performance of his experimental opus Low in its entirety. Toy is an unreleased album recorded by David Bowie and tentatively scheduled for release in mid-2001. ... Heathen is an album by the British singer-songwriter David Bowie, released in 2002. ... Meltdown is an annual music festival held at the Royal Festival Hall, part of Londons South Bank Centre. ... Philip Glass looks upon sheet music in a portrait taken by Annie Leibovitz. ... The Polyphonic Spree is a self-described choral symphonic rock group from the Dallas, Texas area. ... The Royal Festival Hall reopening celebrations The Royal Festival Hall is a concert, dance and talks venue within Southbank Centre in London, England. ... Low is a 1977 album by British musician David Bowie. ...


In 2003, a report in the Sunday Express named Bowie as the second-richest entertainer in the UK (behind Sir Paul McCartney), with an estimated fortune of £510 million. However, the 2005 Sunday Times Rich List credited him with a little over £100 million. Express is a free, widely circulated daily newpaper in the Washington DC metro area. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer-songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, poet, entrepreneur, painter, record producer, film producer, and animal-rights activist. ... The Sunday Times Rich List is a list of the 1,000 most wealthy people or families in the United Kingdom, updated annually in April and published as a magazine supplement by British national Sunday newspaper The Sunday Times since 1989. ...


In September 2003, Bowie released a new album, Reality, and announced a world tour. 'A Reality Tour' was the best-selling tour of the following year. However, it was cut short after Bowie suffered chest pain while performing on stage in the northwestern German town of Scheeßel on June 25, 2004. Originally thought to be a pinched nerve in his shoulder, the pain was later diagnosed as an acutely blocked artery; an emergency angioplasty was performed at St. Georg Hospital in Hamburg by Dr Karl Heinz Kuck.[49] Reality is an album by the British singer-songwriter David Bowie, released in 2003. ... David Bowie: A Reality Tour (2004) Summary David Bowie: A Reality Tour is a DVD of David Bowies performance in Dublin, Ireland during the 2004 Reality Tour. ... Scheeßel is a village and a municipality in the district of Rotenburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Artery (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


He was discharged in early July 2004 and continued to spend time recovering. Bowie later admitted he had suffered a minor heart attack, resulting from years of heavy smoking and touring. The tour was cancelled for the time being, with hopes that he would go back on tour by August, though this did not materialise. He recuperated back in New York City.[50] Heart attack redirects here. ...


In October 2004, Bowie released a live DVD of the tour, entitled A Reality Tour of his performances in Dublin, Ireland on 22 November and 23 November 2003, which included songs spanning the full length of Bowie's career, although mostly focusing on his more recent albums. A Reality Tour is a DVD released in 2004 of David Bowies performance in Dublin, Ireland in 2003 during the Reality Tour. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Still recuperating from his operation, Bowie worked off-stage and relaxed from studio work for the first time in several years. In 2004, a duet of his classic song "Changes" with Butterfly Boucher appeared in Shrek 2. The soundtrack for the film The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou featured David Bowie songs performed in Portuguese by cast member Seu Jorge (who adapted the lyrics to make them relevant to the film's story). Most of the David Bowie songs featured in the film were originally from David Bowie (debut album), Space Oddity, Hunky Dory, The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars and Diamond Dogs. Bowie commented, "Had Seu Jorge not recorded my songs acoustically in Portuguese I would never have heard this new level of beauty which he has imbued them with".[51] Changes was a single by David Bowie, taken from the album Hunky Dory. ... Butterfly Boucher (pronounced bow-cher with a hard ch sound, unlike the French pronunciation) is an Australian singer/songwriter. ... Shrek 2, which was released in the United States on May 19, 2004, is the 2004 sequel to the 2001 computer-animated DreamWorks Pictures film Shrek. ... The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou is Wes Andersons fourth feature length film and was released in the U.S. on December 25, 2004. ... Seu Jorge playing at the 2006 Coachella Festival Seu Jorge (b. ...


Despite hopes for a comeback, in 2005, Bowie announced that he had made no plans for any performances during the year. After a relatively quiet year, Bowie recorded the vocals for the song "(She Can) Do That", co-written by Brian Transeau, for the movie Stealth. Rumours flew about the possibility of a new album, but no announcements were made. In April 2005, film writer and director Darren Aronofsky revealed Bowie was working on a rock opera adaptation of the comic book Watchmen.[52] Stealth is a 2005 action/adventure thriller starring Jamie Foxx, Jessica Biel & Josh Lucas. ... Darren Aronofsky (born February 12, 1969 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American film director, screenwriter and film producer. ... For other uses, see Watchman. ...


David Bowie finally returned to the stage on September 8, 2005, alongside Arcade Fire, for the nationally televised event Fashion Rocks, his first gig since the heart attack. Bowie has shown interest in the Montreal band since he was seen at one of their shows in New York City nearly a year earlier. Bowie had requested the band to perform at the show, and together they performed the Arcade Fire's song "Wake Up" from their album Funeral, as well as Bowie's own "Five Years" and "Life on Mars?". He joined them again on September 15, 2005, singing "Queen Bitch" and "Wake Up" from Central Park's Summerstage as part of the CMJ Music Marathon. is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arcade Fire is an indie rock band based in Montreal, Quebec which is based around the husband and wife duo of Win Butler and Régine Chassagne. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Singles from Funeral Released: June 20, 2004 Released: March 28, 2005 Released: May 23, 2005 Released: September 12, 2005 Released: February 16, 2006 Funeral is the highly critically-acclaimed debut album by Arcade Fire. ... This article is about the song by David Bowie. ... For other uses, see Life on Mars (disambiguation). ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Bitch is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ...


Bowie contributed back-up vocals for TV on the Radio's song "Province" from their album Return to Cookie Mountain.[53] He made other occasional appearances, as in his commercial with Snoop Dogg for XM Satellite Radio. He appeared on Danish alt-rockers Kashmir's 2005 release, No Balance Palace, which was produced by Tony Visconti. The album also featured a spoken word performance by Lou Reed, making it the second project involving both Bowie and Reed in two years, since Reed's 2003 The Raven. TV on the Radio is a New York City indie rock band formed in 2001 whose music spans genres as diverse as free jazz, a cappella/doo-wop, soul, trip-hop and electro. ... Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. ... “XM” redirects here. ... Kashmir is a Danish rock band consisting of Kasper Eistrup (vocals and lead guitar); Mads Tunebjerg (bass); Asger Techau (drums) and Henrik Lindstrand (keyboards and guitar). ... No Balance Palace is the fifth album by the danish band Kashmir. ... For the album by The Stranglers, see The Raven (The Stranglers album). ...


On February 8, 2006, David Bowie was awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. In November, Bowie performed at the Black Ball in New York for the Keep a Child Alive Foundation alongside his wife, Iman, and Alicia Keys. He duetted with Keys on "Changes", and also performed "Wild is the Wind" and "Fantastic Voyage". is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... Alicia Keys (born Alicia J. Augello-Cook on January 25, 1981[2][3][4]) is an American R&B, soul, and neo soul singer-songwriter, pianist, and actress who has sold over 25 million albums worldwide as of 2007, and has won numerous awards, including eleven Grammy Awards, eleven Billboard...


For 2006, Bowie once again announced a break from performance, but he made a surprise guest appearance at David Gilmour's May 29, 2006 concert at the Royal Albert Hall in London. He sang "Arnold Layne" and "Comfortably Numb", closing the concert. The former performance was released, on December 26, 2006, as a single. For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Albert Hall redirects here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Arnold Layne was the first single released by British Psychedelic rock group Pink Floyd, shortly after landing a recording contract with EMI. The song was written by Syd Barrett, Pink Floyds co-founder and original front man. ... The Wall Disc Two track listing Comfortably Numb is a song by the British progressive rock band Pink Floyd, which was released on the 1979 double album The Wall. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In May 2007, it was announced that Bowie would curate the High Line Festival in the abandoned railway park in New York called the High Line where he would select various musicians and artists to perform.[54] The southern end of the High Line on Washington Street in the Gansevoort Market Historic District A portion of the High Line running through Chelsea Market (15th Street and 10th Avenue) which connects to an adjacent building. ...


A forthcoming album entitled Anywhere I Lay My Head, comprising ten covers of classic Tom Waits songs by actress Scarlett Johansson, is due to feature two tracks with David Bowie on backing vocals: "Falling Down" and "Fannin' Street". The album is scheduled for release in spring 2008.[55][56] Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ... Scarlett I. Johansson[1] (born November 22, 1984) is a BAFTA-winning and four-time Golden Globe-nominated actress and singer, of dual American and Danish citizenship. ...


Acting career

Bowie's first major film role in The Man Who Fell to Earth in 1976, earned acclaim. Bowie's character Thomas Jerome Newton is an alien from a planet that is dying from a lack of water. In 1979's Just a Gigolo, an Anglo-German co-production directed by David Hemmings, Bowie played the lead role of a Prussian officer Paul von Pryzgodski returning from World War I who is discovered by a Baroness (Marlene Dietrich) and put into her Gigolo Stable. The following is a listing of films or television programs in which David Bowie has appeared. ... The Man Who Fell to Earth is a 1976 science fiction film directed by Nicolas Roeg about an extraterrestrial who crash lands on Earth seeking a way to ship water to his planet, which is suffering from a severe drought. ... // Events March 5 - Production begins on Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back. ... Schöner Gigolo, armer Gigolo (also known as Just a Gigolo) is a 1979 movie starring David Bowie, Sydne Rome, Marlene Dietrich and Kim Novak. ... David Hemmings in Blowup David Hemmings (18 November 1941 – 3 December 2003) was an English movie actor and director, whose most famous role was the photographer in Michelangelo Antonionis Blowup in 1966 (opposite Vanessa Redgrave), one of the films that best represented the spirit of the 1960s. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ...


In the eighties, Bowie continued with film roles and also starred in the Broadway production of The Elephant Man (1980-1981). In 1982, he made a cameo appearance as himself in Christiane F., focusing on a young girl's drug addiction. Bowie also starred in The Hunger (1983), a revisionist vampire movie with Catherine Deneuve and Susan Sarandon. In the film, Bowie and Deneuve are vampire lovers, with her having made him a vampire centuries ago. While she is truly ageless, he discovers to his horror that although immortal, he can still age and rapidly becomes a pathetic, monstrous husk as the film progresses. In Nagisa Oshima's film Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence (1983), based on Laurens van der Post's novel The Seed and the Sower, Bowie played Major Jack Celliers, a prisoner of war in a Japanese internment camp. Another famous musician, Ryuichi Sakamoto, played the camp commandant who begins to be undermined by Celliers' bizarre behavior. Bowie had a cameo as The Shark in Yellowbeard, a 1983 pirate comedy made by some of the members of Monty Python, and a small part as Colin the hit man in the 1985 film Into the Night. During this time Bowie was also asked to play the villain Max Zorin in the James Bond film A View to a Kill (1985), but turned down the role, stating that "I didn't want to spend five months watching my stunt double fall off mountains."[57] Joseph Merrick, sometimes called John Merrick, known as The Elephant Man. ... Christiane F. (full name Christiane Vera Felscherinow), was born in West Berlin on May 20, 1962. ... The Hunger is a 1983 English language horror film. ... Philip Burne-Jones, The Vampire, 1897 Vampires are mythological or folkloric beings that subsist on human and/or animal lifeforce. ... Catherine Deneuve (French IPA: ), (October 22, 1943, in Paris, France), is an Academy Award-nominated French actress. ... Susan Sarandon (born October 4, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Nagisa Oshima (大島 渚 Ōshima Nagisa, born March 31, 1932) is a famous Japanese director. ... Merry Christmas, Mr. ... Sir Laurens Jan van der Post by Frances Baruch Sir Laurens Jan van der Post (aka Laurens van der Post) December 13, 1906 – December 16, 1996. ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... Ryuichi Sakamoto (坂本 龍一 Sakamoto Ryūichi, born January 17, 1952, Nakano, Tokyo, Japan) is an Academy Awards-winning, Grammy-winning, Golden Globe-winning Japanese musician, composer, producer and actor, based in New York and Tokyo. ... Yellowbeard poster Yellowbeard is a 1983 comedy film, that was co-written and acted by Monty Python member Graham Chapman and David Sherlock, and directed by Mel Damski. ... Monty Python, or The Pythons,[2][3] is the collective name of the creators of Monty Pythons Flying Circus, a British television comedy sketch show that first aired on the BBC on 5 October 1969. ... A hitman (alternately, hit man) is a hired assassin, often by organized crime. ... Max Zorin is a fictional character in the James Bond film A View to a Kill. ... This article is about the spy series. ... A View to a Kill is a 1985 spy film. ...


Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence impressed some critics. His next major film project, the rock musical Absolute Beginners (1986), was both a critical and box office disappointment. The same year he appeared in the Jim Henson cult classic, the dark fantasy Labyrinth (1986), playing Jareth, the king of the goblins. Jareth is a powerful, mysterious creature who has an antagonistic yet strangely flirtatious relationship with Sarah (Jennifer Connelly), the film's teenage heroine. Appearing in heavy make-up and a mane-like wig, Bowie sang a variety of new songs specially composed for the film's soundtrack. Bowie also played a sympathetic Pontius Pilate in Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ (1988). He was briefly considered for the role of The Joker by Tim Burton and Sam Hamm for 1989's Batman. Hamm recalls "David Bowie would be kind of neat because he's very funny when he does sinister roles". The role ended up going to Jack Nicholson.[58] Absolute Beginners is a 1986 slick mod-stylish rock musical movie adapted from Colin MacInnes book Absolute Beginners about life in late 1950s London. ... James Maury Jim Henson (September 24, 1936 – May 16, 1990), was the most widely known puppeteer in American television history. ... Labyrinth is a 1986 fantasy film, directed by Jim Henson, produced by George Lucas, and designed through the art of Brian Froud. ... For other uses, see Goblin (disambiguation). ... Jennifer Lynn Connelly (born December 12, 1970) is an Academy Award-winning American film actress and former child model. ... Pilate redirects here. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Sam Hamm is an American screenwriter, perhaps best known for writing the screenplays for the Tim Burton Batman films. ... Batman is a 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. ... John Joseph Nicholson (born April 22, 1937), known as Jack Nicholson, is a three time Academy Award-winning American actor internationally renowned for his often dark-themed portrayals of neurotic characters. ...


Bowie portrayed a disgruntled restaurant employee opposite Rosanna Arquette in the 1991 film The Linguini Incident, and played mysterious FBI agent Phillip Jeffries in David Lynch's Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (1992). He took the small but pivotal role of Andy Warhol in Basquiat, artist/director Julian Schnabel's 1996 biopic of the artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. In 1998 Bowie also co-starred in an Italian film called Gunslinger's Revenge (renamed from the original Il Mio West).[59] However, it was not released in the United States until 2005. In it he plays the most feared gunslinger in the region.[60] Rosanna Lauren Arquette (born August 10, 1959) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actress, film director, and film producer. ... The Linguini Incident (1991) is a comic film set in New York starring David Bowie and Rosanna Arquette. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... FBI Special Agent Phillip Jeffries (David Bowie) Special Agent Phillip Jeffries is a character played by David Bowie in the movie Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. ... Fire Walk With Me is a 1992 movie directed by David Lynch and starring Sheryl Lee, Ray Wise, Chris Isaak, Kiefer Sutherland, Mädchen Amick, Phoebe Augustine and Dana Ashbrook. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Basquiat (pronounced ) is a 1996 film directed by Julian Schnabel which is loosely based on the life of American postmodernist/neo expressionist artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. ... Julian Schnabel (b. ... A biographical film or biopic is a film about a particular person or group of people, based on events that actually happened. ... Jean-Michel Basquiat (pronounced in French) (December 22, 1960, Brooklyn - August 12, 1988, New York, New York) was an American artist. ...


Before appearing in The Hunger, a TV horror serial based on the 1983 movie, Bowie was invited by musician Goldie to play the aging gangster Bernie in Andrew Goth's Brighton Rock inspired movie, Everybody Loves Sunshine. He played the title role in the 2000 film, Mr. Rice's Secret, in which he played the neighbour of a terminally ill twelve year old. In 2001, Bowie appeared as himself in the film Zoolander, volunteering himself to be a walkoff judge between Ben Stiller's character Zoolander, and Owen Wilson's character, Hansel. The Hunger is a horror serial based on the feature film of the same name. ... For other uses, see Goldie (disambiguation). ... Brighton Rock is a novel by Graham Greene, published in 1938, and later made into a 1947 film. ... Zoolander is a 2001 comedy film directed by Ben Stiller. ... Benjamin Edward Stiller (born November 30, 1965) is an Emmy-winning American comedian, actor, film producer and director. ... Owen Cunningham Wilson (born November 18, 1968) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and writer. ...


In 2006, Bowie portrayed Nikola Tesla alongside Christian Bale and Hugh Jackman in The Prestige, directed by Christopher Nolan. It follows the bitter competition between two magicians around the turn of the century. Bowie has voice-acted in the animated movie Arthur and the Minimoys (known as Arthur and the Invisibles in the U.S.) as the powerful villain Maltazard. He also appeared as himself in an episode of Extras. Bowie (in the context of the show) improvised and sang a song mocking the main character Andy Millman, played by Ricky Gervais. He also lent his voice to the character "Lord Royal Highness" in the SpongeBob SquarePants episode "SpongeBob's Atlantis SquarePantis" who, like Bowie, has mismatched eyes. His latest project is a supporting role as Ogilvie in the new film, August,[61] directed by Austin Chick (best known for writing and directing the 2002 romantic drama XX/XY), and starring Josh Hartnett and Rip Torn (with whom he also worked on The Man Who Fell to Earth).[62] Nikola Tesla (Serbian Cyrillic: ) (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943) was a inventor, physicist, mechanical engineer, and electrical engineer. ... Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is a Screen Actors Guild Award-nominated, Saturn Award-winning Welsh actor[2][3] whose film credits include Empire of the Sun, American Psycho, Equilibrium, The Machinist, Batman Begins and the upcoming The Dark Knight. ... Hugh Michael Jackman (born 12 October 1968 in Pymble, New South Wales) is an Australian film, television and stage actor. ... The Prestige is a 2006 period film directed by Christopher Nolan, with a screenplay adapted from the 1995 World Fantasy Award-winning novel of the same name by Christopher Priest. ... Christopher Nolan (born July 30, 1970) is an Academy Award nominated film director, writer and producer. ... Arthur and the Minimoys (Arthur and the Invisibles in English-speaking territories) is a part-animated, part-live action feature film adaptation of the same-name, 2002 childrens book and the 2003 sequel Arthur et la cité interdite / Arthur and the Forbidden City by filmmaker Luc Besson, who also... Not to be confused with Extra (TV series). ... Andy Millman is a character from the BBC/HBO co-production Extras. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (born 25 June 1961) is a triple Golden Globe-, double Emmy- and seven-time BAFTA award-winning English comedian, writer, actor and former New Romantic musician from Reading, Berkshire. ... This article is about the series. ... SpongeBobs Atlantis SquarePantis is a SpongeBob SquarePants video game based on the television series. ... August is a 2007 drama film about two brothers fighting to keep their dot. ... Austin Chick is a feature film director. ... XX/XY is a film released in 2002 starring Mark Ruffalo and Maya Stange. ... Joshua Daniel Hartnett (born July 21, 1978) is an American actor. ... Rip Torn (born February 6, 1931) is an American Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning television and film actor, who is perhaps best known for his role as Artie on the HBO comedy series The Larry Sanders Show. ...


Personal life

Bowie met his first wife Angela Bowie in 1969. According to Bowie, they were "fucking the same bloke" (record executive Calvin Mark Lee).[63] Angie's sense of fashion and outrage has been credited as a significant influence in Bowie's early career and rise to fame.[64] They married on 19 March 1970 at Bromley Register Office in Beckenham Lane, Kent, England where she permanently took his adopted last name. Their son was born on 30 May 1971 and named Zowie (Zowie later preferred to be known as Joe/Joey, although now he has reverted to his legal birth name - "Duncan Zowie Haywood Jones"). They separated after eight years of marriage and divorced on 8 February 1980, in Switzerland. The marriage has been cited as one of convenience for both.[64] Angela Bowie, most commonly known as Angie Bowie, was born 1949 in Cyprus, as Mary Angela Barnett. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Duncan Zowie Haywood Jones (born 30 May 1971), also known as Zowie Bowie or Joey Bowie, is a British advertising executive best known as the son of popular music icon David Bowie. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Bowie 'outed' himself in an interview with Melody Maker in January 1972, a move coinciding with the first shots in his campaign for stardom as Ziggy Stardust.[22]In a 1976 interview with Playboy, Bowie said: "It's true - I am a bisexual. But I can't deny that I've used that fact very well. I suppose it's the best thing that ever happened to me." He distanced himself from that in a 1983 interview with Rolling Stone, saying his earlier declaration of bisexuality was "the biggest mistake I ever made".[65] In 1993, he made the claim that he had always been a "closet heterosexual", and that his interest in homosexual and bisexual culture was more a product of the times and situation than his own feelings. Bowie stated, "It wasn't something I was comfortable with at all."[66] He expressed a different view in a 2002 interview with Blender: "I had no problem with people knowing I was bisexual. But I had no inclination to hold any banners or be a representative of any group of people. I knew what I wanted to be, which was a songwriter and a performer, and I felt that bisexuality became my headline over here for so long. America is a very puritanical place, and I think it stood in the way of so much I wanted to do."[67] For other uses, see Coming out (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music newspaper. ... Ziggy Stardust redirects here. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ... Bisexual redirects here. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Blender is an American magazine that bills itself as the ultimate guide to music and more. ...


Bowie married his second wife, the Somali-born supermodel Iman Abdulmajid, in 1992. The couple have a daughter, Alexandria Zahra Jones (known as Lexi), born August 15, 2000, and live in Manhattan and London. For the RuPaul song, see Supermodel (You Better Work). ... Iman (born July 25, 1955 in Mogadishu, Somalia as Iman Abdulmajid, Somali: Iimaan Cabdimajiid) is a supermodel based in the United States. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


In September 2007, he made a contribution of U.S.$10,000 to the NAACP[68] for the Jena Six Legal Defense Fund to help with legal bills of six teenagers arrested and charged with crimes related to their involvement in the assault of a teenager in Jena.[69] For other uses, see Jena (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jena (disambiguation). ...


Discography

// 1964: Liza Jane (as Davie Jones and the King Bees) Did Not Chart 1965: I Pity the Fool (as The Manish Boys) Did Not Chart 1965: Youve Got a Habit of Leaving (as Davy Jones and the Lower Third) Did Not Chart 1966: Cant Help Thinking About Me...

Studio albums

David Bowie is the eponymously-titled debut album by rock musician David Bowie, released in 1967 by Deram Records, a Decca offshoot. ... Space Oddity is an album by rock musician David Bowie, released 1969. ... Hunky Dory is the fourth album by English singer-songwriter David Bowie, released by RCA Records in 1971. ... Ziggy Stardust redirects here. ... Aladdin Sane (i. ... Pin Ups is a 1973 covers album by David Bowie. ... Diamond Dogs is a concept album by David Bowie, originally released by RCA in 1974. ... Young Americans is an album by David Bowie released in 1975. ... For the David Bowie album, click here. ... Low is a 1977 album by British musician David Bowie. ... Heroes (the quotation marks are part of the title, for reasons of irony)[1] is an album by David Bowie, released in 1977. ... Lodger is a 1979 album by David Bowie. ... Original LP back cover Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) is an album by David Bowie, released in September 1980 by RCA Records. ... Lets Dance is an album by David Bowie, released in 1983. ... Tonight, released September 1984, is a David Bowie album. ... Never Let Me Down is an album by David Bowie, released April 1987. ... Black Tie White Noise is an album by David Bowie. ... Outside is an album first released September 26, 1995 by David Bowie on Virgin Records. ... Earthling is a 1997 album by David Bowie. ... hours. ... Heathen is an album by the British singer-songwriter David Bowie, released in 2002. ... Reality is an album by the British singer-songwriter David Bowie, released in 2003. ...

Filmography

The following is a listing of films or television programs in which David Bowie has appeared. ...

Awards

The Saturn Awards
The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy, and horror in film, television, and home video. ...

Daytime Emmy Award
A French poster for the film The Man Who Fell to Earth is a novel by Walter Tevis about an extraterrestrial who crashlands on Earth seeking a way to ship water to his planet, which is suffering from a severe drought. ... The Daytime Emmy Awards are awards presented by the New York-based National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and the Los Angeles-based Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in recognition of excellence in American daytime television programming. ...

  • Outstanding Special Class Special, Hollywood Rocks the Movies: The 1970s (2003, Shared with Kevin Burns, David Sehring, and Patty Ivins Specht)

Grammy Awards
Kevin Burns is the prolific producer of literally hundreds of hours of critically acclaimed and award-winning television. ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music...

BRIT Awards
The Grammy Award for Best Short Form Music Video has been awarded since 1984. ... Jazzin for Blue Jean was a 21-minute short film featuring David Bowie and directed by Julien Temple. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and... The Brit Awards are the annual United Kingdom pop music awards founded by the British Phonographic Industry. ...

  • Best British Male Solo Artist (1984)
  • Outstanding Contribution To Music (1996)

Webby Awards
Presented by The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences, the Webby Awards are a set of awards presented to the worlds best websites. The awards have been given out since 1996. ...

  • Outstanding Contribution To Music (2007)

He has also previously declined the British honour Commander of the British Empire in 2000, and knighthood in 2003.[70] The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Knights Dueling, by Eugène Delacroix For other uses, see Knight (disambiguation) or Knights (disambiguation). ...


See also

Bowie Bonds are asset-backed securities of current and future revenues of the first 25 albums (287 songs) of David Bowies collection recorded before 1990. ... This is the list of best selling music artists (including groups) worldwide, alltime. ... This is a list of number-one hits in the United States by year from the Billboard Hot 100. ... This is a list of recording artists who have reached number one on Billboard magazines weekly pop singles chart(s). ... Billboards Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart is a weekly national survey of popular songs in U.S. dance clubs. ... This is a list of recording artists who have reached number one on Billboard magazines Hot Dance Club Play chart. ... The following is a partial list of people who have declined a British honour, such as a knighthood or an honour usually within the Order of the British Empire. ... // Not to be confused with the later ITV Greatest Britons show. ... Low Symphony is a symphony (also known as Symphony No. ... Heroes Symphony is a symphony (also known as Symphony No. ...

Notes

  1. ^ David Bowie by Stephen Thomas Erlewine; URL accessed March 21, 2007
  2. ^ Carr & Murray (1981): pp.68-74
  3. ^ The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  4. ^ "Episode for 29 November 2003". Parkinson (TV series). [29 [November]] 2003.
  5. ^ Bowiewonderworld.com
  6. ^ later renamed Ravensbourne College
  7. ^ Buckley (2000): p.27
  8. ^ Gillman, Peter; Leni Gillman. Alias David Bowie, p.85. ISBN 0-450-413468. 
  9. ^ a b Buckley (2000): p.24
  10. ^ album covers David Bowie Album Covers. GeorgeUnderwood.com.
  11. ^ Peter Doggett (2007). "Teenage Wildlife", MOJO 60 Years of Bowie: pp.8-9
  12. ^ Buckley (2000): p.33
  13. ^ Carr & Murray (1981): p.117
  14. ^ Pegg (2004): pp.197-201
  15. ^ Buckley (2000): p.74
  16. ^ The Three Tuns pub and the Beckenham Arts Lab: BowieWonderworld.com website. Retrieved on 22 September 2007.
  17. ^ "Memory of a Free Festival", hosted by the Beckenham Arts Lab: BowieWonderworld.com website. Retrieved on 22 September 2007.
  18. ^ Buckley (2000): p.156
  19. ^ Pegg (2004): pp.281-283
  20. ^ a b Buckley (2000): pp.182-189
  21. ^ Carr & Murray (1981): pp.52-56
  22. ^ a b Carr & Murray (1981): p.7
  23. ^ Carr & Murray (1981): p.116
  24. ^ Biography of David Bowie
  25. ^ DVD, Dick Cavett Show: Rock Icons, disc 1
  26. ^ [1]
  27. ^ Kris Needs (2007). "The Passenger", MOJO 60 Years of Bowie: p.65
  28. ^ Pegg (2000): pp.90-92
  29. ^ Bowie Golden Years: Marc
  30. ^ In pictures: Marc Bolan (2007-09-13). Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  31. ^ DVD, Bing Crosby, A Bing Crosby Christmas, Questar qd3175, ISBN 1-56855-683-7
  32. ^ Farhi, Paul. "Bing and Bowie: An Odd Story of Holiday Harmony", Washington Post, 2006-12-20. Retrieved on 2007-11-09. 
  33. ^ Bronson, Fred (1990). The Billboard Book of Number 1 Hits. Billboard Books, 572. ISBN 0-823-07677-6. 
  34. ^ Dave Thompson (2007). "Bowie and Bing", MOJO 60 Years of Bowie: p.64
  35. ^ Buckley (2000): p.27
  36. ^ Carr & Murray (1981): p.102-107
  37. ^ a b Carr & Murray (1981): pp.108-114
  38. ^ Pegg (2000): p.29
  39. ^ a b Rock Movers & Shakers, Dafydd Rees & Luke Crampton, Billboard Books, 1991
  40. ^ James McNair (2007). "Tumble & Twirl", MOJO 60 Years of Bowie: p.101
  41. ^ Andy Fyfe (2007). "Too Dizzy", MOJO 60 Years of Bowie: pp.88-91
  42. ^ Buckley (2000): pp.494-495,623
  43. ^ Buckley (2000): pp.623-624
  44. ^ Buckley (2000): pp.512-513
  45. ^ Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction. rockhall.com.
  46. ^ a b Buckley (2000): p.533-534
  47. ^ The Complete David Bowie, Nicholas Pegg, 2006 Reynolds & Hearn Ltd
  48. ^ Illustrated db Discography
  49. ^ BBC News
  50. ^ BBC News
  51. ^ Forbes
  52. ^ Daniel Robert Epstein. "Darren Aronofsky - The Fountain", Suicide Girls, Suicide Girls, 1 April 2005. 
  53. ^ Pitchfork Media
  54. ^ 2007 NYC Show As Bowie Curates first High Line Festival
  55. ^ Rolling Stone: How Scarlett Johansson and David Bowie got together
  56. ^ Bowie Lends Vocals to Scarlett Johansson Album. BowieNet news release reprinted at teenagewildlife.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-03.
  57. ^ The Complete David Bowie by Nicholas Pegg (2004, Reynolds & Hearn Ltd) p.561.
  58. ^ Batman Movie Online: Behind the Scenes
  59. ^ Appearance in Il Mio West, Italian film, 1998: IMDB.com website.
  60. ^ Gunslinger's Revenge, 2005 US release of Il Mio West: review at the Reel Film website.
  61. ^ Film review, August (2008), to be released: ComingSoon.net website. Retrieved on January 24, 2008.
  62. ^ Previous work with Rip Torn, The Man Who Fell to Earth: castlist from the IMDB.com website. Retrieved on March 7, 2008.
  63. ^ Anecdotage.com
  64. ^ a b Buckley (2000): pp.92-93
  65. ^ Buckley (2000): p.401
  66. ^ The Ziggy Stardust Companion
  67. ^ Collis, Clark. "Dear Superstar: David Bowie", Blender, 2002-08. 
  68. ^ "Pop music icon makes contribution to Jena defense effort". 
  69. ^ Donation to the Jena Six: article at the MonstersAndCritics.com website. Retrieved on December 6, 2007.
  70. ^ Thompson, Jody (2007-01-08). Sixty things about David Bowie. (No. 35): BBC News. Retrieved on 2008-01-12.

Parkinson is a British television chat show presented by Michael Parkinson. ... Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication is a specialist higher education sector college founded in 1962 and based in the United Kingdom, near Chislehurst, Bromley, in Greater London. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Kris Needs is a British journalist and author, primarily known for his writings on the music scene from the 1970s onwards. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mojo is a popular music magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Buckley, David [1999] (2000). Strange Fascination - David Bowie: The Definitive Story. London: Virgin. ISBN 075350457X. 
  • Carr, Roy; Murray, Charles Shaar (1981). Bowie: An Illustrated Record. New York: Avon. ISBN 0380779668. 
  • Pegg, Nicholas [2000] (2004). The Complete David Bowie. London: Reynolds & Hearn. ISBN 1903111730. 

Roy Carr is an English music journalist. ... Charles Shaar Murray is an English music journalist. ... Nicholas Pegg is a British actor, director and writer. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Persondata
NAME Bowie, David
ALTERNATIVE NAMES David Robert Jones, Thin White Duke, Ziggy Stardust
SHORT DESCRIPTION English singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer
DATE OF BIRTH January 8, 1947 (1947-01-08) (age 61)
PLACE OF BIRTH Brixton, London
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

Small Text Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a large, comprehensive and high quality metadata database about music. ... Stephen Finer is a London based artist who has been in commercial and public exhibitions since about 1980. ... Last. ... David Bowie is the eponymously-titled debut album by rock musician David Bowie, released in 1967 by Deram Records, a Decca offshoot. ... Space Oddity is an album by rock musician David Bowie, released 1969. ... Hunky Dory is the fourth album by English singer-songwriter David Bowie, released by RCA Records in 1971. ... Ziggy Stardust redirects here. ... Aladdin Sane (i. ... Pin Ups is a 1973 covers album by David Bowie. ... Diamond Dogs is a concept album by David Bowie, originally released by RCA in 1974. ... Young Americans is an album by David Bowie released in 1975. ... For the David Bowie album, click here. ... Low is a 1977 album by British musician David Bowie. ... Heroes (the quotation marks are part of the title, for reasons of irony)[1] is an album by David Bowie, released in 1977. ... Lodger is a 1979 album by David Bowie. ... Original LP back cover Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) is an album by David Bowie, released in September 1980 by RCA Records. ... Lets Dance is an album by David Bowie, released in 1983. ... Tonight, released September 1984, is a David Bowie album. ... Never Let Me Down is an album by David Bowie, released April 1987. ... Black Tie White Noise is an album by David Bowie. ... Outside is an album first released September 26, 1995 by David Bowie on Virgin Records. ... Earthling is a 1997 album by David Bowie. ... hours. ... Heathen is an album by the British singer-songwriter David Bowie, released in 2002. ... Reality is an album by the British singer-songwriter David Bowie, released in 2003. ... Tin Machine was a band, formed in 1989 and fronted by David Bowie. ... Track listing Heavens In Here Tin Machine Prisoner Of Love Crack City I Cant Read Under The God Amazing Working Class Hero Bus Stop Pretty Thing Video Crime Run Sacrifice Yourself Baby Can Dance ... Tin Machine II is the second album by rock group Tin Machine, lead by David Bowie. ... David Live is David Bowie’s first official live album, originally released by RCA in 1974. ... Stage is an underrated live album released in 1978 which opens with five consecutive songs from Ziggy Stardust, but most notably features material from Low and Heroes, Bowies most recent studio albums at the time. ... Alternate cover 30th Anniversary Edition (2003) Ziggy Stardust - The Motion Picture is a live album by David Bowie, corresponding to the film of the same name. ... Standard release Limited Edition box set Wooden box release Santa Monica 72 is a live album by David Bowie recorded at Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, 20 October 1972 during the Ziggy Stardust tour. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Bowie at the Beeb is a compilation album by David Bowie, released in 2000. ... Christiane F. is a soundtrack album by David Bowie, released in 1981 for the movie about Christiane F. The title, Christiane F., Wir Kinder Vom Bahnhof Zoo, means We children of Zoo Station in Berlin, Germany. ... Love You Till Tuesday was a compilation of material by David Bowie, issued as a companion to the belated video release of Bowies 1969 promotional film Love You Till Tuesday. ... For the Juno Reactor album, see Labyrinth (Juno Reactor album). ... The Buddha of Suburbia is a 1993 soundtrack album by David Bowie which accompanied the 4-part television serial The Buddha of Suburbia on BBC2 (itself adapted from the book The Buddha of Suburbia by Hanif Kureishi). ... Uncle Arthur (2:07) (Bowie) Love You Till Tuesday (3:09) (Bowie) There Is A Happy Land (3:11) (Bowie) Little Bombardier (3:24) (Bowie) Sell Me A Coat (2:58) (Bowie) Silly Boy Blue (3:48) (Bowie) The London Boys (5:20) (Bowie) Karma Man (3:03) (Bowie) Rubber... // Rubber Band (2:15) (Bowie) Maid Of Bond Street (1:44) (Bowie) Sell Me A Coat (3:00) (Bowie) Love You Till Tuesday (3:10) (Bowie) There Is A Happy Land (3:11) (Bowie) The Laughing Gnome (3:03) (Bowie) The Gospel According To Tony Day (2:50) (Bowie) Did... ChangesOneBowie was David Bowies first widely-selling compilation album. ... ChangesTwoBowie, released in 1981, was a David Bowie compilation album issued by RCA Records. ... Best of Bowie (2002 is the most recent Greatest Hits album by multi-platinum recording artist David Bowie. ... Rare (often known as Bowie Rare) was a compilation album released by RCA to cash in on Bowie for the 1982 Christmas market. ... Fashion (4:51) (Bowie) Red Sails (3:47) (Bowie, Eno) Look Back In Anger (3:07) (Bowie) I Cant Explain (2:14) (Townshend) Ashes To Ashes (4:26) (Bowie) Golden Years (3:59) (Bowie) Joe The Lion (3:08) (Bowie) Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) (5:14) (Bowie) Wild... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Changesbowie is a compilation album by David Bowie, released in 1990 in the U.S. by Rykodisc and by EMI in the UK as part of Rykodiscs Bowie remastering program, to replace ChangesOneBowie. ... Early On (1964-1966) is a compilation album by David Bowie, released in 1991. ... The Singles Collection is a compilation album by David Bowie, released in 1993 in the UK and (with some changes) as Bowie - The Singles 1969 to 1993 in the US. // Track listing All songs written by David Bowie unless otherwise indicated. ... The Deram Anthology 1966–1968 is a compilation album by David Bowie, released in 1997. ... The Best Of 1969/1979 is an album by rock musician David Bowie, released 1997. ... Sound And Vision (3:02) (Bowie) Golden Years (single edit) (3:28) (Bowie) Fame (4:13) (Bowie, Lennon, Alomar) Young Americans (single version) (3:12) (Bowie) John, Im Only Dancing (Again) (6:59) (Bowie) Can You Hear Me (5:05) (Bowie) Wild Is The Wind (5:59) (Tiompkin, Washington... All Saints is a compilation album by David Bowie released in 2001 on EMI. The compilation showcases Bowies innovative instrumental work mostly from his Berlin Trilogy period as well as later instrumentals dating as recent as 1999. ... Best of Bowie (2002) is the most recent greatest hits album by multi-platinum recording artist David Bowie. ... The Collection is a compilation album by English singer-songwriter David Bowie, released in 2005. ... The Platinum Collection is a compilation album by David Bowie, released in 2005. ... The Best of 1980-1987 is a David Bowie compilation album. ... Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars was a 1973 documentary and concert movie by D.A. Pennebaker. ... Serious Moonlight is the title of a David Bowie concert video; originally filmed on the singers 1983 Serious Moonlight tour in Vancouver (over 2 nights), it was released on video in 1984 and on DVD in 2006. ... All songs written by David Bowie except where noted. ... A Reality Tour is a DVD released in 2004 of David Bowies performance in Dublin, Ireland in 2003 during the Reality Tour. ... Bowie – The Video Collection is a video album by David Bowie, released in 1993. ... Black Tie White Noise is an album by David Bowie. ... Best of Bowie (2002) is the most recent greatest hits album by multi-platinum recording artist David Bowie. ... David Bowie: A Reality Tour (2004) Summary David Bowie: A Reality Tour is a DVD of David Bowies performance in Dublin, Ireland during the 2004 Reality Tour. ... // 1964: Liza Jane (as Davie Jones and the King Bees) Did Not Chart 1965: I Pity the Fool (as The Manish Boys) Did Not Chart 1965: Youve Got a Habit of Leaving (as Davy Jones and the Lower Third) Did Not Chart 1966: Cant Help Thinking About Me... The following is a listing of films or television programs in which David Bowie has appeared. ... For other uses, see Tony Visconti (disambiguation). ... Brian Eno (pronounced IPA: ) born on 15 May 1948 in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) is an English electronic musician, music theorist and record producer. ... Mick Ronson (May 26, 1946 – April 29, 1993) born in Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire was an English guitarist, composer, multi-instrumentalist, arranger and producer. ... Mick Woody Woodmansey (born c. ... Trevor Bolder (born June 9, 1950) is an English rock bass guitarist. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... Mike Garson is a professional pianist, most notable for his work with Nine Inch Nails, David Bowie, Billy Corgan and The Smashing Pumpkins. ... Reeves Gabrels is an American guitarist, best known for his 11-year partnership with David Bowie. ... Earl Slick is a guitarist born in 1952 and best known for his collaborations with David Bowie, though he has also worked with other artists (John Lennon : Double Fantasy, Milk and Honey, Anthology, Wonsaponatime, Yoko Ono, ...) and even released some solo recordings. ... Major Tom is an astronaut created by David Bowie. ... The sixth episode of the HBO comedy series Flight of the Conchords. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... A multi-instrumentalist is a musician who plays a number of different instruments. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... In music, an arrangement refers either to a rewriting of a piece of existing music with additional new material or to a fleshing-out of a compositional sketch, such as a lead sheet. ... An Audio Engineer is a person recording, editing, manipulating, mixing and mastering sound by technical means. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brixton is an area of South London, England, part of the London Borough of Lambeth. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
David Bowie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (7960 words)
Bowie's first flirtation with fame came in 1969 with his single "Space Oddity", supposedly released to coincide with the first moon landing, although Bowie himself has claimed that this is untrue.
Bowie's androgynous image was taken a step further in June 1972 with the seminal concept album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, focusing on the career of an extraterrestrial rock singer.
Bowie and Eno persevered, however, and recorded on their own new songs that were relatively simple, repetitive and stripped, a clear and perverse reaction to punk rock, with the second side almost wholly instrumental.
David Bowie - Simple English Wikipedia (532 words)
David Bowie was born on January 8, 1947.
Bowie let Ziggy Stardust come to an end during a liveconcert in the Hammersmith Odeon theatre (London) on July 3, 1973.
David Bowie, in his turn, was producer for Iggy Pop.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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