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Encyclopedia > David

David Hebrew: דָּוִד, Standard Dawid Tiberian Dāwîḏ, Arabic: داوود or داود, Dāwūd, "beloved"), was the second king of the united Kingdom of Israel according to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. He is depicted as a righteous king—although not without fault—as well as an acclaimed warrior, musician and poet (he is traditionally credited with the authorship of many of the Psalms). The biblical chronololgy places his life c.1037 BC - 967 BC, his reign over Judah c.1007 BC - 1000 BC, and over Judah and Israel c.1000 BC - 967 BC[1] but there is little in the archaeological record to substantiate the bible's detailed narrative. Nevertheless, his life and reign, as recorded in the books of Samuel (from I Samuel 16 onwards) and Chronicles, have been of central importance to Jewish and Christian culture. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (826x1000, 137 KB) David and Goliath by Caravaggio (1600; Oil on canvas; Prado, Madrid) Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (826x1000, 137 KB) David and Goliath by Caravaggio (1600; Oil on canvas; Prado, Madrid) Source: http://www. ... David and Goliath (or David with the Head of Goliath or David Victorious over Goliath ) is a painting by the Italian Baroque master Caravaggio (1571-1610. ... For other uses, see Caravaggio (disambiguation). ... Prado may refer to: Land Cruiser Prado, a 4WD vehicle from Toyota Museo del Prado, an art gallery in Madrid Prado, Spain, a village in Castile-Leon the prado dam Prado River Miguelanxo Prado, a spanish comic book artist Ed Prado, a U.S. appeals court judge PRADO, a PHP... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... // David, may refer to: David (name), a common given name in many languages For other people bearing this as a given name, see David (name). ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Tanakh, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early Middle Ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... Arabic redirects here. ... United Monarchy - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1080s BC 1070s BC 1060s BC 1050s BC 1040s BC - 1030s BC - 1020s BC 1010s BC 1000s BC 990s BC 980s BC Events and trends 1039 BC - Neferkare Amenemnisu, king of Egypt, dies. ... Centuries: 11th century BC - 10th century BC - 9th century BC Decades: 1010s BC 1000s BC 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC - 960s BC - 950s BC 940s BC 930s BC 920s BC 910s BC Events and Trends 967 BC - Tiglath-Pileser II becomes King of Assyria. ... Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1050s BC 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC - 1000s BC - 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC 950s BC Events and trends 1006 BC - David becomes king of the ancient Israelites (traditional date) 1002 BC - Death... (Redirected from 1000 BC) Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1050s BC 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC - 1000s BC - 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC 950s BC Events and Trends 1006 BC - David becomes king of the ancient Israelites (traditional... (Redirected from 1000 BC) Centuries: 12th century BC - 11th century BC - 10th century BC Decades: 1050s BC 1040s BC 1030s BC 1020s BC 1010s BC - 1000s BC - 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC 960s BC 950s BC Events and Trends 1006 BC - David becomes king of the ancient Israelites (traditional... Centuries: 11th century BC - 10th century BC - 9th century BC Decades: 1010s BC 1000s BC 990s BC 980s BC 970s BC - 960s BC - 950s BC 940s BC 930s BC 920s BC 910s BC Events and Trends 967 BC - Tiglath-Pileser II becomes King of Assyria. ... The Books of Samuel (Hebrew: Sefer Shmuel ספר שמואל), are part of the Tanakh (part of Judaisms Hebrew Bible) and also of the Old Testament (of Christianity). ... The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ... Secular Jewish culture embraces several related phenomena; above all, it is the culture of secular communities of Jewish people, but it can also include the cultural contributions of individuals who identify as secular Jews, or even those of religious Jews working in cultural areas not generally considered to be connected... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...

The biblical account of David

Prophet David, by Gentile da Fabriano.
Prophet David, by Gentile da Fabriano.

This section summarizes only a few major episodes from David's life, chosen on the basis of their fame and/or importance in later Christian and Jewish culture.[2] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1256x1132, 121 KB) Description: Title: de: Anbetung der Heiligen Drei Könige, mittleres Giebelfeld, linke Szene: Prophet David Technique: de: Holztafel Dimensions: Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Florenz Current location (gallery): de: Galleria degli Uffizi Other notes... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1256x1132, 121 KB) Description: Title: de: Anbetung der Heiligen Drei Könige, mittleres Giebelfeld, linke Szene: Prophet David Technique: de: Holztafel Dimensions: Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Florenz Current location (gallery): de: Galleria degli Uffizi Other notes... Adoration of the Magi (1423). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...


David is chosen

God withdraws his favor from King Saul and sends the prophet Samuel to Jesse, "for I have provided for myself a king among his sons." The choice falls upon David, the youngest son, who is guarding his father's sheep: "He was ruddy, and fine in appearance with handsome features. And the Lord said [to Samuel], 'Anoint him; for this is he.'" Saul (שאול המלך) (or Shaul) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; asked for) is identified in the Books of Samuel, 1 Chronicles and the Quran as the first king of the ancient Kingdom of Israel. ... Samuel may refer to: Samuel (Bible), seer and prophet Book(s) of Samuel in the Bible Samuel of Nehardea, Jewish Talmudist Sam (name), meaning He (God) has hearkened[1]. Samuel L. Jackson (born 1948), Actor Adriana Samuel (born 1966), Brazilian volleyball player Gene Samuel (born 1961), Trinidad and Tobago road... For other uses, see Jesse (disambiguation). ... The Tetragrammaton in Phoenician (1100 BC to 300 CE), Aramaic (10th Century BC to 0) and modern Hebrew scripts. ...


David plays the lyre before Saul

Saul is tormented by an evil spirit. His servants suggest he send for David, "skillful in playing [the harp], a man of valor, a man of war, prudent in speech, and a man of good presence; and the LORD is with him." So David enters Saul's service, and finds favour in his sight, "and whenever the evil spirit was upon Saul, David took the harp and played it with his hand; so Saul was refreshed, and was well, and the evil spirit departed from him." (1 Samuel 16:14-23) For other uses, see Harp (disambiguation). ...


David and Goliath

The Israelites are facing the army of the Philistines. David, the youngest of the sons of Jesse, brings food to his brothers who are with Saul. He hears the Philistine champion, the giant Goliath, challenge the Israelites to send their own champion to decide the outcome in single combat, and insists that he can defeat Goliath. Saul sends for him, and reluctantly allows him to make the attempt. David is indeed victorious, felling Goliath with a stone from his sling, at which the Philistines flee in terror and the Israelites win a great victory. David brings the head of Goliath to Saul, who asks him whose son he is, and David replies, "I am the son of your servant Jesse the Bethlehemite". [3] “The Twelve Tribes” redirects here. ... Map showing the location of Philistine land and cities of Gaza, Ashdod, and Ashkelon Map of the southern Levant, c. ... This article is about the biblical warrior. ... Home-made sling. ...


The enmity of Saul

Saul makes David a commander over his armies and gives him his daughter Michal in marriage. David is successful in many battles, and the women say, "Saul has slain his thousands, and David his tens of thousands." David's popularity awakens Saul's fears - "What more can he have but the kingdom?" - and by various stratagems the king seeks David's death. But the plots of the jealous king all proved futile, and only endear the young hero the more to the people, and especially to Jonathan, Saul's son. Warned by Jonathan of Saul's intention to kill him, David flees into the wilderness.[4] Gustave Doré, 1865, Michal helps young David escape. ... David and Jonathan were heroic figures of the Kingdom of Israel, whose intimate relationship was recorded favorably in the Old Testament books of Samuel. ...


David in the wilderness

In the wilderness David gathers a band of followers and becomes the champion of the oppressed while evading the pursuit of Saul. He accepts Ziklag as a fief from the Philistine king Achish of Gath, but continues to secretly champion the Israelites. Achish marches against Saul, but David is excused from the war on the accusation of the Philistine nobles that his loyalty to their cause cannot be trusted. This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Gath (Hebrew: winepress) was one of the five Philistine city states established in southwestern Philistia. ...


David is made king

Saul and Jonathan are killed in a battle with the Philistines, and David mourns their death.[5] Then David goes up to Hebron, where he is anointed king over Judah[disambiguation needed]; in the north, Saul's son Ish-Bosheth is king over the tribes of Israel.[6] War ensues between Ish-Bosheth and David, and Ish-Bosheth is assassinated. The assassins bring forward the head of Ish-Bosheth to David hoping for reward, but David executes them for their crime against their king.[7] Yet with the death of the son of Saul, the elders of Israel come to Hebron, and David is anointed King of Israel and Judah. Upon these events he is 30 years old.[8] Arabic الخليل Government City (from 1997) Also Spelled Al-Khalil (officially) Al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 167,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi , Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city at the... Look up Judah in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ish-bosheth (also called Eshbaal or Ashbaal or Ishbaal), appears in the Hebrew Bible. ...


King David

David conquers the Jebusite fortress of Jerusalem and makes it his capital, "and Hiram king of Tyre sent messengers to David, and cedar trees, also carpenters and masons who built David a house." [8] David brings the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem, intending to build a temple.[9] God, speaking to the prophet Nathan, forbids it, saying the temple must wait for a future generation. But God makes a covenant with David, promising that he will establish the house of David eternally: "Your throne shall be established forever."[10] Then David establishes a mighty empire, conquering Zobah and Aram (modern Syria), Edom and Moab (roughly modern Jordan), the lands of the Philistines, and much more.[11] According to the Hebrew Bible the Jebusites (Hebrew יְבוּסִי, Standard Hebrew YÉ™vusi, Tiberian Hebrew Yəḇûsî) were a Canaänite tribe who inhabited the region around Jerusalem in pre-biblical times (second millennium BC). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... A late 19th-century artists conception of the Ark of the Covenant, employing a Renaissance cassone for the Ark and cherubim as latter-day Christian angels. ... Nathan the Prophet was a court prophet who lived in the time of King David and his wife Bathsheba. ... Zobah or Aram-Zobah was the capital of an early Aramean state in southern Syria, at one time of considerable importance. ... The term Aram can refer to: Aram (אֲרָם or ), the son of Shem, according to the Table of nations of Genesis 10 in the Hebrew Bible. ... Edomite redirects here. ... Moab (Hebrew: מוֹאָב, Standard Tiberian  ; Greek Μωάβ ; Arabic مؤاب, Assyrian Muaba, Maba, Maab ; Egyptian Muab) is the historical name for a mountainous strip of land in modern-day Jordan running along the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. ...


Bathsheba and Uriah the Hittite

David and Bathsheba, by Lucas Cranach, 1526.
David and Bathsheba, by Lucas Cranach, 1526.

David lies with Bathsheba, "the wife of Uriah the Hittite", and Bathsheba becomes pregnant. David sends for Uriah, who is with the Israelite army at the siege of Rabbah, that he might lie with her and so conceal the identity of the child's father, Uriah refuses to do so while his companions are in the field of battle. David then sends Uriah back to Joab, the commander, with a message instructing him to abandon Uriah on the battlefield, "that he may be struck down, and die." And so David marries Bathsheba and she bears his child, "but the thing that David had done displeased the LORD."[12] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x3099, 636 KB) Description: Title: de: David und Bathseba Technique: de: Öl auf Holz Dimensions: de: 38,8 × 25,7 cm Country of origin: de: Deutschland Current location (city): de: Berlin Current location (gallery): de: Gemäldegalerie Other notes: Source: The... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x3099, 636 KB) Description: Title: de: David und Bathseba Technique: de: Öl auf Holz Dimensions: de: 38,8 × 25,7 cm Country of origin: de: Deutschland Current location (city): de: Berlin Current location (gallery): de: Gemäldegalerie Other notes: Source: The... Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553) Lucas Cranach the Younger (1515-1586) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Bathsheba (בת שבע) is the wife of Uriah the Hittite and later of King David in the Hebrew Bible. ... Uriah the Hittite was a soldier in King David’s army mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Joab (יוֹאָב The LORD is father, Standard Hebrew Yoʾav, Tiberian Hebrew Yôʾāḇ) was the nephew of King David, the son of Zeruiah in the Bible. ...


The prophet Nathan speaks out against David's sin, saying: "Why have you despised the word of the LORD, to do what is evil in his sight? You have smitten Uriah the Hittite with the sword, and have taken his wife to be your wife." And although David repents, God "struck the child ... and it became sick ... [And] on the seventh day the child died." David then leaves his lamentations, dresses himself, and eats. His servants ask why he lamented when the baby was alive, but leaves off when it is dead, and David replies: "While the child was still alive, I fasted and wept; for I said, who knows whether the LORD will be gracious to me, that the child may live? But now he is dead, why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I shall go to him, but he will not return to me."[13]


Absalom

David’s beloved son Absalom rebels against his father. The armies of Absalom and David come to battle in the Wood of Ephraim, and Absalom is caught by his hair in the branches of an oak. David’s general Joab kills him as he hangs there. When the news of the victory is brought to David he does not rejoice, but is instead shaken with grief: “O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! Would I had died instead of you, O Absalom, my son, my son!” Absalom or Avshalom (אַבְשָׁלוֹם Father/Leader of/is peace, Standard Hebrew AvÅ¡alom, Tiberian Hebrew ʾAḇšālôm), in the Bible, is the third son of David, king of Israel. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ...


The Psalms of David

David is described as the author of the majority of the Psalms. One of the most famous is Psalm 51, traditionally said to have been composed by David after Nathan upbraided him over Bathsheba and Uriah. Perhaps the best-known is Psalm 23: Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... The theme of the 23rd Psalm in the Bible casts God in the role of protector and provider. ...

1 The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want.
2 He maketh me to lie down in green pastures:
he leadeth me beside the still waters.
3 He restoreth my soul:
he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake.
4 Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I will fear no evil: for thou art with me;
thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.
5 Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies:
thou anointest my head with oil;
my cup runneth over.
6 Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life:
and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever."

Reign of David

"Thus David the son of Jesse reigned over all Israel. The time that he reigned over Israel was forty years; he reigned seven years in Hebron, and thirty-three years in Jerusalem. Then he died in a good old age, full of days, riches, and honour; and Solomon his son reigned in his stead".[14] This article is about the Biblical jhhhhnn . ...


David in later Abrahamic tradition

David in Judaism

Abishag, Bathsheba, Solomon, and Nathan tend to aging David, c. 1435
Abishag, Bathsheba, Solomon, and Nathan tend to aging David, c. 1435

David's reign represents the formation of a coherent Jewish kingdom centered in Jerusalem and the institution of an eternal royal dynasty; the failure of this "eternal" Davidic dynasty after some four centuries is viewed by Judaism as a temporary condition that will conclude with the arrival of the Messiah - the human occupant of the renewed throne of David who will "arise to rectify Israel's conduct and prepare their hearts [for the Redemption]."[15]. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nathan the Prophet was a court prophet who lived in the time of King David and his wife Bathsheba. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


In modern Judaism David's descent from a convert (Ruth) is taken as proof of the importance of converts within Judaism. David is also viewed as a tragic figure; his acquisition of Bathsheba, and the loss of his son are viewed as his central tragedies. Naomi entreating Ruth and Orpah to return to the land of Moab by William Blake, 1795 Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld: Ruth in Boazs Field, 1828 The Book of Ruth (Hebrew: מגילת רות, Megilat Rut, the Scroll of Ruth) is one of the books of the Ketuvim (Writings) of the Tanakh (the...


Many legends have grown around the figure of David. According to Rabbinic tradition, David was raised as the illegitimate son of his father Jesse and spent his early years herding his father's sheep in the wilderness while his brothers were in school. Only at his anointing by Samuel - when the oil from Samuel's flask turned to diamonds and pearls - was David's true identity as Jesse's legal son revealed. David's piety was said to be so great that his prayers could bring down things from Heaven, and his adultery with Bathsheba was only an opportunity to demonstrate the power of repentance: some Talmudic authors stated that it was not adultery at all, quoting a supposed Jewish practice of divorce on the eve of battle to prevent the wives of the missing-in-action from becoming agunot. Furthermore, according to David's apologists, the death of Uriah was not to be considered murder, on the basis that Uriah had committed a capital offence by refusing to obey a direct command from the King.[16] The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Agunah (plural: agunot, literally anchored or chained women) is a Jewish halachic term for a woman who is chained to her marriage; either because her husbands whereabouts are unknown, or her husband refuses or is unable to grant her an official bill of divorce under Jewish law known as...


According to midrashim[17], Adam gave up 70 years of his life for the life of David. Also, according to the Talmud Yerushalmi, David was born and died on the Jewish holiday of Shavuot (Feast of Weeks). Midrash (pl. ... Shavuot, also spelled Shavuos (Hebrew: שבועות (Israeli Heb. ...


David in Christianity

King David by Pedro Berruguete.
King David by Pedro Berruguete.

Originally an earthly king ruling by divine appointment ("the anointed one", as the title Messiah had it), the "son of David" became in the last two pre-Christian centuries the apocalyptic and heavenly "son of God" who would deliver Israel and usher in a new kingdom. Saint Dominic Presiding over an Auto-da-fe by Pedro Berruguete (1475), at the Prado Museum, Madrid. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ...


"This was the matrix for the rise of Christianity. The new faith interpreted the career of Jesus by means of the titles and functions assigned to David in the mysticism of the Zion cult, in which he served as priest-king and in which he was the mediator between God and man."[18]


Christians have traditionally believed that the Old Testament prophecies foretold that the Messiah would be a descendant of David, and the Gospels of Matthew and Luke therefore trace Jesus' lineage to David in fulfillment of this requirement. The Tree of Jesse decorating countless cathedral windows illustrates this belief, its branches demonstrating how divine kingship descended from Jesse, through his son David, to Jesus. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... 13th representation of the Tree of Jesse, ivory panel, Louvre The Tree of Jesse, in traditional Christian art, is a visual representation of Jesus ancestry. ...


"Incidents in the life of David [foreshadowed] the life of Christ; Bethlehem is the birthplace of both; the shepherd life of David points out Christ, the Good Shepherd; the five stones chosen to slay Goliath are typical of the five wounds; the betrayal by his trusted counsellor, Achitophel, and the passage over the Cedron remind us of Christ's Sacred Passion. Many of the Davidic Psalms, as we learn from the New Testament, are clearly typical of the future Messias."[19] This article is about the city in the West Bank. ... The 5th-century Ravenna mosaic illustrating the parable. ... The Ascension from a Speculum Humanae Salvationis ca 1430, see below Typology is a theological doctrine of theory of types and their antitypes found in Scripture. ... Flag of Georgia, a variant of the Jerusalem cross representing the five Holy Wounds The Five Holy Wounds or Five Sacred Wounds of Christ were the five piercing wounds inflicted upon Jesus during his crucifixion. ... See Absalom and Achitophel for the political allegory about the Monmouth Rebellion by John Dryden. ... The Kidron Valley (or Qidron Valley) is valley near Jerusalem which features significantly in the Bible. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... The Ascension from a Speculum Humanae Salvationis ca 1430, see below Typology is a theological doctrine of theory of types and their antitypes found in Scripture. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (מָשִׁיחַ anointed one, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew Arabic ) initially meant any person who was anointed by God. ...


In the Middle Ages, "Charlemagne thought of himself, and was viewed by his court scholars, as a 'new David'. [This was] not in itself a new idea, but [one whose] content and significance were greatly enlarged by him."[20] The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For the American band, see Charlemagne (band). ...


Western Rite churches (Roman Catholic, Lutheran) celebrate his feast day on 29 December, Eastern-rite on 19 December.[21] The Eastern Orthodox Church celebrates the feast day of the "Holy Righteous Prophet and King David" on the Sunday of the Holy Forefathers (two Sundays before the Great Feast of the Nativity of the Lord), when he is commemorated together with other ancestors of Jesus. He is also commemorated on the Sunday after the Nativity, together with Joseph and James, the Brother of the Lord. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Western Rite Orthodoxy. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... Icon illustrating, in the center, the Resurrection appearances of Jesus and around the sides, the Great Feasts. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Saint Joseph (disambiguation). ...


David in Latter Day Saint Doctrine

The Doctrine and Covenants of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints cites David as one directed by God to practice polygamy, but who sinned in committing adultery with Bathsheba and having Uriah killed: Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Doctrine and Covenants The Doctrine and Covenants (sometimes abbreviated and cited as D&C) is a part of the open scriptural canon of several denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... For other uses, see The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (disambiguation). ... The term polygamy (a Greek word meaning the practice of multiple marriage) is used in related ways in social anthropology, sociobiology, and sociology. ...

"Verily, thus saith the LORD ... David’s wives and concubines were given unto him of me, by the hand of Nathan, my servant, and others of the prophets who had the keys of this power; and in none of these things did he sin against me save in the case of Uriah and his wife; and, therefore he hath fallen from his exaltation."[22]

This clarifies the LDS doctrine that polygamy is only allowed as directed by the Lord, otherwise it is a grievous sin.[23] The Church forbade polygamy in 1890, citing a revelation given to Wilford Woodruff at that time.[24] Year 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar). ... Wilford Woodruff (March 1, 1807 – September 2, 1898) was the fourth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1889 until his death. ...


David in Islam

David, known in the Islamic tradition as Dawood (Dāwūd), is one of the prophets of Islam, to whom the Zabur (Psalms) were revealed by Allah. Muslims reject the Biblical portrayal of Dawood (in his association with Uriah) as an adulterer and murderer. This is based on the Islamic belief in the righteousness of prophets. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... Zabur (Arabic: زبور) is the holy book of the Seboun (Ar:صابؤون, Grk:Σεβομενοι) which is equated by some scholars with Psalms, is, according to Islam, one of the holy books revealed by God before the Quran (the others mentioned in the Quran being the Tawrat and Injil). ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... Allah is the Arabic language word for God. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Uriah or Urijah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; (My) light/flame of/is the ) was the name of several men in the Hebrew Bible. ...


Goliath appears in the Qur'an as Jalut; and like in Judaism, Jalut's slayer is Dawood. In surah al-Baqarah, ayah 251 says: "And Dawood slew Jalut, and Allah gave him kingdom and wisdom, and taught him of what He pleased."(Transl. Shakir) Dawood was in Taloot's (Hebrew tradition: Saul's) army. See also: Sura (disambiguation). ... Surat al-Baqarah (the Cow) is the second, and the longest, sura of the Quran, with 286 ayat. ... Ayah ( , plural Ayat ) is the Arabic word for sign or miracle. ... Mohammed Habib Shakir, (1866, Cairo–1939, Cairo) was an Egyptian judge, born in Cairo and a graduate from Al Azhar University. ... Saul (שאול המלך) (or Shaul) (Hebrew: שָׁאוּל, Standard Tiberian  ; asked for or borrowed) is a figure identified in the Books of Samuel and Quran as having been the first king of the ancient Kingdom of Israel. ...


Historicity of David

See The Bible and history and dating the Bible for a more complete description of the general issues surrounding the Bible as a historical source. The article concerns the historicity of the Bible. ... The Bible is a compilation of various texts or books of different ages. ...


Archaeology

David and King Saul, by Rembrandt. David plays the lyre (depicted here as a harp) to the king "tormented by an evil spirit"
David and King Saul, by Rembrandt. David plays the lyre (depicted here as a harp) to the king "tormented by an evil spirit"

An inscription found at Tel Dan and dated c.850-835 BCE has been interpreted as containing the phrase 'House of David', in which case it might refer to the royal house of Judah; the Mesha Stele from Moab, and from a similar time, may contain the same phrase; and Kenneth Kitchen has proposed that an inscription of c. 945 BCE by the Egyptian Pharaoh Shoshenq I mentions "the highlands of David," but this has been questioned.[25] "If the reading of ביתדוד [House of David] on the Tel Dan stele is correct, ... then we have solid evidence that a 9th-century Aramean king considered the founder of the Judean dynasty to be somebody named דוד" (David).[26] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1256x1004, 115 KB) Description: Title: de: David spielt Harfe vor Saul Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 131 × 164 cm Country of origin: de: Niederlande (Holland) Current location (city): de: Den Haag Current location (gallery): de: Königliche Gemäldegalerie... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1256x1004, 115 KB) Description: Title: de: David spielt Harfe vor Saul Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 131 × 164 cm Country of origin: de: Niederlande (Holland) Current location (city): de: Den Haag Current location (gallery): de: Königliche Gemäldegalerie... Saul or Shaul (שָׁאוּל Demanded, Standard Hebrew Šaʾul, Tiberian Hebrew Šāʾûl) was the first king of Israel according to the Old Testament of the Bible, as taught in Judaism. ... This article is about the Dutch artist. ... For other uses, see Harp (disambiguation). ... The Tel Dan Stele The Tel Dan Stele, found at Tel Dan in Israel in 1993/1994, is a fragment (in three sections) of an Aramaic inscription on basalt, which appears to be from a stele erected for Ben-Hadad of the Aramaean nation, an enemy of the kingdom of... The stele as photographed circa 1891 The Mesha Stele (popularized in the 19th century as the Moabite Stone) is a black basalt stone, bearing an inscription by the 9th century BC Moabite King Mesha, discovered in 1868. ... Emeritus Professor Kenneth A. Kitchen (University of Liverpool publicity photograph, 2006). ... Nomen: Shoshenq Hedjkheperre Setepenre Shoshenq I (Egyptian Å¡Å¡nq), also known as Shishak, Sheshonk or Sheshonq I (for discussion of the spelling, see Shoshenq), was a Meshwesh Libyan king of Egypt and founder of the Twenty-second Dynasty. ...


The Bronze and Iron Age remains of the City of David[27] were investigated extensively in the 1970s and 1980s under the direction of Yigael Shiloh of Hebrew University. Fieldwork there and elsewhere in Jerusalem failed to discover significant evidence of occupation during the 10th century BCE: not only are there no signs of monumental architecture, but even distinctive 10th century pottery shards are absent.[28] Elsewhere in the territory of biblical Judah and Israel, no royal inscriptions exist from the 10th century BCE, nor evidence of a royal bureaucracy (the equivalents of the LMLK seal[29] attached to oil jars associated with the Judean royal bureaucracy of the late 8th century BCE), nor the inscribed potshards which would provide evidence of widespread literacy. Surveys of surface finds aimed at tracing settlement patterns and population changes have shown that between the 16th and 8th centuries BCE, a period which includes the biblical kingdoms of David and Solomon, the entire population of the hill country of Judah was no more than about 5,000 persons, most of them wandering pastoralists, with the entire urbanised area consisting of about twenty small villages.[30] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Silwan. ... The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים) is one of Israels biggest and most important institutes of higher learning and research. ... LMLK seals were stamped on the handles of large storage jars in and around Jerusalem during the reign of King Hezekiah (circa 700 BC) based on several complete jars found in situ buried under a destruction layer caused by Sennacherib at Lachish. ...


While the Tel Dan stele is largely accepted as supporting the historical existence of a Judean royal dynasty tracing its descent from an individual named David [31], the interpretation of the archeological evidence on the extent and nature of Judah and Jerusalem in the 10th century BCE is a matter of fierce debate. On one hand is the view of Israel Finkelstein of Tel Aviv University, who says (although he has been sharply criticized [32]), in his The Bible Unearthed (2001): "[O]n the basis of archaeological surveys, Judah remained relatively empty of permanent population, quite isolated and very marginal right up to and past the presumed time of David and Solomon, with no major urban centers and with no pronounced hierarchy of hamlets, villages and towns."[33] On the other is William Dever, in his What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did They Know It?,[34] holds that the archaeological and anthropological evidence supports the broad biblical account of a Judean state in the 10th century BCE.[35] Israel Finkelstein Israel Finkelstein is an Israeli archaeologist. ... The Engineering Faculty Boulevard The Smolarz Auditorium Tel Aviv University (TAU, אוניברסיטת תל אביב, אתא) is one of Israels major universities. ... The Bible Unearthed: Archaeologys New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of Its Sacred Texts (Free Press, New York, 2001, 385 pp. ... William G. Dever is an American archaeologist, specialising in the history of Israel and the Near East in Biblical times, who was Professor of Near Eastern Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona from 1975 to 2002. ... What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did the Know It? (US: Grand Rapids, MI/Cambridge, UK: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2001) is a book by biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. Dever detailing his response to the claims of minimalsts to the historicity and value of the...


The Bible and David's Reign

Russian icon of St. David, the Prophet and King, 18th century (Iconostasis of Kizhi monastery, Karelia, Russia).
Russian icon of St. David, the Prophet and King, 18th century (Iconostasis of Kizhi monastery, Karelia, Russia).

The biblical evidence for David comes from three sources: the Psalms, the book of Samuel (two books in the Christian tradition), and the book of Chronicles (also two books in the Christian tradition). Of these, the Psalms need to be treated with great scepticism: although almost half of them are headed "A Psalm of David", the headings are later additions, and the Hebrew preposition translated in English as "of" can also be translated as "for". "No psalm can be attributed to David with certainty, and aside from the headings, they contain no information about David's life that is useful for historical reconstruction."[36] Chronicles retells Samuel from a different theological vantage point, but contains little if any information not available in Samuel. The biblical evidence for David is therefore dependent almost exclusively on the material contained in the chapters from 1 Samuel 16 to 1 Kings 2. Andrei Rublev Trinity c. ... This article is about the religious artifacts. ... 17th-century iconostasis of Prophet Elias church, Yaroslavl. ... Wooden miracle in Kizhi. ... This article concerns the buildings occupied by monastics. ... Map showing the parts Karelia is traditionally divided into. ... Psalms (Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים, or praises) is a book of the Hebrew Bible included in the collected works known as the Writings or Ketuvim. ... The Books of Samuel, also referred to as [The Book of] Samuel (Hebrew: שְׁמוּאֵל), are (two) books in the Hebrew Bible (Judaisms Tanakh and originally writtten in Hebrew) and the Old Testament of Christianity. ... The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ...


The question of David's historicity therefore becomes the question of the date, textual integrity, authorship and reliability of 1st and 2nd Samuel. Since Martin Noth put forward his analysis of the Deuteronomistic History biblical scholars have accepted that these two books form part of a continuous history of Israel, compiled no earlier than the late 7th century BCE, but incorporating earlier works and fragments. Samuel's account of David "seems to have undergone two separate acts of editorial slanting. The original writers show a strong bias against Saul, and in favour of David and Solomon. Many years later, the Deuteronomists edited the material in a manner that conveyed their religious message, inserting reports and anecdotes that strengthened their monotheistic doctrine. Some of the materials in Samuel I and II , notably the lists of officers, officials, and districts are believed to be very early, possibly even dating to the time of David or Solomon. These documents were probably in the hands of the Deuteronomists when they started to compile the material three centuries later."[37] Martin Noth (August 3, 1902 - May 30, 1968 was a German scholar of the Hebrew Bible who specialized in the pre-Exilic history of the Hebrews. ... The Deuteronomist (D) is one of the sources of the Torah postulated by the documentary hypothesis that treats the texts of Scripture as products of human intellect, working in time. ...


Beyond this, the full range of possible interpretations is available, from the "maximalist" position of the late John Bright, whose "History of Israel", dating largely from the 1950s, takes Samuel at face value, to the recent "minimalist" scholars such Thomas L. Thompson, who measures Samuel against the archaeological evidence and concludes that "an independent history of Judea during the Iron I and Iron II periods [i.e., the period of David] has little room for historicizing readings of the stories of I-II Samuel and I Kings."[38] Within this gamut some interesting studies of David have been written. Baruch Halpern has pictured David as a lifelong vassal of Achish, the Philistine king of Gath;[39] Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman have identified as the oldest and most reliable section of Samuel those chapters which describe David as the charismatic leader of a band of outlaws who captures Jerusalem and makes it his capital.[40] John Bright John Bright (November 16, 1811–March 27, 1889), was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with Richard Cobden in the formation of the Anti-Corn Law League. ... Thomas L. Thompson is a Baháí[1] American biblical theologian, born Jan 7, 1939 in Detroit Michigan. ... Baruch Halpern is Chairman of Jewish Studies at Pennsylvania State University. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Israel Finkelstein Israel Finkelstein is an Israeli archaeologist. ... Neil Asher Silberman is an archaeologist who serves as director of the Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage Presentation in Belgium. ...


David's family

The Death of Absalom (engraving from the Doré Bible).
The Death of Absalom (engraving from the Doré Bible).

David's father was Jesse, the son of Obed, son of Boaz of the tribe of Judah and Ruth the Moabite, whose story is told at length in the Book of Ruth. David's lineage is fully documented in Ruth 4:18-22, (the "Pharez" that heads the line is Judah's son, Genesis 38:29). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x1210, 432 KB) La bildo estas kopiita de wikipedia:gl. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x1210, 432 KB) La bildo estas kopiita de wikipedia:gl. ... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... For other uses, see Jesse (disambiguation). ... In the Bible, Obed was a son of Boaz and Ruth (Ruth 4:21, 22), and the grandfather of David (Matt. ... Boaz (Heb. ... The Tribe of Judah (Hebrew: יְהוּדָה, Praise; Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) is one of the Hebrew tribes, founded by Judah, son of Jacob(Israel). ... Moab (Hebrew: מוֹאָב, Standard Tiberian  ; Greek Μωάβ ; Arabic مؤاب, Assyrian Muaba, Maba, Maab ; Egyptian Muab) is the historical name for a mountainous strip of land in modern-day Jordan running along the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. ... Naomi entreating Ruth and Orpah to return to the land of Moab by William Blake, 1795 Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld: Ruth in Boazs Field, 1828 The Book of Ruth (Hebrew: מגילת רות, Megilat Rut, the Scroll of Ruth) is one of the books of the Ketuvim (Writings) of the Tanakh (the... In the Book of Genesis, Pharez or Péretz (פֶּרֶץ / פָּרֶץ Breach, Standard Hebrew Péreẓ / Páreẓ, Tiberian Hebrew Péreá¹£ / Pāreá¹£) is the son of Judah by the Canaanitish woman Tamar. ...


David had eight known wives, although he appears to have had children from other women as well:

In his old age he took the beautiful Abishag into his bed for health reasons, "but the king knew her not (intimately)" (1 Kings 1:1-4). Gustave Doré, 1865, Michal helps young David escape. ... Saul or Shaul (שָׁאוּל Demanded, Standard Hebrew Šaʾul, Tiberian Hebrew Šāʾûl) was the first king of Israel according to the Old Testament of the Bible, as taught in Judaism. ... This entry incorporates text from the public domain Eastons Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. ... Abigail (אֲבִיגַיִל / אֲבִיגָיִל her Fathers joy or, fountain of joy ;leader of/is dance/, Standard Hebrew Avigáyil, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḇîḡáyil / ʾĂḇîḡāyil), once Abigal (Samuel 2 3:3), is a female character in the Bible. ... Nabal (נבל הכרמלי) is a person in the Hebrew Bible who defies the order of King David of the Kingdom of Israel, and is reportedly killed by God as a punishment for his disobedience. ... Maachah is a Biblical name. ... Haggith is a biblical character, one of the wives of David. ... Abital - (father of dew; i. ... Bathsheba (בת שבע) is the wife of Uriah the Hittite and later of King David in the Hebrew Bible. ... This entry incorporates text from the public domain Eastons Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. ...


As given in 1 Chronicles 3, David had sons by various wives and concubines; their names are not given in Chronicles. By Bathsheba, his sons were: A swampy marsh area ...

His sons born in Hebron by other mothers included: . ... Nathan was the son of King David and Bathsheba. ... This article is about the Biblical jhhhhnn . ...

His sons born in Jerusalem by other mothers included: Amnon was Davids eldest son. ... This entry incorporates text from the public domain Eastons Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. ... Daniel (Son of David) , also known as Chiliab (II Samuel, 3:3). ... Abigail (אֲבִיגַיִל / אֲבִיגָיִל her Fathers joy or, fountain of joy ;leader of/is dance/, Standard Hebrew Avigáyil, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḇîḡáyil / ʾĂḇîḡāyil), once Abigal (Samuel 2 3:3), is a female character in the Bible. ... Absalom or Avshalom (אַבְשָׁלוֹם Father/Leader of/is peace, Standard Hebrew AvÅ¡alom, Tiberian Hebrew ʾAḇšālôm), in the Bible, is the third son of David, king of Israel. ... Maachah is a Biblical name. ... Adonijah is a Hebrew name, meaning YHVH is my lord. A number of characters in the Bible bear this name. ... Haggith is a biblical character, one of the wives of David. ... Abital - (father of dew; i. ...

According to 2 Chronicles 11:18, another son was born to David who is not mentioned in any of the genealogies: Ibhar was one of the sons of David Mentioned in: 2 Samuel 5:15 1 Chronicles 3:6 Ibhar also means Chosen References New International Version Bible This entry incorporates text from the public domain Eastons Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... . ...

David also had at least one daughter, Tamar, progeny of David and Maachah and the full sister of Absalom, who is later raped by her brother Amnon. Jerimoth (sometimes spelled Jeremoth) in the Hebrew Bible is the name of eight men: In 1 Chronicles 7:7, Jerimoth is a son of Bela. ...


Claimed descendants of David

A number of persons have claimed descent from the Biblical David, or had it claimed on their behalf. See List of Messiah claimants. The following are some of the more notable: This is a list of people who have been said to be a messiah either by themselves, or by their followers. ...

This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Akiba ben Joseph (or Rabbi Akiva, Rebbi Akiva, c. ... Judah Low ben Bezalel (1525 — 1609) was a Jewish scholar and rabbi, most of his life in Prague. ... The Abravanel family (also Abarbanel or Abrabanel) is one of the oldest and most distinguished Jewish Iberian families; they trace their origin from the biblical King David. ... The Bagratuni or Bagrationi or Bagratid royal dynasty (Armenian: Բագրատունյաց Ô±Ö€Ö„Õ¡ÕµÕ¡Õ¯Õ¡Õ¶ Տոհմ or Bagratunyac Arqayakan Tohm, Georgian: ბაგრატიონთა სამეფო დინასტია or Bagrationta Samepo Dinastia) is a royal family whose ascendancy in Transcaucasia lasted for more than a millennium, since the 8th century until the early 19th century. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain 1901-1906 Jewish Encyclopedia Israel ben Eliezer Rabbi Israel (Yisroel) ben Eliezer (about 1700 Okopy Świętej Tr jcy - May 22, 1760 Międzyborz) was a Jewish Orthodox mystical rabbi who is better known to most religious Jews as the Baal Shem Tov, or... Hasidic Judaism (Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ... For the tanna, see Judah HaNasi. ... Rabbi Dov Ber of Mezeritch (דוב בער ממזריטש‎) (1704/1710 (?) – 1772-12-04 OS) was a disciple of Rabbi Yisrael Baal Shem Tov, the founder of Hasidic Judaism, and largely seen as his successor. ... Rabbi Eliezer Silver in his younger years A famous picture of Rabbi Eliezer Silver Rabbi Eliezer Silver (15 February 1882 - 1968) was the President of the Agudath HaRabbonim of America and among American Jewrys foremost religious leaders. ... For the third Rebbe of the Chabad Lubavitch dynasty see Menachem Mendel Schneersohn Menachem Mendel Schneerson (April 18, 1902 – June 12, 1994), known as The Rebbe[1], was a prominent Hasidic[2] rabbi who was the seventh and last Rebbe (spiritual leader) of the Chabad-Lubavitch movement. ... Judah Low ben Bezalel (1525 — 1609) was a Jewish scholar and rabbi, most of his life in Prague. ...

Representation in art and literature

David, Michelangelo, 1500-1504.
David, Michelangelo, 1500-1504.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1071x2046, 363 KB) Description: Michelangelos David (original statue) Source: private photo Date: created 24. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1071x2046, 363 KB) Description: Michelangelos David (original statue) Source: private photo Date: created 24. ... The Statue of David, sculpted from 1501 to 1504, is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture and one of Michelangelos two greatest works of sculpture, along with the Pietà. It is the statue of the young Israelite king David alone that almost certainly holds the title of the most recognizable... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ...

Art

Famous sculptures of David include (in chronological order) those by:

Statue of Habacuc (popularly known as Zuccone) for the Giottos Bell Tower. ... Donatellos David Donatellos bronze statue of David (circa 1440s) is notable as the first unsupported standing work in bronze cast since classical times. ... Madonna with Sts John the Baptist and Donatus (1475-83), Cathedral of Pistoia. ... Andrea del Verrochios bronze statue of David was most likely made between 1473 and 1475. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... The Statue of David, sculpted from 1501 to 1504, is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture and one of Michelangelos two greatest works of sculpture, along with the Pietà. It is the statue of the young Israelite king David alone that almost certainly holds the title of the most recognizable... Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini; December 7, 1598 – November 28, 1680) was a pre-eminent Baroque sculptor and architect of 17th century Rome. ... Berninis David (1623-24) is a revolutionary statement in the history of art, and is among the first truly baroque statues. ... Gloria Victis by Mercié Marius Jean Antonin Mercié (October 30, 1845 - December 13, 1916), French sculptor and painter, was born in Toulouse. ...

Literature

  • Elmer Davis's 1928 novel Giant Killer retells and embellishes the Biblical story of David, casting David as primarily a poet who managed always to find others to do the "dirty work" of heroism and kingship. In the novel, Elhanan in fact killed Goliath but David claimed the credit; and Joab, David's cousin and general, took it upon himself to make many of the difficult decisions of war and statecraft when David vacillated or wrote poetry instead.
  • Gladys Schmitt wrote a novel titled "David the King" in 1946 which proceeds as a richly embellished biography of David's entire life. The book took a risk, especially for its time, in portraying David's relationship with Jonathan as overtly homoerotic, but was ultimately panned by critics as a bland rendition of the title character.
  • In Thomas Burnett Swann's Biblical fantasy novel How are the Mighty Fallen (1974) David and Jonathan are explicitly stated to be lovers. Moreover, Jonathan is a member of a winged semi-human race (possibly nephilim), one of several such races co-existing with humanity but often persecuted by it.
  • Joseph Heller, the author of Catch-22, also wrote a novel based on David, God Knows. Told from the perspective of an aging David, the humanity — rather than the heroism — of various biblical characters are emphasized. The portrayal of David as a man of flaws such as greed, lust, selfishness, and his alienation from God, the falling apart of his family is a distinctly 20th century interpretation of the events told in the Bible.
  • Juan Bosch, Dominican political leader and writer, wrote "David: Biography of a King" (1966) a realistic approach to David's life and political career.
  • Allan Massie wrote "King David" (1995), a novel about David's career which portrays the king's relationship to Jonathan and others as openly homosexual.
  • Madeleine L'Engle's novel Certain Women explores family, the Christian faith, and the nature of God through the story of King David's family and an analogous modern family's saga.[41]

Elmer Davis Elmer Davis (born January 13, 1890 - May 18, 1958 was prominent newsreporter, the Director of the United States Office of War Information during World War II and a Peabody Award Recipient. ... The biblical Elhanan was the son of Jaareoregim. ... Joab (יוֹאָב The LORD is father, Standard Hebrew Yoʾav, Tiberian Hebrew Yôʾāḇ) was the nephew of King David, the son of Zeruiah in the Bible. ... Homosexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by esthetic attraction, romantic love, or sexual desire exclusively for another of the same sex. ... Thomas Burnett Swann (October 12, 1928 - May 5, 1976) was an American poet, critic and fantasy author. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... David and Jonathan were heroic figures of the Kingdom of Israel, whose intimate relationship was recorded favorably in the Old Testament books of Samuel. ... For other uses, see Nephilim (disambiguation). ... Joseph Heller (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirical novelist and playwright. ... Catch 22 can refer to: A book by Joseph Heller, or the movie based on the book; see Catch-22. ... Juan Bosch y Gaviño Juan Emilio Bosch y Gaviño (30 June 1909, La Vega – 1 November 2001, Santo Domingo) was the first democratically elected president of the Dominican Republic after the assassination of dictator Rafael Leónidas Trujillo in 1961. ... Allan Massie (born 1938) is a well-known Scottish journalist, novelist and establishment figure. ... Madeleine LEngle (November 29, 1918 – September 6, 2007)[1] was an American writer best known for her childrens books, particularly the Newbery Medal-winning A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet and Many Waters. ...

Film

Gregory Peck (April 5, 1916 – June 12, 2003) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... David and Bathsheba is a 1951 film about King David. ... Henry King (* 24th January 1886 in Christiansburg, Virginia; † 29th June 1982 in Toluca Lake, California) was an American film director. ... For other persons named Hayward, see Hayward (disambiguation). ... Raymond Massey photographed by Carl Van Vechten Raymond Hart Massey (August 30, 1896 – July 29, 1983) was a Canadian actor. ... Finlay Jefferson Currie (20 January 1878 – 9 May 1968) was a Scottish actor on stage, screen and television. ... Solomon and Sheba is a 1959 Biblical epic film made by Edward Small Productions and distributed by United Artists. ... King Vidor King Wallis Vidor (February 8, 1894 – November 1, 1982) was an American film director. ... Yul Brynner (July 11, 1920[1] – October 10, 1985) was a Russian-born Broadway and Academy Award-winning Hollywood actor. ... Gina Lollobrigida (born July 4, 1927 in Subiaco, Italy), is a Golden Globe Award-winning Italian actress and photojournalist. ... Jeff Chandler can refer to different people: Jeff Chandler: a cinema actor Jeff Chandler: a boxer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Basil Sydney was a British actor who made over fifty screen appearances. ... Donald Henry Pleasence, OBE (October 5, 1919 – February 2, 1995) was an English stage and film actor. ... Keith Michell (born 1 December 1928) is an Australian actor. ... Timothy Bottoms (born August 30, 1951) is an American actor. ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Richard Tiffany Gere[1] (born August 31, 1949) is a Golden Globe- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American actor. ... King David is a film about the ancient king of Israel, King David. ... Bruce Beresford (born 16 August 1940) is an Academy Award-nominated Australian film director, writer, and producer. ... Nathaniel Parker (born 18 May 1962) is a British actor most widely known as Inspector Thomas Lynley, in the BBC television series based on the novels by Elizabeth George. ... Sheryl Lee (born April 22, 1967 in Augsburg, Bavaria, Germany) is an American actress, best known for playing Laura Palmer and Madeleine Ferguson on the cult TV series Twin Peaks and its prequel Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, for her roles in Vampires and Kingpin, and for portraying photographer... Leonard Simon Nimoy (born March 26, 1931) is an American actor, film director, poet, musician and photographer. ...

Music

Arthur Honegger's oratorio, Le Roi David ('King David'), with a libretto by Rene Morax, was composed in 1921 and instantly became a staple of the choral repertoire; it is still widely performed. Arthur Honegger in 1921. ...


Leonard Cohen's song Hallelujah has references to David ("there was a secret chord that David played and it pleased the Lord") and Bathsheba ("you saw her bathing on the roof") in its opening verses. Leonard Norman Cohen, CC (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ... For other uses, see Hallelujah (disambiguation). ...


Musical Theatre

In 1997, lyricist Tim Rice (Jesus Christ Superstar, Evita) collaborated with Alan Menken to create a musical based on the Biblical tale of King David. Based on Biblical tales from the Books of Samuel and 1 Chronicles, as well as text from David's Psalms, a concert version, produced by Disney Theatrical Productions and André Djaoui and directed by Mike Ockrent, was presented as the inaugural production at Disney's newly-renovated New Amsterdam Theatre (the former home of the Ziegfeld Follies), playing for a nine-performance limited run in 1997. The cast included Roger Bart, Stephen Bogardus, Judy Kuhn, Alice Ripley, Martin Vidnovic, and Michael Goz, with Marcus Lovett in the title role. Though a Broadway run was scheduled, it was soon canceled and there have been no future arrangements to move the musical to the Broadway stage.


See also

Saints Portal

Image File history File links Gloriole. ... The alleged Palace of David site is a large 10th century BC building in East Jerusalem whose discovery was announced on August 4, 2005 by Israeli archeaologist Eilat Mazar, who identifies it as the palace of the Biblical King David. ... King Davids Tomb is believed to be situated on Mount Zion near the Old City of Jerusalem, Israel. ... Tel Arad is an ancient Canaanite city southwest of the Dead Sea, near the modern city of Arad, Israel. ... David and Jonathan were heroic figures of the Kingdom of Israel, whose intimate relationship was recorded favorably in the Old Testament books of Samuel. ...

Notes

(Note:Online Bible references are to the Revised Standard Version)

  1. ^ S. L. Anderson (2002-2008). The accomplishments of King David. Helium inc.. Retrieved on 2006-03-24.
  2. ^ For a more complete summary of all the episodes in the Saul/David story in Samuel (but excluding Chronicles), see synopsis
  3. ^ 1 Samuel 17
  4. ^ 1 Samuel 18 and subsequent chapters of 1 Samuel.
  5. ^ 2 Samuel 1; the death of Saul and Jonathan is described in the closing chapter of 1 Samuel.
  6. ^ 2 Samuel 2:1-10
  7. ^ 2 Samuel 4
  8. ^ a b 2 Samuel 5
  9. ^ 2 Samuel 6
  10. ^ 2 Samuel 7
  11. ^ 2 Samuel 8 and subsequent chapters.
  12. ^ 2 Samuel 11
  13. ^ 2 Samuel 12
  14. ^ 1 Chronicles 29:26-28
  15. ^ "Maimonides Laws of Kings"
  16. ^ Jewish Encyclopedia, "David"
  17. ^ Zohar Bereishis 91b
  18. ^ "David" article from Encyclopedia Britannica Online
  19. ^ John Corbett (1911) King David The Catholic Encyclopedia (New York: Robert Appleton Company)
  20. ^ Oxford Illustrated History of Christianity,
  21. ^ Saint of the Day for December 29 at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Washington, D.C.
  22. ^ Doctrine and Covenants 132:1, 38-39 (see highlighted portions).
  23. ^ Book of Mormon, Jacob 2:28-30.
  24. ^ Doctrine and Covenants, Official Declaration—1
  25. ^ See, for example, The Tel Dan Inscription: A Reappraisal and a New Interpretation [Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2003], pp. 193-194. See also King David: A Biography (Steven McKenzie, Associate Professor Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee): McKenzie discusses the background to his 2002 book of the same title (ISBN 978-0195132731). On the Shoshenq inscription, see K. A. Kitchen, "A Possible Mention of David in the Late Tenth Century B.C.E., and Deity *Dod as Dead as the Dodo?" Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 76 (1997): 29–44, especially 39–41.
  26. ^ Picking Abraham and Chosing David, Christopher Heard, Associate Professor of Religion at Pepperdine University. See also Israeli jounalist Daniel Gavron's King David and Jerusalem - Myth and Reality for a useful overview.
  27. ^ The original urban core of Jerusalem, identified with the reigns of David and Solomon.
  28. ^ See David Ussishkin, "Solomon's Jerusalem: The Text and the Facts on the Ground," in: A.G. Vaughn and A.E. Killebrew (eds.), Jerusalem in Bible and Archaeology: The First Temple Period, (Society of Biblical Literature, Symposium Series, No. 18), Atlanta, 2003, pp. 103-115. See also Cahill, J., David's Jerusalem, Fiction or Reality? The Archaeological Evidence Proves It, and Steiner, M., David's Jerusalem, Fiction or Reality? It's Not There: Archaeology Proves a Negative, both in Biblical Archaeology Review 24/4, 1998 (the two scolars argue opposite sides of the case for a Jerusalem in keeping with the biblical portrayal).
  29. ^ LMLK:"Belonging to the king", or "for the king".
  30. ^ On settlement patterns in ancient Judah, see A. Ofer, "'All the Hill Country of Judah': From a Settlement Fringe to a Prosperous Monarchy," in I. Finkelstein and N. Na'aman, eds., From Nomadism to Monarchy (Jerusalem: Israel Exploration Society, 1994), pp. 92-121; "The Judean Hills in the Biblical Period," Qadmoniot 115 (1998), 40-52 (Hebrew); "The Monarchic Period in the Judaean Highland," in A. Mazar, ed., Studies in the Archaeology of the Iron Age in Israel and Jordan (Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2001), pp. 14-37.
  31. ^ Dever, William G., "What did the Bible writers know and when did they know it?" William B. Eerdmans Publ. Co., Cambridge UK, 2001
  32. ^ Vaughn, A. G. "Is Biblical Archaeology Theologically Useful Today?" in Vaughn, A.G. and ‎Killebrew, A.E. (eds). (2003) Jerusalem in Bible and Archaeology, SBL, pp. 417-8.‎, Roberts, J.J.M, "Solomon's Jerusalem and the Zion Tradition", in Vaughn, A.G. and Killebrew, ‎A.E. (eds). (2003) Jerusalem in Bible and Archaeology, SBL, p. 169.‎, Kitchen, K. "The Patriarchal Age - Myth or History?," Biblical Archaeological Review, March-‎April, 1996.‎
  33. ^ Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman, The Bible Unearthed: Archaeology's New Vision of Ancient Israel and the Origin of its Sacred Texts, p.132. See this summary of Finkelstein and Silberman's book.
  34. ^ Dever, What Did the Biblical Writers Know...?
  35. ^ See especially chapter 4 of What Did the Biblical Writers Know?
  36. ^ Steven McKenzie, Associate Professor Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee.
  37. ^ "King David and Jerusalem: Myth and Reality", Israel Review of Arts and Letters, 2003, Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
  38. ^ "A View from Copenhagen", Thomas L. Thompson, Professor of Old Testament, Copenhagen University.
  39. ^ Baruch Halpern, "David's Secret Demons", 2001.Review of Baruch Halpern's "David's Secret Demons".
  40. ^ Finkelstein and Silberman, "David and Solomon", 2006. See review"Archaeology" magazine.
  41. ^ Madeleine L'Engle, Certain Women, ISBN 9780374120252

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. Starting in 1993, the encyclopedia (now in the public domain) was placed on the Internet through a world-wide... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Pepperdine University is a private University of higher learning affiliated with the Churches of Christ. ... David Ussishkin is a noted Israeli archaeologist. ... What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When Did the Know It? (US: Grand Rapids, MI/Cambridge, UK: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2001) is a book by biblical scholar and archaeologist William G. Dever detailing his response to the claims of minimalsts to the historicity and value of the...

References

  • Kirsch, Jonathan (2000) King David: the real life of the man who ruled Israel. Ballantine. ISBN 0-345-43275-4.
  • See also the entry "David" in Easton's Bible Dictionary.
  • Dever, William G. (2001) What did the Bible writers know and when did they know it? William B. Eerdmans Publ. Co., Cambridge UK.

References to Daud (David) in the Qur'an

  • Appraisals for Daud: 21:79, 27:15, 34:10, 38:17, 38:18, 38:19, 38:20, 38:21, 38:24, 38:25, 38:26
  • Daud's prophecy: 2:251, 6:84
  • Daud took care of his child: 21:78, 21:79
  • the Zabur: 3:184, 4:163, 16:44, 17:55, 21:105
  • the Zabur was revealed to Daud: 4:163, 17:55
  • Daud as an example of a pious person: 38:17
  • Daud's fight: 38:21, 38:22, 38:23, 38:24
  • Challenges for Daud: 38:24
  • Daud's occupation: 21:80, 34:13
  • Daud's power: 2:251, 38:20
  • Daud's kingdom: 2:251, 21:79, 34:10, 38:26

External links

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David of the United Kingdom of Israel & Judah
Cadet branch of the Tribe of Judah
New title
Rebellion from Israel
King of Judah
: 1007 BC – 1005 BC
Succeeded by
Solomon
Preceded by
Ish-bosheth
King of the united kingdom
of Israel and Judah

: 1005 BC – 967 BC
Prophets of Islam in the Qur'an
Adam Idris Nuh Hud Saleh Ibrahim Lut Ismail Is'haq Yaqub Yusuf Ayoub
آدم إدريس نوح هود صالح إبراهيم لوط إسماعيل إسحاق يعقوب يوسف أيوب
Adam Enoch Noah Eber Shelah Abraham Lot Ishmael Isaac Jacob Joseph Job

Shoaib Musa Harun Dhul-Kifl Dawud Sulayman Ilyas Al-Yasa Yunus Zakariya Yahya Isa Muhammad
شُعيب موسى هارون ذو الكفل داود سليمان إلياس إليسع يونس زكريا يحيى عيسى مُحمد
Jethro Moses Aaron Ezekiel David Solomon Elijah Elisha Jonah Zechariah John Jesus Paraclete
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This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... Of all Biblical personages Moses has been chosen most frequently as the subject of later legends; and his life has been recounted in full detail in the poetic haggadah. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Miriam (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; meaning either wished for child, bitter or rebellious, but it might be derived originally from an Egyptian name, myr beloved or mr love[1]) was the sister of Moses and Aaron, and the daughter of Amram and Jochebed. ... Joshua, Jehoshuah or Yehoshua. ... Phinehas or Pinhas - פִּינְחָס, Standard Hebrew Pinəḥas, Tiberian Hebrew Pînəħās is a name shared by two characters in the Hebrew Bible. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For information on the name Deborah, see Debbie For information on the nurse of Rebeccah, mentioned in Genesis, see Deborah (Genesis) Deborah or Dvora (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Bee) was a prophetess and the fourth Judge and only female Judge of pre-monarchic Israel in the Old Testament (Tanakh). ... The Prophet Samuel, fresco painting from the Mikhailovskr monastery of Kiev, c. ... Saul (שאול המלך) (or Shaul) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; asked for) is identified in the Books of Samuel, 1 Chronicles and the Quran as the first king of the ancient Kingdom of Israel. ... Jeduthun - lauder; praising - the name of two men in the Bible. ... This article is about the Biblical jhhhhnn . ... Gad was a seer or more commonly understood, a prophet in the Bible. ... Nathan the Prophet was a court prophet who lived in the time of King David and his wife Bathsheba. ... Ahijah HaShiloni, also known as Ahijah the Shilonite, was a prophet of Shiloh (1 Kings 11:29; 14:2). ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Not to be confused with Elishah. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Isaiah in rabbinic literature. ... For other uses, see Jeremiah (disambiguation). ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... See also Hoshea, who has the same name in Biblical Hebrew. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Book of Joel. ... Amos (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Burden) is one of the twelve minor prophets in the Hebrew Bible, and putative author of the speeches reported in the Book of Amos. ... This article is about people named Obadiah in the Old Testament. ... For other uses, see Jonah (disambiguation). ... Jonah in rabbinic literature. ... Micah the titular prophet of the Book of Micah, also called The Morasthite He is not the same as another prophet , Micaiah son of Imlah. ... Nahum (נחום) was a minor prophet whose prophecy is recorded in the Hebrew Bible. ... Habakkuk or Havakuk (חֲבַקּוּק, Standard Hebrew Ḥavaqquq, Tiberian Hebrew Ḥăḇaqqûq) was a prophet in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... Zephaniah or Tzfanya (צְפַנְיָה Concealed of/is the LORD, Standard Hebrew Ẓəfanya, Tiberian Hebrew ṢəpÌ„anyāh) is the name of several people in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... An 18th century Russian icon of the prophet Haggai For the prophetic book, see Book of Haggai. ... Zechariah as depicted on Michelangelos ceiling of the Sistine Chapel Zechariah or Zecharya (זְכַרְיָה Renowned/Remembered of/is the LORD, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) was a person in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... For the Northern Irish singer songwriter, see Malachi Cush. ... Image File history File links Christian_cross. ... Shemaiah was a prophet in the reign of Rehoboam (I Kings 12:22-24). ... Iddo (עדו also יעדו) was a minor biblical prophet, who appears to have lived during the reigns of King Solomon and his heirs, Rehoboam and Abijah in the Kingdom of Judah. ... Hanani was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Jehu was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Micah or Micha (מִיכָה, Standard Hebrew Miḫa, Tiberian Hebrew Mîḵāh) is the name of several people in the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... Jahaziel or Chaziel the Levite was a prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Eliezer (אֱלִיעֶזֶר / אֱלִיעָזֶר Help/Court of my God, Standard Hebrew Eliʿézer / Eliʿázer, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔlîʿézer / ʾĔlîʿāzer) was Moses and Zipporahs second son. ... Zechariah Ben Jehoida was the son or grandson of Jehoiada, the high priest in the times of Ahaziah and Jehoash (Joash). ... In the Bible, there were two prophets called Oded. ... Huldah was a prophetess mentioned briefly in the Second Book of Kings, Chapter 22. ... Engraving of Sarah by Hans Collaert from c. ... Sarah in rabbinic literature // Sarah was the niece of Abraham, being the daughter of his brother Haran. ... This article is about the Biblical character. ... Rebecca by Johannes Takanen, 1877. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... Eli (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Ascent) was, according to the Books of Samuel, the name of a priest of Shiloh, and one of the last Israelite Judges before the rule of kings in ancient Israel. ... Elkanah was, according to the Books of Samuel, the husband of Hannah, and the father of her children including her first - either Samuel or Saul depending on whether it is those who take the Bible at face value or textual scholars (respectively) that are to be trusted[1]. Elkanah is... Hannah (or Chana) (Hebrew: ×—× ×” - Grace [of God]) was a wife of Elkanah and the mother of the prophet Samuel as recorded in the Book of Samuel. ... Abigail (אֲבִיגַיִל / אֲבִיגָיִל her Fathers joy or, fountain of joy ;leader of/is dance/, Standard Hebrew Avigáyil, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĂḇîḡáyil / ʾĂḇîḡāyil), once Abigal (Samuel 2 3:3), is a female character in the Bible. ... Categories: Hebrew Bible/Tanakh-related stubs | Hebrew Bible/Tanakh people ... Beeri, is the father of the prophet Hosea. ... Hilkiah was a Hebrew Priest at the time of King Josiah. ... Buzi (my contempt) was the father of the prophet Ezekiel. ... For other uses, see Mordecai (disambiguation). ... Esther (1865), by John Everett Millais Esther (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), born Hadassah, was a woman in the Hebrew Bible, the queen of Ahasuerus (commonly identified with either Xerxes I or Artaxerxes II), and heroine of the Biblical Book of Esther which is named after her. ... Baruch ben Neriah was a Jewish aristocrat and scribe of the sixth century BCE. He was the disciple, secretary, and devoted friend of the Biblical prophet Jeremiah. ... In the Book of Genesis, Abel (Hebrew הֶבֶל / הָבֶל, Standard Hebrew Hével / Hável, Tiberian Hebrew Héḇel / Hāḇel; Arabic هابيل HābÄ«l) was the second son of Adam. ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... This article is about the Biblical figure called Daniel. ... Daniel in rabbinic literature // According to rabbinical tradition Daniel was of royal descent; and his fate, together with that of his three friends, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, was foretold by the prophet Isaiah to King Hezekiah in these words, and they shall be eunuchs in the palace of the king... Kenan or Qenan (Cainan seems to be an improper rendering of this word; it is separate from the word transliterated Cainan later in the Torah; the rendering Cainan is based off the Greek renderings, Kaïvav as found in Luke 3:36, 37) (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; possession; smith) was a... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... Noah in rabbinic literature. ... Eber (עֵבֶר, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Arabic: هود) is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... Edwin Longs 1886 painting of Batya finding the baby Moses Bithiah, in Hebrew Batya (בִּתְיָה, literally daughter of God), is the name given to a character in the account of the Hebrew Exodus from Egypt in Rabbinic Midrash, as she is not named in the text. ... Beor is the father of Balaam and is considered a prophet by Judaism because the Talmud says in Baba Bathra 15b Seven prophets prophesied to the heathen, namely, Balaam and his father, Job, Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, Zophar the Naamathite, and Elihu the son of Barachel the Buzite... Balaam (Hebrew בִּלְעָם, Standard Hebrew BilÊ»am, Tiberian Hebrew Bilʻām; could mean glutton or foreigner, but this etymology is uncertain), is a prophet in the Bible, his story occurring in the Book of Numbers. ... Balak was king of Moab around 1200 BC. Revelations 2:12 - 2:14 says about Balak: 12 `And to the messenger of the assembly in Pergamos write: These things saith he who is having the sharp two-edged sword: 13 I have known thy works, and where thou dost dwell... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... one of Jobs friends, probably a descendant of Eliphaz, son of Esau (Job 4:1). ... Bildad the Shuhite was one of Jobs three friends. ... In the Book of Job, Zophar or Tzófar (צוֹפַר Chirping; rising early, Standard Hebrew Ẓófar, Tiberian Hebrew ṢôpÌ„ar) is one of the friends of Job who visits to comfort him during his illness. ... This article or section seems not to be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Adam is the first Prophet of Islam and mentioned in the Quran as the husband of Eve (Hawwa). ... Idris (Arabic: إدريس ) is a Prophet in Islam. ... Nuh is a prophet in the Quran. ... Hud (Arabic هود) is a prophet in the Quran. ... Saleh (Arabic: صالح) is a prophet of Islam and is mentioned in the Quran. ... For information on the racehorse, see Ibrahim (horse) (Arabic: ), the biblical patriarch Abraham, is an important prophet in Islam, son of Azar, and the father of the Prophet Ismail (Ishmael), his firstborn son, who is considered the Father of the Arabs. ... Lut (circa 1781 BC - 1638 BC?[1] [2]), (Arabic: لوط ) was a prophet mentioned in the Quran and known as Lot in the Bible. ... In Islam, Ishmael is known as the first-born son of Abraham (Ibrahim in Arabic) from Hagar, and as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Yaqub (in Syriac: ܝܰܥܩܽܘܒ) is a common Syriac and Arabic name. ... This is a sub-article to Joseph (Hebrew Bible). ... In Islam, Job is known as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... Image File history File links Mosque. ... Michelangelos The Creation of Adam, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. ... Enoch (Hebrew: חֲנוֹךְ; Tiberian: , Standard: ) is a name occurring twice in the generations of Adam. ... This article is about the biblical Noah. ... Eber (עֵבֶר, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew , Arabic: هود) is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... According to the Bible and the Quran, Lot (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Arabic: لوط, ; Hidden, covered[1]) was the nephew of the patriarch, Abraham or Abram. ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about Jacob in the Hebrew Bible. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... William Blakes imagining of Satan inflicting boils on Job. ... Shoaib (Arabic: ‎ ; also ShuÊ•ayb, ShuÊ•aib, Shuaib, literally Who Shows the Right Path), is traditionally associated with the biblical figure Jethro. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harun (Arabic: هارون ) was a prophet of Islam mentioned in the Quran. ... Dhul-Kifl (Arabic ذو الكفل ) is considered by Muslims to be either a prophet of Islam or simply a righteous man mentioned in the Quran. ... In Islam, David is known as an appointed prophet and messenger (Rasul) of God. ... Sulayman (Süleyman, Sulaiman, Suleyman, Suleiman) (Arabic: سليمان) is a prophet in the Quran, which assumes that he is King Solomon of the Bible. ... Ilyas is a prophet in the Quran. ... Al-Yasa is a prophet in the Quran. ... Yunus (Jonah) is one of the prophets of Islam whose story is recounted in the Quran. ... Zakariya (Arabic: زكريا), the New Testament priest Zechariah or Zacharias, is one of the prophets mentioned in the Quran. ... Isa redirects here. ... Muhammad in a new genre of Islamic calligraphy started in the 17th century by Hafiz Osman. ... Jethro (Hebrew: יִתְרוֹ, Standard Yitro Tiberian ; His Excellence/Posterity) is a figure from the Hebrew Bible. ... Moses with the Tablets, 1659, by Rembrandt This article is about the Biblical figure. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Ezekiel, , IPA: , God will strengthen, from , chazaq, [ xazaq ], literally to fasten upon, figuratively strong, and , el, [ el ], literally strength, figuratively Almighty. He is a prophet and priest in the Bible who prophesied for 22 years sometime in the 500s BCE while in the form of visions exiled in... This page is about the Biblical king David. ... This article is about the Biblical jhhhhnn . ... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Not to be confused with Elishah. ... For other uses, see Jonah (disambiguation). ... According to the Gospel of Luke, Zechariah (Zacharias in the King James Version of the Bible) was a priest of the line of Abijah, during the reign of King Herod the Great, and was the father of John the Baptist and husband of Elizabeth, a woman from the priestly family... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Look up Paraclete in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

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